Three Rivers News, 2002-02-05
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 13
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!


CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
ON SUNDAY’S BIG WIN IN
SUPERBOWL XXXVI
PATRIOTS – 20
RAMS – 17

WELCOME TO MILO EMILY HERBEST!!!
     On January 22, 2002 at 2:40 A.M., Bonnie and Kevin Herbest became the proud parents of Emily Jean Herbest. Emily weighed in at 6lbs. 5 oz., and was born at Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor. Her sister, Kayla Christine Bailey from Milo, welcomed Emily, and her other sister, Angela Nicole Herbest from Moreno Valley, California, is eager to meet her. Emily is blessed with many relatives, including grandparents Tony & Barbara Gonzales, and Ronald Towne from Milo, and Ralph Herbest Sr. from Milo. Great-grandparents Phillip & Virginia Barden are also from Milo. Welcome to Milo, Emily.

TRC MAINE WEBSITE TO AIR FISHING DERBY DRAWING LIVE!
     On Sunday, February 17, at 6:30 pm, the TrcMaine.org website will give “up to the second” updates of the 40th annual Schoodic Lake Fishing Derby winners. All the ticket drawing prizewinners will be posted, along with the prizewinners for biggest fish caught.
     There are many prizes, with the grand prize being the winner’s choice of a 2002 Z-370 Arctic Cat snowsled, worth $4,100.00, or a 2002 250 2x4 ATV, valued at $3,950.00. The Milo Fire Department puts a lot of time into making the Fishing Derby a great event. The money raised is donated to many area programs

and charities. Help show your support for this worthwhile project by purchasing a book or two of tickets for the drawing. The tickets are available at many area businesses and from Fire Department members.
     The drawing will also be aired live on radio station WDME, FM 103. Show your support by entering the derby or by purchasing tickets.

Dear Trask Insurance and Robinson's Fuel Mart,
     Thank you for buying the Bangor Daily News for the 5th Grade in Brownville every week. We find a lot of interesting articles in the newspaper. We also enjoy the mini-page. It improves some people's reading and we mostly find out things before we see it on the news.
     We've learned about Shawn Walsh's death, information about the terrorists attacks, and
President Bush choking on the pretzel and scraping his face on his glasses. It's fun to do the activities on the mini page.
     Sincerely,
          Alana Worster
          Grade 5
          Brownville Elem.

GIRL SCOUT COOKIES WILL BE AVAILABLE
     The sale of Girl Scout cookies has now officially ended. I would like to thank all of you who helped out the girls in troop #385. A special thanks to parents for assisting these young girls. This new group of ten 6 and 7 year-olds sold 945 boxes! The profits from their hard work will allow them to go on a day trip to the Discovery Museum. They will be adorned in Brownie attire with all their pins and badges as they march in the 2002 Memorial Day Parade.
     If one of the girls didn't contact you for a sale, don't despair. I over ordered extras of all varieties of cookies and we will hold a "Cookie Cupboard” in mid-March...watch for further notice.
GREAT JOB GIRLS!
     Cindy Herbest
     Troop Leader

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Sheri Conley
Tom Witham | Seth Barden


Brownville History Contest Begins
BY BILL SAWTELL

     The 18th annual Brownville History Contest has begun. Contest originator Bill Sawtell began this year's contest by speaking on early Brownville history to Mrs. Wallace's class.
     The theme of this year's contest will be "Brownville Businesses."
     The contest ends in April with a judging of the projects in grades three through five and Brownville History Day, with a luncheon and viewing of the exhibits followed by the awards ceremony.

BASKETBALL SCORES
BY BILL SAWTELL
Penquis Girls 68, Mattanawcook Academy 59
     Milo, January 30--Playing after a nine-day layoff, the Lady Patriots averted a major upset in the rankings with a 68-59 win here over a promising MA team, which beat their hosts up and down the floor on numerous occasions for scores.
     The issue was not settled until the final two minutes when April Allen went five of six from the line.
Keys to the win:
1. 21 free throws cashed in by Penquis
2. 19 points by Lindsay Hamlin
3. 17 points by April Allen
4. 16 points by Megan Russell
     The matchup on the blocks between Penquis's Jean Hamlin and MA's Kate Head was interesting, with both having 11 rebounds.
     MA had little trouble attacking the Penquis 2-3 zone when Coach Wally Russell employed it.
     It was Senior Night at Penquis, and Coach Russell did not hesitate to go to his bench, as did his counterpart

Terri Thornton, who appeared pleased with her team's work.
Quarter Scores
MA 10 27 41 59
Penquis 14 27 45 68
Officials: Walls and Marquis

Penquis Boys 39, Schenck 29
     Milo, January 31--Tony Hamlin's club staged an upset here by shutting down Ryan Deschenes and Company 39-29.
     The winners took a quick 6-0 lead on hoops by Justin Allen sandwiched around a score by Brandon McKenzie and never looked back, leading by as many as 15 at one juncture in this low scoring affair-one to Hamlin's liking.
Keys to the win:
1. good motion on offense and good ball control-keys to Penquis's state title two years ago
2. solid rebounding; Mckenzie with 11 and Anders Hamlin 10
3. cold Schenck shooting
4.holding Ryan Deschenes considerably under his average (8 versus 21)
5. Brandon McKenzie's 10 points and 9 by Justin Allen
Stanley Graham had 11 for Schenck.
Quarter Scores
Schenck 4 11 20 29
Penquis 17 23 29 39
Officials: Anderson and Plourde

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION TO MEET
There will be a meeting of the Milo High School Alumni Association on Feb. 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the Milo Free Public Library to make plans for the upcoming annual meeting and banquet to be held on Sat., July 6th. Anyone interested in working on these plans is welcomed.

Pedestrian Stuck By Vehicle
     On Tuesday, January 29, 2002 at approximately 5:05 p.m. the Milo Police Department responded to a vehicle / pedestrian accident on Park St.
     The pedestrian, Robert Heath Sr. 67 of Milo, was struck by a vehicle while crossing the street. The operator of the vehicle, Herman Michaud, 58, of Dover - Foxcroft, was heading north on Park St. He did not see
     Mr. Heath crossing the road. The Three Rivers Ambulance Service transported Mr. Heath to Mayo Regional Hospital. The Milo Fire Department Rescue responded as well.
     Mr. Heath was reported to be in good condition. He suffered cuts and bruises and a broken leg. Mr. Heath was kept at the hospital over night for observation. No charges will be filed against Mr. Michaud. Mr. Michaud's vehicle received approximately $500 in damages. Officer Sherry Violette is the investigating officer.

Page 2

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     
My family can make a party out of almost any occasion. We've had parties to jack and level the camp. We've made a party out of trimming trees. We've made a party out of closing up my cousin's pool for the
winter. We've had whole weekend parties revolving around mysteries. One spring, my cousin Joan Soulard planned a "mystery weekend". We sent countless e-mails trying to figure out where we were going. Joan and her husband rented a van so we could all ride together. She had clues she gave us as we drove along, and prizes for whoever guessed the correct destination first. It turned out they took us to Mystic, Connecticut. We spent a beautiful weekend at a wonderfully quaint B & B and ate dinners at some of the finest restaurants in that historic village. On our way home, we took a little detour to Foxwoods. What fun we all had there!
     
Last year, Joan planned a mystery guest weekend. We had no clue who the mystery persons would be. It turned out to be another cousin and her husband, who traveled in secret from East Millinocket, and whom we least expected to be there. We spent the entire weekend eating, shopping, and laughing at and with each other.
     
We're great hands to celebrate each other's birthdays. We planned a 50th birthday party for one of my cousins who lived in Sherman Station at the time. The party lasted an entire weekend. On Friday night, we surprised her by showing up at the Horn of Plenty, a restaurant in Island Falls her husband had taken her to for her birthday dinner. We all arrived with balloons, flowers, and presents. After she got done screaming with excitement that we were all there to surprise her, we told her the real surprise was that we were not only staying overnight at her home.... but that we were staying all weekend!!!! We had brought all the food to feed our small army and unbeknownst to her...the trunks of our cars were filled with more surprises because we'd invited all her friends to yet another surprise party for her on Saturday night. The poor girl was so befuddled when the guests started arriving that two or three couples had shown up and were all settled in before it dawned on the birthday girl that she was having another party! Good food and wine and lots and lots of laughs are always the order of the weekend when we all get together.
     
A recent weekend was no exception to the lengths we'll go to to have a party. The party was dubbed "The Mincemeat Weekend”. We gathered Friday night to begin the festivities. Pizza at the Scootic In in Millinocket was the first order of business. Saturday morning we rose, raring to get started on the mincemeat making.
     
My Uncle Dick arrived in chef's apron and hat and ready to supervise the whole endeavor. Meat was cooked and ground; apples were peeled and ground.
     
Raisins and cherries were measured out and ground. Suet, spices, molasses, sugar, butter and vanilla were added. Fat juicy lemons and oranges were squeezed and the juice was added to the pots. We set the cookers on 200 degrees, set the covers on them, and
let the good smells filter through the house. We had a double aroma sensation on Saturday because Bob was baking beans for our Saturday night supper in the oven at the same time the mincemeat was cooking. The mincemeat simmered all night long, and on Sunday morning, after a huge breakfast, we began the process of putting the mincemeat up in hot sterile jars. Of course, at 12: 30 p.m. we had to have the job done so we could watch the Patriots game. Turkey pie with all the fixin’s was served at half-time. I'm telling you, you don't know anyone who has any more fun creating reasons to have a party than we do. There isn't a family who works any harder, eats any better, or laughs any more uproariously.
     In anticipation of having all these jars of mincemeat in my pantry, I set about finding some recipes I could use to make mincemeat treats. My friend Pat Ricker gave me two that sound wonderful. The first one is:
Carl Ricker's Mincemeat Cookies.
Cream: 1 cup of shortening
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 egg
1 tsp. vanilla
Add: 3 1/4 cups flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
Fold In: 1 1/2 cups mincemeat

Mix completely and drop by rounded teaspoons (size of a walnut) onto a lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake in a 350-degree oven for 12-15 minutes.
     This recipe makes 4 to 4 1/2 dozen cookies. The cookies can be stored for 2-3 weeks in an air tight cookie jar in a cool place. This actually enhances the flavor of these cookies.

Pat also shared:
Ruth Fletcher's Mincemeat Cakes
Cream: 1 cup sugar
1/2 cup of shortening
Add: 1 egg (beaten well)
Put 1 tablespoon of vinegar in 1/2 cup of milk and add 1/2teaspoon baking soda.
Add this alternately with: 1 1/2 cups flour and 1/2 teaspoon salt.
Fold in: 1 tsp. vanilla
1 cup of mincemeat
     This recipe makes 4 mini-loaf-sized cakes. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes in greased and floured pans.

     Make a party as often as you can. Learn to be (and don't be afraid to be) hospitable. Open up your heart and your home to others. The wonderful memories that are left in your heart and your mind from one occasion will sustain you to the next.... and each memorable occasion gives you something to laugh and talk about at your next one, too.
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NEWS ABOUT TOWN….
MILO REC. DEPT. NEWS
BY MURREL HARRIS

Women's Volleyball Playoff Results
(Double Elimination Tournament)

TEAM
WIN
LOSS
BANKER'S
2
0
LELAND'S
2
1
DEMERS'
1
1
COLES (eliminated)
0
2
GRAYS (eliminated)
0
2

Games resume on Monday, Februaury 4, 2002. At 6pm, Leland’s will play Demers’ and the winner must then beat Banker’s team twice. Good luck girls!

EXERCISE CLASSES TO BE OFFERED
BY MURREL HARRIS
     It’s a New Year; is it time for a New YOU? Carol Witham of Brownville Jct. will be offering a beginner’s exercise program at the Milo Town Hall. The cost is $2.50 per session, and the times are as varied as the exercises. So make a resolution to start a program of health fitness. For details, call Murrel Harris at 943- 7326 or Carol Witham at 965-8146.
AMERICAN SELF-DEFENSE SYSTEMS

MILO TOWN HALL
SUNDAY 11:00 AM
AGES 5 AND UP
$5.00 PER CLASS
FAMILY RATES AVAILABLE
Practical Self-defense, Rank advancement classes, Women’s self-defense. Contact Murrell Harris at 943-7326 or Sensei David Edgerly at 949-5017.

DRIVER’S ED. CLASS NEEDS STUDENTS
BY MURREL HARRIS

     The Milo Recreation Department will offer a course in Driver’s Education as soon as fifteen students enroll. There are presently less than that signed up. If you are 15 years old and would like to learn to drive, call Murrel Harris at 943-7326

SKATING RINK READY FOR FUTURE OLYMPIANS!!
     Thanks to the hard work of Jenson Bissell, Bill Warner, and Herb Carey, the Elm Street Skating Rink is now ready to be used. The weather conditions have prevented the ice from being usable, so the three men tricked Mother Nature by watering the rink and carefully shoveling snow from our various snow storms. Thank you so much fellows; the skaters in town really appreciate your hard work.

CONCERT WAS WELL ATTENDED
BY MURREL HARRIS

     On Friday, January 25, the Milo Recreation Department hosted a concert featuring bands from Newport, Hermon and Hampden. Also featured was a local band, Four40, comprised of PVHS students. Over seventy-five young folks attended the show, and an excellent time was had by all.

Page 4

NEWS FROM MARION C. COOK SCHOOL IN LAGRANGE
FOR THE WEEK OF JANUARY 25, 2002
Ms. Ivy's Stars
BY ERICA LYFORD AND BRAD CIMPHER
     Danielle Roberts was this week's Terrific Kid. Ms. Ivy picked her because she's doing a wonderful job in kindergarten, she always follows the rules, is a super listener, always brings back her traveling book bag, is very kind, and tries very hard.
     This week's Bus Students of the Week are Joshua Gray and Laura Gray. Keep up the good behavior!
Mrs. Carter's Class
BY KELSEY OTTMANN AND RICHIE RUSSELL
     This week the second and third graders are studying bones and muscles. They now have 8 parts on their paper bodies.
     The Terrific Kid is Ronald Smith. Good work Ronald!
     The Bus Student of the Week is Alyssa Gray. Thanks for being a good role model on the bus!
Miss K's Kids
BY KEEGAN GRASS
     The Terrific Kid this week in Miss K's class is James Gledhill. He is a wonderful worker. He likes to help with classroom work and always follows the directions. He likes to do extra credit assignments. Excellent work James!
     The class has been studying Daniel Boone, the great explorer. They have also been studying the Wilderness road. They have done a great job!

FOR THE WEEK OF FEBRUARY 1, 2002
Ms. Ivy's Class
BY ERICA LYFORD AND BRAD CIMPHER
     Tyler Tibbets was the Terrific Kid. Tyler worked very hard to get his Journal finished this week. He's trying hard to follow the rules. He's doing a great job in reading and is learning to be a good listener.
Great job Tyler.
     Lindsay Turner is the Bus Student of the week. Bus Driver, Donnie Lundin, awarded Lindsay because she always has "excellent bus behavior."
Mrs. Carter's Class
BY KELSEY OTTMANN AND RICHIE RUSSELL
     Heather Michaud was selected as Student of the Week. Heather is very quiet, follows the class rules and is a good friend.
     Jessica Slaughter was the Bus Student of the week.
     New student Kristen Morse was welcomed to the classroom.
     The class earned their goal of 50 points for good behavior. They will enjoy a game and karaoke party as their reward.

Miss K.'s Class
BY KEEGAN GRASS
Danielle Roberts was this week's Terrific Kid. Ms. Ivy picked her The Terrific Kid was Josh Damon. He worked really hard to complete all of his work and to follow class rules. Josh is always prepared for class.
Danielle Roberts was this week's Terrific Kid. Ms. Ivy picked her The class has been using the Internet to learn about the Olympics and the state of Maine.


MSAD #41 LUNCH MENU
February 4-8
Monday - Pizza burgers, school bun, french fries, corn, mixed fruit, and milk.
Tuesday - Lasagna, salad, dinner roll, peach crisp, and milk.
Wednesday - Hot ham & cheese hoagie, garlic potato, cole slaw, peanut butter cookie, and milk.
Thursday - Italian sandwich, scalloped potato, mixed vegetables, birthday cake, and milk.
Friday - Calzone, California blend veg./cheese sauce, fruit, and milk.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
On this date…

February, 1967
     Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Dority were honored at a dinner held at the Blethen House in Dover-Foxcroft by the teachers of MSAD #41, which includes the towns of Milo, Derby, and Atkinson as well as town officials from Brownville and Brownville Jct.
     Mr. Dority has resigned as superintendent of the district after a 19-year history of service to the towns. Mr. and Mrs. Dority are planning a trip to Florida after his resignation becomes effective. The Dority's were presented with a camera on behalf of the Teacher’s Club. A slide projector was presented from their friends. Mrs. Dority was presented with a corsage and a floral table centerpiece.
     Following the dinner, Phillip Gerow of the Milo schools gave a brief summary of Dority’s life. Earl Gerrish, Brownville town manager and Millard S. Quimby, Milo town manager, also spoke.

February, 1977
     The Milo Community Hospital has been recertified for Travelers and Medicaid coverage. This means that Medicare, Medicaid, and Travelers insurance holders are now fully covered at the Milo Hospital.

February, 1987
     HONOR ROLL AT PENQUIS VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL:
Seniors: High Honors: Ruth Ireland. Honors: Carrie Brawn, Mike Brown, Loretta Harmon, Tracy Lundin, Amy Morrill, Danny Robbins, Wayne Seavey, Ramona Sprague, Stephanie Valente, Melanie Wallace, Ann-Marie Williams, Patricia Zambrano, and Richard Zelkan.
Juniors: High Honors: Lisa Chase and Nicole Lavallee.

Page 5

Honors: Jeff Badger, Donald Merrill, and Christina Owens.
Sophomores: High Honors: Sally Brewer.
Honors: Leona Dorval, Mary Lanphear, Patricia Lundin, Murray MacDonald, Shannon Pineau, Michelle Rhoda, and Melissa Smith.
Freshman: High Honors: Ryan Bradeen, Diane Dow, and James Jenkins.
Honors: Travis Cole, Steven Dunham, Ryan Hayes, Kevin Johnston, Julie Lougee, Jamie Morrill, Colleen O’Connor, Jonathan Raymond, and Darrell Speed.
     Editor’s note: I went to the Historical Society to find specific information but found myself surrounded by a wealth of memories. It was difficult to stay on task as my eyes were constantly captured by generations of images! I heartily recommend a leisurely afternoon of browsing, whether you are new to this area or would like to immerse yourself in your roots.

MEALS FOR ME. MENU
WED. , FEB. 6 HAM A LA KING, MASHED POTATO, BROCCOLI, BISCUIT, BANANA
THURS., FEB. 7 CLAM CHOWDER, CRACKERS, CORN RELISH, BREAD PUDDING
FRI., FEB. 8 BAKED STUFFED CHICKEN, RICE, ASPARAGUS, APPLE PIE
MON., FEB. 11 CHICKEN TETRAZINNI, BEETS, CORN BREAD, ORANGE
TUES., FEB. 12 SAUSAGE PATTIES, SWEET POTATO BAKE, MIXED VEGGIES, RAINBOW GELATIN
WED., FEB. 13 HOMEMADE VEGETABLE SOUP, EGG SALAD SANDWICH, GERMAN CUKES, OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE

RESERVATIONS ARE RECOMMENDED, CALL 943-2324. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED!

BIRDSIGHTINGS AROUND THE AREA
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     I didn’t think I was going to have time to write a column this week. I have been busy getting the ingredients ready to make the Super Bowl Subs. It’s not that it would take a lot of time for me type up my personal bird sightings. Zero. There, now that is out of the way, I will share with you the sightings of those who HAVE birds.
     Nancy Grant writes: John and Eileen Willinski, Church Street, Derby, have enjoyed the birds all winter. They only have three feeders filled with black oil seed and/or sunflowers chips but have nuthatches, chickadees, finches, redpoles, woodpeckers, blue jays, and mourning doves visiting on a regular basis. They even had a flock of bohemian waxwings feast on their crabapple tree! Even the tenacity of a big gray squirrel and two small red squirrels couldn't subdue the hunger of "their" feathered friends!

Last Monday, January 28, Paul McKusick stopped into the room as we were printing this week’s edition of the Three Rivers News. He was excited to report he had seen three robins hanging out with a flock of cedar waxwings on his front yard that previous Sunday. Robins mean spring, or so the theory goes.
     From the John Raymond Road, Chris and Joe Beres report: This winter we have our usual complement of birds and fewer gray and red squirrels than normal ( that is a good thing). We have also seen a barred owl. He was perched on an old dead tree. He sat there for some time one afternoon. He stayed right where he was, even when Joe drove in the yard, but when he tried to get closer to take a picture, the owl flew off and we haven't seen him since.
     We have also had some wild turkeys. Around Thanksgiving, we saw nine of them in our back yard. They disappeared after Thanksgiving and we didn't
see them again for about six weeks. The last two weeks, three of them have been regular visitors to our backyard. They come several times a day and eat cracked corn, sunflower seed and last week ate the tiny apples from our flowering crab.
     On Friday when Joe came home from work they were in the driveway on their way to the back steps. Today we were gone for several hours and when we got home, there were tracks up on the
back porch. Joe says" Wait until they figure out how to open the door!" Actually they are quite large and very beautiful. All three are toms. We have seen no hens to date. To see them try to take off and fly is really amusing. Unlike an airplane, they don't taxi down the runway, so it takes a really wide wing "flap" to lift them off the ground. We haven't seen them spread their tails yet. Perhaps that is because we have seen no hens?
     Chris and Joe joke about the turkeys going into their house; seems Janet and Donnie Richards are such great bird hosts that the birds have decided to go in. Janet wrote;
     Hey, Troy called me at work yesterday. “Mom you'll never believe what's in the living room! A chickadee!” They like me so much they come in, I guess.
     Donnie caught one in the cellar last night. They are fine and back outside now. Wonder what they think? We think they came down the chimney.
So, if you see a chickadee missing a couple of tail feathers, it’s probably the one Donnie caught in the cellar. That’s all for now. Janet
From Crescent Street, Paul and Denise Robertson report that their “borrowed “ pheasant has decided he likes to roost on their steps. The patient couple has post-poned trips to the store for hours, rather than disturb their new pal. Denice told me they have decided to call the bird “Phil”. I found that quite amusing, as I knew Murrel had also given the pheasant that name, before the bird decided to move on up the road.
     As you can see, many folks in the area have interesting bird tales to share. I am so happy for them all. As for Murrel and me, we will just live with our bird memories, and try not to harbor any ill will towards the bird stealers.
Page 6

THE REWARDS OF RAISING A CHILD
I received this from Chris Beres, who wrote:
     Joi Stevens sent this to me. I just loved it and think it would make a moving piece for the paper.
     I have seen repeatedly the breakdown of the cost of raising a child, but this is the first time I have seen the rewards listed this way. It's nice, really nice!!
* * * *
     The government recently calculated the cost of raising a child from birth to 18 and came up with $160,140 for a middle income family. Talk about sticker shock! That doesn't even touch college tuition. But $160,140 isn't so bad if you break it down. I translates into $8,896.66 a year, $741.38 a month, or $171.08 a week. That's a mere $24.24 a day! Just over a dollar an hour. Still, you might think the best financial advice says don't have children if you want to be "rich." It is just the opposite.
     What do your get for your $160,140?
Naming rights. First, middle, and last!
Glimpses of God everyday.
Giggles under the covers every night.
More love than your heart can hold.
Butterfly kisses and Velcro hugs.
Endless wonder over rocks, ants, clouds, and warm cookies.
A hand to hold, usually covered with jam.
A partner for blowing bubbles, flying kites, building sandcastles, and skipping down the sidewalk in the pouring rain.
Someone to laugh yourself silly with no matter what the boss said or how your stocks performed that day.
For $160,140, you never have to grow up.
You get to finger-paint, carve pumpkins, play hide-and-seek, catch lightning bugs, and never stop believing in Santa Claus.
You have an excuse to keep: reading the Adventures of Piglet and Pooh, watching Saturday morning cartoons, going to Disney movies, and wishing on stars.
You get to frame rainbows, hearts, and flowers under refrigerator magnets and collect spray painted noodle wreaths for Christmas, hand prints set in clay for Mother's Day, and cards with backward letters for Father's Day.
For $160,140, there is no greater bang for your buck!
You get to be a hero just for: retrieving a Frisbee off the garage roof, taking the training wheels off the bike, removing a splinter, filling a wading pool, coaxing a wad of gum out of bangs, and coaching a baseball team that never wins but always gets treated to ice cream regardless.
You get a front row seat to history to witness the first step, first word, first bra, first date, and first time behind the wheel.
You get to be immortal.
You get another branch added to your family tree, and if you're lucky, a long list of limbs in your obituary called grandchildren.
You get an education in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, communications, and human sexuality that no college can match.
In the eyes of a child, you rank right up there with God.
You have all the power to heal a boo-boo, scare away
the monsters under the bed, patch a broken heart, police a slumber party, ground them forever, and love them without limits. Soon one day they will, like you, love without counting the cost.

ENJOY YOUR KIDS AND GRANDKIDS!
Love at first sight.
A true story, submitted by Eben Dewitt
     In a supermarket, Kurtis the stock boy was busily working when a new voice came over the intercom asking for a carry out at cash register # 4. Kurtis was almost finished his shift, and wanted to get some fresh air, so decided to answer the call.
     As he approached the checkout stand a distant smile caught his eye, the new check out girl was beautiful. She was an older woman (maybe 26, and he was only 22) and he fell in love. Later that day, after his shift was over, he waited by the punch clock to find out her name. She came into the break room, smiled softly at him, took her card and punched out, then left. He looked at her card, BRENDA. He walked out only to see her start walking up the road.
     The next day, he waited outside as she left the supermarket, and offered her a ride home. He looked harmless enough, and she accepted. When he dropped her off, he asked if maybe he could see her again, outside of work. She simply said it wasn't possible. He pressed and she explained she had two children and she couldn't afford a baby-sitter, so he offered to pay for the baby-sitter. Reluctantly she accepted his offer for a date for the following Saturday.
     That Saturday night, he arrived at her door only to have her tell him she was unable to go with him. The baby-sitter had called and canceled, to which Kurtis simply said, "Well, let’s take the kids with us."
     She tried to explain that taking the children was not an option, but again not taking no for an answer, he pressed. Finally, Brenda brought him inside to meet her children. She had an older daughter who was just as cute as a bug, Kurtis thought, then Brenda brought out her son, in a wheelchair. He was born a paraplegic with Down’s Syndrome. Kurtis asked Brenda, "I still don't understand why the kids can't come with us?"
     Brenda was amazed. Most men would run away from a woman with two kids, especially if one had disabilities. Her first husband, the father
of her children, had abandoned them.
     That evening, Kurtis and Brenda loaded up the kids, went to dinner and a movie. When her son needed anything, Kurtis would take care of him. When he needed to use the rest room, he picked him up out of his chair, took him, and brought him back. The kids loved Kurtis. At the end of the evening, Brenda knew this was the man she was going to marry and spend the rest of her life with.
     A year later, they were married and Kurtis adopted both of her children. They have since added two more kids. So what happened to the stock boy and check out girl? Well, Mr. & Mrs. Kurt Warner now live in St. Louis, where the St. Louis Rams employ him. He is the starting quarterback.
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KIWANIS VARIETY SHOW FOR 2002
     There will be a meeting to start plans for the Kiwanis Variety Show at 6:30pm Thurs., Feb. 7 at the Treworgys’ house on Alton Street. Anyone interested is invited to attend.

Stearns Boys 52, Penquis 56
BY BILL SAWTELL
     Milo, February 2--The Stearns Minutemen came to town this cold day and saw the hosts take an 8 point lead in the third quarter in a closely played game, but hung around to rectify the situation and win.
Keys to the win
1. 10 of 12 Stearns free throws in the final period
2. a better job by Stearns on the boards in the last half
3. 22 points by Derek Defrederico
4. 12 points by Matt LeGasse
5. more intensity in the Stearns play in the second half
Justin Allen had 14 for Penquis and played a fine floor game. in this seniors matinee game.
Quarter Scores
Stearns 10 24 38 62
Penquis 12 27 41 56
Officials: Williams and Stafford

KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     
At Key Club International’s first convention held in 1946, the organization was given the responsibility of creating a program that would bring together all Key Clubs for a common purpose and direct members’ energies and efforts toward a project that would have international impact. That tradition lives today in the Major Emphasis Program. The Major Emphasis Program is designed to improve the lives of children around the world. The motto “Children – Their Future – Our Focus” reminds us that it’s everyone’s responsibility to make sure that all children are well cared for. The Major Emphasis Program strives to strengthen the commitment to community service while producing well-rounded members.
     
Each year Key Club International teams up with other organizations, which focus on improving the lives of children. These organizations are called Partners in Service and there is a different partner for each season of the year. The Partners are as follows:
     
Spring: March of Dimes. The March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects and infant mortality.
     
Summer: Big Brothers/Big Sisters. Big Brothers/Big Sisters matches Key Clubbers with a younger student who needs a friend and role model.
     
Fall: Unicef. Key Clubbers Trick-or-Treat to raise funds for Unicef. Winter: Children’s Miracle Network. The Children’s Miracle Network strives to make a difference in the lives of seriously ill children.
     
Please join us in supporting these worthwhile organizations that serve children.


THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS
CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

JANUARY 30 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     The weekly meeting was held at Pleasant Park at 6pm with eighteen members present.
     Kirby Robertson, Cecelia Harmon, Linda Lumbra, Julie Royal, and an interclub of five from Corinth were guests for the evening meeting.
     The Corinth Kiwanis is having a charter celebration on February 12 at 6pm. The New England Governor will be present and hopefully there will be a good turn out from area clubs.
     The District Interclub that was canceled last month has been rescheduled for March 5 in Greenville. It will start at 5:30pm.
     The Key Club has been very busy serving food at the Penquis Valley High School basketball games.
     The Kiwanis newspaper is finally operating in the black! The paper sold out last week. Yeah!
     A RIF book distribution is scheduled for February 12 at the Milo Primary School. Six adults are needed to help with the Tea Party Theme.
     Dick and Kurt DeWitt have been very busy at the Milo Town Hall installing the pipe that the lights will be hung from. Very special thanks to them for working us into their busy schedule. There is still additional painting to do on the stage. A steering committee meeting has been scheduled for Monday, February 4th at 6:30am at the Milo Town Hall.
     We had much to be thankful for with twelve happy and sad dollars collected.
     Judy Cross will speak to us about her riding school at our next meeting on February 6. On Feb. 20 Harry Anderson, from Guilford Bed and Breakfast will speak and show a video on dog sledding.
     Our speaker for this meeting was Marsha Nye Boody. She informed us about the Reading Recovery Program that has just been introduced to the MSAD district this year through a grant from the Cole foundation. Reading Recovery targets first graders who are not up to task in their reading skills. They receive very special and individual help from the teachers and parents. Most students respond very well to this super program. Teachers must take extra courses to learn the special techniques in order to qualify to teach our young readers. They are very dedicated to this worthwhile cause. Marsha was an informative and passionate speaker. Thank you for educating us regarding this interesting subject.

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