Three Rivers News, 2002-02-26
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 16
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
FREE-THROW CONTEST
     The Knights of Columbus will host their annual free-throw contest at the P.V.H.S. gymnasium. The date for the boys to test their skills is Tuesday, February 26, at 3:00 p.m., and the girls can show their talents on Wednesday, February 27, also at 3:00 p.m. The contest is open to any boy or girl between the ages of 10-14. Applications are available at all area schools.
     The top shooters from the best of 15 shots contest will then go on to compete in Dover on Saturday, March 2 at the Sedamocha Middle School gymnasium at 10:00 a.m. Contestants from Dexter, Dover and Jackman will be participating in this event.
     The K of C invites boys and girls between the ages of 10 and 14 to come to the P.V.H.S. gym and give it your best shot. You may be the next free-throw champion!

PENQUIS MIDDLE SCHOOL CHEERLEADERS SHOW GREAT SPIRIT!!
BY AL TWEEDIE
     On Feb.16, the Penquis Valley Middle School cheerleaders went to Central Middle School for a competition, the first and only of the year. There were 8 teams from around the area: Carvel Middle School, Penquis Middle School, Dexter Middle School, Newport Junior High, Corinna Junior School, Central Middle School, SeDoMoCha Middle School, and Hartland Junior High. Central finished first; Dexter, Hartland, and Penquis finished fourth out of the 8 teams. The Penquis girls brought home 2 trophies. They also won the Spirit Award for their sportsmanship and courtesy. As the other teams were competing, our girls were cheering them all on to do a good job.
     In the first round, the Penquis girls showed some nervousness, but nailed their 2nd round.
     Al and the other parents would like to thank the coach, Jennifer McKenzie and Lindsay Ouellette, her assistant. Their hard work helped the girls gain skill, confidence, and memories that will last a lifetime..
     The following is a list of the girls on the squad. They were awesome, (though I might be a little biased)!:
     Nicole Ballard, Holly Beaulieu, Karen Bell, Kristen Bell, Kelsey Drake, Jenney Ekholm(Mouse), Liz Lemik, Amanda Maioriello, Jessica Metros, Jamie Perkins, Sarah Philbrick, Cheryl Roesing, Brittany Tweedie(Butterfly), Crystal Weston and Nikki Hobbs.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE PENQUIS GIRLS FOR THE GREAT RUN AT THE
AUDITORIUM
EMC Championship Game
BY BILL SAWTELL
Calais Girls 58, Penquis 44
     Bangor, February 23--After three close periods of play here, the Lady Blue Devils pulled away in the fourth to take the diadem 58-44. For three periods the winners struggled with the three Penquis defenses employed, especially the 2-3. But in the fourth they had more success, with trey shooting, taking it to the hoop occasionally, and getting a player behind the zone.
     Center Jean Hamlin had a fine first half with 11 points and grabbing boards to keep her team in the game.
Penquis had slight leads, but seemed to turn the ball over at these junctures when they could have broadened the advances.
Keys to the win:
1. the Calais defense , helping to cause turnovers and shutting down Megan Russell to 4 points
2. the Calais fourth quarter attack of the Penquis 2-3 zone defense
3. 16 points by 1000-point scorer Katie Frost
4. 12 points by 1000-point scorer Lanna Martin
     April Allen hit 15 to lead Penquis and played a great defensive game once more; while Jean Hamlin had 13, playing one of the best games of her career.
Quarter Scores
Penquis 8 20 36 44
Calais 13 21 39 58

EMC Tournament Quarter-Finals
Penquis Girls 47, Narraguagus 33
Bangor, February 19--In a game which featured the physical against the finesse, finesse won out as Wally Russell's Lady Patriots eliminated the Lady Knights here 47 to 33, the contest being closer than the final score indicates. After three the difference was four points.
Megan Russell and April Allen paced the winners with 19 and 11 respectively, each with a pair of treys; while Narraguagus captain Anne Woodson had 11 for the Lady Knights.
April Allen and Lindsay Hamlin played outstanding defense for Penquis. The same could be said of Melissa Barbee of the Lady Knights.
Quarter Scores
Narraguagus 7 16 26 33
Penquis 12 24 30 47
Officials: Paul, Plissey, and McHatton
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EMC Tournament Semi-Finals
Penquis Girls Tip Dexter 42-41
     Bangor, February 22--Lindsay Hamlin's free throw gave the Lady Patriots a 42-41 win over Dexter here in a game in which Penquis trailed much of the way and put only six points on the board in the third quarter.
     Megan Russell's three put Penquis ahead for the first time since the early minutes at 41-39 with just three minutes to go. Megan fouled out a minute and a half later.
     Ashley Ames tied the score on a putback to set the stage for Hamlin's heroics.
Keys to the win:
1. 15 points by Megan Russell
2. 14 by Lindsay Hamlin
3. the Penquis defensive pressure in the second half, fronting Ashley Ames and cutting down her ability to move around
4. the changing foul situation in the second half to favor Penquis (it was 10-1 Dexter in the first half.)
5. the ability of Penquis to hang around, especially with key players in foul trouble
     April Allen played well defensively once more, and subs gave Wally Russell some good minutes.
     Ashley Ames led all scorers with 19-in spite of the extra attention she received. And Christy Veazie tallied 10.
It's tough to beat a good team three times in a row-especially when the third game comes on the floor of the Bangor Auditorium. This game helps exemplify this old adage.
Quarter Scores:
Dexter 17 25 34 41
Penquis 13 25 31 42
Officials: Mellor, Gallant, and Bouchard

St. John's Episcopal Church in Brownville Junction will host the World Day of Prayer Service for all Brownville/Brownville Junction churches on Friday, March 1, at 2pm. All women are invited to participate in this annual service.

STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant
Tom Witham | Seth Barden

NEWS ABOUT TOWN

LAST WEEK'S FIRE CALLS
BY MURRELL HARRIS

DATE TIME OUT TIME IN CALL
2/5/02 11:22 12:15 CHIMNEY FIRE
2/10/02 09:39 12:05 TRAILER FIRE
2/16/02 21:40 22:00 SNOWSLED ACCIDENT
2/17/02 16:38 17:25 ALARM AT MILO HEIGHTS
2/18/02 13:08 13:35 FIRST RESPONDERS

WOMAN’S VOLLYBALL SIGN-UP WAS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25. TEAMS WERE CHOSEN AND WILL BE LISTED IN NEXT WEEK’S THREE RIVERS NEWS.

AMERICAN SELF-DEFENSE SYSTEMS
MILO TOWN HALL
SUNDAY 11:00 AM
AGES 5 AND UP
$5.00 PER CLASS
FAMILY RATES AVAILABLE
Practical Self-defense, Rank advancement classes, Women’s self-defense. Contact Murrell Harris at 943-7326 or Sensei David Edgerly at 949-5017.

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EXERCISE CLASSES TO BE OFFERED
BY MURREL HARRIS
     It’s a New Year; is it time for a New YOU? Carol Witham of Brownville Jct. will be offering a beginner’s exercise program at the Milo Town Hall. The cost is $2.50 per session, and the times are as varied as the exercises. So make a resolution to start a program of health fitness. For details, call Murrel Harris at 943- 7326 or Carol Witham at 965-8146.

Class of 1948 to Meet

     The Milo High School Class of 1948 will hold its next bi-monthly meeting on Tuesday, March 5th at Freda & Everett Cook's Bread & Breakfast on High Street. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. with one of Freda's delicious breakfasts and continue with the usual socializing, and more planning for the 54th reunion on July 6th. In addition to attending the annual alumni banquet in the evening, they are also planning to meet for lunch at the American Legion Hall with the classes of 1949, 1950, 1951 and 1952. The next bi-monthly meeting will be held on Tuesday May 7th, also at the Cooks'.


MAINELY SENIORS
MEALS FOR ME. MENU
WEDNESDAY, FEB.27 AMERICAN CHOP SUEY, ASPARAGUS, HOMEMADE MUFFIN, APPLESAUCE GELATIN SQUARE
THURSDAY, FEB. 28 BAKED HAM W/ PINEAPPLE, MASHED POTATO, FRESH CARROTS, TAPIOCA PUDDING
FRIDAY, FEB. 29 HADDOCK STICKS, MASHED POTATO, CREAM STYLE CORN, MOLASSES COOKIE
MONDAY, MARCH 4 SEAFOOD CASSEROLE, FRESH BROCCOLI, SLICED PEARS
TUESDAY, MARCH 5 VEAL PARMESAN, SPAGHETTI, ITALIAN VEGGIES, LEMON PUDDING W/ TOPPING
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 CHICKEN STEW, TOSSED SALAD, FRUIT COCKTAIL DESSERT

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AT THE LAGRANGE TOWN HALL APARTMENTS ON WEDNESDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 PM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

MSAD #41SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 1
Monday - Chicken burger, potato smiles, beets, sliced pears, and milk.
Tuesday - Ravioli, broccoli casserole, dinner roll, whoopie pie, and milk.
Wednesday - Meatball sub, salad, fruit, and milk.
Thursday - Turkey and gravy, peas, mashed potato, stuffing, dinner roll, jello/topping, and milk.
Friday - Pizza, stir fry veg., mixed fruit, and milk.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     We had to go to a hardware store the other day to return something. I stayed in the car while my husband ran in to do the errand...it was Saturday. The temperature was in the high 40's and you could just feel spring in the air. Of course I know we've still got mud season to get through...but there was that wonderful feeling of not having to wear your heavy winter jacket. Cars were lined up out to the road at all of the car washes. I'm even surprised I didn't see a robin. (I just love that first day of faux Spring.)
     Anyway, while I was waiting in the car for my husband, I was struck by the clientele who were arriving at the store. Twenty years ago if you went to a hardware store, you were a man. Few women needed to go to the hardware store...what would be their purpose? Now, it seems to be a "couples" thing to do. There were tons of cars in the parking lot on Saturday and the majority of them had couples in them. Even trucks with business signs painted on their sides held a man and a woman. Now, what do you suppose the reason for this phenomenon is?
     Quite frankly, my husband was in the store by himself because he was exchanging a little plumbing part that was faulty. You can bet that I'd been in the store with him when it came to the larger purchase of things. We'd bought a new vanity, lavatory and beautiful Price pfister® faucets - you know, the kind that don’t ever drip. I'd been right on hand for all of that decision-making! I wasn't right on hand, however, for the installation. And I saw no need to be right on hand for the

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quirky little plumbing exchange. On the original major purchase, however, there wouldn't have been a prayer that I would have let my husband make that huge decision by himself. I really think that's the answer to why you see so many women at the hardware store these days. Women didn't have to go to the hardware store when there weren't any choices to make. Now when you decide to build or renovate anything, you've got hundreds of choices to make. The husband couldn't possibly be expected to make the right choice...hence the "couples" thing at the hardware store.
     As long as the husband understands that the final choice is up to the wife, renovations and rebuilds can go smoothly. I've had people tell me that they very nearly divorced their spouse when they built their new home. My goodness, how drastic is that!? Just get it straight right from the get-go...the wife makes the major decisions when it comes to any decorating. We probably don't know much about structural things. I could care less about how it gets insulated. Most of us haven't a clue about plumbing and heating, but don't mess with me on lighting, wall coverings, floor coverings, cabinetry or anything else that people are going to actually see.
     It's like the gardening situation at my house. I budget for the plants and flowers that we have in the summer. I pick them out and pretty much decide where they are going. That's my part in the gardening experience. He does the planting, watering, and most of the dead-heading. Oh yes, he lugs all the bags of potting soil and bark chips. It's fair and equitable and we both love gardening. I can't believe that I've digressed from a 10-minute stop at a hardware store to doing "my" summer gardening. Winter is still with us.... big time. After all, The Annual Schoodic Lake Ice Fishing Derby is only hours behind us and here I am thinking spring and summer already. While you've still got some meals to plan this cold winter season, how about trying this delicious meal? My mother gave me this recipe years ago. It serves a crowd - but is wonderful left over so don't be afraid to make it if your family is small. If you work, you'll have to do this one on a weekend as it takes 3 hours (YIKES!) to cook.

Easy Beef Burgundy

2 1/2 to 3 pounds of stew beef
1 package dry onion soup mix
1 can cream of celery soup
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1/2 cup Burgundy wine (actually you can use any red wine)
Mix all ingredients well. Place in a covered

casserole (I use a small roasting pan) and bake 3 hours at 325 degrees. Makes 6 to 8 servings.
     This is wonderful with mashed potatoes as the soups and the wine make for luscious gravy.
     This weekend I tried a new way to fix fresh string beans. Lori and John had given me a bottle of Roasted Garlic Oil from Stonewall Kitchens® for Christmas. Roasted Garlic Oil is a combination of olive oil, canola oil and garlic oil. Stonewall Kitchens® products are sold in specialty shops. I had tucked the oil under my cupboard and hadn't cracked it open yet. Lori arrived Friday evening and told me about the wonderful meal she cooked John for Valentine's Day. She'd used some of her roasted garlic oil....okay, now I was intrigued! I had a bag of fresh green beans in the refrigerator and I picked off the ends, leaving them long. I put them in my handy steamer and steamed them crisp tender. When they were done, I heated a couple of tablespoons of that Roasted Garlic Oil in the frying pan with about a teaspoon of sesame seeds. When the sesame seeds began to get toasty brown in color, I put those crisp tender string beans in the frying pan and tossed them in the oil and seeds and WOW, they were wonderful!
You know, as long as you keep cooking up mouthwatering tasty meals for your hubby, I'll bet you any amount of money he won't mind if you want to be the one who makes the final decisions in the hardware store.

A LITTLE MORE OF MAINE
     Congratulations to all those hard-working firemen who put together a great Fishing Derby—the best in forty years, with only one accident and no injuries. The winners caught some big fish in the warm, sunny weather and were well rewarded with generous cash prizes.
     Before the power auger, everyone had his own ice chisel. There were sloping cutting edges, straight edges, inverted V edges, solid handles, two-piece handles, etc. Charles Chessa, blacksmith at the American Thread, really knew his steel and could make a chisel the way you wanted it. It was quite an art to cut a straight-walled, smooth hole, not too big or too small. There are lots of those chisels on the bottoms of lakes and ponds now, for if you didn’t have a thong over your wrist with the chisel attached, the last cut would go so easy that the chisel would slip through your hands and disappear in the water. It would end a day’s fishing if there was no other chisel and the hole was one of the first cut.
     March and April are pretty dirty months with road sand everywhere and plenty of puddles to keep your car a mess. I like to watch the snow melt, for with each drop of water comes a promise

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of renewal of life. Sap begins to run, small buds appear, crocuses push their beautiful flowers up through the leaves and through the boughs put over them in the fall. The last patch of snow stays on until we can stand it no longer and we grab a shovel and throw it around to make it melt faster. Well, sooner or later we will be back to warm weather and spring and some good sunny days. Keep your courage up.
     Have you ever made maple syrup at home? When our kids were small, we did. It’s really quite an experience. One time I made a stove out of an old refrigerator. I found a pan that just fit the door opening. I had Mahlon Salley cut a hole in the top for the stovepipe, and another in the bottom for the door. With a cord of wood we were ready to start tapping trees. I had about thirty spiles and some pails that had been given to me. Tom Hughes said we could tap the rock maples in his yard. We bored the half-inch holes with a bit stock, pounded in the spiles, hung the pails, and listened to the musical drip of the sap as it landed in the pails. We emptied the pails into three 20-gallon milk containers once or twice a day, depending on how fast the sap was running. I was young and tough then, so could handle the cans. The pan held 25 gallons of sap. We boiled it down until there was about half an inch of sap left on the bottom of the pan. We poured it into a kettle, which we took into the house and finished it on the stove. A candy thermometer is a must now.
     When the sap came out of the pan, and was put into the kettle, it was as black as your hat! We didn’t know how to clear it. We were told to drop an egg into it, which we did, and ended up with the sweetest dropped egg you ever saw. Tom Hughes said to pour a cup of milk into it and then bring it back to a boil. That did the trick. We skimmed the black milk off with a big spoon and then strained it from the kettle through outing flannel. That syrup came out so pretty and clear you could see through it.
     The kids in the neighborhood helped us gather the sap and kept the foam skimmed off the pan. At the end of the season, they gathered the pails, pulled the spiles,, and when it was over, Althea would bake a big batch of biscuits, put a gallon of milk and a quart of syrup on the table and we had the kids all over for a feed. The kids are grown now with families of their own, but they still remember how they helped make maple syrup on Clinton Street.
     If there is anyone out there who would like to make some syrup, I will be glad to help them.
               The Old Whittler
MILO TOWN HALL ARTS CENTER
COMING SOON (WE HOPE)
BY EDWIN TREWORGY
     If you haven’t seen Wingler Auditorium recently, you will notice some changes when you do see it. The new theater lights have been installed and the stage area has been painted. Guards have been hung to prevent volleyballs from hitting the eight new spotlights in front of the stage. Three new curtains are on order, along with cloth that Barbie of Simple Sacks in Brownville is going to sew for valances and wing curtains.
     BUT!! We don’t have enough money for the sound system and we need help!!! If you would like to help get the sound system installed, please send a check made out to the Town Hall Arts Center Fund and take it or mail it to the Milo Town Office, PO Box 218, Milo, Maine 04463. We must order the sound equipment as soon as possible so that it will be ready for the Alice in Wonderland musical scheduled for the first weekend in April.
     Thanks for your help.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
NEWS FROM YEARS PAST
BY NANCY GRANT
Milo Police Department
Monthly Report
February, 1977
A. Criminal Complaints – Total – 56
Crimes against property 19
Crimes against persons 8
Crimes against public 8
Public service complaints 21
B. Amount of stolen property - $2,720.00
C. Property recovered - $1,520.00
D. Arrests/Summons
Arrests 2
Summons 29
Total 31
Criminal arrests 1
Traffic arrests 1
Criminal summons 4
Traffic summons 24
Civil summons 1
E. Accidents – Total - 13
Damage - $10,280.00
Vehicles involved 23
Persons involved 41
Persons injured 4
Times – 6 a.m./6 p.m. 10
6 p.m./6 a.m. 3
F. Warnings 43
G. Defects 22
H. Parking Tickets 13
I. Permits 9
J. Total Calls 142
K. Assistance 39
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L. Doors/Buildings
Checked 1000
M. Fuel Used – 72 gallons
N. Mileage – 5,908 miles
O. Oil Change – 1 (5 qts.)
Add in 8 qts.
Stephen E. Vermette
Police Chief

FEBRUARY, 1977
PENQUIS VALLEY MIDDLE SCHOOL TO DISPLAY SCIENCE PROJECTS
     On Saturday, February 19, 1977, from 2:00-4:00 p.m. Mr. Huri’s science students will have their science projects on display in room 202 of the Middle School. Prior to the public display, the projects will be judged: the judges shall stress neatness, originality, and scientific awareness.
Projects that one might find interesting are:
Kathy Lyford and Beth Owens-The Solar System
Linda Philpot and Denise Bellatty-Cancer
Dave Leonard-Waterwheel
Lisa Rand and Kim Buck-Childhood Diseases
Chucky Stevens and David Chase-A Marine Base
Chris Shaffer-String Design
Jackie Bishop-Parts of the Human Body
John Belvin-Electrical Wiring
Michelle Roberts and Ruth Taylor-The Planets
Bernice Burrill-The Housefly
Larry Foulkes-The Wankel Engine
Betsey Stickney-Model of the Solar System
George Morse-Tree Identification
Scott Lufkin-An Electric Doorbell
Jeanne MacDonald and Donna Royal-Chick Embryo Development
Bill Violet and John Willinski-The Diesel Engine
Scott Sanborn and Marc Pepin-Human Teeth
Karen Larson and Elizabeth Blue-A Balanced Aquarium
Wade Gray and Ricky Badger-A Homemade Radio
Kim Thurlow and Val Weston-A Bird Album
Jill Foss and Tina Coburn-Parts of a Flower
Leroy Wright-A Homemade Motor
Diana Robbins-The Moon
Tim Philpot and Robert Coburn-A Windmill
Gladys Mills and Robin Royal-Parts of a Bird
Dale Mayo-Nuclear Fission
Jim Foss-Animal Footprints
Mike Bouchard-Remote Control Aircraft

     Editor’s note: Penquis Valley Middle School is fortunate to still have Mr. Huri as a science teacher. He continues to conduct interesting classes about plants, animals, and the earth. He imparts up-to-date information as well as informative projects in his teachings. Thank you, Mr. Huri, for all you do for the students.
AROUND AND ABOUT IN
PISCATAQUIS COUNTY
BY SYLVIA BLACK
     I’ve been thinking a lot recently about attitudes and relationships, especially relationships people have with their community. Such relationships are very much affected by attitude, functioning much like any one-on-one relationship between two people. For example, if a person concentrates on and encourages the best qualities and accomplishments of a friend, a spouse, or a child, the relationship flourishes. Affection, good will, and desire for the best for those involved in the relationship are mutually enhanced.
     When we think about and talk about our community, whether it’s our working community, our school community, our town, our county or our country, the same principle applies. Positive attitudes which encourage those charged with responsibilities and which demonstrate appreciation for tasks well done build confidence and create a desire to do even better. Sometimes people think and speak critically and negatively, and the response becomes defensive. The chance to build is negated. How much better it is to say “Thank you” or “You have done a great job” when it is the truth. How much better it is if a job could have been done better to use great tact in making suggestions, so that the person doesn’t feel threatened. It is the attitude that makes the difference.
     In my business I talk to a lot of people ‘from away’. Often, these people have family or friends already settled in our area. Their enthusiasm for our natural beauty, our friendliness, our integrity and our small towns is eye-opening and infectious.
     Sometimes young people feel that there isn’t much to do around here, because they haven’t been introduced to the abundance of activities we have available. People come from all over to snowmobile, fish, hunt, hike, enjoy the fall foliage, spend some time at camp, etc. I remember a day when I confronted that attitude in my own life. I was a single mom with two teen-age daughters. Ever since I was in high school, I had thought and said things like: “Oh, I wish I could visit Hawaii”, “Oh, if only I could afford to visit historic Virginia”, “Oh, I wish had taken my children to Disney World when they were young”. One day it occurred to me that lots of people come here to explore, to snowmobile, to fish, hunt, hike, enjoy the fall
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foliage, or spend time at camp. I had never climbed Mt. Katahdin. I had never hiked in to Gulf Hagas. I hadn’t spent much time attending the community fairs. I hadn’t experienced the Bangor Symphony or the wonderful theaters around central Maine. I knew practically nothing about our own history.
     My daughters and I climbed Mt. Katahdin one July day along with some of their friends. We hiked into Gulf Hagas and met a group from New York City area who marveled at what they were experiencing. We began to experience and enjoy what we had right here. It changed my attitude about ‘nothing to do’.
     I have a friend who lives in Dallas, Texas, most of the year. A couple of years ago she said to me “ I’m so happy to be back in Maine where there is so much to do. There’s nothing to do in Dallas.” I suppose if you’re not into nightclubs, big sporting events, and traveling around in a big city where you feel threatened by the crime rate, Maine does seem wonderfully welcoming.
     Since opening a B & B, I have been asked many times “What do people do around here?” Over the years I have learned to list dozens of activities. There are church suppers, community barbecues, rivers and lakes to swim, boat and fish. There are coffeehouses and variety shows and school events. There are adult education classes where you can learn about many things from computers to quilting. There are friends to play cards with and teams to cheer for and snow to ski over. There are some top notch fields in which to test your bird dog. There are fishing derbies and dog sled tours. There are mountains to climb. There are organizations whose sole purpose is to help the community, but whose meetings are wonderful social events as well. There are historical societies in almost every little town and they are open to the public regularly during the summer. When I was growing up, our whole social life centered on our church friends and our families. This area has an unusual concentration of highly skilled crafters, artisans, artists, songwriters and performers. Who has time to get bored?
     With all these activities, our song needs to be,” What great things we have to do around here! Let me tell you about them.” That is the positive attitude that creates a positive, healthy, forward-looking community full of happy people who love living here.

     Editors note: Thank you for your article Sylvia, we look forward to future submissions.
KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     The Key Club Board of Directors consists of a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, bulletin editor and representatives from each class grades 9 – 12. On Thursday, February 28, the membership will elect new officers for the coming year. We have 10 candidates running for the offices of president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, and bulletin editor. The newly elected officers will serve as observing officers of the present Board of Directors from February until May when they will take office. This transition period allows them the time to become more familiar with the responsibilities of the office and what is going on in the club.
     Each newly elected officer will sign a Service Agreement, which outlines the duties of the office to which he/she was elected. This is the first time our club has tried this, but we felt it would be helpful to have a quick reference guide to the office and to have clear expectations of each officer. Their first order of business will be to set the consequences of not fulfilling their duties. I think it’s important that the officers set the consequences since the success and viability of the club relies on their ability to work as a team. And to do that, each team member must take responsibility for his/her actions.
     I am anxiously awaiting the election results! I’m glad that I don’t have to vote because the choices will be difficult. We have a great group of candidates who will all work hard for their club. I also look forward to the support of the Kiwanis club and other interested parties. Please feel free to come to the high school library at 6:00 PM to show your support!
     Every candidate running for office has already ?won? because by running for office he/she has publicly stated that the club and community service are important to him or her! And that’s what it’s all about!!!

WORDS OF WISDOM
“Assuming leadership in a group dedicated to community service is a triumph of good over evil, for those who lead others in making the world a better place throw pebbles of goodness whose ripples circle the globe without ceasing.”
--- anonymous

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THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

FEBRUARY 20 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s meeting included seventeen members, new member Virgil Valente, and visitors Seth Barden and Ben and Colby Darling, grandsons of Ethelyn and Edwin Treworgy.
     The Key Club will be holding elections on February 28th.
The Kiwanis Newspaper is doing well. They sold out last week and are operating in the black. The web page is receiving about 30 hits a day.
     The RIF Book distribution is rescheduled for Feb 26th.
     The curtains have been ordered for the Milo Town Hall. Barbie Ladd will be helping out in that department. Jeff Richards has finished putting up the lights. We would also like to thank Dick DeWitt for all his help.
     Erica Lyford celebrated her 13th birthday on the 21st and Herb & Merna Dunham had a wedding anniversary on the 20th.
Next weeks meeting should be interesting with a blind auction on tap. Ethelyn says to bring lots of money!
     This week’s speaker was Harry Anderson, race chairman for the Maine Highlands Sled Dog Challenge. Harry gave a brief talk about the history of sled dog racing. He also explained what types of dogs are used for racing and the different types and classes of racing. The Maine Highland Challenge was held in Dover last weekend with 117 racers participating. The event offered a $2000.00 purse. Some of the classes were: Kid’s Class, 1 & 2-dog skijoring, 2-3 dog Junior Class, 4-dog classes, 6-dog classes, 8-dog classes and unlimited classes. Skijoring is a person on cross-country skis being pulled by one or two dogs. In the other classes, the more dogs hitched up, the more miles the run is, and the more experienced you must be. This is

something we should go and learn about first hand. Harry said this is a fun family-oriented event.
     Some of the questions he answered were:
     1. Are dog sleds handicapped? No, sledders are divided into classes, by dogs and abilities.
     2. Are there any local sled dog breeders? Yes, several in this area with four being located right in Corinth.
     3. What is the cost of a sled dog? Lead dogs must be the brains of the team. They must be fast, sense danger and see and hear things even before the masher does. The lead dog must have the respect of the other dogs in the team. A lead dog can cost up to $10,000.00 and sled dogs around $3,000.00 each.
     4. What age do sled dogs start training and how long can they race? Pups are started gradually around eight months and a good dog can race up to eight or nine years.
     5. What is an estimate of feeding one dog for a year? The average would be around $500.00. When dogs are racing they are fed high protein food. During the off season, they don’t require such an expensive diet.
     6. How do they train when there is no snow? Many mashers have unmotorized 3 and 4 wheelers that the dogs can pull on trails.
Rule #1 of sled dog racing is not to let go of your dogs because once they start running they don’t want to stop.
     Thank you, Harry, for enlightening us about the world of dog sled racing.

Katie Robertson Makes Dean’s List!!
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     I’ve got a little space to fill, so I’ll use it to share some news.
     Last week, Katie received a letter from the Dean’s office at the University of Southern Maine, informing her she had made the Dean’s list. Katie is enrolled in science classes, preparing to enter veterinary school.
     Katie lives in Mechanic Falls, near Lewiston, and works at Taylorbrook Animal Hospital as a Veterinary Technician.
     Katie also volunteers weekends at a seal rehabilitation project. She dons a wetsuit and climbs into the water to examine, apply medical treatment to, or feed the animals. When she began her training, the instructor told her to treat each seal as if it were a 400-pound, angry Rottweiller.
     I hope to receive an article from Katie soon, detailing her work with the seals.
     Congratulations Katie!

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