Three Rivers News, 2002-03-26
TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 20
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!

A VERY SPECIAL HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
BY NANCY GRANT
     A special birthday wish goes out to Mrs. Mabel Amelia McCleary, who will be 101 years young on April 2, 2002!
     Mrs. McCleary was born in Tracy, New Brunswick, Canada. She is the third of five daughters born to Leonard and Annabelle DeWitt. She grew up on a farm with her parents and sisters Florence, Myrtle, Edna, and Stella (who will be 93 years young next month). Mrs. McCleary helped her father with the plowing, horses, and other “outside” chores.
     She and her husband Hazen (dec.) raised a family of seven children including Mildred, Mae (dec.), Elwood, Lena, Eileen, Alice (dec.), and Joan.
     Mrs. McCleary’s extended family includes 27 grandchildren, 62 great-grandchildren, 42 great-great grandchildren, and 8 great-great-great grandchildren!!!!!
     Mrs. McCleary, formally from Brownville Jct., is now a resident of Hibbard’s Nursing Home in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine.

2nd Annual Variety Show Being Planned
BY KATHY WITHAM
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis is planning their second annual variety show for May 3rd and 4th, 2002. The show, entitled “The Old Town Hall Tonight”, will be held at the Milo Town Hall at 7:00 p.m. on both of those evenings. Come and enjoy a night of nostalgia as the Kiwanians and their friends entertain you with the sights, the sounds, and the magic that was once....the Milo Town Hall. You’re sure to relive old memories, and take away new ones, as you are entertained throughout the evening.
     If you have an act or special talent, and would like to take part in the show, we would LOVE to have you!
Call Ethelyn Treworgy at 943-7748, Chris Beres at 943-2895 or 943-2122, or Kathy Witham at 943-2112 or 965-8184, if you are interested in taking part.
     Stephanie Gillis is directing the chorus for the
show and if anyone is interested in singing, call her at 943-2470 will let you know when and where rehearsals will be held.

TREVOR LYFORD DOES IT AGAIN!!
     Congratulations to Trevor Lyford for winning another 1st place trophy at the Hermon Mountain Hill Climb Sunday, March 17th. There were only 3 sleds in the 120 division and after he figured out where the finish line was, Trevor ended up coming home with the 1st place trophy, an Arctic Cat hat from Cat Trax and a Polaris T-shirt from Conrad’s.

Move & Improve Update
BY SUE CHAFFEE
     Congratulations to all M & I participants!! We have127 folks signed on at our site. Each participant shows great cooperation and willingness to be a part of a valuable health program.
     This is the start of week # 3. Even if you have not
done well in the first two weeks, it is not too late to improve. Remember, your commitment is for 10 out of the 12 weeks, 30 min. four times a week. You can do it!
     The Wellness Team is working on coming up with some way to celebrate the half-way mark. Week six would actually occur during the week of school break so we would shoot for the week after. If you have any ideas for a group event, perhaps with some incentive prizes, please talk to me. A couple of suggestions have included a Poker Fun Walk and/or Beachball Volleyball in the gym. Any other great ideas out there? Call Sue Chaffee at 943-7346 ext. 208
     Don't forget to keep track of your activity in the log. I have extras if you have misplaced yours. The log is your way of entering the drawing for prizes at the end of the program. Keep up the good work!

AUCTION PLANS UNDERWAY
     The date has been set for the annual Kiwanis Auction. Bargains galore will be up for auction on June 27th and 28th. The proceeds from our auction go toward all of the projects that Kiwanis contributes to over the year. We are looking for items for the auction. If you have items, please call Eben Dewitt ( 943-2486) or Herb Dunham (943-2353 ) for pickup.

EVERYONE WELCOME!!!!
     The annual Brownville Elementary/Historical Society's Brownville History Day will be celebrated on April 12 at the school. All of the student projects will be on display in the library for parents and interested citizens to view at any time during the day. Ceremonies and award presentations will be held following lunch. If you'd like to come for lunch that day please contact Mrs. Witham at 965-8184 by 8:30 am. We hope you can come.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Virgil Valente

5TH GRADE DONATES FRAMES
     Joey Slagle is holding one of the two frames that the Brownville 5th grade is donating to the town. The frames hold signs that the River Walk Committee had already made. The signs will be placed at both ends of the Pleasant River Walk. The frames were made by Joe Beres and funded by a Service Learning Grant through the district.


5TH AND 6TH GRADERS MINGLE
BY LYNN WESTON
     All the 5th grades in the district visited the 6th grades last Friday. Mrs. Russell had ten event stations set up, and 5th and 6th graders rotated through various activities together. One highlight for the 5th graders was having their friends in 6th help them learn how to open a locker! The morning concluded with lunch at the middle school complete with lunch tickets! It was a great experience for everyone and a big help for the 5th graders as they prepare to leave their elementary schools. A special thank you to Mrs. Morrill and the kitchen staff for allowing us to eat lunch there.

PENQUIS MEN’S LEAGUE
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     The newly formed Penquis Men’s League is a huge success. There have been several roster changes, due to new members joining, but the teams are now set.
     The games are thrilling to watch; most results are determined in the final seconds. As you can see from looking at the rosters, the ages vary from 16 years to 52 years old, so as you can imagine, there are many different styles of play involved in the games. I again urge you to go to the PVHS gym and watch a game or two. I guarantee you will be entertained, and at times amused; the inter-generational trash talking is something to hear.

Men’s League standings through Friday, March 22, 2002

TEAM W L
WHITE TEAM (#4) 3 0
YELLOW TEAM (#7) 3 0
GRAY TEAM (#3) 2 1
GREEN TEAM (#6) 2 1
ORANGE TEAM (#8) 2 1
BLACK TEAM (#5) 1 2
BLUE TEAM (#1) 0 3
RED TEAM (#2) 0 3

The schedule for the next two weeks is:

TUES., MAR. 26
6:30-8PM 2 VS 3
8-9:30PM 1 VS 4
THURS.,MAR. 28
6:30-8PM 5 VS 7
8-9:30PM 6 VS 8
SUN., MAR. 31
3:30-5PM 1 VS 2
5-6:30PM 3 VS 7
6:30-8PM 4 VS 6
8-9:30PM 5 VS 8
TUES., APR. 2
6:30-8PM 2 VS 8
8-9:30 1 VS 3
THURS., APR. 4
6:30-8PM 5 VS 6
8-9:30PM 4 VS 7
SUN., APR. 7
3:30-5PM 1 VS 8
5-6:30PM 2 VS 7
6:30-8PM 3 VS 6
8-9:30PM 4 VS 5
Playoffs will start on May 2, and go through May 12.
Championship game will be Sunday, May 12. Single elimination playoff, with position determined by league records.
Good luck to all participants, and have fun!!!

PENQUIS BASKETBALL LEAGUE ROSTERS

TEAM 1 (BLUE SHIRTS)

BRANDON MCKENZIE
JUSTIN ALLEN
DUSTIN PERKINS
STEVEN KISSELL
CHRIS MADDEN
MIKE GRINDLE
LUKE LANDRY
JUSTIN MORRILL
ADAM RUSSELL
TEAM 2 (RED SHIRTS)

NICK YOUNG
JORDEN ALLEN
DEVIN PERKINS
ANDREW SMART
DREW HAMLIN
GERARD TURGEON
RYAN ANDREWS
TERRY JOYCE
ELI LADD
SHANE HERBEST
TEAM 3 ( GRAY SHIRTS)

JORDAN BAILEY
TONY HEAL
DEREK PERKINS
MIKE HARRIS
SHAWN TREVEROW
MIKE HUNTER
LANCE GERRISH
TOBY RICHARDS
BILLY MANN
TEAM 4 (WHITE SHIRTS)

DAVID CAREY
DAVE CHASE
COLBY CHASE
MIKE OSGOOD
REX WEBB
JAIME MILLS
RICKY RUBLEE
SCOTT LEE
BILL MAYO
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TEAM 5 (BLACK SHIRTS)

ERNIE MADDEN
TONY HAMLIN
PETER HAMLIN
JASON MILLS
JENSON BISSELL
BRENT BAILEY
MIKE MOHOLLAND
JEFF GAHAGEN
BILL JOYCE

TEAM 6 (GREEN SHIRTS)

ANDERS HAMLIN
KENDALL ROYAL
SHANE FOWLES
CHRIS RHODA
CHUCKY STEVENS
SCOTT LARSON
CHAD WASHBURN
ELI ZWICKER
ALEX ZWICKER

TEAM 7 (YELLOW SHIRTS)

BEN FAULKINGHAM
STEPHEN GILLIS
MATTHEW HEAL
BRANDON McCARTHY
MIKE WESTON
BEN KNAPP
TRAVIS ELLIS
MATT FOSTER
CHET GILLIS

TEAM 8 (ORANGE SHIRTS)

DICKIE PELLITIER
BRIAN HEAL JR.
BRIAN HEAL SR.
JASON HEAL
GUY HEAL
HAZEN (POOPIE) CONLOGUE
PAUL CONLOGUE
RYAN LARRABEE
JERYME SMITH

NEWS ABOUT TOWN
SURE SIGN OF SPRING
     Despite the snow we received last week, we can be assured spring is really here; Tony Gonzales and his trusty dog Toby made a trip up the Sebec River.
     On Friday, March 15th, Tony and Toby took a trip to their camp in their motor boat. Camp owners on the Sebec River consider this feat the first true sign of spring.


LOCAL ASSEMBLY OF THE INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF RAINBOW FOR GIRLS: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR YOUNG LADIES
BY WALTER MACDOUGALL
     With all the bad news we constantly hear, it is wonderfully encouraging to see so much going on in our community, which is wholesome and just plain good. Our Rainbow Assembly is happy to be a part of this positive movement, for Rainbow is about hope and promise. Rainbow, through one of the most beautiful ceremonies in the world, through example, and through practice, encourages the values which we know are essential: faith in God, compassion toward all human beings, patriotism, moral decision making, participation in a church of choice, and excellence in school. Those are the big values and objectives, but there is much more that is useful taking place in our Rainbow assembly such as, the art of public speaking, the gaining of poise, and practice of manners. All these things take place in an environment where the girls run their own assembly, and are certain to make sure that the importance of fun is not forgotten.
     Senator Olympia Snow remembers her experience in Rainbow: “I am proud to be a Rainbow girl. This group instilled in me the values of service, honesty, and leadership, among others. I have carried these ideals with me throughout the years. Being a member of the International Order of Rainbow for Girls reflects well on a young woman’s character and integrity and will benefit today’s Rainbow Girls throughout their lifetime.”
     In a recent installation, Tina Drinkwater was installed as Worthy Advisor and heads a sprightly group

of officers who are looking forward to welcoming a growing number of young ladies applying for membership. Ms. Lillian Harmon is the Mother Advisor and Mrs. Deanne Merrill is the chairperson of the Advisory Board.
Young ladies, eleven years or older, and their parents are encouraged to contact anyone involved in Rainbow for more information. Lillian Harmon – 564-8790 and Deanne Merrill – 943-2650

YOGA CLASSES
     Have you had the Yoga Experience? Let this class stretch and tone your muscles and ligaments by practicing gentle yoga poses and feel-good stretches. You will also increase your mind and body awareness and control, reduce tension, and improve your posture. This non-competitive class is great for EVERYONE!
     So come and join Cindy Herbest on Wednesday evenings from 6-7, starting March 20, at the Milo Elementary School.

Yoga is like music. The rhythm of the body, the melody of the mind, and the harmony of the soul create the symphony of life - B.K.S. Iyengar

MAINELY SENIORS

MEALS FOR ME. MENU
WED., MARCH 27 BAKED HAM, RED POTATOES, TURNIP, CARROTS, APPLE CRISP
THURS., MARCH 28 BAKED STUFFED CHICKEN, MASHED POTATOES, ASPARAGUS, BISCUIT, OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE
FRI., MARCH 29 BAKED FISH W/WHITE SAUCE, RICE PILAF, FRESH SPINACH, BABY CARROTS, CAKE W/FROSTING
MON., APR. 1 ROAST TURKEY W/GRAVY, MASHED POTATO, FRESH CARROTS, SLICED PEARS
TUES, APR. 2 BREADED HADDOCK W/CHEESE SAUCE, MASHED POTATO, BEETS, FRUIT COCKTAIL
WED.,APR. 3 BAKED HAM, BAKED POTATO, TURNIP, MOLASSES COOKIE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AT THE LAGRANGE TOWN HALL APARTMENTS ON WEDNESDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 PM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

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MSAD #41 LUNCH MENU
March 25 – 29

Monday - Chicken burger, oven fries, mixed veg., roll, pineapple chunks, and milk.
Tuesday - Tomato soup, toasted cheese sandwich, sliced cukes, apple, and milk.
Wednesday - Pizza, rice pilaf, salad, blueberry cake, and milk.
Thursday - Fishsticks, French-fries, carrots, maple roll, banana pudding/topping, and milk.
Friday - Baked beans, hot dog/bun, mixed vegs., fruit cocktail, and milk.


Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     We’re approaching Easter rapidly. It’s coming early this year. I remember being a kid and how neither Charlie nor I liked Easter candy. It made filling a basket for us very challenging. Mom would hide those marshmallow eggs all over the house…we’d search for them, fight over them, and wouldn’t think of putting one in our mouths. YUK! We hated jellybeans and also those little yellow marshmallow chicks. Charlie was allergic to chocolate. I can’t imagine that I was allowed to eat it in front of him, so I’m guessing I was limited, as well. Doesn’t seem fair to me, but I suppose there were other things that I could have besides chocolate, although now I can’t imagine what that could have been. Chocolate is, and will always be, my favorite flavor.
     Mom would fix up Easter baskets using spring toys such as kites and marbles and jump ropes. She’d find some candy that we would eat and wrap it up in waxed paper tied with pretty ribbons and lay those in the baskets as well. I’d always have a beautiful Easter outfit laid out to wear to Sunday School. My outfit always included a spring dress coat, Easter dress, straw hat, patent leather shoes, dressy white socks, and white gloves. If I was really lucky, there would be a purse included. I have always loved pocketbooks and much to my husbands chagrin, have a ton of them.
     Sunday school and singing in the choir was a big part of my life when I was a child. I had heard that the Methodist Church had a choir for little children called the “Jewels.” I told my mother that I wanted to join that “Jewelry” choir…and she made that happen for me. The choirs at the Methodist Church were so many and the membership was so varied in age, that I was able to stay a choir member all the way through my school years. Kay Trickey was the director of choirs in those days, and she knew how to recruit and she knew how to keep the children interested in singing. At age 5 we were learning two-part harmony, stage presence, and self-confidence. What a wonderful lady she was!
     I like to be home on Easter Sunday. I like to shop for “Easter bunny” gifts for my children and my grandchildren. When the kids were growing up, my neighbor (who also was my cousin) Karen and I would go to great lengths to do Easter Egg Treasure Hunts for our kids. We’d plan and hide those little plastic eggs filled with both treats and clues, sometimes on bare ground

and sometimes on snow covered ground. We all loved this tradition, and I think we were still doing it when the kids were in high school.
     We always have a traditional ham meal for Easter dinner. The menu includes: baked ham, mashed potatoes, green bean bake, glazed carrots, fruit salad, and yeast rolls. For dessert I usually make a bunny cake or, if time is closing in on me, cupcakes with white frosting and coconut sprinkled on top and a jellybean for color suffices.
     The recipe for green bean bake is on the side of the onion ring can. I glaze carrots by cooking them first, draining them and then putting a tablespoon of butter and a tablespoon of honey in the pan with the carrots and stirring to coat. One of my favorite yeast roll recipes and my favorite fruit salad recipe follow.
Shredded Wheat Bread (or rolls)

2 cups boiling water over 2 large shredded wheat biscuits in a large bowl
Add: 1 tsp. salt
1/3 cup molasses
1/3 cup sugar
3 Tablespoons shortening

     Let cool to lukewarm and add: 1 package of yeast dissolved in 1/2 cups of lukewarm water. Add 6 cups of flour stirred in a cup or two at a time. When the dough leaves the sides of the bowl put the dough into a greased bowl, roll it around to cover the ball of dough with grease and then cover with a clean towel and let it rise in a warm place until double in size. Punch down the dough and then turn the dough out onto a floured board and form into 2 doz. balls and place in a greased 9” X 13 “ pan and let rise again. Bake at 350 degrees for approximately 25 minutes. Turn the rolls out onto a rack or a clean towel as soon as they come out of the oven.

One of our favorite fruit salad recipes is called Pistachio Salad.
1-12 oz. Cool Whip®
1-20 oz. can crushed pineapple, juice and all
1 small package instant pistachio pudding
1 cup of miniature marshmallows (or a few more if you wish)
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup coconut
a few maraschino cherries
     Put the Cool Whip in a big bowl and add the dry pudding mix. Stir until the Cool Whip is all green. Add a couple of drops of green food coloring if you want a more vibrant color. Stir in the can of crushed pineapple, juice and all. Add the cup of mini marshmallows and use a little more than a cupful, if you prefer. Stir in the coconut and 1/4 cup of the walnuts and put the whole thing in a pretty serving bowl. Sprinkle with the other 1/4 cut walnuts and decorate with a few maraschino cherries. You need to keep this refrigerated until it’s time to serve.
     A bunny cake is pretty easy to put together. Use any cake mix and bake according to package directions in 2 round cake pans. Turn the cakes out of the pans and cool. I usually cover a heavy piece of cardboard, in a rectangular shape, with aluminum foil to display the cake on. To assemble you need to keep one round cake intact.

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     The second round cake needs to be cut it into 3 pieces. Cut a bunny ear from both the left and the right side of the cake. It leaves you with a bow tie shaped piece in the middle. Do you get it? Assemble using the whole round cake as the bunny face, the bow tie piece beneath and the two bunny ears atop. Frost the whole thing with white frosting, sprinkle with coconut, use jellybeans for eyes and nose, and string licorice for whiskers. It’s absolutely adorable.
     To each of my readers I wish you a blessed and Happy Easter

RITE AID NEEDS ITEMS FOR RUMMAGE SALE
     Milo Rite Aid is accepting donations of new or used items to be sold at their annual rummage sale on April 9, 2002.
     Proceeds from this event will benefit the Children’s Miracle Network.
     So, box up your extra clothing, books, tools, knick-knacks or appliances and drop them off at Milo Rite Aid before April 6. Call Lori at 943-7780 for more information.


Maine Taxpayers Eligible for Free Online Filing of Taxes
Senator Paul Davis encourages eligible taxpayers to use the program.
(AUGUSTA, ME) - Senator Paul Davis (R-Sangerville) announced today that some Maine taxpayers can file their 2001 individual federal and state tax returns online at no cost. Intuit Inc., the developer of Quicken financial software and TurboTax tax preparation software, is sponsoring the Quicken Tax Freedom Project (QTFP), a philanthropic initiative of the Intuit Financial Freedom Foundation, which donates Web-based tax preparation and electronic tax filing services to lower income individuals and families nationwide.
     "The Internet and computer based programs really are helping make tasks such as filing taxes easier and easier. Approximately 40 million people filed their taxes electronically in tax year 2000 and that figure is expected to increase to 45 million this year." stated Senator Davis. "For those who are interested in trying this program, I encourage you to check it out. If you expect a refund, filing electronically will certainly shorten the time in which you have to wait to receive your refund check from the government."
     Taxpayers with an annual adjusted gross income of $25,000 or less are eligible to participate in the program. This amounts to 60 million taxpayers nationwide. Qualification for the free program is determined by the users' actual tax information. The TurboTax program asks the taxpayer for all relevant information and automatically calculates their tax return. Taxpayers may access the QTFP website at www.quicken.com/freedom. For more in-formation about the program, please contact Senator Paul Davis at 287-1505 or 876-4047.

BROWNVILLE TRIVIA
BY BILL SAWTELL

1. PCI stands for (a) Pleasant Central Institute, (b) Plymouth Cordage Industries,(c) Phosphorous Chlorine Industry, (d) Pleasant Cedar Industry
2. Cal Herrick came to Brownville from (a) Guilford, (b) Millinocket, (c) East Corinth, (d) Atkinson
3. Shephard and Morse had a unique (a) dry kiln, (b) press saw, (c) telephone system, (d) bunk house
4. The YMCA secretary was also a (a) constable, (b) call boy, (c) teacher,(d) preacher.
5. Harland Ladd became (a) Governor, (b) representative, (c) Commissioner of Education, (d) town manager
6. The Grange Hall was built in (a) 1850, (b) 1889, (c) 1891, (d) 1895
7. Dillon's Hall was also known as the (a) Majestic Theatre. (b) Brownville Junction House, (c) Henderson Cafe, (d) Pop's Theater
8. The B&A came here to transport (a) iron, (b) slate, (c) wood ,(d) both a and b.
9. Mac Buchanan came here from (a) Bangor, (b) Boston, (c) Millinocket, (d) Guilford.
10. Mrs Gerow was a(n) Home Ec, (b) English, (c) French, (d) math teacher.
Answers: 1-b 2-c 3-a 4-d 5-c 6-d 7-a 8-d 9-c 10-a


Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz (Hard one this week)
Match common and Latin names for native trees:
1. birch a. Quercus
2. spruce b. Malus
3. maple c. Tsuga
4. willow d. Ulmus
5. hemlock e. Pinus
6. oak f. Betula
7. apple g. Abies
8. elm h. Acer
9. pine i. Picea
10. fir j. Salix

How does a refrigerator work?
     It takes energy to vaporize a liquid. An example is boiling water. Some substances are gases at room temperature, but under pressure can be kept as liquids. An example of this is propane. In the tank it is a liquid, but when the pressure is released it becomes a gas and can be transported to a stove for burning. The first gas used in refrigerators was ammonia. When the pressure on the liquid form of ammonia is released, the ammonia vaporizes and in the process converts from a liquid to a gas. Since no heat is provided, the energy is taken from the molecules themselves, and the gas cools. This cool gas is circulated through the inside coils of a refrigerator and absorbs heat from the interior, cooling the food. The ammonia gas gains this heat and flows to the coils outside the cooled area. This is usually on the back or bottom area of the refrigerator. A compressor motor then compresses the gas until it turns into a liquid again. The heat gained from the inside of the refrigerator as well as the heat removed when the gas is converted back to a liquid is lost to the room through the cooling coils. Remember, vaporizing a liquid requires heat. Condensing a gas requires an equal loss of heat. The cooled liquid is

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then ready to be vaporized again to further cool the food inside the refrigerator. Because no machine is 100% efficient, there is always more heat generated than is removed from the inside. This is why you can’t cool your house by leaving the refrigerator door open. Ammonia caused health problems when it leaked out, so a substance know as Freon was introduced, which did the same job, but was thought to be better for the environment. We all know about the hole in the ozone layer because of Freon, but that’s another story. New gases are now used which are supposed to be better for the environment.
     An air conditioner works on the same principle, but the cooling coils are placed outside the house so there is a net loss of heat on the inside. If one placed their refrigerator in a wall so the coils were outside the house, then it too could be used as an air conditioner.

Answers 1.f, 2.i, 3.h, 4.j, 5.c, 6.a, 7.b, 8.d, 9.e, 10.g
Score 4 Good, 5-7 Excellent, 8-10 Expert

AROUND AND ABOUT IN PISCATAQUIS COUNTY
BY SYLVIA BLACK
     Spring is officially here, even though, right now, we are having our second snow storm in as many days.
     It seems to me spring ushers in common rituals amongst us. Many of those common rituals have to do with opening up our houses, airing them out and cleaning them up. We get out onto our porches again, and into our yards. We stop and converse longer with each other instead of a quick hello as we are escaping the cold winter winds.
     Even though we are around and about during the winter, it somehow seems we have been hibernating to a certain degree. We have a tendency to huddle into our warm coats and hoods and houses. Just as the tulips and daffodils shed their winter coverings, we begin to shed the heavy clothing we have needed during the cold times; we discover anew the joy of the warming sunshine. It strikes me that our neighbors in southern states reverse the ritual; they are out more in the winter and huddle in their air-conditioned spaces during the summer.
     I love the changing seasons. I love even the extremity of them. I think, though, winter in Maine has a tendency to isolate us from each other. Too much isolation for too long can be destructive.
     As I was working on the discovery research for our CHEt (Cultural Heritage for Eco-tourism) project, I got a funny little mind picture of our lives in many ways progressing like an ant hill- lots of good stuff going on, but not where it’s visible. There’s a ton of talent in Piscataquis County that’s barely recognized! During the research process, we held a series of community forums where people from the community were encouraged to share their memories, songs, stories, poetry and possessions that were dear to them. We had lengthy discussions about who we are and how we feel about life in these parts. The subject of isolation came up and someone suggested that people who settled here were hardy, hard-working people who kept to themselves. Naturally, we would inherit those traits to some extent.

     It was also noted during several conversations that we are extremely generous and caring when we see a neighbor in need.
     I guess the point I’m trying to make is that many needs go unnoticed because of our independent natures and thus, can not be addressed by our caring and generous neighbors. Reaching out to each other is a two-way street that involves communication of both needs and of solutions. Many things can be accomplished by several when they seem impossible for one. Talking to one another about what’s important to us, sharing our favorite pastimes or books, swapping plants or hanging out over a meal or a cup of coffee can be wonderfully rewarding. Asking a friend to help you brainstorm ideas about something you want to do can be fun as well as informative.
     Finally, I have another suggestion for those who can’t think of a way to reach out. My experience is that the best thing you can do when you feel isolated and needy is to give. It pulls you out of yourself and puts you in the mind-set of meeting another person’s needs. Volunteering is one way to give. Many, many times during the process of volunteering or giving to another, our needs get miraculously met, almost without effort.
HAPPY SPRING!!!



     The Milo-Brownville Neighbors Against Domestic Violence is a group of concerned citizens who work to promote a zero tolerance of domestic violence in the community. We are not a service provider. We meet the second Tuesday of each month at Pleasant Park Community Center at 5:30 PM. Refreshments are served. Please plan to join us at our next meeting.



BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR..
(A STORY THAT IS “DEER” TO ME)
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     As you may have read in past editions of the Three Rivers News, Kirby and I were disappointed this winter with the disappearance of the birds from our feeders. I have reports from folks telling me they now have robins and red-winged blackbirds at their feeders, a sure sign of spring. Well, we now have a flock at our feeders, not of birds, but of deer.
     Each morning for the past two weeks we wake up to a herd of deer sleeping in our front yard. The first count we took was nine; on Thursday, March 21, we had thirty.
     Now before you read on, I want to remind you that I LOVE animals of all kinds, deer included. I remember as a child, going for long rides with my Grammie and Grandpa Stanchfield looking for deer. We would roam all over the county hoping for that rare glimpse of a deer in a field. I know we occasionally saw one, but more often than not, our trip was ended with a trip to the Tastee-Freeze for an ice cream to appease us for not seeing any deer. Things have sure changed. Have
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you ridden to Dover at sunset lately? There are dozens of deer in every field. I have to admit I find the huge number of deer around a bit creepy.
     The deer that hang out around my house on Sargent Hill Drive are a hale and hearty lot. This is due to the fact that at least five households in our neighborhood put food out for the deer this winter. I did not. I have never fed the deer because their presence would cause my precious Heikki to want to frolic with them, and a dog “playing” with deer is a no-no. Despite that, we’re having a hard time keeping Heikki away from the deer. Each morning, as we begin to move around the house, the “girls” are lying within twenty feet of our bedroom window, which is an eight-foot sliding glass door. (I call them the girls because they have no antlers. Kirby says no deer have antlers this time of year, but I still like to pretend they are all girls; girl deer get hunted less in November). As we make noise the deer look up at us, twitch an ear or two, decide we are no threat and keep on resting. A beautiful sight you are probably thinking; I used to think the same thing. But, a problem has arisen; How do I let the dogs out to do their morning “business”? Not only am I afraid Heikki will run to the deer, the deer are sleeping in Heikki’s favorite bathroom area.
     When the deer first appeared, we thought the opening of our front door would send the herd running for the woods, but soon found out that our “girls” think we are an interesting bunch of animals. When we open the door, the deer slowly stand up, snort a few times then continue staring at us. We have to hold Heikki and his brothers back for a few minutes to give the deer a chance to look things over before they turn and stroll slowly into the woods. As you can imagine, this is very frustrating to the dogs, who really have to “go”.
     I have been assured that as spring progresses, the snow in the woods will melt and the deer will go hang out there. I certainly hope so. If my herd does consist of mostly “girls”, chances are they are pregnant (it is that time of year); if that’s the case, it’s possible we could have fifty or sixty deer staring at us each morning.

KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     Four Key Clubbers: Liz Laverty, Lacey Russell, Peter Bissell and Eli Ladd, joined Kiwanians for breakfast on March 20th. Since four members attended they were able to retrieve the Key Club bell “stolen” by Kiwanians on February 28th. I’m not sure, but I think I saw two bells being carried out…The Key Clubbers chose a great day to attend the Kiwanis meeting. The speaker today was Tom Peaco from Make-A-Wish Foundation. Mr. Peaco gave a history of the foundation and showed a short video of local Wish stories. It was a very moving presentation and the Key Club is anxious to help make Wishes come true for children in need.
     This week’s meeting was held on Wednesday because there won’t be classes on Thursday and Friday due to teacher in-service days. Thanks to Nancy Grant for being our guest. The club is making plans for a Lock-In to be held in Mid-May. Each member would pay to spend the night “locked in” the high school. Area Key Clubs will

be invited and the money raised will be donated to a local charity. The club will vote on which charity they will donate to at the next meeting.
     We hope you’ll join us at our next meeting. Please remember to stop at the office to let them know you’re visiting us. Please enter the building through the double doors at the front of the school; all other doors are locked during the day.


THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MARCH 20 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     The meeting began with twenty members present along with an interclub from Orono/Old Town. Also joining us for breakfast was Key Club President Liz Laverty and members Peter Bissell, Lacy Russell, and late but not least, Eli Ladd. They had enough people to make an interclub, so they were entitled to claim their bell.
     Our club is planning an interclub to Dexter on March 29 at 6:00 am.
Liz Laverty, Key Club President, told how successful the blood drive was on March 19th.
     The Kiwanis Newspaper is experiencing growing pains. Things are going great, but maybe leasing a printer is going to be an option.
     All the curtain materials have arrived to be installed. Heidi Finson found a program for the dedication of the Milo Town Hall in 1924. She brought it to the meeting to share and also pointed out that a relative of Ed Treworgy was involved with the Town Hall at that time. So the circle goes.
     If anyone has anything for the Kiwanis Auction coming up in June, Herb Dunham and Eben DeWitt are the men to see.
     The Variety Show, coming up May 3 and 4, is coming along nicely. The program is almost finalized for the "Old Town Hall Tonight" and Ethelyn Treworgy will have a sign up sheet at next weeks meeting for help with all the loose ends.
     Birthdays for this week are Susan Almy on the 20th, Rachel Almy will celebrate on the 21st, and
     Mary Jane Zamboni on the 25th. Spouses were present at the meeting and were given a gentle reminder.
     All eight dollars collected this week for the administration fund were happy dollars.
     On March 27, Candidate for Congress Mike Michaud, from East Millinocket, will speak.

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     Our speaker for this week was Tom Peaco, Executive Director for the Maine Make-A-Wish Foundation. Tom opened his talk with a brief history of how Make-A-Wish evolved. In 1980 a seven- year-old boy from Arizona with leukemia, had a dream. That dream was to be a police officer. Through some friends the dream was found out and became a reality. He was taken by State Police helicopter from the hospital to the police barracks; he was clothed in a uniform made just for him; and a proclamation was made for him to be an officer for a day. He spent the whole day as a Trooper, which had never been done before in Arizona. He loved the cruiser, but wouldn't ride on a motorcycle because it didn't have any doors. When he died four days later, he was buried in his uniform. This touched a couple of the officers so much that later on they got together with the little boys mom and decided to do this for other children with life- threatening illnesses.
     So, from 1980 with six people in Arizona, we come to our present day foundation. Twenty- two years later there are 80 chapters around the United States and 20 outside the States. The organization is all about granting a wish to a child under 18 with a life threatening illness. Hope, strength, and joy is the motto and they often find that a child who has had a wish granted has newfound strength and determination to fight their illness. You never know the power of a wish. Make-A-Wish provides an experience that you couldn't do on your own. They want the child to see beyond the hospital setting. Usually children ask for a trip somewhere, to be something (like an officer), to have something, or to meet someone. Make-A-Wish makes it happen. Everything is taken care of and they mean everything.
     Tom showed a very moving video about four wishes that had been granted in Maine. The parents were so grateful to have a day with their child and not to have worries about anything. Unfortunately there is more need for wishes. The foundation has gone from granting 350 wishes, over a ten-year period, to 90 to 100 wishes to be granted in just the year 2002. If anyone is interested, there is a Walk for Wishes scheduled for June 8th, starting at Bass Park in Bangor. You can Walk for Wishes (walk-a-thon) or Dash for Dreams (5k run). You can be sure that the Kiwanis will be very active in contributing to this very worthwhile foundation. Thank you very much, Mr. Peaco.

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