Three Rivers News, 2002-04-09
TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 22
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!

MSAD 41 BUS DRIVERS ARE THE BEST!
April 4, 2002
Dear Val,
     I first want to say that I am so glad our area has this valuable resource for local information, humor and up-lifting news. I feel this is the best place to express my gratitude to the bus drivers of S.A.D 41 for their courtesy toward other drivers and for their interest in the safety of our kids.
     As a commuter who must drive back and forth from Milo every day to my job as a J.M.G Project Reach teacher at Brewer Middle School, I meet LOTS of bus traffic. My experience with bus traffic around here, combined with all the other places I’ve lived throughout the country, tell me we have the best drivers, bar none.
     An example: A bus is traveling through a stretch with lots of stops. A S.A.D. 41 bus driver often pulls over to let traffic behind the bus pass. In my opinion, getting that traffic out of the way is not only helpful to commuters, but it makes for a safer situation for kids. Extra traffic near a bus makes for blind spots and other cautious situations.
     Another example is when a bus driver and a commuter are approaching one another in a 50 mile-an-hour zone; our bus drivers will often make the effort to wait until that car has passed before flipping on the lights and triggering the bus stop sign, to prepare for dropping off a student. Once again, bus drivers are avoiding the more dangerous situation of wondering if the approaching car will or can stop in time by making a swift and smart judgement.
     As I mentioned, I’ve lived in several other areas, and I commute through other school districts each day. I know, and I’m sure I’m not alone in saying this, that S.A.D. 41 bus drivers are the most professional ones I’ve ever encountered. This letter serves to thank them for their intelligence and consideration.
     Sincerely, Shannon Greaney, Turner Howe Rd., Milo


Dare Program Graduation
The Brownville 5th Grade will hold their D.A.R.E. graduation ceremonies on Tuesday, April 23, at 6:30 in the school gym. Parents, relatives and friends are all invited to attend. Officer Scott Stubbs will be doing the presentations.
The next day the class will travel to the Bangor Historical Museum with Officer Stubbs. Transportation for the trip is being funded by a grant from "Safe and Drug Free Schools".

“THE OLD TOWN HALL TONIGHT”
SECOND ANNUAL
THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
VARIETY SHOW
“A TIME FOR REMINISCING”
FRIDAY, MAY 3
SATURDAY, MAY 4
7:00 PM
PROCEEDS TO GO TO:
MAKE-A-WISH FOUNDATION
PINE TREE HOSPICE FOR CHILDREN
MILO TOWN HALL ARTS CENTER

     The Brownville 5th grade has been studying electricity. Here Adam Brewer and Jason Thomas work the electric car they're building.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Virgil Valente

PENQUIS MEN’S LEAGUE
Men’s League standings through Sunday, April 7, 2002

TEAM W L
YELLOW TEAM (#7) 7 1
WHITE TEAM (#4) 7 1
ORANGE TEAM (#8) 4 4
GRAY TEAM (#3) 4 4
GREEN TEAM (#6) 4 3
BLUE TEAM (#1) 4 4
BLACK TEAM (#5) 1 6
RED TEAM (#2) 0 8
Teams 5 and 6 will play a makeup game as soon as a date is available to use the gym.

The schedule for the next two weeks is:

TUES., APR. 9
6:30- 8PM 1 VS 7
8- 9:30PM 2 VS 6
THURS., APR. 11
6:30-8PM 3 VS 5
8-9:30PM 4 VS 8
SUN., APR. 14
3:30-5PM 1 VS 6
5-6:30PM 2 VS 5
6:30-8PM 7 VS 8
8-9:30PM 3 VS 4
TUES., APR. 16
6:30-8PM 2 VS 4
8-9:30PM 1 VS 5
THURS., APR. 18
6:30-8PM 3 VS 8
8-9:30PM 6 VS 7

SUN., APR. 21
3:30-5PM 1 VS 4
5-6:30PM 2 VS 3
6:30-8PM 6 VS 8
8-9:30PM 5 VS 7

Playoffs will start on May 2, and go through May 12.
Championship game will be Sunday, May 12. Single elimination playoff, with position determined by league records.
Good luck to all participants, and have fun!!!

Click here for Team Rosters


Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Will Crozier served as selectman for (a) 25, (b) 31, (c) 37, (d) 40 years.
2. No. 41 was a (a)passenger train, (b) freight train, (c) mixed train, (d) troop train.
3. Railroad Days commemorated 100 years since the first (a) passenger train, (b) freight train, (c) rail, (d) railroad station on the Short Line through Brownville Junction.
4.Rodney Ross came from (a) Massachusetts, (b) New York, (c) New Jersey, (d) New Brunswick.
5. Brownville could claim land in (a) Williamsburg, (b) Milo, (c) Millinocket, (d) Lake View.
6. Rev. John Meisner was a(n) Democrat, (b) Republican, (c) Independent, (d) Green.
7. Chautauquas came in the (a) summer, (b) fall, (c) spring, (d) winter
8. The restaurant in Dillon's Hall was (a) upstairs, (d) downstairs, (c) to the front, (d) both (a) and (c).
9. The Pleasant River Hotel was once called the (a) Caboose, (b) Round House, (c) Eureka Hotel, (d) North Station.
10. The first quarry to open was the (a) Merrill Quarry, (b) Highland Quarry, (c) Crocker Quarry, (d) Wilder Quarry.
Answers 1-c 2-a 3-a 4-c 5-d 6-b 7-a 8-d 9-c 10-c

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THANK YOU ANGIE’S FROM MEALS FOR ME.

BY VALERIE ROBERTSON

     Because of water problems at the Civil Defense Center, Meals for Me was forced to shut down their kitchen for the week of April 1-5. The kitchen will resume operation on Thursday, April 11, 2002, but shut-ins will receive their meals all week thanks to Doris Washburn and the folks at Angie’s Restaurant. Monday’s, Tuesday’s and Wednesday’s meals will be prepared by the staff at Angie’s, then the Meals for Me. crew will pick up and deliver the meals.
     Val and the rest of the gang at Meals for Me. would like to thank Doris, Rhonda and the rest of the crew at Angie’s for their help. Because of their participation, 50 shut-in, elderly folks will have a delicious hot meal delivered to their home.
     The dining halls are scheduled to resume Thursday, April 11, 2002, and we apologize for our down time. Before this interruption, Milo Meals For Me had never missed a single day of their scheduled meals.

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED.,APRIL 10
(Home deliveries only)
CHOP SUEY, GREEN BEANS, DINNER ROLL, DESSERT AND MILK
THURS., APRIL 11
CHICKEN TETRAZZINI, BROCCOLI, CORNBREAD, CAKE W/FROSTING,
FRI., APRIL 12 BAKED HADDOCK W/ EGG GRAVY, BAKED POTATO, GREEN BEANS, FRUIT GELATIN
MON., APRIL 15 ALL SITES CLOSED FOR PATRIOTS DAY
TUES., APRIL 16 VEAL PARMESAN, SPAGHETTI, BROCCOLI, SLICED PEARS
WED., APRIL 17

CHICKEN NOODLE CASSEROLE, PEAS, CUCUMBER AND ONION SALAD, OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AT THE LAGRANGE TOWN HALL APARTMENTS ON WEDNESDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 PM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

NEWS ABOUT TOWN

MILO FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS
DATE TIME OUT TIME IN CALL
04/01/02 09:10 09:35 EMS HELP
04/01/02 11:22 11:48 EMS HELP IN MEDFORD

FIREMEN RECEIVE PROMOTIONS
BY MURREL HARRIS
     At a Fire Department officers meeting on April 1, 2002, Fire Chief David Preble announced the promotions in rank of three members. Don Richards was promoted from Captain to Assistant Chief of Maintenance, Ladder Truck #3 Lieutenant Rick Flagg was promoted to Captain, and Fireman Ken Demers was promoted to Lieutenant on Ladder #3. The town congratulates you and appreciates the work you do.

MILO REC. WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL
STANDINGS

TEAM W L
STANCHFIELD'S 6 3
BANKER'S 6 3
COLE'S 5 4
GRAY'S 4 5
DEMERS' 3 6
LELAND'S 2 7

SWING DANCING LESSONS
BY MURREL HARRIS
     Susan Harriman will offer Swing Dance lessons to 8 couples. The lessons will take place at the Milo Town Hall on Sundays from 6:30-8 PM. The classes will start on April 14, 2002, and spots will be filled on a first come, first served system. Call the Milo Recreation Department at 943-7326 for more information.


MARION C. COOK SCHOOL NEWS
MS. IVY'S STARS
BY ERICA LYFORD AND BRAD CIMPHER
     The Terrific Kid this week is Codie Donlon. Ms. Ivy and Mrs. Farrar picked Codie because he hasn't been going to the thinking chair, he's been trying hard to be a good listener, trying to follow the rules, and trying hard to be a good friend.
     The kindergarten and 1st grade friends have been learning how to do jelly bean graphs and patterns. They grew grass for Easter and dyed hard-boiled eggs different colors. They worked on April Fool's rhyming books.
News in Mrs. Carter's Class
BY KELSEY OTTMANN AND RICHIE RUSSELL
     On Friday, April 5th, Mrs. Carter's students will be handing in their planet reports and projects. They will be displaying their projects in the gym at 10:15. On April 12th they will be presenting a play called,
     "The Planet Parade" and singing a song called "The Family of the Sun". The weekly Terrific Kid assembly will follow.
     The class will be going to the planetarium and viewing a show of stars and planets. There will also be a gift shop if the students would like to bring spending money. The Terrific Kid this week is Justin Ottmann. "Justin is terrific because he is a friend to everybody. He works hard on all his work and always has a smile on his face," says Mrs. Carter. Bus Student of the Week is Morgan Drake.
News From Miss K.'s Class
     The Terrific Kid was Jonathan Spencer. There aren't enough words in the dictionary to describe all the terrific things about Spence. His is kind, helpful and is always there for a friend. He also is in charge of keeping the classroom organized and clean. A responsibility he takes very seriously. Keegan Grass was our Bus Student of the week. James Gledhill and Tyler Elsenheimeer were recognized for their help in a bus evacuation drill.

     The 4th and 5th grade continues their study of change over time. Students compared the forelimbs of a chimpanzee, a crocodile, a bat and a whale. Clay models were designed and displayed. The skeleton of an Archaeopteryx was compared with a bird and a dinosaur. The class is learning about the Civil War during Social Studies class. Students are using the Internet to find information about Margaret Chase Smith. We will be joining Mrs. Wallace's class on a tour of the senator's home and library in Skowhegan on May 1st.

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MILO ELEMENTARY
TERRIFIC KIDS
BY TOM WITHAM
From the room of:
Mrs. Barden- Derrick Johnson is our Terrific Kid. He uses good manners and encourages all to do their best.

Mrs. Chessa- Our Terrific Kid this week has worked very hard to remember what he needs to do. He is bright and bubbly and always ready with a smile. He is
Tyler Creighton.

Mrs. Dell'olio- Mary Jay is our Terrific Kid. - She loves to read and write, and has some very creative ideas. Animals seem to fascinate her, and often she shares what she learns about them with the class.

Mrs. Dunham- Our Terrific kid is Rochelle Hicks. Rochelle is new to our school. She has made a fine adjustment to our routines. She is making new
friends and learning all the teacher's names.

Mrs. Hayes-
All students in Ms. Marie and Ms. Linda's class have made wonderful progress in reading. We are proud of their hard work in literacy. Great job K and 1st grade students.

Mrs. Hudak- Tyler Pelletier is our Terrific Kid. Tyler is super polite and a very good student. He is always willing to help others and is a fine example of an excellent student. We love having Tyler in our room.

Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey- Shawn Pullyard is our Terrific Kid, He is a hard worker and follows the I Care rules, is a super math student ; we are proud of you! Anthony Murano is our other Terrific Kid. Anthony is a very hard worker, he is first to get to work each morning and tries his best on all tasks. He is another great math student and we are proud of you.

Mrs. Whitney- Mrs. Whitney's terrific kid for 4/5 is Josh Hathorn. He has spring fever! It shows through his work. He is attempting to get it done within the time limits given. Good job Josh!

MSAD#41 LUNCH MENU
APRIL 8-12
Mon.-Chicken burger, potato oval, peas, fruit, and milk everyday.
Tues.-French toast sticks, sausage links, hash brown, applesauce.
Wed.-Chicken noodle soup, egg salad sand., blueberry shortcake.
Thurs.-Pizza burger, rice pilaf, broccoli/cheese, orange _’s.
Fri.-Foot long hot dog, french fries, assorted veg., assorted desserts.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     As I write this, rain is pouring down outside. We need the rain so desperately that I can’t help but be glad that we’re getting all of this needed moisture. I’ve never been a lover of rain. Other people tell me how soothing the sound is to them. Some even love to walk in the rain, dance in the rain, sing in the rain, for heaven’s sake! Please!!!
     Rain means having to lug around an umbrella all day long unless you can afford the luxury of letting your hair-do get wet. It means wet and usually cold clinging clothing. It means little kids tracking mud across your clean kitchen floor. No, much as we need it…I don’t much like rain.
Well, I take that back just a little.
     In the middle of a summer night, I don’t mind having rain falling on our camp roof. It’s comforting to
be all cozy inside, it cools the air down, and you don’t have to rush right out the first thing to water the plants. I guess that as long as the rain is finished by morning and the sun comes out, I don’t mind it too much.
     I’ve recently been on-line with a dear old friend and neighbor of mine. Some of you will remember the Moore family who lived on the corner of Clinton and Water Streets in the late 50’s and 60’s. Mary and Helen were closest to my age and we became fast friends as soon as they moved in. Mary and I have been the ones communicating lately. We’ve been reminiscing about some summer activities that we used to engage in. We used to set up “fairs” in the neighborhood. We charged the other neighborhood kids money (and kids who came to our “fairs” from other neighborhoods, as well) to play such games as: Drop the Clothespin in the Milk Bottle, have a swing on the Moore’s enormous homemade swing, go into a blanket tent with a kid all dressed up like a gypsy and have your palm read, join in a Board Hockey tournament…there was no end to what we’d charge them to do! We’d dig around our old used and for the most part discarded toys and have a nice stash of prizes to give away. We’d make posters and tack them

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to telephone poles in a few other neighborhoods. And, the funny part about it was the kids would come!!
     The board hockey game was home made by the Moore kid’s dad. They had played it at church camp one year, and they gave their Dad directions that he followed to a tee. We had so much fun with that game, and it lasted for years. I’ll never forget what it looked like. They painted the base of it beige and the sides and blocks were turquoise blue. I think that the puck was about the size of a checker and we had dowels for the sticks. Those of us who played it the most became pretty good at the concept of banking shots. When my husband and I were first dating he made the mistake just once of challenging me to a game of bumper pool at the Bangor/Brewer Bowling Alley. All of the “moves” came flooding back to me, and I beat him unmercifully. Of course showing off like that could have worked against me, but I think that he was impressed. I will tell you this, he never challenged me to a game of bumper pool again.
     I think that we probably sat around on the rainy days and prepared for these “fairs” and then prayed for good weather on “Fair Day.” I remember that we didn’t throw them together in a hurry. They took days of preparation. Mary’s mother used to let us do the cooking for the candy sale in her house. My mother took care of providing the Kool-aid® and the cups.
     Mary got really excited about helping me locate the fun recipes that her mother used. The following is what she sent to me in Mary’s own words.

Molasses Taffy

Put in a heavy pan:
1/2 cup molasses
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tbsp. vinegar

Cook, stirring constantly, to the boiling point. Add

1/4 tsp. cream of tartar

Boil to 256 degrees, stirring constantly during the last part of the cooking. When nearly done, add

1/4 cup melted butter
1/8 tsp baking soda

     Pour into a buttered pan. As the candy cools around the sides, fold towards the center. When it is cool enough to handle, butter your hands and pull it, using your fingertips and thumbs, until it is porous and light-colored. Shape into a rope and cut in small pieces with scissors or a sharp knife. Put on waxed paper to harden. Wrap hardened candies in pieces of waxed paper. Makes about 1 pound.

Optional flavoring: Add to the cooked candy a few drops of oil of peppermint or wintergreen, 1/2 tsp. vanilla or lemon extract, or 1/4 tsp. powdered cloves or cinnamon.

I found a recipe in my old Fanny Farmer cookbook that sounds just like the one's Mum used to make.
Peppermint Patties

Put in a saucepan: 1 1/2 c. sugar and 1/2 c. boiling water
Stir until the sugar dissolves. Boil to 256 degrees (very firm ball stage), then add 6 drops oil of peppermint (or wintergreen...which we used to call "checkerberry"). Beat until creamy. Tint delicately with food coloring, if desired.
Drop from the tip of a teaspoon onto waxed paper. Reheat the syrup from time to time if it becomes too thick.
     What wonderful memories that Mary and I share about this cooking activity. Sadly, both of our mothers are gone now but we have those fond memories of Fun Fairs from our childhood to reminisce about. And we also have wonderful memories of our moms who must have had better things to do…but let us make messes in their kitchens anyway!
We were lucky girls.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE

Quiz: Flowers that bloom in the spring
1. onion a. Tulipa
2. glory of the snow b. Eranthis
3. lily of the valley c. Ornithogatum
4. tulip d. Camassia
5. winter aconite e. Galanthus
6. daffodil f. Chionodoxa
7. Star of Bethlehem g. Scilla
8. wild hyacinth h. Allium
9. Siberian squill i. Narcissus
10. snowdrop j. Convallaria

How Do Eyes Work?
     Have you ever stopped to ponder the miracle of sight? What has to happen in our body so that we can “see”? In school we all learned that the outer liquid portion of the eye is called the cornea. The colored portion is called the iris and in the middle is the lens, which we call the pupil. Light passes through the cornea and is focused by the lens to project an image on the retina. We also learned that in the retina are formations called the rods, which perceive light intensity, and cones, which distinguish colors. The cones take a higher intensity of light in order to function. In fact, even on a bright moonlit night we only see black and white because there isn’t enough light for the cones to work. The question which remained unanswered in the school explanation of sight is how is the light energy entering our eye is transformed into images in our brain.
     The rods and cones of our eyes are each composed of stacks of small chambers piled on top of one another. You can think of them as little rooms with doors. Liquid containing sodium ions flows in and out of them. When light strikes these little rooms, a chemical called rhodopsin, or visual purple, changes its shape and

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the two major parts of the molecule split. The shape change takes place in the part of the molecule related to Vitamin A. Our mothers weren’t far from wrong when they said “Eat your carrots; they are good for your eyes,” because Vitamin A is necessary for good sight. The shape change and split sends out a signal that through a series of chemical reactions closes the doors to the rooms. This closure interrupts the chemical balance and sends an electrical message through the optic nerve to the brain, where it is perceived as sight. In bright light, the rhodopsin is depleted and regenerated quickly. In dim light the rate is much slower. This is why we experience discomfort when we go from darkness to bright light. It takes the eyes a while to adjust. In the mean time we deplete all the rhodopsin in the eye. The rhodopsin has to be rebuilt before it can be used again. Part of this conversion takes place in the liver. The constant flow of light rays eventually damages these chambers or rooms and they are discarded. A typical rod or cone loses around 200 of these chambers each day and constantly rebuilds more. There are four similar compounds called rhodopsin. We have the one for black and white and one for each of the three primary colors. The difference is in the part of the molecule that attaches itself to a chemical related to Vitamin A. When the split takes place, there is a slightly different signal sent out by these four compounds so the brain can interpret them as color.

Answers: 1.h, 2.f, 3.j, 4.a, 5.b, 6.i, 7.c, 8.d, 9.g, 10.e
Score number right: 5 good, 6-8 Excellent, 9-10 Expert

AROUND & ABOUT IN PISCATAQUIS COUNTY
BY SYLVIA BLACK
     Co-operation is the word on my mind this week. Communities thrive on people communicating with and helping one another. We have a very interesting example of that happening in Piscataquis County right now. Eleven towns and the County commissioners have joined together into a group called the Piscataquis Properties Corporation. Their first meeting was held on March 27, 2002. Their goal is to ‘create or rehabilitate high quality space that will help generate jobs across the County’. More specifically, they will build a speculative building in three areas of the county and utilize it as an economic development tool to entice new business and thus bring in more jobs. These types of buildings are open shells that will allow the incoming business to customize their usage of it.
     The beginnings of this project started in 2001 when a building committee was organized by the Piscataquis County Economic Development Council to study the importance of available buildings for economic growth. They learned two significant facts: (1) Having existing building space gives a region an edge when attracting a business or helping a local business expand. And (2) our county ‘had a significant lack of available building space’ of 5,000 square feet and up.
     They also found that spec buildings are popular with expanding businesses.
The decision was made to build three buildings – one in the Greenville area, one in the Milo/Brownville area and one in the Dover-Foxcroft/Guilford area. Because of the high cost of construction, only one building can be built at a time, so a criterion was established to decide where to start. The committee asked three questions: Is there an available tenant waiting? Has there been recent sudden/severe economic dislocation? Is there developed land available for donation?
     Building one will be constructed in the Greenville area because there is an available tenant and a spot on which to put the building.
Building two will be constructed in the Milo/Brownville area because the loss of jobs in this area is the most acute. The town boards of selectmen are beginning the process of finding a site for this building.
     Building three will be located in the Business Park in Dover-Foxcroft.
     None of this could be accomplished without many communities working together. We are so much more powerful when we pool our resources. The whole team spirit of “Many hands make light work” comes into play here and the benefits can be enormous to all of us who live and work in or near our hometowns.
     If you are interested in more details about the spec buildings, contact the PCEDC Executive Director, Mark Scarano at 1-800-539-0332 or email him at mscarano@emdc.org.


BAKED BEAN SUPPER
PARK STREET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2002
5 TO 6:30 PM

BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, ROLL, COLE SLAW, HOMEMADE PIES

PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE FOLDING TABLES FOR THE NEWLY REMODLED DINING ROOM.

ADULTS : $5.00
CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER : $2.50
FAMILY RATE: $12.00
MAKE PLANS NOW TO ATTEND!

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HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
     The Bangor & Aroostook and Derby go hand in hand for anyone who spent their childhood “across the tracks.” Special memories for me include; sliding on the park, skating on “Lake Edith” and being envious of the older kids who used a long scarf to “whip” other skaters around, going to Hackett’s store, getting a drink of ice cold water at the wellhouse, and especially being at the playground in the summer time. The teeter-totters, swings, the “rope”, merry-go-round, and monkey bars were kept in top shape, thanks to the workers at the “shops.” Ed Hackett was “in charge” and kept us busy. One of the highlights was playing ball at the ball diamond, located at the very end of First Street.
     The following story was first printed by the Bangor Daily Commercial on November 18, 1905 and was reprinted by Joanne Brigham in the Town Crier in 1972. This is the third installment.
     The conditions of the country hereabout also served to help the officials of the road in their selection of a place for the new shops. On the left of the main tracks and slightly to the southwest is a broad stretch so generally level and smooth that practically no grading work was necessary. On the other side is a slight eminence from the top of which one can overlook the surrounding country for miles around. This knoll is not steep enough to make climbing difficult and yet it has a sufficient elevation to assure the most healthful conditions. At this point the Bangor & Aroostook owns 80 acres of land, about 25 of which are now being built over with new houses while on the flats just below are 50 acres and the shops now in the process of construction cover seven and one-half acres.
     The new village which is being made by the erection of the residences and other buildings for the use of the employees will be a well arranged settlement. It is plotted out into squares similar to some of the larger cities in this country. Parallel with the railroad track and about 400 feet from the track is the first street and it is called First Street. Just beyond will be Second Street. At right angles to these two highways and extending from the railroad track well over toward Pleasant River (Sebec River) which winds through about 80 acres of the company’s land are A Street, B Street and Main Street is given the name of Main for the reason that it strikes the railroad nearest to the depot building.
     Up-to-date coal pockets will be established at some other point on the company’s land. In this manner the common will not be defaced by the rather ugly

looking coal sheds. The water tank which stands near will, however, not be moved.
     The principal house in the village will be the residence of the superintendent of the works. This will be the finest, largest and most thoroughly modern of all the structures. It will be built on the northern corner of Main and First streets, facing toward the south and the west. It will contain 14 rooms all of good size and very conveniently arranged.
     On the northerly side of First Street and between Main and A streets are nine, nine room houses, now nearly completed. Back of these and the superintendent’s house on Second Street are ten more houses of the same size as the nine previously mentioned. These houses are now in the hands of the inside finishers and will soon be ready for occupancy. Between Main and B streets are five more houses of the same size in various stages of construction. This makes a total of 29 nine-room houses. On the north side of Second Street, between A and B streets are thirteen six room residences. These are for those who desire cheaper rents and not so large quarters as would be used in the nine room dwellings.
     No Outsiders Allowed: The Bangor & Aroostook company will allow absolutely no business whatever to be transacted on the 80 acres of land which they control by the general public. All stores must be across the railroad tracks on the road which swings from the Junction toward Milo. The stores will however, be located near enough so that the in habitants of the village may do their shopping with no inconvenience. The village proper, will, however be kept free from the intrusion of all kinds of mercantile establishments. The merchants of Milo are anticipating the grand opening of business with interest and already several of the most enterprising have built little stores on the extension where they are now doing business with the army of mechanics.
     As 25 of the 80 acres of the company’s tract is used for building purposes there will be 35 acres left clear of buildings. In summer this is a very pretty place and this 35 acres will largely be used as a common playground for the children of the employees. In the winter the casino, the school, and the church will help break up the monotony of the long cold season.

(The forth and final installment will be in the next edition.)

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THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

APRIL 3 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     Today’s meeting began with seventeen members present. The Three Key Club members visiting us today were treasurer Lindsay Hamlin, Kate Hamlin, and “birthday girl” Megan Russell.
     On March 29th an interclub visited Dexter and heard about the State Police Bomb Squad. An interclub has also been planned to go to the next Key Club meeting with the intention of getting our bell back. The Key Club will be traveling to the spring convention on Friday the 5th and return home on Sunday. They have a "lock-in" planned for May 11. There will be more details in the future.
     The Newspaper is in need of a printer. A presentation or plea will be made at the next Kiwanis board meeting.
     The Treworgys’ have completed an application to the King Foundation seeking a grant for the Town Hall Arts Center project. We should hear something by the end of the month. Work is coming along nicely on the “curtain hanging” project.
     Anybody feel like singing? The Variety Show is coming right up and chorus singers are needed. Contact Ethelyn Treworgy for more information.
     This week ten happy and sad dollars were collected. A couple of them were for the wonderful rain we’ve needed and received.
     This week’s speakers were Tom Lizotte and Merlene Sanborn. We heard about the Penquis Leadership Institute. This organization was formed to promote community development by strengthening local leadership skills. Local problems require local solutions so therefore local leaders are a must. This program promotes leadership skills and networking opportunities for rural communities in this region. The program is a nine- month program, usually meeting one day a month at various locations in the county. The institute promotes goals as a team, service organizations in the area, local government issues, small business, health care issues, tourism, manufacturing, and effective presentation skills. Participants in this program will emerge with an understanding of their own strengths, skills, and knowledge of the people and systems that make our region work. If you have an interest in learning more leadership skills, this would be a great place to start. The Penquis Training and Education Center is located at 50 North Street in Dover-Foxcroft.

Where some well-known expressions come from...
SUBMITTED BY JANET RICHARDS
     In George Washington's days, there were no cameras. One's image was either sculpted or painted. Some paintings of George Washington showed him standing behind a desk with one arm behind his back while others showed both legs and both arms. Prices charged by painters were not based on how many people were to be painted, but by how many limbs were to be painted. Arms and legs are "limbs" therefore painting them would cost the buyer more. Hence the expression "Okay, but it'll cost you an arm and a leg”.


     In the late 1700's many houses consisted of a large room with only one chair. Commonly, a long wide board was folded down from the wall and used for dining. The "head of the household" always sat in the chair while everyone else ate sitting on the floor. Once in a while an invited guest would be offered to sit in this chair during a meal whom was almost always a man. To sit-in the chair meant you were important and in charge. Sitting in the chair, one was called the "chair man." Today in business we use the expression/title "Chairman”.


     In Colonial times, personal hygiene left much room for improvement. As a result, many women and men had developed acne scars by adulthood. The women would spread bee's wax over their facial skin to smooth out their complexions. When they were speaking to each other, if a woman began to stare at another woman's face she was told "mind your own bee's wax." Should the woman smile, the wax would crack, hence the term "crack a smile." Also, when they sat too close to the fire, the wax would melt and therefore the expression "losing face”.


     In Colonial times, ladies wore corsets, which would lace up in the front. A proper and dignified lady wore a tightly laced corset, resulting in the expression "straight laced".


     Common entertainment included playing cards. However, there was a tax levied when purchasing playing cards but only applicable to the "ace of spades." To avoid paying the tax, people would purchase 51 cards instead. Yet, since most games require 52 cards, these people were thought to be stupid or dumb because they weren't playing with a full deck”.
     Early politicians required feedback from the public to determine what was considered important to the people. Since there were no telephones, TV's or radios, the politicians sent their assistants to local taverns, pubs and bars who were told to "go sip some ale" and listen to people's conversations and political concerns. Many assistants were dispatched at different times. "You go sip here" and "You go sip there." The two words "go sip" were eventually combined when referring to the local opinion and thus, we have the term "gossip”.
     At local taverns, pubs and bars, people drank from pint and quart sized containers. A barmaid's job was to keep an eye on the customers and keep the drinks coming. She had to pay close attention and remember who was drinking in "pints" and who was drinking in "quarts." Hence the term "minding your "'P's and Q's”.

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