Three Rivers News, 2002-04-16
TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 23
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!

2002 Brownville History Contest Results
BY BILL SAWTELL
     Brownville--The Brownville Elementary School's spring tradition, the Brownville History Contest, ended with judging on April 8. This year's theme was "Business and Industry."
     Mrs. Weston's Grade Five presented a group project: a color calendar of Brownville buildings.
     Mrs. Wallace's Grade Four had the following winners:First Place--Brooke Snide (YMCA); Second Place--Jeremy Russell (Herrick Hotel); Third Place--Corey Herbest and Jesse McLaughlin Combined (CP and B and A); Honorable Mention--Cody Wentworth (B and B Bridge).
     Mrs. Page's Third Grade: First Place--Jerell Arefein (Bishop Concrete); Second Place--Shelby Hall (Herrick Hotel); Third Place--Miranda Conklin (B.J.'s Market); Honorable Mention--Shelby Weston (Larson's Farm)

The Three Rivers News congratulates Chris Almy, who is running in the Boston Marathon!!!
(Details in next week’s edition.)

Joi Stevens of Joyful Photos offers Senior Pictures
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     Many folks in the Three Rivers area may not realize that a student can have their senior pictures taken here in town. I received this letter from Joi Stevens of 37 Elm Street, Milo, and decided to pass the information along. I can think of no better background for a senior picture than our beautiful area.
     Joi writes: Believe it or not, it is time to start thinking about Senior pictures! If you are not familiar with JOYFUL PHOTOS, my name is Joi Stevens, and I live in Milo. I have been doing senior photos for several years now and always look forward to this time of year. I truly enjoy photographing this age group and bringing their personality alive on film. We normally travel around in the Milo area to get many different backgrounds. I love it when someone has a particular place they would like to have their photos taken! For example, I have used trains in Brownville and trees and rocks in Lakeview. I have several package prices that I have found are very popular-or I can also customize packages to suit your needs. I would love to have the opportunity to discuss this further with you or to set up a date and time to do photos for you. Please ask above specials that are available for summer appointments.
Joi
We wish Joi luck in photographing young folks in this area.

JOE ZAMBONI NAMED MAINE STATE TROOPER OF THE YEAR
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     One of Milo’s finest has been recognized as one of the state’s best. On April 5, 2002, Colonial Mike Sperry notified Joe that the Maine State Police had named him Maine State Trooper of the Year.
     Joe lives in Milo with is wife Mary Jane (Hogan). They will have been married for 30 years in June, and have three children. Their son Zach, who is living in Portland, is involved with filming television commercials and making independent films. Their daughter Maggie graduated from The University of Maine at Orono and is attending The University of New England Medical School in Biddeford. She is well on her way to becoming a fine physician. Their youngest child Joe is attending the University of Maine in Orono, majoring in anthropology.
     Joe graduated from P.V.H.S. in 1970, then attended the University of Maine at Farmington. While attending college, he enlisted in the Navy Reserves unit and trained as a pilot. While in the Reserves, he flew P-3 Orions. After graduation from college, he joined the Navy as a Lieutenant Commander and flew EC-130 Hercules reconnaissance planes. His missions took him all around the world, including parts of Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Azores.
     Joe joined the Maine State Police in 1982, and has earned the rank of Detective. He has 20 years of service in the State Police.
     Joe is active in the Three Rivers Kiwanis. As a matter of fact, while I was doing the interview for this article, he was helping Edwin Treworgy clean and prepare the floor on the stage of the Town Hall for painting. The Three Rivers Community would like to congratulate Joe for his achievements and thank him for all the great work he does for the area.

How much do you know about domestic violence?
BY TRISH HAYES
1. Domestic violence is:
A. Abusive behavior used by one person in an intimate relationship to control the other.
B. Abusive behavior caused by one person in a family as a result of drugs or alcohol.
C. Abusive behavior caused by one person in a family as a result of stress.
D. All of the above
Stay tuned to next week’s edition to find out the answer.
     Interested community members are invited to attend the Milo-Brownville Neighbors Against Domestic Violence task force meetings the second Tuesday or each month at 5:30 PM at the Pleasant Park Community Building in Milo.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Virgil Valente

“THE OLD TOWN HALL TONIGHT”
SECOND ANNUAL
THREE RIVERS KIWANIS VARIETY SHOW
“A TIME FOR REMINISCING”
FRIDAY, MAY 3 & SATURDAY, MAY 4 AT 7:00 PM
PROCEEDS TO GO TO: MAKE-A-WISH FOUNDATION, PINE TREE HOSPICE FOR CHILDREN, MILO TOWN HALL ARTS CENTER

Move & Improve
BY SUE CHAFFEE
     Can you believe that at the end of next week we will have reached the halfway mark of the Move & Improve Program?
     I hope that all of you are "moving & improving" at least 30 min. four times a week and that you are faithfully keeping your log. We have had a wonderful incentive offer from Edie Miles. If you keep your log and turn it in to me at the end of the 12 weeks there will be a local drawing for a kayak trip sponsored by the Moosehead Adventures Company. Edie could take as many as six for a kayak adventure right here in the area. We would probably draw three names before the logs are sent to EMMC and each winner could bring a guest. Sounds like fun! If you would like more information check the web site: http://www.kynd.com/~kayak/kayak.html
     There has also been a suggestion that after school break it might be fun to plan a "community" move & improve time where those interested could do group activity of some sort: A walk, volleyball challenge? Any other ideas as to how we could celebrate reaching the halfway mark? Keep up the good work! You may establish some good habits that will last a lifetime.

NEWS FROM MILO P.D.
BY TODD LYFORD
Chase Ends in Arrests
     On Friday, April 5, 2002, Officer Michael Harris, of the Milo Police Department, became involved in a high-speed chase that started on Elm St. in Milo. Officer Harris attempted to stop a vehicle on Elm St. and when the vehicle would not stop Officer Harris pursued the vehicle. The vehicle continued to Lagrange, onto the Medford Rd and then onto the Tower Rd. The vehicle stopped when it got stuck trying to go on a snowmobile trail.

     Both occupants of the vehicle ran into the woods. Trooper Gene Sutton, of the Maine State Police, and his K-9 were called in to assist. The driver of the vehicle, a 16-yr. old juvenile, was taken into custody. The passenger and owner of the vehicle, Eric Grover, 22, of Lagrange came out of the woods on his own. The juvenile was arrested for Eluding a Police Officer, Driving to Endanger, Operating without a License, Speeding 30 +. Mr. Grover was charged with allowing Unlawful Operation and Illegal Attachment of Registration Plates. Mr. Grover was wanted on a warrant from the Maine District Court in Lincoln for Marijuana Cultivation. The juvenile was taken to the Mountain View Youth Center in Charleston and Mr. Grover was taken to Piscataquis County Jail.
New Reserve Police Officer Hired
     On 04/02/2002 the Milo Board of Selectman appointed Dennis Dorsey as Reserve Police Officer. Dennis is a Milo resident who currently is working full time in the computer field. Dennis is also a part-time Deputy Sheriff with the Washington County Sheriff’s Dept. He teaches S.C.U.B.A. diving as well.
Ambulance Service now Hiring
     The Three Rivers Ambulance Service is currently taking applications. Anyone interested in being on the service should call for an application. The phone number is 943-2950. If you leave a message a representative will contact you.
Emergency Number Phone Stickers Available
     The Milo Police and Fire Departments now have Emergency phone number stickers for your home. These orange stickers adhere to your phone so you may refer to them in case of an emergency. These stickers are available at the Milo Town Office during regular business hours.

BAKED BEAN SUPPER
PARK STREET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2002
5 TO 6:30 PM

BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, ROLL, COLE SLAW, HOMEMADE PIES

PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE FOLDING TABLES FOR THE NEWLY REMODLED DINING ROOM.

ADULTS : $5.00
CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER : $2.50
FAMILY RATE: $12.00
MAKE PLANS NOW TO ATTEND!

Penquis Men’s League standings through Thursday, April 11, 2002

TEAM W L
Team #7 (yellow) 8 1
Team #4 (white) 8 1
Team #8 (orange) 5 3
Team #3 (gray) 4 5
Team #6 (green) 4 3
Team #1 (blue) 4 5
Team #5 (black) 2 6
Team #2 (red) 0 9
Teams 5 and 6 will play a makeup game as soon as a date is available to use the gym. The schedule for the next two weeks:

The schedule for the next two weeks is:

TUES., APR. 16
6:30-8PM 2 VS 4
8-9:30PM 1 VS 5
THURS., APR. 18
6:30-8PM 3 VS 8
8-9:30PM 6 VS 7
SUN., APR. 21
3:30-5PM 1 VS 4
5-6:30PM 2 VS 3
6:30-8PM 6 VS 8
8-9:30PM 5 VS 7
TUES., APR. 23
6:30-8PM 3 VS 7
8-9:30PM 1 VS 2
THURS., APR. 25
6:30-8PM 4 VS 6
8-9:30PM 5 VS 8

SUN., APR. 28
3:30-5PM 1 VS 3
5-6:30PM 2 VS 8
6:30-8PM 4 VS 7
8-9:30PM 5 VS 6

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INDIVIDUAL SCORING (pg=Points per game)

TEAM 1
Justin Allen 200 pts 22.2 pg
Dustin Perkins 98pts 10.9 pg
Steven Kissell 119pts13.2 pg
Chris Madden 99pts 11pg
Brandon McKenzie 87pts9.7pg
Mike Grindle 55pts 6.1pg
Adam Russell 12pts 1.3 pg
Luke Landry 31 pts 3.4 pg
Justin Morril 16pts 1.8 pg
TEAM 2
Jordan Allen 151pts 16.8pg
Devin Perkins 140pts 15.6pg
Andrew Smart 119pts 13.2pg
Gerard Turgeon 34pts 3.7pg
Nick Young 18pts 2pg
Drew Hamlin 29pts 3.2pg
Ryan Andrews 29pts 2.9pg
Terry Joyce 26pts 2.9pg
Shane Herbest 11pts 1.2pg
Eli Ladd 7pts .8pg
TEAM 3
Tony Heal 233pts 25.9pg
Derek Perkins 146pts 16.1pg
Mike Hunter 58pts 6.4pg
Lance Gerrish 69pts 7.7pg
Toby Richards 40pts 4.4pg
Mike Harris 65pts 7.2pg
Jordan Bailey 11pts 1.2pg
Ryan Larrabee 68pts 7.6pg
Billy Mann 2pt .2pg
TEAM 4
David Carey 212pts 23.6pg
Dave Chase 141pts 15.7pg
Billy Mayo 91pts 10.1pg
Colby Chase 90pts 10.pg
Ricky Rublee 112pts 12.4pg
Scott Lee 9pts 1pg
Mike Osgood 6pts .7pg
Lyle McDonald 37pts 4.1pg
TEAM 5(one game to make up)
Ernie Madden 52pts 6.5pg
Tony Hamlin 28pts 3.5pg
Peter Hamlin 70pts 8.8pg
Jason Mills 104pts 13pg
Jenson Bissell 7pts .9pg
Brent Bailey 60pts 7.5pg
Mike Moholland 94pts 11.8pg
Bill Joyce 0pts 0pg
Jeff Gahagen 11pts 1.4pg
TEAM 6(one game to makeup)
Anders Hamlin 100pts 12.5pg
Kendall Royal 26pts 3.3pg
Shane Fowles 87pts 10.9pg
Alex Zwicker 30pts 3.8pg
Chucky Stevens 54pts 6.8pg
Scott Larson 130pts 16.3pg
Chad Washburn 111pts 13.9pg
Eli Zwicker 37pts 4.6pg
Chris Rhoda 2pts .2pg
Tom Pender 12pts 1.5pg
TEAM 7
Matt Heal 75pts 8.3pg
BrandonMcCarthy233pts26pg
Mike Weston 121pts 13.4pg
Ben Knapp 44pts 4.9pg
Travis Ellis 93pts 10.3 pg
Stephen Gillis 112pts 12.4pg
Ben Faulkingham 14pts 1.6pg
Chet Gillis 84pts 9.3pg
Matt Foster 52pts 5.8pg

TEAM 8
Brian Heal Jr. 107pts 11.9pg
Brian Heal Sr. 73pts 8.1pg
Jason Heal 74pts 8.2pg
Guy Heal 89pts 9.9pg
Poopie Conlogue 89pts 9.9pg
Paul Conlogue 63pts 7pg
Dickie Pelleitier 46pts 5.1pg
Jeryme Smith 17pts 1.9pg

Playoffs will start on May 2 and go through May 12. Championship game will be Sunday, May 12 with single elimination playoff and position determined by league records.
Good luck to all participants, and have fun!!!


MAINELY SENIORS
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
MEALS FOR ME NEWS

     I am pleased to report that everything is back to normal at the Meals for Me C.D. Center kitchen. The County Commissioners have replaced what needed to be, and everything is running smooth. We are so sorry for any inconvenience our patrons experienced.
     I want to thank Jane Jones, Murrel Harris and the rest of the staff at the town hall for putting up with us for the week we were there. We are so lucky to live in a town that is so willing to help others.

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED., APRIL 17 CHICKEN CASSEROLE, PEAS, CUCUMBER AND ONION SALAD, OATMEAL COOKIE
THURS., APRIL 18 FISHBURGER DELUXE, ROSEMARY POTATOES, 3-BEAN SALAD, RASPBERRY YOGURT SQUARE
FRI., APRIL 19 SALIBURY STEAK W/GRAVY, MASHED POTATO, MIXED VEGGIES, CAKE W/FROSTING
MON., APR. 22 BAKED HAM W/RAISIN SAUCE, SWEET POTATO, GREEN BEANS, SLICED PEACHES
TUES, APR. 23 BAKED STUFFED CHICKEN BREAST, RICE PILAF, ZUCCHINI AND TOMATOES, BANANA PUDDING
WED.,APR. 24

TUNA SALAD ON CROISSANT, POTATO SALAD, GREEN SALAD, PUMPKIN PIE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 PM, AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 PM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

NEWS FROM AREA SCHOOLS
BROWNVILLE ELEMENTARY
BY LYNN WESTON
     The Brownville Elementary School has recently completed one of their most successful Scholastic Book Fairs ever. Over $1,400 was earned thanks to the generous parents, and devoted volunteers at this school. Many thanks go out to the ladies who worked so hard to make it a success. They include Ginger Twitchell, who has become a whiz at setting the fair up and selling books, Rose Clement, who also took more than one turn at selling, Lynn Kearns, Tammy Gilman, Stacey Slagle, and Ginger and Melissa Weston. Ginger and Melissa have become very adept at the intricacies of closing the book fair up. Money must be accounted for, teacher's selections must be picked out and stamped, and the fair has to be put back in the boxes and cases and made ready to be shipped back.
     It's quite a job and Mrs. Witham appreciates all the help. This year a book entitled Lost by Paul Brett Johnson and Celeste Lewis has been placed in the Brownville Elementary School Library in honor of the volunteers. It's about a little girl who loses her dog in an Arizona National Forest and who never gives up hope of finding him. Many thanks to all who made this book fair possible.
BROWNVILLE’S TERRIFIC KIDS
     The week before Spring Vacation is one of the hardest weeks to find kids acting terrific! But, Brownville Elementary School sure had their share of T-Totally Terrific Kids the week of April 8th. They were Micki Lovejoy in Kindergarten, Matthew Vachon in First Grade, Stephanie Vachon in Second Grade, Jerell Arefein in Third Grade, Cody Wentworth in Fourth Grade and Thomas Carpenter in Fifth Grade. Congratulations to all of these fine students.
     Brownville Elementary also honored some wonderful students at last week's assembly. They were: Justice Stone in Kindergarten, Sarah Voisine in First Grade, Priscilla Almodovar in Second Grade, Jesse Witham in Third Grade, Pamela Almodovar in Fourth

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Grade and Sandie Scribner in Fifth Grade. Some of
these students are new to our district and we are so happy to welcome them to the Brownville Elementary School. Good job everyone!!!
NEWS FROM THE MARION C. COOK SCHOOL IN LAGRANGE
Ms. Ivy's Stars
BY ERICA LYFORD AND BRAD CIMPHER
     Tabitha Sneed is this week's Terrific Kid. Ms. Ivy picked Tabitha because she's been bringing back her traveling book bag, being a better listener, getting her journal done, and she's been trying hard to stay in her space.
     The K/1 students have been studying birds and eggs. They also have been enjoying listening to the chapter book called, My Father's Dragon.
News in Mrs. Carter's Class
BY KELSEY OTTMANN
     To finish off the unit on the solar system, the 2nd and 3rd grade students traveled to the Planetarium. They had a marvelous time and learned a tremendous amount. Many of the students purchased souvenirs. Putty, fake eyeballs, a compass, flashing shadow lights, moon bouncy ball, and key chains were popular items. The students displayed their planet projects and put on a play at the Terrific Kid assembly on April 12, 2002.
     The next unit they will be studying is about Egypt. They have already made paintings of King Tut with Mrs. Chapman, the art teacher. They look forward to learning lots of interesting facts.
     The Terrific Kid is Lillis Noke. "Lillis just moved here a few weeks ago and has fit into the routine very well. She has made a lot of friends and is kind and respectful to everyone," says Mrs. Carter. Congratulations, Lillis!
Miss K's Kids
     The fourth and fifth grade students are completing their unit, "Change Over Time." Projects have been assigned and are due May 8th.The students have been given a challenge. They have been hired by a movie studio that is making a science fiction film, which is set 1 million years in the future. Their mission is to select an organism (or a community of organisms). They will redesign the organism to show how it might change in the next million years. They will use the information that they have collected through explorations and research to create a project.
     Mr. Tom Witham shared his collection of Civil War memorabilia with the class. Lots of questions were asked and Mr. Witham patiently answered all of them. Our Terrific Kid was Kris Foss. Kris works hard every day. He completes all assignments, asks lots of questions and makes super comments. He is a wonderful 5th grade role model.

MILO ELEMENTARY’S TERRIFIC KIDS
FROM THE CLASSROOM OF:
Mrs. Barden's Terrific Kid is Tiffany Lyford. She loves books and shows it everyday in her reading. She is a good helper and a good friend to everyone in the class. She is a joy to have in our class.
Mrs. Chessa- The Terrific Kid in Mrs. Chessa's room has just recently joined us. After three days here he volunteered to take a speaking part in our
play. He is an eager reader and an all around terrific kid. His name is Levi Bubier.
Mrs. Dell'olio- Terrific Kids this week are Ashley Renner and Philip Larrabee. They have both had a great week, have been very cooperative, and have been
examples of good behavior for their classmates.
Mrs. Dunham- Bobby Dugans is our Terrific Kid. Bobby has worked very hard to follow the school rules. He is kind and helpful to others. Bobby volunteered for two parts in our spring program. He did both beautifully.
We are all proud of him!
Mrs. Hayes- We have two Terrific Kids this week. Their classmates chose both. Tristen Beckett was chosen for the Kindergarten class. Tristen’s friends say that he is really nice. He lost two teeth this week. He does great journals and nice neat work. He loves the children in our class and we love him. Hannah Guthrie was chosen for the first grade students. Kendra reports that Hannah is nice and uses kind words. David says that she respects everyone. Cody feels that Hannah shares and has good manners. Courtney tells us that Hannah does great journals and she is beautiful. Dylan thinks she plays nicely with her friends. Chad likes Hannah because she minds her own business. Everyone says, “We love having her in our class”
Mrs.Hudak- Our Terrific Kid is Andrea Hamilton. Andrea comes to school very happy and motivated. Her stories are super and her illustrations are awesome. Andrea is becoming an excellent reader. She is friendly and kind. We're glad you are in our room.
Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey- Miranda Andrick has been a wonderful helper and a hard worker, we are proud of her. Tony Jay is an honest person, he found money and returned it to the owner. Tony always tries his best, we are proud of you!
Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Carey- Jade is a gentle little girl who is always kind andhelpful to her friends. She USED to have a tiny little voice but now she uses her BIG voice and reads in front of the whole class. She is a book lover! And we love Jade.
Kendra is a sweet little classmate who is truly terrific! She loves to write in her journal and we won't be surprised if she grows up to be a famous author and illustrator of children's books. Maybe she'll comeback to Milo Elementary School someday and visit us! We love Kendra, too!
Mrs. Whitney’s grade 5 The Terrific Kids for April 12 are 2 A's so I couldn't choose----Ashlee Dean and Angel Hulsey. They both are special and shine every day so they get to be special together. I'd give them both A's anyway! Congratulations girls!

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KITTY’S KORNER
Milo Public Library News:
     Jeanne Treworgy Hamlin has given a “Special Collection” of theater arts books to the library. This collection is a great resource for those involved in performances to be held at the Town Hall Arts Center. The books will be kept in our Reference Room. Hopefully, we will have a special shelf for them at a future date. A collection of one-act plays will supplement the collection; previously donated from the late Clarice Munson's estate, by her late husband.
Acting Games / Marsh Cassady
Acting is Believing / Charles McGaw
Actor's Book of Improvisations / Sandra Caruso
Best Women's Stage Monologues of 1993 / Jocelyn A. Beard, ed.
Children's Plays for Creative Actors / Claire Borko
Christmas Plays for Favorite Young People / Sylvia E. Kamerman
101 Costumes of All Ages, All Occasions / Richard Cummings
Dramatists Sourcebook / Gillian Richards, ed.
Elegantly Frugal Costumes / Shirley Dearing
Finding Funding / Ernest W. Brewer
First Plays for Children / Helen Louise Miller
Get in the Act! / Shirley Ullom
50 Great Monologs for Student Actors / Bill Majesky
Here's How, A Basic Stagecraft Book / Herbert V. Hake
How to Overhall & Upgrade Your High School Theater / J.E. Ellery
Humorous Plays for Teenagers / Christina Hamlett
Improvisations for the Theater / Viola Spolin
Instant Acting / Jeremy Whelan
Mel white's Readers Theater Anthology / Mel White
Mystery Plays for Young Actors / John Murray
On Stage / Robert Mauro
On Time, On Budget / Sunny Baker
Play Director's Survival Kit / James W. Rogers
Play It Again / Norman A. Bert
Plays of Great Achievers / Sylvia E. Kamerman
Presenting Performances / Thomas Wolf
Sanford Messner Approach / Larry Silverberg
Small Stage Sets on Tour / James Hull Miller
Self-Supporting Scenery / James Hull Miller
Simple Makeup for Young Actors / Richard Cummings
Stage Lighting Revealed / Glen Cunningham
Stage Plays from the Classics / Joellen Bland
Staging Musical Theatre / Elaine A. Novak
Stock Scenery Construction Handbook / Bill Raoul
Theater Art in Action / publisher
Theater Games for Rehearsal / Viola Spolin
Theater Games for Young Performers / Maria C. Novelly
Theater Props Handbook / Thurston James
What, Where, When of Theater Props / Thurston James
Winning Monologues for Young Actors / Peg Kehret
Plus... 33 magazines of plays.

Kiwanis Auction News
BY CHRIS BERES
     Three Rivers Kiwanis Auction. June27 and 28 at the Milo Farmer's Union Parking Lot Three Rivers Kiwanis of Milo-Brownville is getting ready for their annual auction. The auction is the major fundraiser for the club. Proceeds from the auction are used to fund the many service projects the club supports
throughout the year.
     This past year the club has taken on one very large project. They have donated funds and lots of sweat equity in the renovation of the Wingler Auditorium at the Milo Town Hall. Cleaning, organizing, painting, etc. have been done by community volunteers. New curtains, lights and sound system have been purchased to provide a

community arts center. The grand debut of the improved facility is planned for April 26 and 27 with the Penquis Valley Senior Play. Following that event, the Kiwanis will present "The Old Town Hall Tonight", the second annual Kiwanis Variety Show. This will be on May 3rd and 4th.
     Kiwanis sponsors Reading Is Fundamental. This program provides free books three times a year for preschool and Kindergarten children in the area. Next year Milo PTO will become partners in this project to expand the program to include all K-5 students. The PTOs in the Brownville School and the Marion C. Cook School have provided this program in those schools for several years. Each child ends the year with three brand new books that they have selected.
     This past year the Kiwanis sponsored a Veteran's Day Dinner honoring the area veterans. Kiwanis and Key Club members prepared and served a delicious turkey dinner to 80 veterans and guests. Some 5th grade students presented the entertainment from Milo Elementary as did a group of staff members from the school.      During the month of December the club provided for about 125 children through the Secret Santa program. They also supported a visit with Santa for children in the community.
     Another large project that the club has taken on this year is the Community Newspaper. With the close of the Town Crier, our community was left with no local paper. The Kiwanis club was doing a club newsletter and people in the community were interested in more community news. So, Three Rivers Kiwanis stepped in and has since November, printed the weekly
community newsletter.
     Contributions have also been made to the area Key Club, Terrific Kids, Piscataquis Soil Conservation program, the TRC Web Pages, Outing Club, fishing derby, American Cancer society, Pine Tree Hospice for children, Make a Wish Foundation, school playgrounds and graduations books awards for Penquis Valley Key Club members.
     Now that you know what Kiwanis does in our communities, we are asking for your help in making our auction a success. We can use new and used items that turn up while you are spring cleaning, renovating, or whatever. We could use donated goods and services from local businesses. If you are a crafter that would be willing to make a donation to the auction, we would be happy to accept your donation.
     If you have items that you need picked up for the auction, please call Eben Dewitt (943-2486) or Herb Dunham (943-2353). If you are a local business who wishes to make a donation, please contact Lorraine Schinck(943-2145). Local crafters who wish to make a donation, please contact Chris Beres (943-2895).

AROUND AND ABOUT IN PISCATAQUIS COUNTY
BY SYLVIA BLACK
     Last Friday I attended the Terrific Kids assembly at one of our local elementary schools. I always enjoy this little ‘job’ as the Kiwanian who hands out the award certificates to the children chosen as Terrific Kid of the week. The children come to the front of the auditorium as their names are called. Always there is a little essay or perhaps a poem about what makes that child terrific. I

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hand the certificate to the child and congratulate them. Some of them make a point of shaking my hand. When they have all come to the front, they stand there facing the audience and a song is sung to them. I think it goes like this: “Hey, look at me. Can’t you see I’m terrific? I am someone you’d like to know. I may be a kid but you know I’m terrific. Just be proud of me as I grow”. The positive encouragement given to the children can, hopefully, be a good self-esteem builder and I am sure that it helps the teachers and staff at the school focus on the positive. I would think that positive focus is an invaluable asset to the atmosphere of the total school.
     My next volunteer duty, as a member of the PCEDC (Piscataquis County Economic Development Council) board, was to spend an hour at our booth. The booth was set up at the annual county Expo. I was able to talk to people about the Penquis Leadership Institute (I shared about it in mid-March in this column) and got to visit other displays. The Historical Societies had their own room, which they shared with the ‘Middle Ground’ display. There was music and lots of sharing and laughter.
     The next day, I was at The Maine Highlands Guild display. Our booth was giving away free homemade fudge and peanut brittle and tastes of delicious jams and pickles all made by members of the Guild. We displayed woodcarvings, paintings, photography, ceramics, therapy packs, maple syrup, cross-stitching and several more types of high quality goods all produced by local talent. The purpose of the guild is to promote area products locally and nationally and to help the artist and artisan build their business to the degree that they are comfortable. If they need help with any aspect of bringing their product to market, the Guild is there to offer advice, give info and market the product, when ready.
There was also a new group called the ‘Heart of Maine Gallery & Café’. They will be opening this spring in the historic Peter’s Pharmacy Building located in downtown Dover-Foxcroft. To quote from their information: “The Gallery is being created on the premise that beauty and art attract. Our desire is to create a catalyst for regional development, downtown revitalization, as well as small business growth.” Quality works will be displayed, coffees and pastries will be served, seminars will be held and shipping services will be made available. There will also be an information center in the building.
     My impression was that the Expo was a big success and I thoroughly enjoyed my time served this past week as a volunteer.


Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     The last couple of weeks I've walked down nostalgia's path recalling a time and a place in Milo's history that, although totally unfamiliar to some of you, is totally familiar to lots of you. As we stuffed and addressed envelopes for the annual Milo High School alumni letter last week, I realized just how many people who share memories with me actually do live here in Milo. There's a whole big bunch of us! We can all remember when there were stores to shop in right here in town. You absolutely didn't have to leave town to do your shopping. You could shop for school clothes right on Main Street, get your prescription drugs and toiletries right downtown. and you had a choice of which store you
wanted to do business in, for that matter. There was a jewelry store, a couple of hardware stores, four grocery stores, a furniture and gift shop, a small department store, and a couple of choices of places to eat, all in downtown Milo! Amazing! Milo boasted many choices of doctors and dentists and lawyers and barbers and photographers. There was a movie theater, a place to bowl (YIKES! I've only heard about that place!) There were oil companies and dairies and new car dealerships. There were hotels, a hospital and a railroad station, you could catch a train to anywhere in the world, right here in good old Milo, Maine. My dad caught a train from the station in Milo that took him half way around the world during WWII, and then blessedly returned him four years later to that same station.
     So what happened? Where did all the businesses go? Did the death of our Main Street result because we don't shop anymore? I think not. I think you'll find that statistically we purchase more now, and consume it quicker than any other time in history. We just don't mind driving to Bangor to do it. You'd think we would, wouldn't you? More of us work all day at jobs that keep us away from our homes, leaving only the evening hours and the weekends to do all that extra traveling to buy our stuff. Getting in the car and driving to Bangor isn't a treat anymore. Many, many of our citizens work there every day of the week, for heaven's sake! What's another 40 or 45 minutes traveling time added to our already incredibly busy days. As a matter of fact, we justify the time away traveling as good "reflective time." We get a chance to relax and "collect" ourselves while we're mindlessly listening to the radio and making the trek. "I suppose," she sighed plaintively.
     My friend Cheryl (who moved away years ago and then moved back recently) once told me that when she moved to the Bangor area that it took her the whole morning to buy her son a little package of stars. (You know the kind of stars I mean come in a package and if you were lucky you had them stuck on your papers that came home from school.) Evidently her son wanted or needed some for a project and it ended up taking her the whole morning to get into town, find a store that sold stars and then get back home again. She said, "In Milo we could just walk down to the 5 & 10, get the stars and be home again in just a few minutes." Imagine it!
     That's the beauty of living in a small town. But not the beauty of living in a small town where you can't get the things you need. There is no beauty in not being able to buy children's underwear here in town. How wonderful is it that we have to travel to buy even one skrid of clothing for our family or ourselves. We're very fortunate to have the Rite Aid Pharmacy, you can pick up a few toy and gift items and I do give them credit for carrying things that we want and use, but where are the booths and the stools in front of the soda fountain.
     Did the demise of our beautiful little down town occur when the people in Milo ran out of money? Did it happen when we ran out of time and energy? After all, it's pretty hard to work all day, make all those added trips to towns away from Milo in order to do our shopping, and then tend our children and keep our own homes in order.
     When did we lose pride in what our community looked like? My husband and I took a walk this morning. Of course, I'll admit that early spring is the worst time to expect things to look spiffy. Our sidewalks are
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horrendous. Some of those buildings on Main Street look terrible. We have the unique honor of having a Main Street that has, for the most part, maintained it's architectural integrity. With vision and some energy we could have a gold mine on our Main Street. Why couldn't it be our little town that people think is quaint? What's wrong with zoning laws and a few rules and regulations about how your property should look and be kept? Why should Milo homeowners have to settle for rock-bottom prices for their homes, when in other places those same houses would sell for top dollar? Do we only want to attract homeowners who can't afford to live anywhere else?
     Is it lack of leadership? Is it lack of interest? Is it lack of capital? We certainly have enough money to pay big utility bills and fairly high tax bills. We have enough money to put gas in our cars and play with our expensive toys. As far as I'm concerned we need to figure out what's holding us back from having a beautiful and productive community, and then do something about it. We need to take some great big risks, become visionaries, spend some money and bring our community back to the lovely level it once was.
Where's the bandwagon? Let's all jump on!
Next week I'll be back to writing recipes!!

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
     The following is the forth and last in a series about the building of Derby. It was first printed by the Bangor Daily Commercial in November 18, 1905 and reprinted by Joanne Brigham in the Town Crier in 1971.
The Building of Derby
     The Big Repair Shops: The principal part of the whole business is the immense repair car shops which will bring the people and keep them supplied with the necessities of life by the employment they will furnish.
     To commence with the building of the shops and general work at the Junction is carried on under the direct supervision of O. Stewart, the superintendent of locomotive power of the Bangor & Aroostook system. That Mr. Stewart is a very busy man is easily imagined.
     Work on the plant was begun May 1 and has since been rushed, the contract calls for the completion of the entire work by Jan. 1, 1906. This means a great rush of work throughout the cold weather, now setting in. The builders are confident, however, that they will be able to complete things to comply with the contract.
     The plant is made up of six buildings besides the big transfer stands and locomotive turn-table. The first thing noticed upon looking things over is an eight-stall roundhouse made in a quarter circle. This is 80 feet in depth. The turn-table is directly in front. Directly in back of this looms up the lofty chimney, just outside the power and machine shops. The building is an irregularly shaped structure, 41 feet long o the southerly end. On the right side it runs down 125 feet and then at right angle makes out 150 feet squaring on the northerly side which will have a frontage on the north side which fronts on the big transfer stand and is 242 feet in width.
     On the left the wall runs down 90 feet and juts out for 50 feet and six inches for the blocking out shop, then extends 137 feet to the northern wall. This is really the most important building on the lot but not as large as the repair and paint shop. At the extreme southerly end of this building is the coal storage section and next to this comes the boiler room.
     In the boiler room are three immense tubular boilers. The engine room comes next in which will be the dynamo for furnishing the electric juice to light the entire plant. The air compressing machinery is also located in the boiler quarters.

     To the west of the power apartment is the blocking out shop. The remainder of the building is to be used as a general machine shop and the locomotive repair department, also the blacksmith section where many smithies will be kept continually busy. The space devoted to these later departments is 242 by 102 feet.
     In a westerly direction from this building is the mill and woodworking shops. This 152 x 52 feet in size and in the same direction and near the later department is the lumber shed, 150 by 60 feet. The transfer shed, 370 feet in length and 75 feet wide, stands north of those buildings. This part of the plant is so arranged that cars may be moved along to enter whatever part of the plant is desired to reach.
     To the north of the transfer shed stands the largest building in the group, the passenger and freight car repair and paint shop. This is in reality two buildings under one roof for the department given up to decoration occupies one whole end of it. A wall will separate the two departments. This building is 322 x 167 feet in size and is the largest in the county of Piscataquis.
     To the east stands the large storehouse and office building. This is 153 x 52 feet in size and the northern portion for the depth of 52 feet will be used for the executive and clerical work of the plant. The remainder will be used as a storehouse for all kinds of railroad supplies. They will be shipped from here to all other points on the system.
     With the exception of the roundhouse all are walled in and the roofs cover the greater part of them. The carpenters have been busy for several weeks past in putting in the windows preparatory to the cold weather. The concrete walls and concrete supports for the rails are in place.
     Judgment has been used in the expenditure but cost has not been spared in the construction. Everything is of the best possible quality. The workmanship is the best that money can secure.
     The plant throughout is unexcelled in arrangement and practical adaptability as well as for solidity of construction. The walls have required over 3,000,000 bricks while the inside finish has used up about 1,000,00 feet of lumber to say nothing of the many and costly steel trusses which support the walls and roofs.
     A particularly noticeable feature of this plant is that plans have been laid for an immense amount of work in the future. When it is fully completed it can handle more work than the whole Bangor & Aroostook system coupled with the new Northern Searsport road can turn over for years to come. It looks as if a future of increased business was surely coming as undoubtedly it is. The Bangor & Aroostook and eastern Maine is just awakening to its true possibilities and the future certainly looks rosy.
     Editor’s note: This article has been a labor of love for me. Derby was a great little village to spend a childhood in, not only for the beauty of it, but because of all the very special people who shared in each other lives.

WATER, ANYONE?
SUBMITTED BY EBEN DEWITT
Did you know?
1. 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated.
2. In 37% of Americans, the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger.
3. Even MILD dehydration will slow down one’s metabolism as much as 3%.
4. One glass of water will shut down midnight hunger pains for almost 100% of the dieters studied in a U-Washington study.
5. Lack of water, the #1 trigger of daytime fatigue.
6. Preliminary research indicates that 8 – 10 glasses of water a day could significantly ease back and joint pain for up to 80% of sufferers.

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7. A mere 2% drop in body water can trigger fuzzy short-term memory, trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on the computer screen or on a printed page.
8. Drinking 5 glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon cancer by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast cancer by 79%, and one is 50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.
ARE YOU DRINKING THE AMOUNT OF WATER YOU SHOULD EVERY DAY?

BE PREPARED FOR SKUNKS!
BY NANCY GRANT
     Spring is here, and it’s wise to be ready in case your pets have a run-in with these amusing looking little creatures. Those of us who have had a pet sprayed by skunk scent remember the experience for a LONG time. It’s a good time to be ready with items that neutralize the odor. A product called SKUNK KLEEN works very well, but if you don’t have a bottle on hand, you could use tomato juice. Also, a vinegar and water bath will help take away at least some of the distinct “striped kitty” odor!

KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     Andrew Walker, Brett Gerrish, Chris Merritt and Shawn Burke attended the New England District Key Club convention from April 5th -7th. These members represented our school, clubs and community well!
     Shawn and Brett attended officer training sessions as well as other information sessions with Andrew and Chris. Andrew and Chris were the club’s delegates and attended sessions to listen to candidate’s speeches and vote on district officers for the 2002-2003 year. I participated in two training session for advisors. In addition to the training sessions, I met advisors from all over New England. It was fun to compare notes on our clubs and see that we have a lot in common whether we live in a rural area or an inner city. We all came home with some new information and some good ideas for next year. I’m already looking forward to next year’s convention!!!
     The keynote speaker at Friday night’s opening ceremony was Ed Garety. Part of Mr. Garety’s message was that we should not take our family and friends for granted and he asked the crowd whom they would call if they only had one hour to live. When Chris was called upon to answer he was invited onto the stage and handed a cell phone, which he used to call his mother. Mr. Garety encouraged the Key Clubbers to develop compassion for one another, to take responsibility for one’s actions, and to become well-rounded people. The message was well received by the audience and Mr. Garety received a standing ovation - a pretty clear sign that his message got through!!
     The Key Club is busy planning its Lock-In scheduled for May 11th. Area clubs are looking forward to joining us and we’re hoping to have a big crowd. All profits will be donated to the Make-A-Wish foundation to help grant the wish of a child. Remember, Kiwanians, you’re welcome to join us! You can pay half price to join us for dinner and entertainment, or full price to spend the night. If you just want to help us raise money for this worthwhile cause you’re welcome to pay full price NOT to join us. You can stay in the comfort of your own home but feel satisfied that you’re making a difference. Please let me know if you’re interested in joining us!!

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

APRIL 10 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     Today’s meeting began with twenty-four members in attendance. Our guests today are President Liz Laverty, Key Club member Lacy Russell, and Kathy Witham's grandson, Josh Dillon.
     An interclub is planned for Tuesday, April 16, to Dover-Foxcroft. Heidi Finson is speaking Monday, April 15, at Miller’s in Bangor, and maybe enough will go for an interclub there.
     Trish Hayes reported that the Key Clubbers were great at the Convention in Springfield, Massachusetts. They represented themselves well. The Key Club disqualified the Kiwanis Club interclub at their meeting, so, as of today’s meeting, we still don't have our bell. We are going to try again on Thursday, the 11th. The Key Club is busy planning their "lock-in". They hope to have people from Dexter and Greenville attending.
     The newspaper is going well. Virgil Valente has really stepped up and helped with distribution and printing. He is going to check into actual numbers to see who's selling how many and where.
     The stage is to be painted soon at the Milo Town Hall, the curtains are almost complete, and a closet is scheduled to be built in the men’s bathroom to be used for additional storage.
     Kathy Witham has made some great posters to advertise the upcoming Variety Show. Hope everyone intends to attend May 3 and 4.
     Troy Richard’s birthday is April 11and Jeremy Finson's is April 12. Todd and Diane Lyford's wedding anniversary is April 11 and Neil and Barb Hamlin's is April 14.
     A meeting for planning the next RIF book distribution is scheduled for April 17 at 9:30 am at the Milo Elementary. They are tossing around a lot of good ideas and will consider doing a summer distribution with the Key Club helping.
     We were really happy this week with twenty dollars being collected.
     Today was our business meeting and we went over the Board Meeting decisions. 1. We voted to put on a Turkey Dinner for the Dog Trials in the fall. 2. We voted to donate 25% of the proceeds from the upcoming Variety Show to the Make-A-Wish foundation, 25% to Pine Tree Hospice, and the rest to the Town Hall Arts Center project. 3. A committee was formed to investigate newspaper printer options. 4. We voted to make a donation to the Outing Club and to the Guilford Muscular Dystrophy walk. 5. Nominations for next years officers are President- Ed Treworgy, Vice President-Joe Zamboni, Second Vice-President-Murrel Harris, Secretary-Nancy Grant, and Board members-Chris Beres and Sherry Conley.

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