Three Rivers News, 2002-05-07
TUESDAY, MAY 7, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 26
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!

KIWANIS VARIETY SHOW

FUN FOR ALL!!

BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     The months of hard work by the Variety Show committee paid off in a grand fashion this past weekend; the second annual Three Rivers Kiwanis Variety Show was stupendous!
     Over 600 people viewed the program, which was presented on Friday, May 3rd and again on Saturday, May 4th.
     The show was performed in the newly remodeled Milo Town Hall Auditorium; the site of so many children’s programs, wedding receptions, and basketball games. It has never looked so spectacular. The beautiful new royal blue curtains and the sparkling new chairs truly transformed the beloved auditorium into a Performing Arts Center. The new sound system and the versatile lighting made the presentation a joy to see and hear.
     Master of Ceremonies Jenson Bissell hosted the show quite professionally. Jenson was given a run for his money by his witty and humorous co-host, the Milo High School Black Panther, portrayed by a talented Kylie Beals. Their friendly banter was humorous and informative. Kylie’s ability to ad-lib made the time between set changes fly by. She has a beautiful speaking voice and her timing and delivery of one-liners was impeccable.
     The show opened with a very talented chorus singing a lively rendition of Irving Berlin tunes. Their voices melded together beautifully. Kate Smith couldn’t have sounded better! Every foot in the place was tapping.
     The chorus ended the medley with “God Bless America”, and many members of the audience were singing along.
     Between the first and second acts, Edwin and Ethelyn Treworgy presided over the dedication of the Performing Arts Center. Edwin’s speech was classy and emotional, as are the Treworgys. The area will forever be in their debt for the great work they have done.
     The next performance was by a group of area elementary school kids who call themselves “2002 Kids”. Their first selection, “We are the Children of Tomorrow” was very well done, and their rendition of “From a Distance” brought tears of pride to my eyes. The words were sung so clearly and with such feeling. “God is watching us…” the beginning of the song’s chorus has never been truer. The group was directed by Stephanie Gillis, who has the unique ability to bring out the best in all of her performers.

     Next on the billing was a tap dance routine that was made doubly wonderful by the Bell twins, Karen and Kristen. Sarah Philbrick, doing a super job, joined the two girls in the clever performance of “Me and MY Shadow”.
     Another highlight of the evening was the storytelling of “The Old Whittler”. Carl Hamlin proved he could tell a funny story as well as he can give a massage. Carl is a frequent contributor to The Three River News and we look forward to his next article.
     Megan Russell, Chad Gerrish, Peter Bissell, and Vanessa Hartin were elegant in their re-enactment of a prom dance from years gone by. A very handsome Edwin Treworgy added to the formal atmosphere with his fine voice. It was great to hear “Pomp and Circumstance” played as the Megan and Chad marched in a mock Milo High graduation.
     After an intermission, the elementary students did a cute skit recalling the Milo High Basketball team of 50 years ago. The names of the members of that State Championship team were read and cheerleaders did a few of the cheers from that era. I was pleased to hear two of my uncle’s names mentioned, Micky Chase and Richard Vail.
     The chorus followed with an enthusiastic rendition of “MHS Forever” with many members of the audience joining in. The presentation was enhanced with Kathy Witham standing at the end of the front row of the singers with the Gold Ball from that championship season.
     Melissa Hussey Hall sang “I’ll Be Your Friend” and her beautiful voice traveled perfectly through the auditorium.
The Elementary kids did a great job jitterbugging; there were many flips and twirls. Their outfits were well thought out and very dazzling.
     The fifth graders, who recited the Gettysburg Address, spoke very clearly and with great inflection. The words of that great speech are timeless and always dramatic to hear.
     What a pleasant surprise greeted us upon the lifting of the curtain for the tenth act. There stood a whole bunch of Elvis’s, complete with shiny gold scarves! The Notable’s (AKA the El-Tones) variation of, “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” was so humorous and made even funnier when the “frisky” Elvis appeared. I think the only time the entire evening that the Panther was flustered was when Elvis started to work his magic on her!
     The hall was alive with the sound of music when Edwin sang “Edelweiss”, solo at first, then accompanied by the entire cast. What a talented troupe!
     The final song of the night, “America The Beautiful” was also sung by the entire cast and accompanied by the audience. It is a special feeling to

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stand in the midst of such a wonderful community, in the greatest country in the world, and sing a song that is so meaningful.
     Saturday’s show featured two additional performances: Lenny Stafford and The Smith Brothers. Lenny sang a selection of cowboy songs and his yodeling was the highlight of each selection.
     The Smith Brothers, Jay who is 12 and played fiddle, and Shane who is ten and played guitar, were fantastic. Their performance was crisp and flawless. The audience was compelled to clap along with the lively well-done tunes as well as giving the boys a well-deserved standing ovation!
     At the end of the show Kiwanis President Todd Lyford presented Edwin and Ethelyn with a bouquet of roses, thanking them for the effort they put into organizing the show. The area is so lucky to have such a generous community spirited couple in their midst.

STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Virgil Valente


CHICKEN PIE SUPPER
BROWNVILLE JCT. METHODIST CHURCH
SATURDAY, MAY 11
5:00-6:30 PM
ADULTS $6.50, CHILDREN $3.00
CHICKEN PIE, PEAS, ROLLS, AND ASSORTED DESSERTS

SPRING FLING

On Saturday, May 11, from 10:00am to 1:00pm the Brownville PTO will be sponsoring
The Annual Spring Fling at the Brownville Elementary School. There will be many Games,
a Bike Rodeo, Face Painting, a Plant Sale, Refreshments, and much More.
Hope to see you and your children there for a Great Family Fun Day!!!

BAKED BEAN SUPPER
PARK STREET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2002
5 TO 6:30 PM

BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, ROLL, COLE SLAW, HOMEMADE PIES

PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE FOLDING TABLES FOR THE NEWLY REMODLED DINING ROOM.

ADULTS : $5.00
CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER : $2.50
FAMILY RATE: $12.00
MAKE PLANS NOW TO ATTEND!

FREE KITTENS!
WE HAVE FOUR ADORABLE, HEALTHY KITTENS TO GIVE AWAY TO LOVING HOMES. THE PLAYFUL BABIES WILL BE READY THE 2ND WEEK OF JUNE, BUT YOU ARE WELCOME TO COME CHOOSE ONE BEFORE THEN. CALL GEORGE OR BEV TUCKER AT 943-1033 TO SCHEDULE A VISIT.


MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED., MAY 8 ROAST TURKEY W/GRAVY AND STUFFING, MASHED POTATO, SQUASH, PUMPKIN PIE
THURS., MAY 9 HOMEMADE BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, POTATO SALAD, FROSTED CAKE
FRI., MAY 10 CHEESEBURGER PIE, GREEN BEANS, TOSSED SALAD, SLICED PEARS
MON., MAY 13 PORK PATTY W/ SUPREME SAUCE, ROSEMARY POTATOES, MIXED VEGGIES, VANILLA PUDDING
TUES., MAY 14 PEPPER STEAK, MASHED POTATO, SCALLOPED TOMATOES, RAISIN CAKE
WED.,MAY 15

BAKED HADDOCK, RICE PILAF, SLICED BEETS, PINEAPPLE CHUNKS

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

AUCTION PLANS UNDERWAY

     The date has been set for the annual Kiwanis Auction. Bargains galore will be up for auction on June 27th and 28th. The proceeds from our auction go toward all of the projects that Kiwanis contributes to over the year. We are looking for items for the auction. If you have items, please call Eben Dewitt (943-2486) or Herb Dunham (943-2353) for pickup.

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NEW BUSINESS OFFERS MANY SERVICES
The Three Rivers news received this letter from Joi Stevens and would like to pass it along.
Hello all you busy people,
     I am starting a new business in Milo and felt it would be of interest to all of the busy people in the area. For those of you who do not know me, my name is Joi Stevens and I live in Milo. I am going to be offering many new services with my Personal Assistant business. I feel there are many of you out there that do not have the time for all the "little things that life demands", so I am here to help!! Please take a few minutes to look over the items I will be offering and then feel free to contact me at home 943-2613 or email me minolta@kynd.com
     *Custom Baskets- MOTHERS DAY IS COMING!!! You name the price you want the basket to cost $15-$20-$25 or up. I charge ONLY $10 to buy the items and make the baskets. I will be accepting orders for Mothers day baskets until May 9 so please call soon.
     *Personal Picker Upper (simply picking up items in Bangor, Dover etc. for you) It would take you at least $5 in gas for you to go yourself.
     *Reminder Service - I will contact you 3 weeks prior to holiday and birthdays that you have registered with me. (There will be a yearly fee) I also will provide unique ideas for your gifts if you wish at no char     ge.
*Personal Shopper - I will shop for Birthdays, Anniversaries, Holidays.. You name it! I can choose the gifts after we do a personal profile for the gift recipient. This can all be done via email or phone. Whenever it is convenient for you. The whole idea is to simplify your life. No need to panic, simply call Joi!
     *Secret Gifts/For no reason gifts - Feel like making someone smile? A random act of kindness? Send a Secret gift (candy bar, lottery ticket -$2 or under item) This will cost you a minimal amount and will brighten some ones day!
     *Comparison shopping - Need an item but want to find a great deal?
     I will do the legwork for you, and if needed, pick the item up for you.
     (Charges are based on a % of the item purchased)
     Vacation, appliances and big ticket items.
     ~Other items I will offer~
     *Recipe and meal planning
     *Local errands
     *Grocery shopping
     *Home decorating help
     I am going to be doing all of these services at reasonable prices! Please contact me so that we can discuss any of the services you are interested in. If you can think of any other items to make your life easier, just let me know.
     I look forward to making your life easier!!

Your new best friend,
~Joi~

KITTY’S KORNER
NEWS FROM THE MILO PUBLIC LIBRARY
NEW HOURS FOR THE MILO PUBLIC LIBRARY
EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY THE HOURS FOR THE LIBRARY ARE:
     1 - 8PM MON., WED., AND FRI.
     2 - 4PM ON SATURDAY
(BEGINNING JUNE 8 THROUGH LABOR DAY, CLOSED SATURDAYS)

New State and Federal Posting Requirements for All Maine Employees:
     Many business and libraries may have received a recent notice from a Poster Compliance Center, listing the Mandatory Federal and State posters. State and Federal regulations require you to post the following notices in conspicuous places. The reminder to keep our posters up-to-date is appreciated. However, from experience, we find our laminated poster have a tendency to curl up and drop off the wall. And, it seems that there is a charge for these posters.

     I found a link to a website entitled, "Compliance Poster Company - Your source for Safety Posters" where the cost was less: http://complianceposter.com/aboutcpc.cfm
     Help from another library: Librarians help one another with our Maine State Library Discussion List. Regarding the above subject, the librarian of Caswell Library, Maine did better than I. Quoting from her letter, "A search of Maine's website brought me to Business Answers - 1-800-872-3838 - who will provide required posters at no charge."
     From our library to others: Shared reviews about personal computer firewalls recently posted on our library discussion list.
     Personal Computer Firewalls. The following information may be useful to some... Quote from a Smart Computing magazine online editorial: "Firewall" is just a generic term used to describe a variety of security techniques used to safeguard your Internet and network connections.
     Title: Personal Firewalls Block Out Bad Guys
     Protect Your Data From The World: When we write articles about personal computer security, we have to call around and find someone who has dealt with an attack, but not this time. As it turned out, our computers were being probed, scanned, and otherwise scrutinized by a variety of never-do-wells looking for a way to either install a malicious program or nab our files. Worst of all, we didn't know any of this was going on until we installed a personal firewall. The chances are high that your computer has at some point been targeted.
     We were experiencing these scans and access attempts on a standard 56.6Kbps (Kilobit per second) modem dialup connection. If you use cable modem or DSL (digital subscriber line) service, things are even worse. These types of connections are persistent, which means that when your computer is on, your connection to the Internet is live. Most of these services also assign customers a permanent IP (Internet Protocol) address. The combination of an always-on connection and a static IP address creates a particularly juicy target for hackers, but they won't even know you're there if you're using the right firewall." Smart Computing magazine - April 2002 - Vol. 13, issue 4, pg. 46-48.
Title: A Line in the Sand - Software Firewalls Protect Your PC
     1. BlackICE Defender Firewall - $39.95 @http://www.iss.net/newsitesummary.php. Quote from website: "As organizations increasingly depend on online information resources for daily business operations, rapid access to timely, proactive information for protecting networks, servers and desktops become increasingly important. "Quote from magazine: "BlackICE is easy to install and immediately goes to work with its default settings. You can change these to greater or lesser protection if you like. Help topics are very good in explaining security terms. Runs under Win9x/Me/NT/2000/XP."
     2. McAfee Firewall 3.0 - $29.95 @
http://www.mcafee-at-home.com/products/firewall/ Quote from website: "Safeguards your PC's connection via DSL, cable modem, satellite, or dial-up. Gives you the powerful tools you need to control the communications into and out of your PC. "Quote from magazine: "Installation is straightforward. Generates a short list of your applications that access the internet for whatever reason and asks you to tell it which you trust and which you don't. The program won't let untrusted applications send data from your computer or receive it. Runs under Win95B/98/Me/NT/2000/XP."
     3. Norton Personal Firewall 2002 - $49.95 @
http://www.symantec.com/sabu/nis/npf/ Quote from website: "Keeps hackers out and personal data in. Every minute your computer is online it's vulnerable to intrusions and information theft."
     Quote from magazine: "The 2002 version of Norton's firewall includes automatic small network setup and better control over inbound and outbound internet access. Supports Win98/Me/NT/2000/XP."
     4. Tiny Personal Firewall is free for personal use and has a goodreputation@ http://www.tinysoftware.com/home/tiny?la=EN&va=aa. Quote from website: "Solution-in-Focus. News Release... Don't let anybody wipe out your hard-drive! Trojan Trap, a must addition to

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all personal firewalls." Quote from magazine: "It consults you when it detects application data transmission activity or potential intrusions. Tiny's installation is the quickest and easiest of the bunch. Is a no nonsense utility with plenty for intermediate users. More technical than some novices may like. Runs with Win9x/Me/NT/2000/XP."
     5. ZONE Alarm Pro - Software Protection- $39.95 @
http://www.zonelabs.com/ Quote from website: "Keep hackers and data thieves out of your computer. Protects against internet-borne threats like worms, Trojan horses, and spyware."
     Quote from magazine: "Among the firewall's features are pop-up add blocking, control over cookies, and password protection for your settings. Free updates. use with Win9x/ME.NT.2000/XP."
     Note: WinXP comes with its own (ICF) Internet Connection Firewall program. Secure as BlackICE's or McAfee's, but harder to configure.
     Test Your Firewall Online with several free online services...
     6. Gibson Research Corporation - Shield's UP @
http://grc.com/default.htm Combination website/magazine description: "The internet's quickest, most popular, reliable and trusted free internet security check up and information service... easy to use... commentary helps to explain what the results mean."

NEWS ABOUT TOWN
BY MURREL HARRIS

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL REGULAR SEASON FINAL STANDINGS

TEAM W L
1. BANKER’S 13 8
2. COLE’S 13 8
3. STANCHFIELD’S 12 9
4. GRAY’S 12 9
5. DEMER’S 8 13
6. LELAND’S 8 13

PLAYOFFS, MONDAY, MAY 6

6PM BANKER’S VS LELAND’S
6:30PM COLE’S VS DEMERS'
7PM STANCHFIELD’S VS GRAYs

MILO RECREATION IS OFFERING SWING DANCE CLASSES ON SUNDAYS AT 6:30PM AT THE MILO TOWN HALL. CALL 943-7326 FOR DETAILS.

     It is time to sign-up for the Spring Driver’s Education classes. A minimum of 15 must enroll before the classes can begin. If you are 15 years old or more, call 943-7326 to sign-up.

AROUND THE STATION: CALLS RECEIVED BY THE MILO FIRE DEPARTMENT

DATE TIME OUT TIME BACK NATURE OF CALL
4/07/02 18:19 18:44 SMOKE IN WOODS
4/15/02 18:15 18:55 EMS ASSIST
4/16/02 20:00 20:10 FLAMES IN WOODS
4/22/02 19:52 21:00 CHIMNEY FIRE
4/26/29 14:56 15:12 FURNACE FIRE

The Game of the Week
BY BILL SAWTELL
Penquis Girls 14, PCHS 11
Milo, May 1--On a clear and chilly day, Dick Martin's protégés downed the visitors from the Guilford area 14-11, as Danielle Graves fanned nine Pirates, and her teammates came up with six in the bottom of the sixth en route to the win.
     Jean Hamlin smashed the only hit of the game for Penquis and made a fine running grab on a foul ball off the bat of Greta Korsman. PCHS dented the plate three times in their half of the seventh to cause excitement.
     Shortstop Megan Russell made a fine catch, ranging far into foul territory, off the bat of Ivy Galuski in the fourth.
     The home team picked up their second win in six starts as many Penquis girls saw action and ran the bases well.

PENQIUS MEN’S BASKETBALL
LEAGUE PLAY OFF RESULTS
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     On Sunday, May5th, the Penquis Men’s League semi-final games were played at the PVHS gym. The first game, played before dozens of fans, was a shoot-out between the yellow team and the cagey veterans of the green team. Green, who was missing their newly acquired center, Ernie Madden, played a clean, determined game, but in the end was overpowered by the 3-point shooting of the young guns, 99-76.
     The green team consisted of, Chucky Stevens, Kendall Royal, Scott Larson, Anders Hamlin and Alex Zwicker. Playing for the yellow team was: Matt Heal, Brandon McCarthy, Mike Weston, Ben Knapp, Travis Ellis, Chet Gillis, Matt Foster and Stevie Gillis.
     The second game of the evening was a close, exciting match. The white team, the number one seed of the tourney, consisted of Bill Mayo, David Chase, Colby Chase, Ricky Rublee, Scott Lee and David Carey. The referees were Scott Larson and Kendall Royal, who did a flawless job of officiating.
     Playing for the much younger gray team were: Tony Heal, Derek Perkins, Mike Hunter, Lance Gerrish, Toby Richards and Ryan Larrabee.
     Despite the hot shooting of the gray squad, the “old” fellows came out victorious, with the score being White 91-Gray 86.
     The championship game between the yellow scoring machine and the white team with experience on their side, will be played Sunday, May 12 at 5:00PM at the PVHS gym. See you there!

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
MILO, JULY 28, 1939-Vacation time may occasionally hang heavy on idle young hands, but for two teen-aged young Milo capitalists, Jeanie and Alice Gerrish, the summer months provide a happy medium of business and pleasure.
     The two sisters, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Judson Gerrish, are helping to make a family affair out of the management of the Kathdin Country Club, popular out Park Street nine-hole golf course.
     Jeanie, 14 and Alice, 16, spending most of their working hours as greenkeepers, are responsible for the fine condition of the close-clipped greens and rolling fairways, operating power-mowing equipment as well as hand tools.
     Alice handles the driving assignments, hauling behind her jeep a heavy gang-mower for grooming the fairways, followed by a light stone drag which carries Jean’s light power-mower and tools from green to green.
     In addition to clipping and cleaning up, the sisters are responsible for keeping a weather eye open for loose divots, and manning the sprinkling system during the dry weather.
     Besides their management jobs, the girls find time between outside jobs to handle daytime business at the club, as well as maintaining rental equipment and keeping the clubhouse in order.

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The local club, kept invitingly cool during the late afternoon and early evening hours by breezes rising over the hills from the nearby river, calls for family teamwork during the busy hours.
     The girls’ father a local attorney, handles the business. Mrs. Gerrish supplies the refreshments, and young Judson, Jr. “Sonny” Gerrish, finds plenty of work as a caddy.
Far from spending all of their time at work, Jean and Alice find their busy jeep provides ideal vacation transportation.
BROWNVILLE-JUNE 5, 1890
     One of the finest localities for fishing in this section of the State, undoubtedly is at Onawa on the C.P.R., 17 miles from Brownville and 15 miles from Greenville. Salmon are plenty in the lake and trout are caught in Benson and Greenwood ponds, while this section is not excelled in it’s magnificent scenery. Parties can find good accommodations with Mr. A. F. Arbo who runs a house at Onawa station on the C.P.R. where all trains stop for passengers.
SEBEC STATION
     Our esteemed townsman Jason Hassell seems to be gaining although he still remains dangerously sick.
Misses Ida and Lizzie Hoyt, daughters of the late Mr. Andy Hoyt, of East Dover, were both married at their mother’s home in Milo on the 24th, to young men in that section. Mrs. Snow is a daughter of Mr. Americus Crockett, of Foxcroft.
MILO
     During the last eighteen years M. L. Durgin, Jr., of this town has sung at one hundred and fifty-seven funerals.
     The Milo Dramatic Club gave a very pleasant entertainment at Chase’s Hall one evening last week.
     Building lots in this village containing one-fourth of an acre are bringing from two to three hundred dollars, and one lot 40x60 feet recently sold for $350.
     F. M. Strout of this town is quite a rustler and carries one of the best stocks of goods in the county.
C. D. Paine’s cutter was in town Memorial Day and took quite a large order from the members of J. S. Sampson Post for uniform suits.
     The Milo Cheese Factory began operations last week with S. O. Gould in charge.
     Milo at present is mending her ways.
     The festive mosquito has put in an appearance and presented his bill.

CORRECTION CORNER
Last week’s article, ‘It Is Now Safe To Wash Your Windows’, contained a wrong name. It should have been Tom Wallace instead of Tom Witham. Sorry, Tom!


MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
MAY 6 – 10
Monday-Teriyaki chicken, potato smiles, carrot sticks, cinnamon roll, orange sherbet, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Juice, pancakes, ham, potato puffs, and applesauce.
Wednesday-Shepherd’s pie, salad, mixed fruit, dinner roll, and birthday cake.
Thursday-Turkey & gravy, mashed potato, corn, dinner roll, and icy juice.
Friday-Egg muffin, spinach, grapes, strawberry shortcake.

How much do you know about domestic violence?
What percentages of American women say a husband or boyfriend at some point in their lives has physically abused them?
A. 10%
B. 14%
C. 31%
D. 58%
     If you would like to take a stand against domestic violence in our community please join us at our next meeting. The Milo-Brownville Neighbors Against Domestic Violence is a group of concerned citizens who work to promote a zero tolerance of domestic violence in our community. We are not a service provider. We meet the second Tuesday of each month at Pleasant Park Community Center at 5:30 PM. Refreshments are served.
The answer is C – 31%.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. In 1819 Brownville became; a(n) (a) town, (b) plantation, (c) unorganized territory, (d) small city
2. Dave Cota's brother was a(n); (a) professor, (b) engineer, (c) town manager, (d) minister
3. Quarry Pines was completed under; (a) Lyle Towne, (b) Dave Cota, (c) Dave Barrett, (d) Gerald Wagg
4. Phil Adams was a; (a) basketball coach, (b) history teacher, (c) guidance counselor, (d) all of these
5. Mesach Jones was; (a) Welsh, (b) French, (c) Irish, (d) Spanish
6. Merrill Quarry slate was greatly used for; (a) roofs, (b) pool tables, (c) resistors, (d) walkways
7. K.C. Gray bought the Railroad Diner from; (a) the Perrys, (b) the Smiths, (c) the Rolfes, (d) the Webbs.
8. Dillon's Hall was used for; (a) basketball, (b) silent movies, (c) town meetings, (d) all of these.
9. Jake Larson was an ice man and a; (a) mechanic, (b) teacher, (c) farmer, (d) surveyor.
10. Amy Nee was a; (a) (nurse, (b) waitress, (c) preacher, (d) writer
Answers: 1-b 2-c 3-b 4-d 5-a 6-a 7-d 8-d 9-c 10-a

NEWS FROM THE AREA SCHOOLS
FOURTH AND FIFTH GRADER’S FIELD TRIP
BY SALLY WALLACE
     On Wednesday, May 1, 2002, the Brownville Elementary fourth grade and the Marion C. Cook fourth and fifth grades toured the Margaret Chase Smith
     Library in Skowhegan. The museum features displays from Senator Smith's life as well as a special traveling exhibit from NASA. Students also toured the Senator's home. This trip was made possible with a grant from Northwood University.
Cook School News
Miss K.’s Kids
     The class traveled to the Margaret Chase Smith Library in Skowhegan, ME. We toured the library and the Senator’s house. We learned interesting new facts and asked many questions. We were on our best behavior. Many students discussed returning to the museum with their parents. Our thanks to Mrs. Wallace and the Brownville 4th graders for inviting us on this wonderful field trip.
Other Cook School News
     Tony Mourkas, from the Department of Transportation and the Bike Coalition of Maine, presented a bike safety program to each class. He stressed proper use of

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helmets, wearing sensible clothing, following the rules of the road, and completing the ABC Quick Check prior to riding.
     Mr. Mourkas used his bicycle, his biking outfit, and helmet to reinforce his main ideas. Thank you Mr. M.
Students in grades K-5 joined in the “World’s Largest Exercise Class” sponsored by the Youth Fitness Coalition and The Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. Last year over 65 schools in Maine participated. The event is held to show the nation and world that Maine’s children are physically active. All the students and staff walked around the loop in front of our school for 30 minutes. Students and staff walked at their own pace. Many walked close to 2 miles. We will receive a special participation certificate signed by Governor Angus King.

MILO ELEMENTARY TERRIFIC KIDS
FROM THE ROOM OF:
Mrs. Barden- Our Terrific Kid is Tristi Gould. She has been working very hard in class and is practicing her ‘I care rules.’ We are happy with Tristi's great effort.
Mrs. Chessa- Our terrific kid has really been very helpful to all of her classmates. While waiting patiently to conference with the teacher she conferenced with others during writing time. Her suggestions were positive and constructive. She is also willing to help others with Math. Her homework is always done and complete. Congratulations Kasey Sherburne
Mrs. Dell'olio- Breanne has done a wonderful job of completing her work in a neat and orderly manner this week. She has been very cooperative, and
on task. Great job, Breanne!
Chad had a great week. He has been very helpful to his classmates, and teacher. Chad has practiced good judgement, and a great deal of patience. Nice work, Chad!
Mrs. Dunham- Our Terrific Kid is Taylor Small. Taylor shows those great qualities of a terrific kid every day. Taylor has become an active participant in reading group. She often asks to share a prediction or other
points of a story. Taylor is working very hard to learn her
multiplication facts. We are proud of all her efforts.
Mrs. Hayes- Our terrific kid has a bright and smiling face. He has a great new haircut! This terrific kid loves books and he loves to listen to stories. He shares lots of information from reading his books during story time. He is always honest and is working hard at finishing his jobs and following our school rules. Our Terrific Kid is a good little singer. We are all so happy to have John Badger as our terrific kid this week. We are proud of you John. Keep up the good work.
Mrs. Hudak- Mrs. Hudak's Terrific Kid is Alexis Pelkey. Alexis is so kind and considerate to her teachers and classmates. She works very hard with her reading and enjoys being a guest reader. Alexis is a Terrific Kid!!!! We love having her in our room.
Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey- Kambrea Atkinson- she is a great friend to her classmates
and is making good progress with her math facts
Alisa Pelkey- she had made awesome progress in reading and always follows the "I CARE " rules.
Mrs. Walker and Mrs.Carey- Maurice is most kind and has marvelous manners. He is a master story-

teller and always compliments his classmates. Maurice is
into beginning books and follows the Golden Rule. He shares and is a helper to others in our room. He is our M&M kid>> We love you Maurice!!!! Congratulations!!!!
     Macy is becoming quite a reader. She loves to do her journaling each day and then goes right to her book box and starts to read to herself, her friends, and her teachers. She is also a good listener as she is quite an observer during calendar time. We can make NO mistakes!!!! She keeps us all on our toes!!! Her confidence is growing every day. Keep up the good work, our little bookworm!!! We love Macy!!! Congratualations.
Mrs.Whitney- Whitney's Terrific Kid for 5/3 is Kristi Crommet. She has adjusted well to our classroom and become a welcomed, valued member. Great job, Kristi!

The Bull Run of 1951
BY TOM POOLE
     Real adventure was not hard to find for a five-year-old growing up in Milo, Maine. The short cut through Hughey Boates’ pasture promised danger behind every shrub. It was a place where a kid could ride his palomino through Indian Territory as he headed for the hills and his classroom at Chase Hall. The danger was not limited to various war parties. Mr. Boates had pastured a large black bull that was quite fond of protecting his owner's turf. We had respectfully called him, Killer. Hughey Boates’ farm was in the middle of town. His pasture ran down behind the buildings on Main and Park Street. A senior complex occupies part of the property today. It was a small farm but not to a kindergartner. Behind his house on Park Street stood a large barn that also served as an icehouse.
     I remember dad backing our Henry J. up to the barn. Mr. Boates would haul out a large block of ice from beneath the sawdust and drop it into our trunk. We would head off for Schoodic Lake where an ice chest awaited in the rented cottage. A stop at Ned Hoskin's store on the way out of town was always part of the trip.
     One day, on my way to school, I had the notion to gallop down the embankment behind Grindle's house and head for the open range. I easily got under the pasture's barbed wire fence and started for the other side. As I entered the middle of the pasture, I noticed Killer at the lower end. This was a good sign and relaxed me for a moment, until the bull looked up and spotted me. He immediately lowered his head and began charging right at me. The cowboy panicked and turned into a little boy running for his dear life. Now the best way to leave the pasture was through the gate, but there was no time to reach and unlatch it. I headed for the nearest fence and jumped over just as the bull arrived. I was safe from the bull but unfortunately not from my mother. The dramatic leap for life left a perfect three-cornered tear in the seat of my trousers. It took Mom little effort to realize what had happened. Some twenty years later in Spain, I suddenly struck off for a church service instead of a bullfight. Evidently, Killer and mom had left their lasting impression.
Editors note: Thanks Tom, for sending us this story!

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     For those of you who aren't right up on local happenings, I have some interesting news. It's about the Milo Town Hall. Recently, a committee spearheaded by Edwin and Ethelyn Treworgy has made a dream come true in the form of a major renovation of the auditorium at the Town Hall. If I were a betting woman, which I have been known to be, (isn't that right Stephen), my bets would be on the fact that Edwin had a dream. He saw a project that needed to be accomplished. He was a driven man and he was able to find others who would help take

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him for the ride. With a lot of help from his Kiwanian friends, Penquis High alumnus, Milo High alumnus, clubs and organizations in town and a Maine Community Foundation grant, and now a grant from the Stephen and Tabitha King Foundation, he has seen his dream become a reality.
     The project became known as the Milo Town Hall Arts Center Project. A lofty idea that wasn't necessarily met with enthusiasm from town officials but accepted by them, after all, when the enthusiasm of the old community spilled like a waterfall into the coffers of the treasury. Well, think about it!! If you went to Milo High School, your school memories are still reverberating from the walls of that auditorium. Every kid that ever performed in any school program did it at the Town Hall. With few exceptions, since 1924 every major decision regarding this town was made within those auditorium walls. Back in the days when the town's business was carried out with animated debate at Town Meetings, it happened at the auditorium
     When my Dad was a little boy, his mother used to work all day at the Town Hall the day of Town Meeting. The ladies of the town made a big dinner for all of the participants. The meeting took all day! It started in the morning, broke for lunch and then went on during the afternoon and into the evening if necessary. My grandfather ran a little grocery store on Main Street and Dad said that on Town Meeting day, he and his brothers would walk downtown to the store when school let out for lunch. Their father would serve them a sandwich lunch at the store at noontime because their mother would be otherwise occupied at the Town Hall. Remembering my grandfather's penchant for local politics, however, leads me to believe that Grampa must have spent a bit of time at the meeting himself.
     Once I thought I would try to count the number of times that I walked up over the stairs to the Town Hall auditorium. It wasn't possible. At age four I was dancing tap and ballet under the direction of Dana Small. His productions were the professional kind with black velvet curtains, professional lighting, and gorgeous sequined costumes. The formal programs were printed professionally and professional pictures were taken of each group of dancers. My mother's sisters would come to my recitals, and they'd bring flowers and presents to me. It was a really big deal!
     Milo High School used the auditorium as though it were an appendage of the school. Every school assembly, school dance, choral performance, science fair, prize speaking program, senior play and rehearsal, basketball game, prom, and graduation happened there. Is it any wonder that the alumni of that school are excited about its renovation? Penquis Valley High School alumni also share many memories with the old building. They don't have quite as many high school memories as the Milo High School alumni have, but if they went to school at Milo Elementary they have plenty. Just think of the Rec. programs that have taken place there; Pee Wee Basketball, volleyball games, Halloween parties, school programs and numerous private parties bring a number of wonderful memories flooding back.
     This has been a phenomenal undertaking. The new electrical work is completed, the stage has been cleaned and painted, the theater curtains and the lights are up, the sound system is in place, the piano has been repaired, and the chairs have been ordered. There's tons more to do, though. The old wainscoting needs to be refinished. The floors need to be tightened, and some totally replaced, to eliminate squeaks. The restrooms need new lights and fixtures and the stage and auditorium ventilation needs some improvement. Lots and lots to do, but don't you suppose that with determination it will be completed. Hats off to Edwin and everyone else who dreamed the dream with him. God loves the hearts of the movers and the shakers. We need more of them in this town.
     I've often wondered what kind of resistance the visionaries, who first conceived the building of the Milo Town hall, ran into. If there was resistance, thank God they persevered. Imagine for just a moment our town without it. Think for a moment of your memories of childhood, teen years

and adulthood with an empty spot where the Town Hall sits. Impossible! I'm scaring myself!
     I've tried to think of what my Mammie might have cooked up for the Town Meeting luncheon. Do you suppose they had chop suey? How about baked beans? Probably both of those dishes were there because you can increase or decrease the ingredients to accommodate the size of the crowd. Mammie may have made fruit salad. I recently looked at some of her old recipes and found this one (written in her own hand).
Fruit Salad Dressing
1-cup pineapple juice
Juice of 2 oranges and 2 lemons all in the top of a double boiler.
Add:
1-cup sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons cornstarch
Thin with whipped cream.
     I know just enough about making a concoction like this to know that you would heat the juices over hot water in the double boiler and while they were heating you would mix your eggs, sugar, and the cornstarch. When the juice mixture is hot, you would add the sugar mixture and continue cooking. The sugar mixture will thicken the juices. After you remove the dressing from the heat and let it cool, you would add the whipped cream until you were happy with the consistency. I would use a combination of drained canned fruit and cut up fresh fruit in this salad. I might even spread a thin layer of whipped cream over the whole thing after I got it into a pretty serving dish. I'd decorate the top with cherries. Okay, I think I've talked myself into making this tonight.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz
Match invention with inventor

1. Air Brake a. Zeppelin
2. Gas Burner b. Land
3. Hot Air Balloon c. Ritty
4. Bicycle d. Westinghouse
5. Aerosol e. Bissell
6. Carpet Sweeper spray f. Carrier
7. Dirigible g. Starley
8. Polaroid Camera h. Goodhue
9. Cash Register i. Bunsen
10. Air Conditioning

j. Montgolfier

What causes eclipses of the sun and moon?
     Ancient civilizations thought of eclipses of the moon and especially the sun as omens of bad things to come. Some like the Mayan Indians and ancient Babylonians studied them and were able to predict when they were going to happen.
     Eclipses are caused by the moon and earth aligning themselves so the one in the middle casts a shadow on the third by blocking the sun’s rays. Eclipses of the moon seem to be more common because when they occur, everyone on the side of the earth away from the sun can see them.      The earth casts a large shadow. When the moon passes through the shadow of the earth it darkens because it no longer receives light from the sun. The moon produces no light of its own. The reason we can still see the moon when it is in total eclipse is that it receives earthshine from the earth. Eclipses of the moon only occur when the moon is full. Full moons occur when the earth is between the sun and the moon, but not always in a straight line. The moon does not orbit the earth in the same plane as the earth’s orbit around the sun, called the ecliptic. It is tilted so most months the full moon orbits above or below the shadow of the earth and gets the full impact of the sunshine. When the orbits coincide at what are called the nodes we get the eclipse. Sometimes the moon only partially enters the earth’s

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shadow. At these times we can watch the shadow of the earth pass across the moon, but it never fully covers it.
     The duration of the eclipse depends on how far the moon is from the earth. The shadow of the earth is a cone shape and extends to a point about 857,000 miles away from the earth. The moon varies in its distance from the earth, but on average it is 239,000 away and at that distance the shadow of the earth is about 5700 miles wide. This allows for an eclipse to be about two hours long as the moon travels through the shadow. If the moon is at or near perigee, or its closest approach to the earth, the shadow is bigger so the eclipse lasts longer. If it is at apogee or its farthermost point away from the earth the shadow is smaller and the eclipse has a shorter duration.
     Eclipses of the sun in contrast occur only at the new moon phase when the moon is between the sun and the earth. Since the shadow of the moon varies in length from 228,000 to 236,000 mi. depending how far we are from the sun, we seldom see a solar eclipse, and when we do it is only over a small part of the earth.
     Since the average distance to the moon is 239,000mi. It means that the moon must also be at or near perigee. The widest shadow a total eclipse can cast on the earth is 167mi in wide and that is when everything is at its optimum value (the moon is at perigee and the earth is farthest from the sun).
     As mentioned above, ancient cultures were able to determine when eclipses will occur. We now know they occur in a cycle called a saros. The saros is 6585.3 days long or about 18 years and 9 to eleven days depending on how many leap years happen during that time. Then the cycle starts over again. During the 20th Century there were 228 solar eclipses and 147 lunar eclipses. Remember many of these were only partial.
     A particular form of a partial eclipse is the annular eclipse of the sun. Unlike other partial eclipses the moon in this case passes directly in front of the sun. This occurs when the moon is too far from the earth to cast a dark shadow or umbra. Only the partial blocking of light occurs and the sun peeks around the moon forming a ring of light. This ring is usually irregular because the mountain and valley formations on the moon allow varying amounts of light to come to earth. We call this irregular light Bailey’s Beads.
     Those of us old enough will remember the total eclipse of the sun that occurred over the Milo-Brownville area in the early 60s. It was a rare treat, as another will not occur here for a number of lifetimes.

Answers: 1.d, 2.i, 3.j 4.g, 5.h, 6.e, 7.a, 8.b, 9.c, 10.f
Score: 5 Good, 6-7 Excellent, 8-10 Superb

KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     Ten members of our Key Club will be helping the Brownville PTO at their “Spring Fling” on May 11 at the Brownville Elementary School. The Key Clubbers will be helping to set up, run children’s games, and provide general assistance throughout the day. We appreciate this opportunity to help the PTO.
     On the evening of May 11 the club will be hosting its annual Lock-In. Dover, Greenville, and Dexter Key Clubs will be joining us for an evening of fun. We will open the doors to the high school at 7:00 PM and will remain “locked in” until 8:00 AM Sunday. This is a good opportunity for the members to get to know each other and members of the other clubs better. Any Kiwanians who would like to stop by to visit are welcome!
     Several members will be helping the Make-A-Wish Foundation on June 8 during the Walk for Wishes, Dash for Dreams fundraiser in Bangor. Members will be helping along the walk/run route and in other roles throughout the day. While the members are working I will be participating in the walk and have begun to solicit pledges. The average cost of a “Wish” is $5500 and I’m anxious to see how much money we can raise locally. Thanks to everyone who has contributed. I will continue to

collect until June 7. If you would like more information on this event please feel free to contact me.
     Thanks to Roy Bither, Frank Cochran, and Joe Beres for attending our meeting on April 25th. Thanks to Roy Bither and Joe Beres for attending the meeting on May 2nd. We appreciate you taking the time to visit us and look forward to seeing you again soon! Please remember to stop at the office to sign in and pick up a visitor’s badge when you attend one of our meetings.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MAY 1 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     Today’s meeting began with twenty-five members and an interclub from Orono/Old Town present.
     There is an upcoming training session for the Key Club officers on Tuesday, May 11 is their "Lock-in", and on June 8th Advisor Trish Hayes will be walking in the Make-A-Wish walk-a-thon with Key Club members helping.
     The Senior Play went well using the new sound and lights at the Town Hall. A big thanks to all that has helped. A very big thanks to the King Foundation for their generous donation of $25,000.00.
     The Town Hall steering committee will meet Monday the 6th at 6:30 at the Town Hall.
     The Variety Show is shaping up. Refreshments are needed for both nights.
     Gary Black's birthday is May 1st and Kathy Witham's birthday is May 2nd.
     Ten Happy and Sad dollars were donated this week.
     The upcoming officers are as proposed: President Ed Treworgy, Vice-president Joe Zamboni, 2nd vice-president Murrel Harris, Secretary Nancy Grant, and Board members Chris Beres and Sherry Conley. The term is October 2002 - Sept 2003.
     Heidi Finson graciously filled in as our speaker today. She explained about a program that she is actively involved in, the Assistance Design Center. The center provides a place for people who need assistance making or designing equipment to help special needs children and adults. Did you know that a lot of the equipment isn't covered under insurance and certain items that are found to calm children can be very costly? Heidi has explored and made a lot of these items. It has been found that weight and massage can be calming. Hats, blankets, and vests are a few items that have been made using BB’s as weights. Children with special needs sometimes cannot cope with all the noises of everyday life and an item called a squeeze chair can provide a safe haven and calm them. Heidi gave an excellent presentation and provided great pictures of these items. It is one day hoped this program will have a home or that the training will be available on the road. This would allow people to make items and just replace the materials. Maybe someday, through the schools, products of great benefit to others will be produced. Thank you Heidi for caring so much and sharing with us your great ideas.

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