Three Rivers News, 2002-05-14
5/14/02
TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 27
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES, DIAL 911!


MILO’S MEMORIAL DAY PARADE REALLY SHAPING UP
BY PHIL GEROW

Milo – After a meeting held Tuesday night at the Joseph P. Chaisson American Legion Hall, organizers feel that the year 2002 in Milo will host one of the best Memorial Day parades ever.
     The theme of this year’s parade is “Milo Honors Our Veterans and the Victims of 9-11.” Taking the secondary theme of “Red, White, and Blue Patriotism”, participants are asked to have banners or signs in the parade honoring the victims of September 11 and the many veterans, both living and deceased, who made sure that we are able to live in a country that gives us the freedom to hold parades.
     A few of the many participants joining the parade will be the Penquis Valley Bands, the Piscataquis County Sheriff’s Department color guard, members of the American Legion and the Auxiliary, the Boy and Girl Scouts, Key Club members, the Penquis Valley Student Council, and Stephanie Gillis with her “Roll-a-B Ladies.” All are invited to participate.
     The Brownville Jct. parade is scheduled for 9 a.m., 10 a.m. in Brownville, 11 a.m. in Milo, and 1:30 p.m. in LaGrange. Final schedules will be announced in the May 21st edition of the Three Rivers News.
     Arrangements have been made with the Mayo Regional Hospital Heartwise Rehabilitation to have its float in the parade and allow veterans the option of riding instead of walking. Bobby Ellison will have his pontoon boat on a trailer and gladly invites veterans to ride with him.
     The committee has been very busy and we aren’t done yet. We will work right up to Sunday, May 26, contacting individuals and organizations to “come on out and support the local veterans and the victims of 9-11” in a display of patriotism. So, if you haven’t been contacted yet and you want to show your support, please show up at the American Legion Field by 10:45 a.m. on Monday, May 27. No one showing their patriotism will be turned away!
     In the event you have questions, please feel free to contact Legion members Donald Banker, Jim Lockwood, or Alfred Shaw, or committee member Phil Gerow. Thanks to all for your participation.

Former Brownville Man to Be Honored
BY BILL SAWTELL
Orono--On May 18, the University of Maine will confer an honorary degree, Doctor of Science, on Dr. D. Allan Butterfield, a professor in the chemistry department at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.
     Dr. Butterfield grew up in Brownville and attended Brownville Junction High School Class of 1964, where he lettered in basketball and basketball and was president of the Future Teachers of America.
     Among his several publications and much research, he has studied multiple sclerosis and cell membranes.

AUCTION PLANS UNDERWAY

     The date has been set for the annual Kiwanis Auction. Bargains galore will be up for auction on June 27th and 28th. The proceeds from our auction go toward all of the projects that Kiwanis contributes to over the year. We are looking for items for the auction. If you have items, please call Eben Dewitt (943-2486) or Herb Dunham (943-2353) for pickup.

BAKED BEAN SUPPER
PARK STREET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2002
5 TO 6:30 PM

BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, ROLL, COLE SLAW, HOMEMADE PIES

PROCEEDS WILL BE USED TO PURCHASE FOLDING TABLES FOR THE NEWLY REMODLED DINING ROOM.

ADULTS : $5.00
CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER : $2.50
FAMILY RATE: $12.00
MAKE PLANS NOW TO ATTEND!

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Virgil Valente


MEALS FOR ME. MENU
WED., MAY 15 BAKED HADDOCK, RICE PILAF, SLICED BEETS, PINEAPPLE CHUNKS
THURS., MAY 16 CHICKEN ALA KING, BAKED POTATOES, GREEN BEANS, BISCUITS, SLICED PEACHES
FRI., MAY 17 LET’S HAVE A PICNIC!!
HAMBURGER DELUXE, POTATO SALAD, CORN RELISH, FROSTED CAKE
MON., MAY 20 HONEY GLAZED CHICKEN, MASHED POTATO, PEAS AND CARROTS, BANANA PUDDING
TUES., MAY 21 VEAL SCALOPPINI, BAKED POTATO, GREEN BEANS, CUSTARD W/ TOPPING
WED., MAY 22

CORN CHOWDER, EGG SALAD SANDWICH, TOSSED SALAD, GELATIN JEWELS

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

FREE KITTENS!
WE HAVE FOUR ADORABLE, HEALTHY KITTENS TO GIVE AWAY TO LOVING HOMES. THE PLAYFUL BABIES WILL BE READY THE 2ND WEEK OF JUNE, BUT YOU ARE WELCOME TO COME CHOOSE ONE BEFORE THEN. CALL GEORGE OR BEV TUCKER AT 943-1033 TO SCHEDULE A VISIT.
     The paper has been notified that Leanne Bailey also has some kittens that will be ready to be adopted soon. For more details, give her a call at 943-2655.

MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
MAY 13-17
Monday-Chicken nuggets, corn on the cob, mashed potato, roll/butter, watermelon, and milk all week.
Tuesday-Juice, pizza, green beans, hash browns, ice cream.
Wednesday-Chicken burger, cole slaw, rice pilaf, oatmeal cookie
Thursday-Bacon cheeseburger, oven fries, Calif. Blend veg., mixed fruit.
Friday - NO SCHOOL!!!

How much do you know about Domestic Violence?
BY TRISH HAYES
     Each year, medical expenses from domestic violence total at least $3 to$5 billion. Businesses forfeit another $100 million in lost wages, sick leave, absenteeism and non-productivity. (Domestic Violence for HealthCare Providers, 3rd Edition, Colorado Domestic Violence Coalition, 1991.)
     It is estimated that 25% of workplace problems such as absenteeism, lower productivity, turnover and excessive use of medical benefits are due to family violence. (Employee Assistance Providers/MN)
     Violence is the reason stated for divorce in 22% of middle class marriages. (EAP Digest November/December 1991)

     The Milo-Brownville Neighbors Against Domestic Violence is a group of concerned citizens working to promote a zero tolerance of domestic violence. Our meetings are held the second Tuesday of each month at 5:30 PM at the Pleasant Park Community Building and are open to the public. Please plan to join us on May 14th. Refreshments are served.

LOCAL AUTHOR/HISTORIAN
BY NANCY GRANT
     One of Brownville’s residents attributes his writing career to another local resident. William “Bill” Sawtell gives credit to the late Ralph Berg for the idea of becoming a published author. After finishing his military duty in 1968, Bill spent some of his spare time at Mr. Berg’s store in Brownville Jct. Ralph kept urging him to write a book about the Katahdin Iron Works. He eventually did, but his first book in 1989 was a historical account of “Onawa”. Because of personal reasons, this is his favorite.
     Bill told me that it takes about a year to complete one of his works. He does admit that choosing a subject depends somewhat on the marketability of the subject but also on his feelings about it. Bill researches the facts pertaining to the event or structure but also feels the “human interest” aspect is just as important. The books take on a much more personal note because of comments

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and recollections from people who have “been there.” Not only has Bill authored thirty-one books but has had a “letter to the editor” published in the June 23, 1983 issue of “Time” magazine! He writes in long hand but leaves it up to others to prepare his works for printing.
     When he was asked what he would be doing if his life had taken a different path, he didn’t hesitate to say, “Statistician, probably in a Bangor office.” He went on to say that it would have been in the field of sports, particularly baseball. It’s his love of the game that makes it possible for him to remember statistics, from many years ago to the present. To say that he possesses an incredible mind would be an understatement. Bill attributes his amazing memory to what he calls “over-studying” in high school and college. It is not surprising that he has earned three ‘Bachelor of Arts’ degrees (history, psychology, and French) from as many institutes of higher learning.
     Mr. Sawtell was born in Bangor on July 5, 1946 to William ‘Don’ and Constance Louise Roberts Sawtell. He is the big brother of Richard Sawtell and Ruth Heath, both of Brownville. Bill attended the local schools and graduated from B.J.H.S. in 1964 with the distinction of valedictorian. His degrees were earned from: Farmington, where he held the position of third base on the baseball team; UMO; and Laval, in Quebec, where he was a starting forward on the basketball team and was named the “Ball-Player of the Week.” He also coached the girls’ basketball squad for a time while at Laval.
     Relaxation for Bill comes in the form of reading, French books of course, music, also French, and keeping up with his studies of the German and Russian languages.
     It would be time well spent to peruse any and all of Bill’s works. They contain a wealth of local information as well as amusing stories from the past.
     Editor’s note: During a discussion on future articles about historical buildings in the Brownville area, I mentioned that I would have to do some research. Bill’s immediate reply was, “What do you want to know?”

NEWS FROM BROWNVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
BY LYNN WESTON
     Asa Sproul is shopping at the Boston Museum of Science gift shop. It looks like he's going to be getting a dinosaur!

Here are some very interesting poems by Brownville fifth grade students:

Can You Imagine?
BY SHANE WOODARD

A world without homes
And hair without combs

A body without bones
And houses with domes

A mole without a hole
And a play without a role

Cereal without bowls
And people without souls

A head witHout a nose
And a garden without a hose.

Can You Imagine?
BY ASHLEY STANHOPE

The world without people
Or a church without a steeple

A fish without fins
Or God full of sins

A turtle with glasses
Or a teacher without classes

Elephants without trunks
Or gangs without punks

A king who isn't called sire
Or a forest without a fire.


Can You Imagine
BY JOSH CLEMENT

A world without money
Pigs that make honey

A rabbit without hair
A pink fluffy bear

A person with fleas
Orange polka-dotted peas

A circus without clowns
A world without towns

A jump rope with the blues
A porcupine with shoes

A goat without horns
A death without mourns.

     Fifth Graders at Brownville Elementary are inviting grandparents to school on May 21. The students will be doing a scrapbooking project with their grandparents from 9:30 ‘til about 11:00. All grandparents are invited. If you want to stay for lunch please let Mrs. Weston know that day. Adult lunches are $2.75.

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     The M.S.A.D #41 Educators Association recently held election of officers for the upcoming school year. The slate includes Lynn Weston-President, Russell Carey-Vice President, Susan Worcester-Secretary, and Walter Oakes-Treasurer.
     The teachers and staff at Brownville Elementary would like to thank the PTO for remembering them during Teacher Appreciation Week. Each day the staff received a special surprise. It's very nice to know that teachers are appreciated!
     The Brownville Elementary students were thrilled to see their old friend Mr. Walker on Friday, May 3rd. Mr. Walker had been invited back to do the assembly in place of Mrs. Bradbury, who accompanied the 5th graders on their trip to Boston. Mr. Walker was assisted by Todd Lyford, Three Rivers Kiwanis President, in presenting the following Terrific Kid Awards to: Nicole Padilla in Kindergarten, Evan Worster in First Grade, Morgan Russell in Second Grade, Colby Brown in Third Grade, and Jesse McLaughlin in Fourth Grade. Fifth Graders were on their trip and will participate in the Teriffic Kids assembly again beginning this week. Mrs. Witham presented the Opal Award to Tami Andrews who is a substitute teacher in the Brownville School. Art certificates were presented and Birthdays for the week were celebrated.

MILO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL HAPPENINGS
BY CHRIS BERES
     Three classes went to the theater this week. Mrs.Gillis, Mrs. Dunham and Mrs. Bessey accompanied their students to a play at the Bangor Civic Center on Tuesday. The students saw the play "Tom Sawyer." Several of the key parts of the book, such as the whitewashing of the fence and Tom and Huck's reported "demise" were in the play. Students from the 4th grade reported that the story was somewhat like the book. "Some things were a little different, but it all added up to the same thing," commented Ricky Bradeen. This was a musical production with singing and dancing. The students reported that they enjoyed the program. The teachers want to thank the bus drivers and parent chaperones who accompanied them.
     On Thursday, the K-2 students were treated to a program sponsored by the Maine Nutrition Network's Maine-ly Nutrition Program. Bill Wood and the Good Food Fun Show entertained students. Bill taught them the following nutrition lessons: Breakfast is a very important meal because the body needs a new supply of energy for the day ahead. Choosing healthy snacks is a good nutrition habit. Eat a variety of whole foods for good health. All of these lessons were presented in a fun and entertaining format for the children. Bill used magic and balloons in his presentation. This was one of the culminating activities for our annual school wide unit on good nutrition. We have been very fortunate to have had wonderful support from the Maine-ly Nutrition program over the last several years. They have provided funds for teachers to do nutrition activities in their classrooms, funds for the healthy snacks at the Healthy ME (Milo Elementary) Family Walk that is now in it's third year, as well as curriculum materials and interesting programs such as the Good Food Show.

     On Tuesday, May 7, thirteen students registered for kindergarten for next year. It is always an exciting time to see the smiling faces of our new students.
     They are all so excited to be coming to school. We have what looks to be a wonderful group of new friends joining us next year. There are still two or three students on our list who need to register. If there are any children whom we have not contacted about registering for school, please call the school at 943-2122.
     Milo PTO will be meeting on Tuesday, May 14th at the school at 7:00. This will be the final meeting of the year. It is important for all interested parents or family members to attend, as we will be talking about plans for next year. Parents of students who will be coming to kindergarten are also invited to attend this meeting. Plans for activities, projects and fundraisers for next year will be the focus. We need help from everyone in our school community. We hope to see a big crowd there.
     Just a reminder that we hold our school assembly every Friday morning at 8:30. We announce our Terrific Kids, and recognize Bus Students of the week. This week's students were Josh Hathorn and Alan Yanbul,. We also celebrate Artists of the Week and birthdays. Often students choose to share songs or poems with us. This is a truly wonderful way to end our week. We invite all interested community members to join us.

MILO’S TERRIFIC KIDS
FROM THE CLASSROOM OF:
Mrs. Barden- Our Terrific Kid is Jessie Raye Moulton. Jessie has been working hard to be a good friend. She helps others with their morning work and is practicing to be a great reader.
Mrs. Chessa- Our terrific kid this week is a super helper and an all-around nice person. She is always willing to help others and works hard at doing
her work and asking questions in a positive way when she doesn't know the answers. She is a real asset to our classroom. Rachel Emery-congratulations!
Mrs. Dell'olio- Michael Johnson is a terrific kid for our class this week. He is a willing helper, and a good friend to others. Mike's been working to improve the quality of his work. Good job, Mike. Morgan Hall is also a terrific kid in our room this week. She is trying
VERY hard to work carefully and get all of her work in on time. What GREAT effort. We are proud of you, Morgan!
Mrs. Dunham- Joshua Dillon is our Terrific Kid. Josh has worked very hard to become an active listener. He has made good progress during reading time. He loves
to discuss books and the characters. He's a real fan of Horrible Harry! Joshua is kind and helpful to all his classmates. We are proud to have Joshua in our class. ©©Mrs. Hayes- The first grade students are the terrific kids in our room this week. They worked so hard on their writing prompts. I am proud of their attitudes and sincere efforts in doing this important task. The stories were great and I know they will be proud of their scores. Great job to these first grade writers.
Mrs. Hudak - Our Terrific Kid is Brooke Morrill. Brooke is such an awesome helper. Mrs. Hudak and the

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class depend on her so much to keep us straight!! Her reading and writing skills are terrific!! We love having Brooke be a part of our room!!
Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey- Caitlyn Durant- Caitlyn has made great progress in learning her math facts. We are so proud of the work she is doing..
Brooke Bowden- Brooke is working hard and making wonderful progress in reading skills. Both these girls are cooperative, helpful and wonderful TERRIFIC kids!!
Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Carey- Alan is a hard worker and is practicing his writing and his reading every day. He loves to read to us all and we love listening to him. He is one of the first people to give a compliment to a friend or to say "congratulations" to another child who has accomplished a job. We love his cheerful attitude - and we love Alan!!! David is always kind and helpful. He is one of the most thoughtful children you will ever meet. He works hard on all of his jobs –and works hard on keeping the teachers on their toes!!!! David has a great sense of humor and we love our days working with this terrific kid –we love him!
Mrs. Whitney's Terrific Kid for 5/10 is Britney Cross. She never complains, also lends a hand and is a willing participant in our classroom activities. I really appreciate your attendance and smile everyday.

FROM LAGRANGE..
COOK SCHOOL NEWS
Ms. Ivy’s Stars
BY ERICA LYFORD AND BRAD CIMPHER
     Michelle Baker is this week’s Terrific Kid. Ms. Ivy picked Michelle because she always follows the rules, she’s trying to work out her problems on her own, she always remembers to bring her traveling bookbag back, and she works very hard on her writing.
     Billy Parker, Shalene Cody, and Joshua Gray were chosen for Artists of the week for making beautiful pictures!
     Bus driver Kathy Foss chose Laura Gray as Bus Student for her super bus behavior. The Kindergarten and 1st grade have been working on Mother’s Day presents. They are making Mother’s Day books and planters. They are learning about farm animals, dinosaurs, and beginning a unit on nutrition.
Mrs. Carter’s Class
BY KELSEY OTTMANN
     The second and third graders made flower books for Mother’s Day. They are beautiful! The students are kicking off a new unit in math. They are doing
geometry, using shapes, slides, corners and angles.
     Justin Moulton was chosen Terrific Kid because, “Justin always tries hard to get his work done. He shares his things and is very creative,” says Mrs. Carter.
     Mrs. Foss chose Jacob Turner as Bus Student of the Week. Thanks for being safe on the bus!
Miss K’s Kids
     Richie Russell was honored as Student of the Week. Richie works hard every day, is very organized and asks many questions. He has lots of background knowledge and we love when Richie shares information
with the class. Richie is our resident dinosaur expert. He is a role model every day.
     Patrick Norwood was chosen as Bus Student of the week. Kathy appreciates your effort.
     Grade 4 and 5 students have completed their final projects for the “Change Over Time,” unit. The projects were very creative. Posters and models are on display in the school gymnasium. Students made Gardens-in-a-Jar for their mothers. Moms will have wildflowers to plant. Our thanks to Mrs. Johnston for helping us with this project.
     The Marion C. Cook School staff would like to thank the La Grange PTO for remembering us this week. We will enjoy our new plants. The lunch was excellent. We appreciate all you do!

PENQUIS MEN’S LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP RESULTS
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     On Sunday, May 12th, the PVHS gym was the scene of a very exciting championship game. The Penquis Men’s League’s final game was a match-up between two fine teams, the number one ranked White team, and the two seeded, Yellow team.
     The White team, consisting of David Carey, David Chase, Colby Chase, Scott Lee, Billy Mayo and Ricky Rublee played a good solid game against the Yellow team. Playing for the yellow team were Travis Ellis, Ben Knapp, Brandon McCathy, Stevie Gillis, Chet Gillis, Mike Weston and Matt Heal.
     The first half was a close contest, with White at one time leading by 7 points, but then Yellow went on a scoring spree and at half-time the score was Yellow-43, White-39.
     Yellow extended their lead in the opening minutes of the second half of the game, but the careful passing and shooting of the White team kept the game close. With 1:15 left in the game, White got to with-in four points of the Yellow team, but in the end the young Yellow team prevailed with the final score being Yellow 85, White 81.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham
Being inspired to write a column every week is more difficult than I would have ever believed it to be. Hardly a day goes by, though, that someone doesn't come up to me and want to talk about the recipes or topics of my column. I appreciate their speaking to me and telling me the things they like and the recipes they've tried. I enjoy sharing old memories with fellow Milo-ites and these conversations inspire me to keep writing.
One of my other passions, besides writing, is keeping up with friends both near and far, with my e-mail. I have a cousin who moved away three or four
years ago and we have stayed in touch via e-mail ever since her move. Her husband credits her adjustment to

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her move away from home to our constant connection through cyberspace. There are two of us cousins left behind here in Maine, and we keep up three-way conversations with her several times a week. I have a friend right here in Milo that I could talk to on
the phone whenever I wanted to, but we seldom talk on the phone; we are in touch, however, every day.
     It amazes me that I can just type a few lines to dear old friends whenever I want and they can type a few words back, or not, depending on how busy they are. But, we're in touch. They usually do type back a few lines, and sometimes they type back volumes. My husband's family is all on-line now. That totally blows my mind! If my in-laws could see all of their children rolled up to their individual computers, and com-municating through cyberspace, they'd be amazed. They wouldn't be able to believe it!
     I have a friend in Texas who sends me great stuff. Today I got this list from her that was so good I thought I'd share it with everyone. I'd gotten this list before, but hadn't saved it and so was happy to have gotten it again. The subject is Things That Make You Feel Good. By golly they do make you feel good! Read them and enjoy them. They are listed by number, but I'm just going to put commas between them. They begin with: falling in love, laughing so hard your face hurts, a hot shower, no lines at the supermarket, a special glance. The list continues: getting mail, taking a drive on a pretty road, hearing your favorite song on the radio, lying in bed listening to the rain outside, hot towels fresh out of the dryer, chocolate milk shakes, a long distance phone call. The feel-good list includes: a bubble bath, a good conversation, finding a $20 bill in your coat from last winter, running through sprinklers (I would add to this doing it with a little kid), having someone tell you that you "look like a million bucks," laughing at an inside joke, accidentally overhearing someone say something nice about you.
     The list goes on: waking up and realizing you still have a few hours left to sleep (ah, heaven), song lyrics printed inside your new CD so you can sing along without feeling stupid, going to a really good concert, making eye contact with a cute stranger (which really appealed to the flirt in me). The list winds up with: winning a really competitive game, and making chocolate chip cookies, watching the sunrise or watching it set, and finally; getting out of bed every morning and thanking God for another beautiful day.
     All of these feel-good things do sound wonderful, don't they! They are positives in our often-times negative lives. We need to be spending as much time thinking positive thoughts as possible. Our little newspaper is a positive. The good things that the Kiwanis does every week for this community are a positive. Joining that wonderful, busy, determined, generous group was one of the best decisions that I've made in a long time.
     We had a wonderful time planning and putting on the Variety Show. There was such a wonderful turn-out both nights. The old Town Hall looked and felt wonderful. All the money earned is going to such wonderful causes. It's always worth the effort to be able to give generously to a good cause. It's always worth the effort to do good things for your community, no matter what capacity you do them in. I'm adding "doing something nice for my community" to my Things That Make Me Feel Good list.
     Here's a Feel Good main dish that you might also add to the list. It's so simple that you might think it must be typed wrong, but I assure you it isn't and it's wonderful.

Old-Fashioned Macaroni and Cheese with Ham
7-ounce package macaroni, cooked and drained
1 pound cooked ham, cut up in little bite-sized pieces (I use a ham steak cut up)
1 pound shredded cheddar cheese
12-ounce can evaporated milk, undiluted (you can use low-fat, if you prefer)

     Grease a 9X13 inch glass baking dish. In a large bowl, mix cooked macaroni, ham and cheese until well blended. Spoon into the baking dish. Pour the evaporated milk evenly over the ingredients in the baking dish.
     Bake in a preheated 375-degree oven for 55 to 65 minutes or until top of dish is crispy brown and bubbling. Let it stand for 5 minutes, serve. Makes 8 servings.
     Here's a nice comforting muffin recipe that you might like with the above dish.
Squash Muffins
1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup sugar
1 egg
1 cup milk
1 cup squash (you can use left over mashed squash or canned squash)
2 cups flour
1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. cream of tartar
     Cream the shortening and sugar. Add the egg and mix well. Add the milk and squash. Sift the flour, salt, baking soda and cream of tartar. Add to the creamed mixture. Fill approximately 16 muffin cups that you have
greased, or sprayed with baking spray, or lined with papers, and bake at 425 degrees for 20 to 25 minutes.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz
Collections of Animals

1. Cast a. Ducks
2. Exaltation b. Sheep
3. Band c. Quails
4. Charm d. Elk
5. Gam e. Larks
6. Bevy f. Geese
7. Flock g. Hawks
8. Gang h. Goldfinch
9. Brace i. Whales
10. Gaggle

j. Gorillas

It’s Time for Vernal Pools
     Probably some of you have never heard of vernal pools. I’m sure most of you have seen or at least heard them. Around here we call them bogs or swamps. By definition vernal pools are between 25 and 75 feet across

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and rarely exceed 3 feet in depth. They are a depression in the ground that lacks a permanent source of water and an outlet. They become dry during some part of the year or at least every few years. Vernal pools fill with water during the winter and are sometimes enjoyed as small skating rinks. The water in the pools usually disappears by mid summer. Vernal pools are characterized further in that they contain no weeds or cattails and because of their seasonal nature cannot support fish. This is important because most of the organisms using the pool would die out because of fish predation.
     Until recently, vernal pools were ignored as habitats for animals. Recent studies, however, have shown that some animals would become extinct without them. A number of organisms require vernal pools to complete their life cycle. Among these are fairy shrimp. These are 1” crustaceans that spend their entire life cycle in the pools. The eggs hatch in the spring and the entire life cycle is completed in a few weeks before the pool dries up. The eggs laid by the females can lose up to 92% of their water content and lie dormant at the bottom of the dry pool until the next spring. Since they make excellent food for fish, their presence indicates a vernal pool, not a pond.
     Wood frogs are another animal that requires vernal pools. These frogs are brown in color and are 2 to 3 inches long. Wood frogs spend their adult life in forests away from the water. They live up to a quarter mile away from the pool and migrate to the water in the spring to lay their eggs and immediately return to the forest. You can hear them near boggy areas in the spring. Their mating call closely resembles a quacking duck. Wood and tree frogs are especially adapted so they go from egg to adult in the short time the pool is filled with water.
     Many salamanders also use vernal pools for laying eggs. Mole, spotted and Jefferson salamanders, to name a few, live on the forest floor and travel to the pools one rainy spring night each year. If there is no rain, they burrow in the ground near the pool and when the rain comes, they enter the pool in the same spot each year and have a congress. The congress is a mating dance where the salamanders swim and dance through the night. The males release spermaphores on the bottom of the pool and the females pick them up to fertilize their eggs. They do not stay in the pool after mating, although some females have been observed guarding their eggs for a few days. They exit the pool where they came in, which makes them easy prey for predators such as owls. Mole salamanders are 8” long and are black with yellow spots. They are seldom seen because they are nocturnal and are easily frightened. It takes them three years to reach sexual maturity, but they have no difficulty in finding their way back to the pool. They have been known to travel over snow on their journey.
     The food chain of one of these pools starts with leaves falling into the depression in the fall. Bacteria start to decompose them. The bacteria are eaten by organisms such as daphnia, copepods and rotifers. These in turn are eaten by caddis flies, waterboatmen, diving beetles, damselflies, water scorpions and dragon fly lavae.
     Turtles are another denizen of vernal pools. They feed on frog, toad and salamander eggs.
     Vernal pools aid the environment in other ways as well. They tend to moderate extreme temperatures and they slowly release their water to the surrounding area as the weather gets warmer.
Answers: 1.g, 2.e, 3.j, 4.h, 5.i, 6.c, 7.b, 8.d, 9.a, 10.f
Score: 5 Good, 6-7 Excellent, 8-10 Superb

Psychology Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the answer most closely associated with the term:
1. Ink blots
(a) lying, (b) phobia, (c) projection, (d) intelligence
2, Kinsey
(a) unconscious, (b) sex, (c) occult, (d) normal
3. Binet
(a) psychoses, (b) reaction time, c) intelligence, (d) obesity
4, Sheldon
(a) abnormality, (b) love, (c)discrimination, (d) body types
5. schizophrenia
(a) simple, (b) catatonic, (c) manic,(d) both (a) and (b)
6. cranium
(a) mouth, (b) brain, (c) stomach, (d) foot
7. ectomorph
(a) thin, (b) fat, (c) lazy, (d) quiet
8. Bedlam
(a) Paris, (b) New York, (c) Vienna, (d) London
9. bipolar
(a) eccentric, (b) manic depressive, (c) outspoken, (d) angry
10. extinction
(a) end of world, (b) end of relationships, (c) end of conditioning, (d) end of testing
Answers: 1-c 2-b 3-c 4-d 5-d 6-b 7-a 8-d 9-b 10-c

PVHS KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     The Key Club administrative year ended on March 31, 2002. Looking back over the past nine months, I’m very pleased with what the club has accomplished! The club has re-focused its efforts on community service and has completed 597 community service hours since September 2001. We thank the community for affording us the opportunity to assist in community projects and look forward to another year of service. We completed the two required community service projects with our sponsoring Kiwanis club and our members enjoyed breakfast with the Kiwanians on a regular basis. Kiwanians attended our meetings more often than in the past and we can even boast about having a few “regulars” now. We began a new tradition with the “Community Christmas Tree” which was well supported by our club and well received by the community. We assisted Everett and Freda Cook for the second year with their Annual Christmas Dinner. We donated nearly $2000 to local charities such as Camp Sunshine, Kiwanis Secret Santa, Town of Lincoln Disaster Relief, MSAD #41 Outing Club and the 9-11 Fund. We began to work harder to understand our roles within the club and fulfill the obligations of each office. The required monthly reports are accurate records of the club’s activities and were filed on time each month. The weekly club meetings have improved greatly this past year, as have the board meetings. I have enjoyed working with the club this past year and appreciate the support the members have given me! And I look forward to the great things we will accomplish in the next year.

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HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
THE ‘Y’
     During the earlier part of the past century, more rail traffic was very evident in Brownville Jct., which meant more employees. This posed the problem of where to house them. In 1917, the employees of the Canadian Pacific Railroad contributed a day’s pay, and the YMCA was built at a cost of $17,500.
     It was an eight-bedroom, three-story structure, reddish-brown with white trim. The major source of heat was coal. The first floor contained a lounge, dining room, and recreational area with a pool table, shuffleboard, and a tennis table. There was also a doctor’s office where Dr. Hardin and Dr. McDonough immunized many people.
     The banquet room was the scene of many railroad retirement, baseball, basketball, Boy Scout, and alumni banquets as well as serving as a meeting place. The “Y” was run by secretaries, the first two being Mr. John H. Henry and Mr. James L. Hay, who also served as supply (substitute) preachers in the Brownville churches.
     The basement contained a two-lane bowling alley (complete with manual pin setters), showers, and a kitchen where boarders could prepare their own meals. Many of the roomers were temporary but a few stayed much longer. Two of them were Bill Stineford and a man who always wore a sports jacket and carried screwdrivers in his pocket, hence the name “Screwy Louis.”
     There were more activities available outside, a tennis court, skating rink, and a baseball field. It was usually a dirty sport, playing baseball at the “Y”, since the field contained mostly cinders.
     On the morning of December 20, 1919, the “Y” became instrumental as a temporary hospital. At 7:30 am, a passenger train, going west, and a freight train, going east, collided in Onawa. The injured were taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal and to Brownville Jct. Seven doctors were called, Dr. Bundy being one of them. Fifty-nine people were injured and eighteen killed. One of the freight sheds was utilized as a morgue.
     As time wore on more men were building their own houses and the YMCA was not needed as before. The Canadian Pacific offered the building to the town of Brownville for the sum of one dollar. The town was in doubt whether they could maintain the building so it was demolished in 1965.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MAY 8 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     
This week’s breakfast began with twenty-one members and guest Bud Daggett present.
     
The Key Club has a big Lock-In on May 11 - 12. Several area Key Clubs are participating including Dexter and Greenville. Pizza and refreshments will be served for sure, with something special happening at midnight.
     
Let’s see, the newspaper is seeking a new printer, the Town Hall steering committee met the 9th, the books have been ordered for the RIF distribution, the work sign- up sheet was

circulated for auction help, and work goes on to finish the Community Birthday Calendar.
     The Variety Show was a huge success. Great participation and some healthy donations will be made to the Make-A-Wish and Pine Tree Hospice foundations.
     There were twenty-four Happy and Sad Dollars this week, mostly for a great Variety Show.
     A motion was made to accept the slate of officers for the Oct 1, 2002 to Sept 30, 2003 year as follows: President - Edwin Treworgy, Vice President - Joseph Zamboni, Second Vice President - Murrel Harris, Secretary - Nancy Grant, Board members - Chris Beres and Sheri Conley. It was passed.
     Upcoming Speakers: David Walker and the following week Walter Macdougall.
     Today was the monthly business meeting so the minutes from the monthly Board meeting were discussed. The board decided to decline the offer of DLC Reality's house donation, the raffle at the Kiwanis Auction will be a 50/50 instead of a canoe or kayak raffle, a vote was held on the division officers with Doc Sherman to become our Lt. Governor. We donated to the Crider girls for their mission trip to Mexico and to HOBY, a Kiwanis sponsored leadership program, and to Trish Hayes for the Make-A-Wish foundation Walk-A-Thon. May has five Wednesdays so the 29th will be a supper meeting with a speaker. Regretfully we won't be able to attend Guilford's Charter night as that conflicts with our auction.
     President Todd Lyford, AKA Police Chief, AKA Firefighter, gave us an update on the B & A tie pile fire in Derby. At this time, the pile was still burning with bulldozers coming in with hopes of moving ties to get at the lingering fire. A very amazing fact about this fire was that there was not one reportable injury.

     Editors Note: For those of you who live outside of the area, the fire Janet refers to in the meeting notes was a huge fire at the B & A Shops yard in Derby. A grass fire leaped to a 15ft.tall pile of used railroad ties and caused a huge blaze. The surrounding woods and fields are still very dry due to the drought and the possibility of a huge fire was very real.
     From 1:50 PM until 4PM Tuesday, May 7, the sirens I heard from my house made it sound like the world was coming to an end! I live high on Sargent Hill, across from the C.D. Center, and I can easily hear sounds from downtown. At about 10 minutes of 2 that day I heard the first series of sirens, but wasn’t too concerned, because oftentimes the Dover ambulance automatically responds to calls for Milo’s ambulance, to offer assistance.
     After an hour and a half of sirens, and the sight of two helicopters flying overhead, my curiosity got the best of me, and I called Tammy Vail to see if she knew what was going on. Her hair salon is located on the corner of Elm and Main Streets, so I figured she would have seen or heard what had happened. She told me that there was a huge fire at the B & A shops and that fire departments from all nearby towns were responding. Also responding was the Maine Forestry Department, and that explained the helicopters.
     In all, 15 fire departments gave assistance. The fire was contained, then extinguished. It was an incredible sight seeing all those uniformed men working together flawlessly. Kirby said he was amazed at the organization of the trucks on scene. A long line of fire vehicles formed a brigade and one by one they moved near the fire, deposited their load of water, then drove to load on more water. Adding to the effort were two forestry helicopters. Each would scoop 300 gallons of water into their suspended hopper by dragging it in the nearby river, then dump the water on the fire.
The next day, the front page of the Bangor Daily News displayed an incredible photograph of three of our firemen. Ricky Flagg, Troy Richards and Dickie Pelletier looked so dedicated and professional in the dramatic photo.
     We at The Three Rivers News would like to express our thanks and our pride. We have an extremely capable and dedicated group of fire fighters, and for that the area is grateful.

MAY 1 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY

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