Three Rivers News, 2002-06-18
TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 32
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

KIWANIS AUCTION

     The Kiwanis Auction will be held June 27th and 28th. Bargains galore will be up for auction. The proceeds from our auction go toward all of the projects that Kiwanis contributes to over the year. (Like this newspaper) We are looking for items for the auction. If you have a donation, please call Eben Dewitt (943-2486) or Herb Dunham (943-2353) to have your items picked up.

THE UNITED BAPTIST CHURCH OF MILO
PRESENTS
“CHRISTMAS IN JUNE”
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL
JUNE 24TH –28TH
ALL CHILDREN FROM AGES 3 THROUGH 5TH GRADE ARE WELCOME.
9:00 TO 11:30 AM
CHRISTMAS SNACKS, CRAFTS, CAROLS AND GAMES

SEE YOU THERE!!!!
CALL 965-8590 FOR MORE DETAILS

BLOOD DRIVE
MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2002
2-7 PM
AT THE MILO TOWN HALL
SPONSORED BY CARING MILO CITIZENS

Thought of the week: The general rules of inductive reasoning no longer apply after age 70.
Edwin Treworgy, June 12, 2002

THE MILO TOWN OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED ON JULY 4TH AND 5TH IN OBSERVANCE OF THE HOLIDAY. HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY FOURTH!!
ALSO, IN OBSERVANCE OF THE JULY 4TH HOLIDAY, THURSDAY’S CURBSIDE TRASH PICK-UP WILL BE ON WEDNESDAY, JULY 3RD.

CRIMINOLOGY EXPERT HAS MILO ROOTS
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     Dr. Kim Cook, the daughter of Everett and Freda Cook of the Hitching Post B &B, is a graduate of the PVHS class of 1979. She has since had an interesting and fulfilling academic experience. She is also an author and lecturer.
     Kim has worked hard at her education and her achievements are many. After graduating from Penquis, Kim moved to Florida. She left there to escape an abusive relationship and returned to Milo. In July of 1981, Kim gave birth to her son Gregory. She worked outside the home and while raising her son and a nephew. Rather then settle into a traditional single mother role, Kim opted to go to college full time!!!
     In January of 1984, Kim was a full-time student, travelling to Orono each day to attend classes at the University of Maine. She originally intended to study to be a travel agent, but after taking a sociology course she decided that was the field for her. It was then she decided that she wasn’t going to stop her education until she had earned her Ph.D.!
     In 1987 she received her Bachelor’s degree in Sociology, graduating with distinction. She had decided to narrow her studies to the field of Criminology. She was chosen that year as one of 100 of the United States Outstanding College Women’s Graduates, and was featured in Good Housekeeping magazine.
Immediately after graduating, Kim started classes at the University of New Hampshire and received her doctorate in 1994. While she was living in New Hampshire, Gregory attended elementary school there. A family member had adopted her nephew.
     After earning her doctorate, Kim accepted a faculty position at Mississippi State University. She worked at MSU for a year, then accepted her present position as Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Southern Maine, in Portland.
In 1998, Northeastern University Press published her first book, “Divided Passions: Public Opinions on Abortion and the Death Penalty”. Her book analyzes and interprets perspectives on abortion and capital punishment.
     Kim was in Australia and New Zealand for six months as a Fulbright Scholar, where she studied a specific element of Australia’s criminal justice system: Restorative Justice. The aim of restorative justice is to integrate the criminal back into society while at the same time giving the victim a voice and a chance to tell the offender the impact the crime has made on the victim’s life. The program has a high success rate in Australia and trial programs are being started here in the states.
     Kim has a book in the works based on the theories of restorative justice, and if you want to read more about her and her work you can visit her website at KJCook@usm.maine.edu.
     Kim is an inspiration to single mothers and to all that would like to further their education.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

Non - Emergency Phone Service to Change
BY TODD LYFORD
     With the advent of the E9-1-1 system, the Town of Milo will change its phone service on the former emergency number as of June 12, 2002. The former emergency phone number for the Town of Milo was 943-2281. This phone number will continue to be used for non-emergency phone calls to the dispatcher at the Piscataquis County Sheriff's Department. All Emergency Calls Dial 9-1-1. By changing this service, the Town of Milo will continue to provide a phone number for 24-hr. non-emergency dispatch and save the town several thousands of dollars.
     If you have any questions about this change in the phone service, contact Todd Lyford at the Milo Police Department.

MOVE & IMPROVE CELEBRATION TIME
BY SUE CHAFFEE
     The Move & Improve Celebration time will be held on June 19th at the Bangor Civic Center. Registration and social time (including line dancing) will be from 4:30 - 5:15. Prizes will be awarded from 5:15 - 7:00.
     If anyone is interested in keeping a Move & Improve log through the summer you can go on line at www.move&improve.org. Hope someone from our site wins a prize!!

BROWNVILLE NEWS
BY SOPHIA WILSON
     The Town of Brownville is having a Special Town Meeting on Thursday, June 27, 2002 at the Brownville Town Office beginning at 6.m. to consider raising the interest rate on delinquent 2002 property taxes from 6.75% to 8.75% per year.
     Penquis Valley High School's Jobs for Maine's Graduates (PVHS JMG) Program is sponsoring a benefit softball game on Saturday, June 22, 2002 at the Filed of Dreams on Elm Street in Milo beginning at 1:00 p.m. The employees of the Town of Brownville have challenged the Town of Milo employees to a seven-inning game in memory of

Joel Morrill, a much beloved community member and dedicated Milo firefighter who died earlier this year. Although the Milo Town Manager, Jane Jones, has guaranteed a Milo victory, we, at the Brownville Town Office, are quite confident that our stellar lineup of players (ranging in age 18 - 80) will walk away with the "W"! This will be a fun game for participants and spectators alike -- and it’s for a good cause.
     We want to thank Steve Jay for all of his work to get water running in the Village and Pine Tree cemeteries in Brownville. He wants to make sure that folks know that the new water spigots are more sensitive and will have 100% flow with a quarter turn.

FIELD DAY
BY LYNN WESTON
     This week was "Field Day" time for students in Grades K-6. P.E. teacher, Mrs. Russell, organizes the weeklong event. Each day students from different grade levels met at Milo Elementary and participated in a variety of activities ranging from tube belly bumping to water soccer. The day always concludes with a pie-eating contest. Thanks Mrs. Russell. It was a lot of fun.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. The exact center of Maine was once situated at (a) Brownville High School, (b) the Prairie Pavilion, (c) the Gerry Company, (d) Seth Wilkerson's store
2. Lefty Strout was signed by the (a) Red Sox, (b) Braves, (c) Yankees, (d) Giants
3. The longest serving officer of the BJHS Alumni Association is (was) (a) George Dean, (b) Linda Coburn, (c) Eddie Weston, (d) Jim Bryant
4. Ralph Perry began his business on (a) Van Horne Avenue, (b) Main Street, (c) Front Street, (d) Stickney Hill
5. Mrs. Gerow's father was (a (n) (a) governor, (b) judge, (c) doctor, (d) author
6. Driver Education at BJHS began in (a) 1955, (b) 1959, (c) 1961, (d) 1962
7.Rev. Kwan Lee hailed from (a) Japan, (b) China, (c) Korea, (d) Thailand
8. The Brownville Community Church tennis court was the work of (a) Rev. Tracy, (b) Rev. Loudon, (c) Buddy Gerrish, (d) Rev. Boutwell
9. The Frog Pond is located in (a) North Brownville, (b) Skunk Hollow, (c) Brownville Junction, (d) Lake View
10. Lori Larson was once (a) town treasurer, (b) librarian, (c) basketball coach, (d) Miss Brownville

Answers
1-d 2-b 3-b 4-a 5-c 6-d 7-c 8-a 9-b 10-d

A FOND FAREWELL TO THE AYUDA CLUB
     Our last meeting as an organized club was our picnic at the home of Dorothy Trask in Sebec. As we separate and go our different ways, we will always treasure the time we have spent as a group of caring, loving women who has served our community, state and nation with diligence. The following notes are part of our history.
     On January 30, 1940, members of the New Idea Club assisted thirty young women of the town of Milo in forming a service club. They helped immeasurably in showing us how to conduct a meeting, form a constitution and elect our officers. We shall always be grateful to them for their kindness.

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     We applied to the State Federation of Women’s Clubs for membership and were immediately accepted in June of 1940. Our first president was Doris Skoog Larouche, who served us well and will be remembered with love and admiration. She was unable to be with us for our final meeting, but expressed her appreciation for the invitation.
     The name “ Ayuda” was selected, and is derived from the Indian phrase meaning “ I lead”. We have been an integral part of serving the area in our outreach to the various charities, our support of the in-town needs of children and adults, as well as supporting the schools in their various programs.
     Many worthwhile projects have been accomplished over the sixty-two years of our existence. We raised funds to purchase a Resuscitator to be used in life-saving work by the Milo Fire Department and the local hospital. Rummage sales have been held twice a year since November 15, 1941, with our last one being held on May 4, 2002. All of our members were involved in selling bonds, working for the Red Cross, helping the U.S.O. and participating in many ways in the Civilian Defense Program during the war. We sponsored the Girl Scouts in the ‘40s, furnishing time, money and leaders.
     We furnished free milk to schoolchildren who were unable to pay in 1948-49, and continued that service for many years. In the ‘50s, we bought playground equipment, a television set and shrubbery for the new Elementary School, as well as drapes and fixtures for the Town Hall, and started a blood bank for the Milo Hospital. This was the year that we assisted a group of young women to organize a Junior Women’s Club, named the Neoteric Club.
     In the ‘70s, we helped organize a committee to formulate plans to decorate Main Street at Christmas time. Wreaths were purchased, and we have continued to do so each year. We helped Literacy Volunteers of America, sponsored girls to Girls State and delegates to the conservation camp at Bryant Pond. We have donated to the Close-Up Program since 1978. We sent gifts to the Bangor Mental Health Institute each year at Christmas time.
     One of our special projects was to help the Three Rivers Ambulance Service. We sponsored “ Ambulance Day”, and donated many dollars to this worthy cause. Many times, the amount was $5,000.00 or more. Over the years, we have given “Kind News” to the third grade at Milo Elementary School. Each year the students, under the direction of teacher Debbie Dunham, have presented an evening of songs and readings on a special theme, as a thank you to our club. It is very gratifying to see these children work so hard to entertain us, and we appreciate all the work that goes into the production.
     Each year we help send a student to the Hugh O’Brian (HOBY) conference. They are taught good leadership qualities, and have always come home with a sense of their own worth as a person. Each October, they are invited to our meeting to present a synopsis of their time at HOBY.
     There are many more service missions projects that we have assisted over the years, and we are so thankful that we have been able to make a difference in many lives. As our club celebrates its last time together, we want to thank all the friends and fellow workers who have made our years of service a time of accomplishment in many areas. As we join in fellowship today, let us remember our past and be mindful of our sharing of thoughts and deeds as a club of dedicated women.
     It is with mush admiration of the past presidents, and with love to my fellow officers and members, that I say farewell to the Ayuda Club. We have served well, and will continue to be part of one another in a lasting bond of friendship. Thank you. May God Bless and keep you.
Merna Dunham, President 2002

KATAHDIN COUNTRY CLUB OFFERS FREE LESSONS
     The golf course in Milo will offer free golf instruction to the first twelve 6th, 7th and 8th graders (boys or girls) who sign up with Murrel Harris at the Milo Rec. Dept. by Thursday, June 20, 2002. Four from each grade will be accepted. Call 943-7326

MILO REC. DEPT. ISSUES WARNING
     The light box at the Basketball Court will be fixed one more time. If it is tampered with again, the lights will be terminated and there will be no more ball playing at night!!

Marion C. Cook School News
Ms Ivy’s Stars
BY ERICA LYFORD AND BRAD CIMPHER
     Samantha Noke was this week’s Terrific Kid. Ms Ivy chose her because Samantha has been trying hard to be a good listener, is learning her alphabet and numbers, always follows the rules, and is always a good friend. K/1 friends are studying nutrition. They are working on a book called The Noisy Lunch. The snack each day coincides with the page they are working on. They have done carrots, celery, and apples.
     On Monday, the children enjoyed Field Day at Milo Elementary. Games, a water slide, and a pie-eating contest were enjoyed by all the K/1friends of the district.
Mrs. Carter’s Class
BY KELSEY OTTMANN AND RICHIE RUSSELL
     Michael Grant was named Terrific Kid. He had a wonderful week as he completed all his work on time and showed improved self-control.
     Jessica Slaughter was named Bus Student of the Week. She always makes good choices on the bus.
     On Monday, the students went to Bar Harbor, enjoying the beach, a picnic lunch, and the seaquarium.
     On Tuesday the class went to Field Day at Milo Elementary with all 2nd and 3rd graders of the district.. Although the weather was uncooperative and activities were held inside, the students had a fun and exciting time!
Miss K’s Kids
     Alyssa Medeiros was the Terrific Kid. Alyssa works hard and is a good friend to all. 4th and 5th graders had visitors this week-6th graders Kelli Heath, Travis Willette, Nate Durant, and Cheryl Roesing answered questions about moving up to the 6th grade, alleviating many fears. The class
enjoyed hearing about different activities that go on in the 6th Grade.
From Brownville Junction!
     On Thursday, 4th and 5th graders joined 5th and 6th graders from the district for their Field Day. The weather was wonderful, and a good time was had by all!

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED., JUNE 19 ALL SITES CLOSED. ALL MEALS FOR ME EMPLOYEES WILL BE AT THEIR ANNUAL STAFF MEETING.
THURS., JUNE 20 HAPPY THIRTIETH BIRTHDAY TO MEALS FOR ME!!! CHICKEN CORDON BLEU, WILD RICE, GREEN BEANS, LEMON MERINGUE PIE
FRI., JUNE 21 BEEF STROGANOFF, NOODLES, MIXED VEGGIES, CANTALOUPE
MON., JUNE 24 LIVER & ONIONS, MASHED POTATO, CORN, FRUIT COCKTAIL
TUES., JUNE 24 BAKED STUFFED HADDOCK, MASHED POTATOES, FRESH CARROTS, CHOC. PUDDING
WED., JUNE 25

COLD PLATE: SLICED TURKEY, PASTA SALAD, BEET SALAD, ICE BOX PUDDING

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED.

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Milo Elementary School News
BY TOM WITHAM
     I would like to take advantage of the spot where Milo's Terrific Kids news has been, and say a few words about everyone that helps make Terrific Kids happen.
     Milo Elementary, along with the other schools, is filled with many many terrific kids. Every kid here has his or her moment (regardless of how many minutes I see him or her spend on the bench outside Mrs. Beres' office). Oh how I remember shaking in my boots trying to walk calmly to Jane Skehan's office after "playing dangerously" on the jungle gym.
     I'd really like to commend the teachers this year for making the Terrific Kid certificate printing process seem less like a chore and more like a pleasurable duty. There are a few teachers that really stand out because I think they did an outstanding job. Mrs. Whitney tops the list. Even when the ice knocked out her internet connection in the portable this year, she still managed to find a way to email me her name way ahead of when I needed it. Mrs. Barden and Mrs. Dunham also were excellent when it came to promptitude.
     You might be asking yourself what the big deal is about it all. The teachers have to pick a Terrific Kid. Then they have to email me their name, and a description of why they were picked. I then have to enter the name into a database, and copy all the TK reasons to a word document to be printed and sent with the certificates. Then I have to email the reasons to Val for the paper and then the names to Pat Bradbury for the Tuesday News and Notes: All before Friday morning. This gets challenging sometimes when I'm missing names, or when someone else decides to print while I'm doing the certificates. I wish I had a nickel for every speech document I had pop out of the printer on a Terrific Kid certificate. Teasing Mrs. Meyer about it never gets old.
     Finally, I'd like to thank Mrs. Beres for passing the torch on to me two years ago. When she gave the job to me, she had done the hard work of setting up the database, and continues to be a good resource when doing the certificates.
     It's nice to have a little break, but I look forward to starting back up in the fall. I'm sure Val will be glad to get the content back in the paper.
Editors note: I love reporting about the Terrific Kids each week in the paper. The motto and creed of Kiwanis is “Children Priority One”, and the Terrific Kids columns from each area school is a wonderful forum for showing the world how wonderful our children are. I will miss reading about them this summer, and look forward to starting the columns back up in September.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     I had a wonderful television experience last night. The "AFI 100 Years 100 Passions" show was on CBS. I'd been watching all the hype for several days, and got glimpses of scenes from some of my all time favorite movies. I couldn't wait to get into my pajamas and bathrobe and get comfy in the recliner to watch the whole show. I decided it would be fun to keep the list on paper, myself, to use it for

reference whenever I might need to retrieve that information. I marked a tablet of paper starting with 100 and five pages later I was on numbers 10 - 1. Jerry McGuire was movie number 100. I don't remember that I ever saw Jerry McGuire, but I think I might rent it soon, as I think I might like it. There were scenes that they showed that I "kind of" remembered, but possibly it was just from the advertisements. Pillow Talk, Grease, Dirty Dancing, and Bridges of Madison County (all particular favorites of mine) were also in the 100-90 list. I was beginning to feel bummed. Yes, some of my favorite movies made the list, the bottom of the list!
     I've always thought that I could do a pretty good job critiquing movies. I'd really rather critique restaurants. But that probably not being possible, rating movies would be my next idea of a good job. Anyway, my favorites were slipping away quickly and I was racking my brain trying to figure out what movies could possibly be better love stories than any of the aforementioned.
     The next 10 movies (90-80) didn't hold any surprises for me. I was only vaguely familiar with any of them, and The Goodbye Girl was the only movie that I really had any opinion on at all. My favorite movie of all time, The American President with Michael Douglas and Annette Benning fell in place at # 75. I couldn't believe it! I was stunned! They had led me to believe it was going to play a more prominent roll because they used my very favorite scene in the advertisements for the AFI show itself. You know the scene I mean, where Andy waltzes Sidney around the dance floor at a state dinner. They discuss the fact that all the eyes in the place are on her because she's dancing with the President and everybody is wondering who she is, and because she told him "yes." An orchestra in the background is playing strains of the love song with the words “I would love being loved by you”. It was the most sensuous scene I've ever had the pleasure of watching, over and over and over again. And all they gave it was a 75! Unbelievable!
     At the halfway mark the local election results scrolling across the bottom of the screen annoyed me. Whoever invented that process ought to be shot. It's totally annoying! While the vague and inconclusive numbers were scrolling, you couldn't see the movie titles or the year the movie was released. Keep in mind I was keeping track on paper of this whole thing. As my other favorite movies, one by one were dropped into their places I began to wonder what could possibly be left to count down. Can you believe that Sleepless In Seattle was only # 45! An Officer and a Gentleman, Sound of Music, On Golden Pond and Pretty Woman were all in the 20's range. What is wrong with these people! They wouldn't know a good movie if it jumped up and hit them in the face.
     Finally we got down to the teens and there were some wonderful movies listed there. Singing in the Rain came in at # 16, Out of Africa came in at #13, and My Fair Lady was at #12. Now we were getting somewhere. These were more like it! They went into a long advertising segment and we finally got to the top 10. It was 10:30 p.m. A whole hour and a half past my normal bedtime and I was excitedly ready for the final countdown. Wait a minute! What's this! A local News brief! Can you believe that at the most crucial part of the program, when all the audience was two and half-hours into this show, they break into the network broadcast with a Local News Brief? If they hadn't been going to have a full broadcast of the election results at 11:00, it might have been different. If anyone gave a darn about the sketchy results they'd collected, I could see it. But, at that precise time of night, and under the circumstances, I was totally infuriated with what Channel 5 was doing to me. Naturally, I took the whole thing personally.

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     The show came back on in about 5 minutes, and I was able to fill in the gaps by watching closely and writing quickly. We were down to the final 5 romantic movies. There were a few wonderful movies that hadn't been listed and down in the lower left-hand corner of my tablet I wrote the words "Gone With the Wind" and "Casablanca." Of course, there wasn't anyone in my household still up for me to share this prediction with, but I wrote it anyway. Those film institution people are so predictable. Those two movies came in # 2 and #1 just like I wrote them.
     Since my wonderful husband knew that I'd be tired from staying up so late last night, he fixed dinner for us tonight. He made one of our favorite meals. Our good friend Stephen Rhoda gave us this wonderful recipe idea a few summers ago. Stephen usually makes this dish in a small roasting pan on his grill. We have adapted the directions to use in our oven. We call it Baked Boiled Dinner. You'll need a large covered casserole dish. We use our 10-inch Corning Ware dish that's about 2 inches deep. It had a real nice glass cover on it until tonight when my husband made the fatal mistake of setting the hot cover in the sink - which would be the sink, that had a few drops of cold water in it. He thought a bomb had gone off in our kitchen, and the glass cover is history! Next time we'll have to use foil to cover this dish.
     You'll need a thick-cut ham steak, about 8 small white potatoes, a lb. bag of carrots and several small white onions. Lay the ham steak in the dish and lay the peeled vegetables all over the top of it. We usually quarter the carrots so they have a fighting chance of being done when the other things get done. We drizzle about 2 tablespoons of olive oil over this, a small pat or two of butter, pepper, 1 crushed clove of garlic, and a couple of teaspoon of dried parsley. Cover tightly and bake in a 375-degree oven for about 1 hour and 20 minutes. These ingredients make their own juices. The casserole dish can go right from oven to table on a hot dish mat. So easy to prepare and serve. And, the best part-it's delicious! What a treat tonight's supper was.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz
Match inventor with invention

1. Rocket Engine a. Pullman
2. Thermometer b. Fahrenheit
3. Electric Razor c. Goddard
4. Television d. Spangler
5. Vacuum Cleaner e. Coolidge
6. Sewing Machine f. Schick
7. X-ray tube g. Farnsworth
8. Safety Razor h. Howe
9. Mercury Thermometer i. Galileo
10. Sleeping Car

j. Gillette

Red Paint Indians
     Ever since I was small, I have been fascinated with Red Paint Indian lore. I remember my folks talking about a burial site being found in Bradley when a farmer plowed his field. Archeologists appear to be closing in on the mystery of who they were and why they disappeared, but the answers aren’t in yet.
     Red Paint sites have been dated in Maine from around 4000 to 1000 BC. Around 1000 BC, they seem to have vanished without a trace. Burial sites have been found in Howland, Eddington, Hampden, Milford, Swanville, Bucksport, Bradley, Old Town, Passadumkeag, Blue Hill, Orland, Oakland, Waterville, Winslow, and Kineo as well as a few others. Each site is

characterized by the red ocher present in the gravesite. Many scientists guess the red ocher, or Iron Oxide came from the Katahdin Iron Works area. The site in Kineo was discovered when tennis courts were built for the Kineo Hotel. No care was taken to document the site and after picking up a few artifacts, the courts were completed on top of them.
     All burial sites have been found near large navigable rivers or the ocean. They have been found as far north as Labrador. Items found in the burial sites include stone knives, bone needles, cooking implements, swordfish hooks and spears. Some of the tools were made of slate and who knows, they may have come from the deposits in Brownville. Many of these were decorated with shapes of animals, birds and fish. Some of the tools have decorations of other tribes that indicate some trading must have been going on.
     The Red Paint Indians were similar in build to the Penobscot Indians of today, but the tools found are quite different, indicating an earlier separate culture. They appear to have been excellent sailors because of their wide spread presence along the coast and the fishing gear that has been found.
     As to why they disappeared, we have only guesses. One theory is that the coast of Maine was subsiding into the ocean at the time and there may have been an earthquake that spawned a tidal wave and killed them all. Maybe as sites are studied in the future we will have more clues.
     Red Paint Indians are now referred to as the Moorehead burial tradition, after Warren K. Moorehead who did extensive investigations of their sites.
Answers: 1.c, 2.i, 3.f, 4.g, 5.d, 6.h, 7.e, 8.j, 9.b, 10.a
Score 5 Good, 6-7 Excellent, 8-10 Superb

How old are you?
SUBMITTED BY RODNEY RUSSELL
Older than dirt..........
     My Dad was cleaning out my grandmother's house and he brought me an old Royal Crown Cola bottle. In the bottle top was a stopper with a bunch of holes in it. I knew immediately what it was, but my daughter had no idea. She thought they had tried to make it a salt shaker or something. I knew it as the bottle that sat on the end of the ironing board to "sprinkle" clothes with because we didn't have steam irons.
Man, I am old.
How Many Do You Remember??

Head lights dimmer switches on the floor.
Ignition switches on the dashboard.
Heaters mounted on the inside of the firewall.
Real iceboxes [Ask your Mom about that].

Pant leg clips for bicycles without chain guards.
Soldering irons you heat on a gas burner.
Using hand signals for cars without turn signals.

Older Than Dirt Quiz
Count all the ones that you remember- not the ones you were told about!
Ratings at the bottom.

1. Blackjack chewing gum
2. Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water
3. Candy cigarettes
4. Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles
5. Coffee shops with tableside jukeboxes
6. Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers
7. Party lines
8. Newsreels before the movie
9. P.F. Flyers
10. Butch wax
11. Telephone numbers with a word prefix (Olive-6933)
12. Peashooters
13. Howdy Doody
14. 45 RPM records
15. S&H Green Stamps

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16. Hi-fi's
17. Metal ice trays with lever
18. Mimeograph paper (and how it smelled)
19. Blue flashbulbs
20. Packards
21. Roller skate keys
22. Cork popguns
23. Drive-ins
24. Studebakers
25. Wash tub wringers

If you remembered 0-5 = You're still young
If you remembered 6-10 = You are getting older
If you remembered 11-15 = Don't tell your age
If you remembered 16-25 = You're older than dirt!

LADIES’ NIGHT OUT
By Nancy Grant
     The Cinder City Café, on Main Street in Brownville Jct., was the site of a festive gathering on Tuesday, June 11th. Hostess Alice Kinney, friends, and fellow staff members honored Mrs. Madeline Decker with an informal retirement get-together.
     Mrs. Decker has been an instructor of math, French, and Spanish for the past 34 years at Penquis Valley High School. Madeline has gone above and beyond her academic duties by chaperoning class trips to France and Spain. She shared some memories with her friends on Tuesday evening to the delight of all.
     Mrs. Decker was honored with ‘appropriate’ quotes, a touching poem, and a gift certificate that has to do with her “second home”, a fabric store! (She has created some beautiful quilts!) The cake, made by a mysterious baker, resembled a lavender woven basket topped with flowers of all colors and hues.
     Those wishing Madeline a long and happy retirement were: Pam Stubbs, Ellen Kirby, Debbie Folsom, Gayle Shirley, Kelly Bradeen, Alice Kinney, Carol Jean Sawyer, Carol Smith, Nancy B. Grant, Nancy L. Grant, Robbie Grant, Ginger Wentworth, Sue Chaffee, Chris Hamlin, Ginny Foss, Shirlene Ladd, Lynn Gerrish, Laura Mallett, Allison Saunders, Kathy Ward, and Janet Brown.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
     The present school system, MSAD #41, consists of four separate buildings with an enrollment that seems small in comparison with many other school districts in the state. But, try to think back 112 years, or I should say, try to imagine what it was like many decades ago when there were nine buildings dedicated to readin’, ritin’, and rithmitic’.
1890

District
Pupils
Registered
Average
Attendance
1. Sargent Hill
26
24
2. Goodrich
9
9
3. Hobbstown
4
3.9
4. Stanchfield Ridge
17
24
5. Grammar
50
40
    Intermediate
40
35
    Primary
35
30
6. Murray
9
8.5
7. Tollbridge
14
13
8. Drake
7
6.85
9. Holbrook
10
7.5

KIDS GAMES
     Today’s “kids” have so many opportunities to keep them selves occupied (whether they wish to do so is another matter) but; what did young people do for fun in the olden days, say between 1910 and 1922, in a more simplistic lifestyle? According to Mr. Lloyd Treworgy, in his book, The History of Milo Schools:
     “They worked on the fair, studied evenings, played games, fished, swam, hung may-baskets, played ball, slid, skated, made snow forts, and skied – on unwaxed barrel staves. If they were very lucky, according to Maurice Richardson, a kindly uncle might make them a pair of white maple skis. He had such a pair himself.
Kids had parties, and spelling bees, got up Larkin soap orders to earn their bicycles and watches, and other needs, as “premiums”; went to the “movies” once in while; popped corn, made molasses candy, attended the Price-Weber shows, in Chase’s Hall in May; and jumped up and down on the bulges in unsurfaced roads to make the bulges “buckle”, just after the frost in the spring.
     At Hallowe’en, they played tick-tack-toe with a notched spool, making a devilish noise on windows, to set households in a dither. They played ball, haley-baley over the roof, went to box socials at Christmas time and bought the lunch their girl had put up, to eat with her; and played marching, hand-squeezing games to express their feelings for the pretty girls.
     At any of the many parties, at one home or another, they played – with a great deal of laughter – button, button, winkum, musical chairs, drop the handkerchief, post-office (which could be slightly amorous), or blind man’s bluff. On occasion, they went to dances, though these were rather frowned on as immoral. “Rubbing bellies”, critics called dancing.
     Really, in those times before pleasure came to be measured by how fast one could travel in his sports car, such simple enjoyments, as making molasses candy, weren’t to be laughed at. Having a candy pull, they called it.”

GOING TO EXTREMES
By Nancy Grant
     Sunday, June 9th, was a perfect day for Dustin Bishop and Luke Landry to compete in a Sebois Stream Xtreme Motocross event. The two boys, from the Milo/Brownville area, placed 2nd and 3rd with Dustin coming in the two spot and Luke taking the third. They will be competing again on August 18 and September 15 at the same place. COME CHECK IT OUT!!!!

WHO PLANTED THE TREES ALONG THE STREETS OF MILO? – PART 1
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
Local History Bonus - Reprints from MHS Breeze and other sources
     The great majority of the trees now growing in the yard of the present primary school and what used to be the primary school, high school and all the rest, were set out in 1876 by the pupils of the school and members of the Milo Lodge of Odd Fellows.
     The year of 1876 was known as the Centennial year, the hundredth after the signing of the Declaration of Independence and there was a general tree planting all over the country as one

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way of celebrating the completion of this important cycle in the nation’s history. Milo wasn’t in quite as close touch perhaps with the rest of the world as it is now (1908) but the tree planting spirit reached us and many of the beautiful shade trees growing in various part of the village are a result.
     The planting of the trees in the schoolyard was, however, an event of public interest and importance. The building next below the school house and now (1908) used as a tenement house, I believe, was at that time the Odd Fellows hall and was subsequently a school house itself, before it became a tenement. The two yards were practically one and it was resolved by the members of the lodge and the school committee that a handsome grove of maple and elm trees should be set out there, one which future generations should be proud of. So a day was set apart for a general tree planting bee. The Odd Fellows had a committee, as I recall it, to look after their side of the yard but it was proposed in the school yard that each pupil who had the inclination and was able, should set out a tree, which should be his particular property to be cared for by him and when in after years, it grew to be of large size and spread its grateful shade about, it should be pointed out by the gray- haired citizen or citizens who planted it there, as his or her tree thus becoming a treasured memento of the past and making the one who placed it there somewhat of a public benefactor.
     It was a pretty good idea too, and fired most of us with an ambition to have a tree, which should represent us to future generations. So on the day appointed, it was a Saturday of April 1876, a large crew of men and boys gathered to plant a tree. Many of the school’s boys had previously gone into the woods and taken up a tree to be transplanted in the school yard and the Odd Fellows committee had gone into it in such a lavish manner that there was plenty of small maples on hand for those boys to set out who had not been able to go into the woods and get one.
     The men first set to work and run lines and staked off the location of the trees so that they should be set out in a regular manner and when this was done all hands fell to plant his (or her) tree. Shovels were plied and the dirt flew forenoon and afternoon.
(From: Recollections of a Milo Boy, by Fred K. Owen – MHS Breeze 1908)
CONTINUED NEXT WEEK……

COFFEE HOUSE
JULY 5, 2002 – 7 PM
MILO TOWN HALL ART CENTER
FEATURING THE SMITH BROTHERS
AND CHAIRBACK GAP
$8 PER PERSON WITH THE BENEFITS GOING TO THE MILO TOWN HALL ART CENTER FUND

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MEETING NOTES JUNE 12
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s meeting began with twenty members present. Our guests were an interclub from the Sunrise Club from Dexter and Heidi Finson’s son Jeremy. Thank you Jeremy for saying the invocation for us. Also joining us for breakfast was Rick Benoit who represented the Maine Field Springer Spaniels. He made a request for the Kiwanis food wagon to be at a dog trial, to be held at Al Estes Three-Wing Shooting in September. We will discuss his request at a future board meeting.
     We received a very nice thank you note from the Special Olympic Student Athletes from MSAD #41.
     Updates: the Kiwanis newspaper has a new banner, thanks to Seth Barden, John Sherburne did some prep work on the town hall stage floor so it can be painted (Lance Harris will assist Ed Treworgy on this project), Frank Cochrane passed out Kiwanis auction raffle tickets, and help will be needed June 23rd with tent set up and the rest of the week with moving auction items. A request has been made for baked goods for the food wagon. Food is needed for both nights and also for the Penquis Cruize- In on Sunday. Remember, July 5th, the Smith Boys and Chairback Gap will be playing at the Milo Town Hall for the “Coffee House”.
     Fifteen Happy and Sad Dollars were contributed this week. Jeremy Finson put one in for the Red Sox but Lance Harris counteracted Jeremy’s by putting one in for the Yankees.
     Upcoming speaker: Sheena Lundin of Volunteer Services.
     We heard about the Boston Marathon this week from someone who has first hand knowledge, Chris Almy. Chris ran this year in the 26 mile and oldest marathon in the world. He qualified for the race by running fast enough for his age and sex in another marathon. He trained long and hard to build up his endurance by running 30 to 40 miles a week and building up to 70 at the end. Hills were added along with repeat hill running without slowing. Chris ran with a field of 13,000! They were lined up by their qualifying time and had a computer chip attached to their sneaker. These are used to officially clock the runner’s time along the race by using sensors. For the first four or five miles the running is very difficult because the field hasn’t spread out. Chris said he met some interesting people during this time. The fans are great, cheering and providing refreshments along the race route.
     Chris said that Heartbreak Hill had a profound effect on him and caused him to have a hard time at the very end. He finished the race in 3 hours and 33 minutes but had to go to the medical tent for fluids and attention. He said he didn’t remember much about the last leg of the race but was proud to have finished.
     Did you know that running was once thought to be very risky? Only twenty people ran in the first Boston Marathon and each had to be deemed fit by a physician. Their running shoes were primitive and quite painful. This race did not become such a popular event until the 1970’s and 1980’s when physical fitness became more important. Women weren’t allowed to compete for many years and when the first woman did, she needed a bodyguard. Joan Benoit is one of a very few athletes who have won the Boston Marathon and an Olympic medal.
     Chris intends to run another race in Philadelphia this fall. We wish you good luck, Chris.
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Three Rivers Community

A new feature to the Three Rivers News is the TRC Page. Every week, it will feature the current week's community calendar, and some other feature of our site.

Community Calendar

     The Three Rivers Community Alliance is a website that promotes the greater Milo area. We cover Atkinson, Brownville, LaGrange, Lake View, Medford, Milo, & Sebec. On our site, we have a complete month of the above Community Calendar, a local club and organization listing, a comprehensive business directory, regional maps, recreation information, and even local news, including this paper, completely online! If you would be interested in helping out with the website, please contact Seth Barden, the Director, at info@trcmaine.org, or 943-2425.

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