Three Rivers News, 2002-06-25
TUESDAY, JUNE 25, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 33
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES DIAL 911!!!

In this issue….
• Milo/Brownville Little League
• Penquis Valley School’s Honor Rolls
• Kiwanis Auction
• Milo Town Hall Arts Center Coffee House
• Annual Penquis Cruizers Cruize-In
• Five Family Yard Sale

COFFEE HOUSE
July 5, 2002---7:00 PM
MILO TOWN HALL ARTS CENTER
Featuring :
CHAIRBACK GAP and the SMITH BROTHERS
Tickets $8.00
Refreshments , Coffee, and Iced Tea on sale
     This will be the first Coffee House held at the Arts Center in Milo. Chairback Gap is well known for its wonderful music and this will be a return of the Smith Brothers playing fiddle and guitar. We have new tables and chairs for the audience so dessert can be enjoyed during the program. Tickets are on sale at Trask Insurance or can be purchased at the door Friday night.

ANNUAL CRUIZE-IN, JUNE 30TH
BY SUSAN AND FRED WORCESTER
     Sunday, June 30th, the Penquis Cruizers and other car-buffs will gather at the JSI Store Fixtures parking lot on Route 11 in Milo for the 13th Annual Cruize-In. The event begins at 10am and ends at 2pm. There will be dash plaques included in the goody bags given to participants. There will be a 50-50 raffle as well as a raffle for a Coca-Cola Diner Clock from Danbury Mint. As always, there will be a Rap Contest at noon to see who has the loudest car. There will also be a display by the Maine HO Association - slot racing cars for all to try out - young and not so young.
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis will provide refreshments for the day. Paul Hanson of Bangor will provide music for the event. There will be trophies and awards, which will be presented following the auction, which begins at 1pm. This is an event to be enjoyed by those driving their cars and trucks and displaying them for the day and also by those who come to enjoy the vehicles and talk to the owners. Don't miss it!

FIVE FAMILY YARD-SALE
Saturday June 29th, 9:00a.m. - 4:00p.m.
RAIN OR SHINE
Lots to buy...This is a don't miss!
Located on the Milo/LaGrange road. On right just before the sharp corner before entering LaGrange.
C-Ya then!

KIWANIS AUCTION

     The Kiwanis Auction will be held June 27th and 28th. Bargains galore will be up for auction. The proceeds from our auction go toward all of the projects that Kiwanis contributes to over the year. (Like this newspaper) We are looking for items for the auction. If you have a donation, please call Eben Dewitt (943-2486) or Herb Dunham (943-2353) to have your items picked up.

PENQUIS VALLEY SCHOOLS’ FOURTH QUARTER HONOR ROLL

SENIORS
HIGH HONORS:
Kristen Farrar
Eileen Flanagan
HONORS:
Tim Briggs
Courtney Brown
Justin Cook
Jessica Decker
Adam Foran
A.J. Gahagen
Chad Gerrish
Anders Hamlin
Erica Havens
Eli Ladd
Paul Kusnierz
Elizabeth Laverty
Joseph Mohseni
Matthew Morris
Miranda Patton
Ryan Stanchfield
JUNIORS
HIGH HONORS:
Amanda Crouch-Smith
Jean Hamlin
Melissa Madden
HONORS:
Tiffany Bishop
Jeffery Brunner
Leah Landry
Lucas Morris
Zachary Severence
Danielle Willette
SOPHOMORES
HIGH HONORS:
Shannon Gerrish
Desiree Hogan
Amanda Kahl
Rebecca Madden
HONORS:
Shawn Burke
Heather Dolley
Justin Foran
Jennifer Hussey
William Koelsch
Erika Morrill
Krystle Morrill
Shenna Sibert
Cameron Wellman
FRESHMEN
HIGH HONORS:
Erin Beasley
Elizabeth Comeau
Elyse Kahl
Jessica LaMunyon
Maria Mills
HONORS:
Michael Bishop
Derek Brewer
Samantha Ellis
Lisa Koelsch
Hilary London
Krystle Parkman
Devin Perkins
Lindsay Small
8th GRADE
HIGH HONORS:
Adam Ballash
Christina Gerrish
Kyli Palmer
Brian Twitchell
HONORS:
Jennifer Hartmann
Rene Harvey
Tyler Herbest
Nikki Hobbs
Jaime Perkins
Alex Zwicker
7th GRADE
HONORS:
Chris Bessey
Kristen Burch
Mindy Dolley
Krystle Leavitt
Amanda Maioriello
Mirand McSwine
Jessica Metros
Sean Murphy

CONGRATULATIONS TO YOU ALL!!

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

THANK YOU ORION REBECCA LODGE!
The Three Rivers News would like to thank the Orion Rebecca Lodge #16 for their generous donation! We appreciate it so much!!!

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED., JUNE 26 COLD PLATE: SLICED TURKEY, PASTA SALAD, BEET SALAD, ICE BOX PUDDING
THURS., JUNE 27 ROAST PORK/GRAVY, RED POTATOES, PEAS, PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE
FRI., JUNE 28 SALISBURY STEAK, MASHED POTATO, GREEN BEANS, HOMEMADE BISCUIT, WATERMELON
MON., JULY 1 CHICKEN PARMESAN, SPAGHETTI, ITALIAN VEGGIES, PEACHES
TUES., JULY 2 SALMON LOAF/EGG SAUCE, BAKED POTATO, PEAS, STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE
WED., JULY 3

HAM/POTATO CHEESE CASSEROLE, ASPARAGUS, FRUIT WHIP

BROWNVILLE HAPPENINGS
Brownville Elementary news:
     Students at Brownville Elementary held their final assembly on Wednesday morning with many invited guests present. Students in each class received various awards including Attendance and Citizenship awards. The "graduating" fifth graders introduced their parents and thanked them for their support while in elementary school. Each child presented their parent/s with a carnation. Following the assembly members of the PTO served the students ice cream sundaes. Thank you to Trish Stanhope, Rose Clement, and Brenda Roberts for arranging it. The teachers also want to thank all of the school volunteers and parents for their support throughout the year. It's been greatly appreciated.

     District K-5 students had a real treat last Monday. For the second year in a row the local country rock band, "RiverTown" gave students a live concert at the Milo Elementary gym. Arranged this year by teacher Stephanie Gillis, the program had students dancing to the music. It was a lot of fun and we appreciate the band offering this opportunity to the children.

     The Town of Brownville is having a Special Town Meeting on Thursday, June 27, 2002 at the Brownville Town Office beginning at 6.m. to consider raising the interest rate on delinquent 2002 property taxes from 6.75% to 8.75% per year.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Hezekiah May was Brownville's first (a) town manager, (b)selectman, (c) preacher, (d) policeman
2. Rev. Ann Stead came from (a) Massachusetts, (b) New York, (c) New Hampshire, (d) New Brunswick
3. The YMCA was built by the (a) railroad, (b) state, (c) town, (d) International YMCA
4. On Windy Hill was once a(n) (a) toboggan slide, (b) watering trough, (c) watch tower, (d) ski jump
5. Fires ravaged the Lewis Mill in (a) 1915 and 1927, (b) 1904 and 1910, (c) 1929 and 1935, (d) 1926 and 1950
6. Sumner Fish was a well-known (a) Granger, (b) engineer, (c) teacher, (d) musician
7. The Gerry Company was first run by (a) Sam Smith, (b) AC Dougherty, (c) Ralph Perry,(d) Sam and Dolly Cohen
8. The first slate quarry in Maine was the (a) Merrill Quarry, (b) Wilder Quarry, (c) Highland Quarry, (d) Crocker Quarry
9. Mike Knox was a fine (a) first baseman, (b) pitcher, (c) catcher, (d) outfielder
10. 1936 and 1966 were (a) drought years, (b) flood years, (c)quarantine years, (d) eclipse years

Answers: 1-c 2-d 3-a 4-d 5-a 6-a 7-b 8-d 9-c 10-b


ALLEN MONROE IS MOVE & IMPROVE GRAND PRIZE WINNER!
     Congratulations to Allen Monroe of Milo as a grand prizewinner in the Move & Improve Program that was recently sponsored by the MSAD # 41 Wellness Team. Allen's Fitness Log was drawn from the 15,000 logs that were submitted, and he is now the happy owner of a beautiful kayak! Allen went above and beyond the Move & Improve Program requirements and exercised every single day of the 12 week program
     Allen is also a participant in the Weight Watchers at Work Program, which is sponsored by the Wellness Team. He was one of the "few brave men" who joined the group last year, reached his Lifetime Goal and has maintained goal weight for over a year. Keep up the good work Allen, you are an inspiration!
     Our site was well represented at the Move & Improve Celebration on June 19th. We were all excited that we had some other prizewinners to cheer for! Neil Hamlin (won two prizes!), Ricky Bradeen and Sam Bradeen all successfully completed the program and took home some nice prizes.
     Stay safe & healthy this summer! Sue Chaffee, Site Coordinator

MSAD #41 Wellness Team Goes to Sugarloaf
BY SUSAN CHAFFEE
     On Sunday June 23rd the MSAD #41 Wellness Team will
travel to Sugarloaf USA for a 5-day conference sponsored by the Dept. of Education. Those attending this year's conference are: Christine Beres, Marie Hayes, Stephanie Salley, Wanda Wright,

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     Ginny Morrill, Lynn Gerrish, Edward Oakes, Deborah Folsom, Allison Chapman and Sue Chaffee.
     The Maine Schoolsite Health Promotion Conference XVII
is a unique professional development experience that provides a forum for representatives of all segments of a school or school administrative unit to discuss and respond to issues related to health promotion, health education and the maintenance of a healthy learning environment. Participants attend workshops that provide information for enhancing school climate and student health and contribute to personal well being. During the conference team participants will develop an Action Plan that will set forth our goals and objectives for putting wellness ideas into action for the coming year.
     This is the third year that MSAD #41's Wellness Team
has attended the Health Promotion Conference. The team has remained committed to its Vision Statement which says: The MSAD # 41 Wellness Team wishes to nurture the development of a healthy resilient community. It is our hope that we will return from Sugarloaf with renewed energy and that we will continue to promote wellness for all.
     More when we return! Sue Chaffee, Team Leader

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     The Milo Free Public Library began a big transition when Catherine Ellison, head librarian, resigned on May 20 after nearly 40 years of dedicated service to the library and community. She felt she needed some time for herself, for her family, for her many hobbies including woodworking and also to spend more time with her faithful companion of many years, Trin, her German Shepherd dog. She will certainly be missed by all the library patrons, staff and trustees.
     I was privileged to work with her for nearly 24 years as the assistant librarian and Pamela Flanagan worked as a substitute and as a work/study student this past year. We were very pleased to acquire some of Kitty’s knowledge and values of library and community. As the present head librarian and with Pam as the acting assistant librarian, we hope to have the library continue to serve the patrons and the community well in the tradition that Kitty set during this transition of the library personnel.
     On June 24, the Milo Free Public Library began to welcome explorers to their summer reading program-GO ON A SAFA-READ, a safari with books. Any child 6th grade or younger, even pre-school, can join us for fun with books, book bags, book marks, toys, puzzle pages, prizes, mascot animals, lots of new books and a party! Come to the library anytime we are open- Mon., Wed., or Fri. From 2-8pm and join our expedition.
     By the time you read this notice, these new books will be ready to go out. This is a partial list, I will print the rest next week.

Andrews, V.C.
Auel, Jean
Beaton, M.C.
Bradford, Barbara T.
Brown, Rita Mae
Brown, Rita Mae
Brown, Sandra
Buchanan, Patrick J.
Cookson, Catherine
Cornwell, Bernard
Cornwell, Bernard
Cussler, Clive
Delinsky, Barbera
Deveraux, Jane
Frances, Clare
Goldberg, Bernard
Goudge, Eileen
Falling Stars
The Shelters of Stone
Death of a Celebrity
Three Weeks in Paris
Alma Mater
Catch as Cat Can
A Kiss Remembered
Death of the West
Silent Lady
Gallow’s Thief
Sharpe’s Prey
Fire Ice
A Woman Betrayed
A Knight in Shining Armor
Betrayed
Bias
Taste of Honey

Life looked better in Black and White
SUBMITTED BY KITTY ELLISON
WRITTEN BY DUTCH SNOW

You could hardly see for all the snow,
Spread the rabbit ears as far as they go.
Pull up a chair to the TV set,
"Good night, David; Good night, Chet".

Dependin' on the channel you tuned
You got Rob and Laura - or Ward and June.
It felt so good, felt so right.
Life looked better in black and white.

I Love Lucy, The Real McCoys
Dennis the Menace, the Cleaver boys
Rawhide, Gunsmoke, Wagon Train
Superman, Jimmy & Lois Lane.

Father Knows Best, Patty Duke
Rin Tin Tin and Lassie too,
Donna Reed on Thursday night--
Life looked better in black and white.

I wanna go back to black and white.
Everything always turned out right
Simple people, simple lives
Good guys always won the fights

Now nothin is the way it seems
In living color on the TV screen.
Too many murders, too much fight,
I wanna go back to black and white.

In God they trusted, in bed they slept.
A promise made was a promise kept.
They never cussed or broke their vows
They'd never make the network now.

But if I could, I'd rather be
In a TV town in '53.
It felt so good, felt so right
Life looked better in black and white.

I'd trade all the channels on the satellite
If I could just turn back the clock tonight
To when everybody knew wrong from right
Life was better in black and white!

BROWNVILLE AND MILO RECREATION DEPTS. 2002 PENQUIS LITTLE LEAGUE
BY SCOTT AND JEAN LARSON
     Summer is here and what is more American or more fun than watching youngsters playing the country’s favorite sport-BASEBALL?!. The following is a list of the team’s rosters and the dates and times of the games. Why not spend a beautiful Maine evening watching a fun-filled game?

SUMMER LITTLE LEAGUE TEAM ROSTERS
CUBS
KIEL LARSON
JONATHAN RUBLEE
TIM NASON
ZACK KUTZ
BEN OGDEN
RYAN BADGER
JAIMIE NASON
WADE WITHAM
BRIAN SAUNDERS
DUSTIN LANCASTER
CATLYN BALLARD
ALYSSA MEDEIRO
CHAD BADGER
JAMES WATSON
NATE KUTZ
TYLER CREIGHTON

COACHES:
SCOTT LARSON
RICK RUBLEE
BRAVES
KYLE GEROW
SEAN MURPHY
TYLER ELSENHEIMER
BRAD BROWN
TONY GABARRO
STEPHEN MORSE
ASA SPROUL
BRIAN GLIDDEN
GRACE MERCHANT
KYLE MURPHY
CODY HOWE
EDDIE COBB
CHRIS GLIDDEN
KATRINE COMEAU
JOHN HARMON
JUSTIN MOULTON

COACHES:
BOB HATHORN
GEORGE MORSE

ORIOLES
MIKE LAWSON
RICHIE RUSSELL
CHRIS MCCLEARY
RYAN BEARD
SUZANNE JOHNSON
ERICA LYFORD
BRAD CIMPHER
SHELISHA CLARK
JOSH BROWN
KELSEY OTTMANN
IAN CHAMPEON
MICHAEL JOHNSON
JAKE LYFORD
BRYAN RUSSELL
JUSTIN OTTMANN

COACHES:
DAWN RUSSELL
RUSTY LAWSON

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RED SOX
NICK EMERY
LEIGH DOLLEY
BRIAN ZWICKER
NATHAN CRANKY
CHELSEA CLARK
JOSH SOMMERS
ERIC BACHAK
PATRICK NORWOOD
ANNIE ALLEN
JAMES GLEDHILL
ROBBIE PELLETIER
JEREIL AREFIN
JOSHUA DILLON
JACOB TURNER
RON SMITH

COACHES:
TOM DOLLEY
MIKE LAPOINTE
A’S
ZACHARY LYFORD
ALEX LONDON
DYLAN LYFORD
TYLER CASE
LOGAN GREENLAW
LUKE KNAPP
BRUCE BENOIT
CALEB STANLEY
JOSH CLEMENT
RYAN MCLAUGHLIN
CODY WENTWORTH
J.D. WESTON
JUSTIN ARTUS
JOSH BESSEY
BRYANT LUGO
HAROLD EMERY

COACHES:
TODD LYFORD
STEVE BEALS

METS
JESSIE MCLAUGHLIN
COREY HERBEST
NOAH BISSELL
CODY ANDREWS
ED MERRITT
NICK RICHARD
RYAN BAILEY
JOE LELAND
LOGAN WHITTEN
SHANE WOODARD
TYLER JOHNSON
JEREMY RUSSELL
ALYSSA GRAY
PHILLIP LARRABEE
COLBY BROWN
LEVI BUBIER

COACHES:
JOEY MCLAUGHLIN
JULIE HERBEST

GAME HIGHLIGHTS:
Sat. June 15, CUBS AT ORIOLES
     The first game of the season put the Cubs vs. the Orioles at the field in Brownville Jct. The Cubs won a close one, 6-3. The game started out with the Orioles taking a 3-0 lead. Then, the Cubs broke the game open in the top of the third with 5 runs coming from in-the-park home runs by Kiel Larson and Jamie Nason, and a single by Zach Kutz that finished the scoring for the game. Jaime Nason received the game ball for the Cubs
Tues., June 18, Cubs vs. Mets at Brownville Jct.
     The visiting Cubs started the game by scoring 3 runs in the first inning, and never looked back. 2 players got 3 hits each, Zach Kutz and Kiel Larson and Brian Saunders and Jaime Nason with 2 hits apiece. The Cubs as a team had 13 hits, and that’s all they needed behind the pitching of Kiel and Jamie.
     The Mets had a hit by Ryan Bailey. Final score: Mets 0, Cubs 13.
Thurs., June 20, Red Sox at Cubs at Milo
     The game started with the Red Sox taking an early 3 run lead behind the hitting of Brian Zwicker and Nick Emery. Brian went 3 for 3, while Nick was 2 for 3.
     At the bottom of the 6th, the game was 8 to 4 , Red Sox, the Cubs came up with 4 runs to tie the game.
     With the bases loaded, it came down to Alyssa Medeiro, who singled in the game winning run and that earned her the Game M.V.P.! Also for the Cubs, Timmy Nason went 3 for 4. Final score: Red Sox 8, Cubs 9.

Editors note: I want to thanks Scott and Jean for their great reporting on their Little League team, and to encourage the other coaches to get items to me. Our children are the most important aspect of our community, and it is great to read about them having so much fun!

LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULE FOR THE NEXT 2 WEEKS
(all games are at 5:30 pm)

Tues., June 25 At Brownville Field A’S AT BRAVES
Wed, June 26 At Milo field A’S AT CUBS
Thur., June 27 At Milo ORIOLES AT RED SOX
Thur., June 27 At Brownville BRAVES AT METS
Mon., July 1 At Brownville CUBS AT BRAVES
Mon., July 1 At Milo ORIOLES AT A’S
Tues., July 2 At Milo

METS AT RED SOX

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     I can't believe that I neglected to do a graduation column. YIKES! This school year has just kind of crept up and gotten over with and I've kind of missed the whole thing. When you don't have a child of your own or a relative graduating it just kind of does that. Graduations are such a huge traditional thing. When you think about it, graduations in Milo haven't changed all that much in how many years? Seniors since the late 1800's have been graduating from one school or another in this little town. Well wishers have been celebrating with them for all those many years, as well.
     When the greatest class that ever graduated from Milo High School graduated (That would have been June 9, 1965), we celebrated for a solid week. In hindsight, I can see why the class advisors have pared that week's activities down a bit. Baccalaureate was on Sunday, Class Night on Monday, prom on Wednesday, Graduation on Thursday evening, Last Assembly on Friday and that was it. That was ENOUGH!!! A full week of activities certainly wore us, our advisors, and our parents completely out. Our senior banquet was always out of town and I haven't any idea when that was ever squeezed into our schedule, but I remember that we went to the Lancey House in Pittsfield for ours.
     Baccalaureate, a time honored tradition of ours, has gone the way of all religious festivities at school. It just doesn't happen any more, sad to say. God forbid we cross that line between church and State. Class night was a chance for the students to give their class prophesy, class
gifts, class history, etc. We used to do it in the form of a little playlet that Mr. Gerow helped us with. I remember writing our class history and how careful I had to be to include everyone. I set the class list up in front of me on my bulletin board and then had the yearbooks spread around me on the desk to use as references. As I would include a name, I'd check it off the class list. Quite a procedure, if I remember correctly.
     We had to wear special white or light colored dresses under our robes because our robes were white. Those of us participating on the stage on Class Night had to have something that was not only white or light, but something special because we didn't wear our robes while we were on the stage doing the playlet. The theme of our graduation in 1965 was Shangri-La. We did the little fake trees with tiny little tissue-paper blossoms on them, and the legendary bridge. That bridge was used for years and years after our graduation for just about every prom they had. I wonder what ever became of that little bridge?
     Individual parties at graduate’s homes hadn't become vogue at that time. My parents had a few friends

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and family members in for a little punch, coffee and snacks after my graduation, but I don't remember it being a big deal. Our whole week had been so hectic that by Thursday night we were exhausted. Nowadays the graduation party is a big deal! When my own two children graduated we went to great lengths to have huge parties for them. The year my daughter graduated we did our whole living room over , cleaned every nook and cranny of the house, painted the porch, planted special flower gardens and just totally went overboard! We plunked a great big sign out in our front yard that screamed "A Penquis Valley High School Graduate Lives Here!!! Congratulations Carolyn and Bud!!! (Bud was her boyfriend, and was also in her class. He's now her husband!) Red, white and blue balloons blew in the wind from everything that we could possibly tie them to. No matter how hard I tried to plan how much food to prepare, I still worried that I didn't have enough. Bud's mother and I just couldn't seem to get a handle on how many people we might be expecting.
     At the end of the party I realized that I hadn't had a bite to eat myself. To my chagrin I was able to literally scrape bowls clean and get a small plateful of food. Which meant we probably should have planned for more food. That was one of those deals when you invite all the people you'd like to share the joy with, but expect that only about half of them feel the same way about your kid graduating as you do, but they surprise you and come. It was all very exciting and a party that my daughter won't ever forget. I'm so glad that we put the effort into that party.
     We did the same thing when Tom graduated, but I had brains enough not to think I needed to do rooms over. I still cleaned every nook and cranny and planted pretty flowers out in the yard. Tom shared his party with his cousin Jason, who was also graduating. Taking a hard lesson from Carolyn's party, we all overdid with refreshments and ate graduation party food for a
week afterwards.
     It's so easy to buy paper products for Penquis Valley graduates. If you're smart enough to buy the stuff that they have on display for the 4th of July, you can't go wrong. If you're really smart you buy the stuff that goes on sale on the 5th of July the year before your kid is graduating!!! I learned that little trick from Debbie Walker. How clever is that? If you're from Brewer November 1st would be the smart day to do your shopping!
     Food for graduation parties can be as hard or as easy as you want to make them. You can slave over a huge potato salad, or you can buy a great big tub of it at Sam's Club for under $3.00! You can agonize over making the graduation cake yourself, or you can go to the local grocery store and have them do it. You can make your own meatballs and put them in the crockpot with homemade sauce. Or you can buy frozen meatballs and then try this sauce: 1 small bottle of ketchup and 1 small jar of grape jelly. Yummy! Macaroni salad with chunks of cheese and pepperoni a little chopped onion and green pepper and maybe a little celery chopped up as well can make a really good sized salad. I always cut up a couple of hard cooked eggs in it, too. The dressing is as simple as Miracle Whip and a squirt of mustard, sprinkle in a little sugar, thin

it out with a little vinegar and voila! Little mini hot dogs heated up in a frying pan with a rounded tablespoon of mustard and about 1/4 cup sweet and sour sauce always goes well. Serve these with toothpicks on the side. A veggie platter or a meat platter (served with bulky rolls) from the Farmer's Union really takes the "heat" off the hostess. If you do a veggie platter, be sure to make yourself a spare container of dip to have in reserve. You can easily make this from a container of sour cream mixed with an envelope of Knorr Vegetable Soup mix. One word of caution: If you plan on hiring the store to make your platters, please give them plenty of notice. It's only fair to them.
     Graduation is a huge milestone in your child's life. Don't let your child be the one who is neglected or forgotten on that special day in his/her life. If your child says they don't want you to make a big deal about it, make a big deal, anyway! It is a big deal and should be treated as such! And now, you've got at least a whole year to be preparing for it.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz
Match Group name with animal

1. Congregation a. Elephants
2. Knot b. Chicks
3. Grist c. Rhinoceri
4. Drift d. Hares
5. Clutch e. Cats
6. Crash f. Bees
7. Colony g. Toads
8. Herd h. Plovers
9. Down i. Swine
10. Clowder

j. Ants

The Planet Mercury
     Mercury is the closest planet to the sun. Its distance to the sun varies from 30 to 44 million miles. Its orbit is the most elliptical except for Pluto. The orbit of Mercury is not what was predicted by Classical Physics. This was a cause of concern. Einstein’s Theory of Relativity correctly predicted the orbit and this fact was largely responsible for its early acceptance.
     Mercury has a diameter of 3008 miles. If the Earth were the size of a baseball, Mercury would be the size of a golf ball. It has almost no atmosphere. What atmospehre is present is due to the solar wind and is constantly changing. Gravity is about 1/3 that of Earth. Up until 1965, scientists thought the same side was always toward the sun. We now know it has a rotation period of 58.9 days and a revolution around the sun of 87.9 days so it rotates three times while going around the sun twice.
     Mariner X in 1974 and 75 took photos of the surface of Mercury. In 1974 Mariner passed within 450 miles of the surface and in 1975 it got within 200 miles. The surface looks like the moon with many craters. The largest feature is called the Caloris Basin and was caused by an asteroid impact. Mariner also detected ice at the poles. This was not expected because the day temperature is about 900 degrees Fahrenheit and the night temperature drops to -350 Fahrenheit. The coldness of the night is due to the lack of an atmosphere. The ice is found in deep craters where the sun doesn’t shine. Rock is a poor conductor of heat so even if the sun heats the rim of the crater, the heat doesn’t reach the bottom unless the sun is directly overhead.
     Galileo was the first human to observe Mercury through a telescope in 1610. In 1631 the first observation of it passing in front of the sun was made.

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     Mercury is very dense. This is mostly due to its iron core being very large compared to the size of the planet. One possible explanation for this is that part of the surface of Mercury has vaporized because of its closeness to the sun.
     If you want to see Mercury, you have to look either directly after sunset or just before sunrise because it is never far from the sun. In June this year it is a morning star. By the end of July after disappearing for awhile, because it is too close to the sun to be seen, it will be an evening star. You can find out where it is on any given day using our latitude as 45N and our longitude as 69W at www.lightandmatter.com/area2planet.shtml

Answers: 1.h, 2.g, 3.f, 4.i, 5.b, 6.c, 7.j, 8.a, 9.d, 10.e
Score
5 Good, 6-7 Excellent, 8-10 Superb

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 2002
     Commencement exercises were held on Sunday, June 16, 2002, for the graduating seniors of Penquis Valley High School.
     The gymnasium was filled with family and friends of the soon to be alumni. The class proudly marched in to the theme from “Pomp and Circumstance” by Edward Elger and performed by the Penquis Valley High School Band, Mr. Jack Eastman, conducting. At the head of the processional was the class Marshall Jean Hamlin.
     Valedictorian Paul Kusnierz, salutatorian Matthew Morris, first honor essayist Ryan Stanchfield, and second honor essayist Elizabeth Laverty gave memorable speeches.
     Awards and scholarships were presented to many of the graduates. Principal John Robinson expressed his surprise and gratitude to the area residents for the more than $40,000 awarded in scholarships.
     Mr. Robinson gave a special mention to the fact that Mrs. Madeline Decker was retiring after teaching 34 years at PVHS.
     A special veteran diploma was presented to Mr. Hanford “Sonny” Burton. The class of 2002 congratulates you!
     This years class motto is “If it wasn’t for last minutes nothing would get done.” Their class song is one by Joe Cocker – “A Little Help From My Friends” and the class colors are navy and red.
     Receiving diplomas were April Allen, Peter Bissell, Timothy Briggs, Courtney Brown, Sallie Byrne, Lesly Chase, Linda Coburn, Cassandra Conlogue, Justin Cook, Lawrence Davis, Jessica Decker, Jessica Dyer, Candice Ekholm, Danielle Emmons, Kristen Farrar, Jeremy Ferris, Eileen Flanagan, Adam Foran, A.J.Gahagan, Chad Gerrish, Chester Gillis, Christopher Gray, Michael Grindle, Anders Hamlin, Brooke Hamlin, Lindsay Hamlin, Erica Havens, Brandon Hoxie, Terrence Joyce, Ben Knapp, Paul Kusnierz, Eli Ladd, Ryan LaMunyon, Elizabeth Laverty, Jessica Leland, Christopher Madden, Ashlee McGill, Andrea McLaughlin, Randy McMahon, Joseph Mohseni, Matthew Morris, Crystal Nickerson, Caleb Nuite, Miranda Patton, Edward Phil Roberts, Lacey Russell, Megan Russell, Jason Smith, Ryan Stanchfield, Scott Stetson, Shannon Wentworth, Amanda White, Alicia Wright, Meggin Young, Jessica Zeigler, and Kimberly Zimmerman.

BLUEBIRDS
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
     Ruth Fletcher, a retired schoolteacher, spent her retiring years watching and studying the bluebirds in her back yard. For many years she kept a journal of the bluebirds. She knew when the birds would nest, how many eggs had been laid, and to the day, when the little birds would arrive.
     When Ruth passed away her family placed a bluebird house on the family lot in the Milo cemetery. Ruth would be very pleased to know that the ladies who walk past the bluebird house each morning have seen bluebirds building a nest.

Who planted the trees along the streets of Milo? – Part 2
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
Local History Bonus – Reprints from MHS Breeze and other sources
     Of course every boy in the village whether he had a tree or not was on hand and as I have said, the Odd Fellows had provided so many extra ones that every boy had a tree who wanted one and it’s safe to say that every one there did. I remember that I was one of the unfortunates who had no little tree on hand but I was told to pick out one by one of the men and when I had done so it didn’t take me long to select my stake where I would locate it, borrowed a spade, dig my hole, and set my tree therein. I don’t suppose the man who told me to pick out that tree has the slightest recollection of doing so but I remember him. He was James Macomber, a lawyer, son of the man who was for many years postmaster of Milo and himself now being a judge in Iowa somewhere.
     Planting the trees wasn’t all for it was necessary to build up a little protection about them by driving a couple of pieces of joist into the ground and connecting the tops with two small boards. When the work was completed that night nearly every tree that had been planted was protected in this manner and there was a goodly lot of them too. The outer line was within a rod or two of the street and they ran back to the limits of the lot just back of the school building which now sand I should judge where it did then.
     Each boy took pretty good care of his own tree for awhile but the older ones kept dropping out of school year after year just as they do in all schools will so long as there are such institutions and the younger ones who came along to take their places did not have the respect for the little trees that the older ones did and so it came to be a fashion to bend them about and break off the branches until very many of them died or if they did not were left in such a condition that they would have been a credit to no one even had they succeeded in reaching maturity.
     Then it never seemed to me that the soil there particularly adapted to the maple trees for those that were let alone did not grow very fast so that the other day when I was going by there I didn’t notice a real large one in the bunch. Anyhow, beautiful grove which we had planted ourselves we had started on that April day nearly 31 years ago fell far short of what our ideas had pictured it. There are some trees there though, and some useful trees and they help to beautify the lot a little measure and perhaps now and then furnish some very slight shade. And I suppose what had proven true of the grove has been true in some measure of other dreams that were dreamed by those school boys of nearly a third of a

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century ago, and who saw their own future something as they saw that of the maples they had planted. Some did not reach maturity, others were bent and twisted in their early days by poverty and care or perhaps did find themselves adapted to their surroundings or their surroundings to them, but there were many who did grow up to be useful if not great and are filling creditable if not conspicuous stations in life. And that is something.
(From: Recollections of a Milo Boy, by Fred K. Owen– MHS Breeze 1908)

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
     The practice of consolidating a few small schools into one larger district is not a recent concept. This idea was mentioned in an 1893 report by A.N.Stanhope. He said it was believed by many to be the best device for a rural community such as the Milo area. It was again an issue in 1894, brought forth by Superintendent I.G.Mayo. At this time there were 188 “scholars” in the village (Milo) and 126 in the other eight districts. In 1895 it was voted to go along with a partial consolidation by combining the Morse District with the village; Holbrook with Sargent Hill; Hobbstown with Drake; and pupils east of Pleasant River in one school. This same year saw 140 students in the village building (the new grammar school completed in 1893). This building will be remembered by most people as the “old Junior High”. It was this school that Milo’s first graduating class (in 1895) emanated from and included Carroll Ramsdell, Clara Sherburne, Ethel Thomas, Mae Stanchfield, W.H.Hobbs, and Nora Ladd.
     By 1896 there were 187 children in the village school and 76 registered as attending the five rural schools. In 1897, it was reported by the superintending school committee that the cost of educating one pupil per year was $5.40 in the village school and $9.58 for each child outside the village. That year’s transportation cost was $350.
     There were major renovations made to the grammar school in 1906 but with increased enrollment, a new high school was a must. The town’s voters approved this at the town meeting on April 14, 1906, set the cost at $12,000, and the new Milo High School was completed in the fall of 1907. That year's graduating class spent their final term of their final year in the new building. That class had a total of nine, E. Ethel Bishop, Delia M. Clark, Mary L. Ingalls, Maribel Levensalor, Charles W. Leonard, Edna A. Packard, Bessie E. Snow, Lizzie Shaw, and Linnie A. Ryder.
(‘History of Milo Schools’, Lloyd Treworgy, 1976)

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MEETING NOTES JUNE 19
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     The June 19th meeting was attended by eighteen members and an interclub from Orono/Old Town.
     Guilford's Kiwanis Club will have their charter night Thursday, June 27th. This is Auction night for us, so we won't be attending, but hopefully a delegate will, possibly Paul Grindle.
     Chris Almy will speak to Dexter's Kiwanis Club, July 5th about his Boston Marathon experience. We hope to send an interclub. We will also visit Guilford on July 25th.
     The Kiwanis Newspaper will be up and running with their new printer soon. It is to be set up at the CD Center. The quality will be excellent. A very big Thank You to the Orion Rebecca Lodge for their very generous $100.00 donation to the paper.
     The Town Hall Steering Committee met Tuesday, June 18th. It was decided to carpet the upstairs balcony. The stage floor has been painted and a July 5th CoffeeHouse has been planned.
     Get ready for the Kiwanis Auction. Tent set up is Sunday around 9:00 am. Monday and Tuesday - items will be moved from Salley's Storage to the auction site. Any businesses that want to donate and haven't been contacted get in touch with Lorraine Schinck. Remember sweets are needed both nights for selling in the food wagon. Raffle tickets for the 50/50 drawing are available from any Kiwanis member.
     Adam Harmon's birthday is June 22nd and Sonja Salley's is the 24th. Lots of anniversaries, David and Debbie Walker and Sandra and Leo Gray the 19th, Virgil and Janet Valente the 22nd and Mary Jane and Joe Zamboni the 25th.
     Fourteen Happy and Sad dollars came in this week; Several for the ending of the school year.
     It was announced that there will be a blood drive on the 24th. Hopefully there is a good turn out as supplies are low.
     Here is the run down on the June 13th Board Meeting:
     1.Approved newspaper printer purchase. 2.Voted to keep Newspaper Funds in a separate account. 3.Let Methodist Church borrow the tent for July 7th. 4.Buy some new meeting flags. 5 .Donating $300.00 to the newly established Guilford Kiwanis Club. 6. Voted to keep THAC operating funds separate. 7. Agreed that we should push the gift certificates both nights of the Auction.
After this we heard and saw a very interesting presentation from Officer Joe Zamboni, also Trooper of the Year. He explained the fairly new ERT or Evidence Response Team. This team was formed to help local and State Officers investigate scenes that they didn't have time or man power to follow through on. It is very hard, especially in smaller towns to investigate criminal scenes with only one officer on duty; they could easily be called away to another emergency. When a scene is left not fully investigated, valuable evidence can be lost. This is where the ERT unit is called on. With three divisions, North, South, and Central, Team Leaders, troopers and detectives, forensic scientists, lab techs, etc. the crime scenes, especially burglaries, are getting much needed attention and solved. Evidence is getting very technical with the aid of DNA, static dust lifters, casting tools, tire prints and metal detectors. As you can see lots of hands are involved in investigations. So a lone officer really needs the ERT unit to help solve these crimes. Criminals beware, hi tech will get you. Crime just doesn't pay!

Editors note: Looks like there’s a little space to fill, so I’ll share a little family news: Katie Vail Robertson was named to the Dean’s List at the University of Southern Maine. She is a junior, studying Natural and Applied Sciences, and will soon be entering her doctorate program to become a veterinarian…her lifelong dream. Congratulations Katie, we love you!!!
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Three Rivers Community

A new feature to the Three Rivers News is the TRC Page. Every week, it will feature the current week's community calendar, and some other feature of our site.

Community Calendar

     The Three Rivers Community Alliance is a website that promotes the greater Milo area. We cover Atkinson, Brownville, LaGrange, Lake View, Medford, Milo, & Sebec. On our site, we have a complete month of the above Community Calendar, a local club and organization listing, a comprehensive business directory, regional maps, recreation information, and even local news, including this paper, completely online! If you would be interested in helping out with the website, please contact Seth Barden, the Director, at info@trcmaine.org, or 943-2425.

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