Three Rivers News, 2002-07-02
TUESDAY, JULY 2, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 34
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES DIAL 911!!!

In this issue….
• Milo/Brownville softball game
• MHS Benefit Dance
• United Methodist Breakfast
• Milo Town Hall Arts Center Coffee House
• Library news
• Wellness Team Excursion

COFFEE HOUSE
July 5, 2002---7:00 PM
MILO TOWN HALL ARTS CENTER
Featuring :
CHAIRBACK GAP and the SMITH BROTHERS
Tickets $8.00
Refreshments , Coffee, and Iced Tea on sale
     This will be the first Coffee House held at the Arts Center in Milo. Chairback Gap is well known for its wonderful music and this will be a return of the Smith Brothers playing fiddle and guitar. We have new tables and chairs for the audience so dessert can be enjoyed during the program. Tickets are on sale at Trask Insurance or can be purchased at the door Friday night.

MHS BENEFIT DANCE
SATURDAY, JULY 6, AT THE
SKATEWAY ROLLER RINK
ON PARK STREET
IN MILO.
8-12PM (AFTER THE ALUMNI MEETING)
FEATURING, FOR YOUR DANCING PLEASURE, BOYZ-N-ME. PLAYING ALL OF YOUR FAVORITE SONGS!
ADMISSION, $10.00
TO BENEFIT THE MHS SCHOLARSHIP FUND
SEE YOU THERE!!

BREAKFAST….........BREAKFAST…...BREAKFAST
     It’s Alumni weekend!!! After an exciting evening of music at the “Coffee House” on Friday, why not come to breakfast at the Methodist Church and perhaps meet some of your classmates and friends. Good food and good fellowship!!!

Saturday, July 6, 2002
At the Park Street United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall.
Time: 7:30 to 10:30 a.m.
Menu: Scrambled Eggs, Canadian Bacon, Baked Beans, English Muffins, Juice, Coffee, Tea
Price: $4.00 Adults $2.00 Children

MILO WINS CHALLENGE FROM BROWNVILLE
BY MURREL HARRIS
     Elm Street Field, June 22, 2002. Town Manager Jane Jones of Milo accepted a challenge from Brownville Town Manager Sophie Wilson to a softball game between teams from each town. Wilson’s husband, Carl, who heads JMG, Jobs for Maine Graduates, at PVHS supplied Brownville with players, and Murrel assembled a team from Milo.
     The two teams met at the Milo Softball field, and were coached (or managed) by Jane and Sophie.
     The game was played at 1pm on a beautiful Saturday afternoon. Each team played well in the hard fought 7 innings, but Milo came out on top, 13 to 6.
     Coach Sophie Wilson had 22 players on her Brownville team. Coach Jones’ team was made up of: Mike Harris at first base, Kristen Lee at second, Justin Allen played short-stop, Colby Chase at third base, Travis Ellis, Mindy Dyer and Jordan Allen in the out field, Nick Mariello , catcher Murrel Harris, pitcher and Sub. , Barb Allen.
     A good time was had by all!

NEED COMPUTER HELP?
     Seth Barden, an invaluable part of this newspaper and co-creator of The TRCMaine website, is available to help you with ANY computer problem. He can make your computer do what you want it to do! He can work on any PC, so if you have a computer problem, call Seth at 943-2425 or check out his personal site at www.sethen.com.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

MSAD #41's Wellness Team Back from Sugarloaf!
BY SUE CHAFFEE, TEAM LEADER
     I'm still deeply entrenched in the "Wellness Mode" as I report back to you on the wonderful Health Promotion Conference we attended at Sugarloaf. What a great team of people to work with! MSAD #41 can be proud of all that we accomplished in the development of an Action Plan for the year ahead, and all that we learned and hope to share with students, staff and community in the near future.
     This year's theme, The Spirit of ME: Wellness Endures, focused on personal wellness with emphasis on the spiritual aspect of overall wellness. (The five components of wellness include: physical, emotional, mental, social and spiritual.) We spent much time attending workshops, round table presentations, experiencing personal wellness time and listening to tremendous keynote speakers.
     Just to highlight the keynote presentations, Sunday night Robert Fellows, who is a widely respected educator who promotes self-responsibility, presented "The Power to Manage Change. A talented magician, he entertained us while teaching us the skills needed to manage change while remaining strong and flexible so that we can see change as opportunity.
     Monday evening's program was presented by Maine singer/songwriter Mike Nobel. Mike's musical approach to health education brought a powerful "Don't Smoke" message, geared for young people, to the conference participants. Mike brought with him three young, and very talented young ladies, Sarah, Jennifer and Jaime Kennedy from Gorham, who stole our hearts and convinced us that this program titled "I'm Alive" is something our own students could do. Mike's goal is

to make this program available "cost free" to Maine schools. I'm working on getting it for us!
     On Wednesday we were totally entertained and inspired by Mark Fenton, host of America's Walking on PBS television and author of "The Complete Guide to Walking for Health, Weight Loss, and Fitness". Mark was an entertaining, persuasive, and knowledgeable walking advocate, and one of the nation's foremost experts on its favorite exercise. This was especially valuable to us since we are in the hope of keeping the Move & Improve momentum going this summer and fall!
     Thursday's keynote presenter was our absolute favorite! (They keep the best for last in the hope that we won't sneak away early.) Jana Stanfield stole our hearts and touched our souls with her presentation, "I'm Not Lost, I'm Exploring: How to Keep Joy in the Journey." Jana is a multi-platinum songwriter who is known as the Queen of Heavy MENTAL, whose music has been described as "psychotherapy you can dance to." Jana made us laugh and cry and truly make us feel that we need to keep "joy in the journey."
     I can't say enough about the value of the Maine Schoolsite Health Promotion Conference. It has to be one of the best things that the Dept. of Education offers. We will do our best to share everything with you in the months ahead. Stay tuned for WEllness!

MILO LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDY MCDOUGALL
     Our summer reading program, SAFA-READ, is up and trekking. Sign-up week brought in a lot of members, old and new, for our expedition. This week, our first week of the actual program, has been a busy one. The mascots are all popular but George Giraffe has been the one many little explorers have most wanted to take home. He has had to be rescued and returned to the desk several times. The community reader this week for the story time was Jane Jones, Milo town manager. Ralph Jones, trustee, was to read, but was ill and Jane volunteered to take his place. There were 26 children and parents present. The story time is open to all children, not just SRP members. If you have children visiting, they are welcome to come to story time on Wednesday at 2:30p.m.
     Phase one of our renovations has been completed. On June 18 ten of us moved the adult non-fiction downstairs to the reference room. It was a big job and I sincerely thank the town crew, Richard Chessa, Frank Colson and John Daggett for all their help. Also two generous husbands volunteered their time, Herbie Carey and Walter Macdougall. Trustees Helen Carey, Joanne DeWitt, Ralph Jones and Shirlene Ladd participated with input, time and energy. I thank you one and all. Without your help we could never have made the change. We plan to put a children's area where the adult non-fiction was previously. Come visit us and see how things are
progressing.

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Here is the completed list of our newest titles.
Barnard, Robert
Clark, Mary Higgins
Collins, Jackie
Greeley, Andrew
Grisham, John
Higgins, Jack
Hillerman, Tony
Holland, Cecelia
Karon, Jan
Kienzle, William X.
King, Stephen
Koontz, Dean
L'Amour, Louis
Lindsey, Johanna
McBride, James
McMurtry, Larry
Meier, Leslie
Michaels, Fern
Muller, Marcia
Morrell, David
Parker, Robert B.
Patterson, James
BONES IN THE ATTIC
MOUNT VERNON LOVE STORY
DEADLY EMBRACE
IRISH STEW
SKIPPING CHRISTMAS
MIDNIGHT RUNNER
THE WAILING WIND
THE SOUL THIEF
IN THIS MOUNTAIN
THE GATHERING
EVERYTHING'S EVENTUAL
ONE DOOR AWAY FROM HEAVEN
WITH THESE HANDS
THE PURSUIT
MIRACLE AT ST. ANNA
SIN KILLER
WEDDING DAY MURDER
KENTUCKY HEAT
DEAD MIDNIGHT
LONG LOST
WIDOW'S WALK
2nd CHANCE

Library Summer Hours
Mon., Wed., and Fri. 2-8:00p.m.
Closed July 5th


LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULE FOR THE NEXT 2 WEEKS
(all games are at 5:30 pm)
Click here for team rosters!

Tues., July 2 At Milo METS AT RED SOX
Tues., July 9 Brownville A’S AT METS
Tues., July 9 Milo RED SOX AT BRAVES
Wed., July 10 Milo ORIOLES AT CUBS
Thurs., July 11 Milo RED SOX AT A’S
Thurs., July 11 Brownville METS AT CUB
Tues., July 16 Brownville

ORIOLES AT BRAVES

Tues., July 16 Milo

CUBS AT RED SOX

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1.The Grange originally represented (a) railroad workers, (b) teachers, (c) town employees, (d) farmers

2. BJHS was torn down in (a) 1969, (b) 1970, (c) 1975, (d) 1976

3. The YMCA was torn down in (a) 1960, (b) 1965, (c) 1970, (d) 1972

4. Rodney Ross was a(n) (a) Republican, (b) Democrat, (c) Independent, (d) Green

5. The Bangor and Katahdin Iron Works Railway was taken over by the (a) Canadian Pacific, (b) International of Maine, (c) Bangor and Aroostook, (d) Quebec Southern

6. Harry Green was once a(n) champion speller, (b) selectman, (c) Pepsi Cola salesman, (d) champion boxer

7. The Briggs Block burned in (a) January, (b) February, (c) April, (d) August 1951.

8. While attending Husson College, Ralph Berg sold (a) cars, (b) real estate, (c) pens, (d) Cloverine Salve

9. Sam Smith had a(n) (a) general store, (b) livery stable, (c) hotel, (d) sawmill in Brownville

10. Brownville is the (a) largest, (b) second largest, (c) third largest, (d) fourth largest town in Piscataquis County

Answers: 1-d 2-d 3-b 4-a 5-c 6-a 7-b 8-c 9-a 10-d

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     I guess I was just unaware of how things were progressing with the Ayuda Club. In last week's paper there was an article telling about their final meeting. I was stunned! For as long as I can remember these ambitious war brides have served the Town of Milo. Lovely ladies, doing their very best to help in any way they could. Back in the days when you couldn't get State help to take your children to the doctors if you were poor, the Ayuda Club ladies sponsored Well Baby Clinics, where thankful mothers could bring their babies for their shots and checkups and the children were seen by doctors and nurses who were donating their time to this charitable effort. The Ayuda Club paid for recess milk for children at the elementary schools whose parents couldn't afford it. I'm sure they put more than one pair of glasses on little kids who needed them, too.
     They always have provided funds to beautify the town both in the summertime and at Christmas time. They've delivered countless trays of goodies to shut-ins and senior citizens over the years, and in more recent years they've been the champions of the Three Rivers Ambulance Service. What will we do without them?
     Their presence in the community has always been such a comfort. Surely God will shine down his light of love on the beautiful faces and the busy hands of these wonderful women who have brought such dignity and love of community to this town.
     When we were little girls (I say "we" because so many of my friends were daughters of the woman of the Ayuda Club) we would go to the Town Hall on the Friday nights that our moms would be setting up for the semi-annual Rummage Sale. Now, for those of you who are unfamiliar with the term....you need to know that the Rummage Sale is the forerunner of the Yard Sale. Do you suppose that the Ayuda Club dreamed up the Rummage Sale themselves? If so, then can we also credit them with inventing the Yard Sale? Anyway, we'd go on Friday nights and it was so much fun! We'd scour the jewelry table for gaudy gems. We'd have our choice of dresses and coats and belts and scarves. You can't imagine what wonderful "dress up" wardrobes we accumulated. We were all great hands to play "dress up,"

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and these rummage sales were our outlet for getting the "stuff" we needed. I can see the ladies now, rolling their eyes at each other as we'd get rigged up in an outfit. They'd click their tongues and say to each other, "How much do you think this is worth?" We'd pray that they'd settle for a small amount (something within our budgets). We could usually cajole our mothers into forking over the money. After all, it was for a good cause.
     I'll never forget the year that Lorraine and I helped our Ayuda Club member mothers make May baskets to be delivered to shut-ins. We went to the Farmer's Union and got green paper type containers from Pauline Grindle in the produce department. We made hundreds of Kleenex flowers to adorn them, and we fashioned braided tissue paper handles for carrying them. The ladies filled each of these semi-lovely creations with fruit and homemade cookies, and then I remember loading up the trunk of the car and driving Mom and a couple of other club members around town delivering them. I guess we must have gone in the evening because most of the elderly would-be recipients were in bed. It got to be comical as one by one we found everyone in bed for the night! On to Plan B...whatever that was!
     The Ayuda Club ladies always had wonderful fun at their meetings. They'd have pot luck suppers and fun nights, banquets and guest speakers, mystery meetings and Halloween and Christmas parties. They knew what it was like to be an asset to their community. They taught us a lot about civic duty and giving and caring about our community and it's children. They also knew how to have a good time and they taught their daughters well.
     The Ayuda Club sponsored the Neoteric Club, which was also a Federated Woman's Club whose members were between a half and a whole generation younger than their Ayuda Club counterparts. One of the projects that the Neoteric Club did once was a little recipe booklet. I helped put that book together...and I still use many of the recipes that were in that booklet. The following are recipes that my dear neighbor and friend Judith Stevens contributed to that booklet. Great for parties!

Baby Cheese Cakes
Batter: Cream together:
2 - 8 oz. Pkgs., Cream cheese
2 eggs
2-tsp. vanilla
3/4-cup sugar
Put 1 vanilla wafer in the bottom of a small cupcake liner. Fill 3/4 full with batter.
Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. Top with a very small amount of pie filling or fresh fruit after cooled. I like to use a slice or two of fresh strawberry if available. These freeze very well before topping is added.
Lemon Squares
1 and 3/4 cup flour
1/2 cup confectionery sugar
1 cup margarine
Mix like a pastry and pat into a 10 X 15 pan and bake 20 to 25 minutes at 350.
Mix and pour over the baked crust:
4 eggs
2 cups sugar
5 Tablespoons of flour
6 Tablespoons of bottled lemon juice
Sprinkle with 1 cup coconut and Bake 25 minutes longer. These freeze well.

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED., JULY 3 HAM/POTATO CHEESE CASSEROLE, ASPARAGUS, FRUIT WHIP
THURS., JULY 4 HAPPY BIRTHDAY AMERICA!!!!
ALL SITES CLOSED
FRI., JULY 5 SEALEG SALAD, CUKES, MACARONI SALAD, LEMON YOGURT SQUARE
MON., JULY 8 BUBBLE AND SQUEAK (STEW), CALICO SLAW, BISCUIT, SLICED PEACHES
TUES., JULY 9 CHICKEN SALAD, CRANBERRY SAUCE, BEET AND ONION SALAD, POTATO SALAD, PINEAPPLE CRISP
WED., JULY 10

BAKED FISH WITH WHITE SAUCE, MASHED POTATO, BEETS, GELATIN JEWELS

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz
Where are these muscles and tendons located?

1. Latissimus dorsi a. Upper Arm
2. Trapezius b. Rump
3. Occipitofrontal c. Upper leg
4. Masseter d. Neck
5. Deltoid e. Lower Arm
6. Gluteus maximus f. Back
7. Achilles Tendon g. Foot
8. Ham strings h. Jaw
9. Flexor i. Forehead
10. Sartorius

j. Near Knee

Fireworks
     The Chinese created fireworks around the 6th century. They were a natural off shoot of their invention of gunpowder. The formula for gunpowder is pretty much the same today as it was then: Potassium nitrate, charcoal and sulfur mixed in the proper proportions. It is not something a person should play with unless they have had proper instruction.
     Simple fireworks such as firecrackers are made by wrapping the gunpowder in paper and adding a fuse. Gunpowder is a slow burning substance, but if confined it can produce an explosion. There are also ground displays such as pinwheels, suns and pastilles. The pinwheels and pastilles spin while the suns do not.
     Aerial displays come about by lifting the charge into the air before it detonates. The lift charge is placed in the bottom of a steel launching tube imbedded in sand or some other material to keep it in place. The shell must

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be of the proper size so that it fits tight in the tube on top of the lift charge. The shell contains explosive charge, chemicals to add color and fuses to delay the action in paper wrappings. This method can lift the firework to a height of up to 1000 ft. The shell is packed with more gunpowder to cause heat and pressure to ignite and spread the colors we see.
     The colored part of the firework is a mixture of potassium chlorate with various components. If one wants stars it is mixed with gun powder as well as starch gums, sugar, and shellac to bind it together into jawbreaker sized balls. Titanium and iron are used to produce sparks. Zinc gives the smoke, sodium the yellow color and antimony produces the glitter we sometimes see. Strontium and lithium compounds produce red, magnesium and aluminum white, barium green and copper blue displays. Turquoise and sea green displays are rare because of the lack of suitable cheap chemicals. Some of the chemical salts like barium and strontium are too reactive and would go off early if they were not packed separately to keep them away from the heat until it is time for them to display. Copper salts must also be isolated because too much heat washes out the color.
     Some aerial shots occur in stages called breaks. This effect is obtained by packing the shell with separate compartments and slow burning fuses connecting them so that they go off at different altitudes. There are many trade secrets that pyrotechnic companies guard to keep away from their competitors.
     I need to caution the reader that working with strong oxidants such as potassium nitrate and potassium chlorate can be very dangerous. Even coming in contact with other materials at room temperature they can cause an explosion so they should not be experimented with. I haven’t given any information here that is not readily available in encyclopedias or on the Internet.
     As a chemist I have had some experience with fireworks. I recall one year when some of my students built model rockets. I designed small fireworks and we sent them up in the rockets on a Saturday night at my camp in Gouldsboro. In Monday’s paper there was an article mentioning mysterious red flares over Gouldsboro bay. I never tried it again.

Answers: 1.f, 2.d, 3.i, 4.h, 5.a, 6.b, 7.g, 8.j, 9.e, 10.c
Score 5 Good, 6-7 Excellent, 8-10 Superb

Piscataquis Lodge
Ancient, Free & Accepted Masons
SUBMITTED BY WALTER MACDOUGAL
     On the tenth of December in 1822, a group of men met at the home of Arvardis Shaw in the village of Sebec “To see if it be expedient to form a lodge in order to advance the interests of masonry in this section of the country.” Among these men were Moses Greenleaf, Maine’s most notable cartographer and first geographer; his brother Eben who had been a sea captain and who settled in Williamsburg; Colonel William Morrison and Captain Ephraim Moulton, both veterans of the Revolution, and John Thompson who would walk from

Milo to Masonic meetings in Sebec.. Ten months later, Piscataquis Lodge was chartered and became the forty-fourth lodge under the new Grand Lodge of Maine.
     All of these men had become masons-- some in far places as in the case of John Tompson who had become a master mason in Greenock, Scotland. The Greenleafs were a Masonic family of long standing. Their father had served as master of the military lodge attached to the Massachusetts Line (regiment) and had told his sons how Brother and General George Washington used to come without fanfare and sit among the brethren.
     But neither being old nor having been organized by such leading citizens is not sufficient to assure an institution’s present worthiness nor its current importance to the community as a whole. Do those needs and purposes which concerned those men as they met around the candle-lit table in Sebec still exist? Are the methods and modes of Freemasonry still as vital as they were two hundred and eighty years ago? We think they do and are. Little that is truly significant in the lives of human beings has changed nor has the moral significance of those beliefs which Masons have shared for centuries diminished.
     In 1825, the Masonic Lodge in Skowhegan sent the new lodge at Sebec a simple gift. It came through the woods and over the bridle trails and these are the words which Eben Greenleaf, acting as lodge secretary, wrote in appreciation:... we are stimulated to exertion to defuse Masonic Light and Knowledge when we remember that Brethren at a distance and personally unknown take so much interest in our welfare. Wishing you all the happiness that can result from a strict adherence to the principles of our order, I am your friend and brother....
     Despite all our present technology and means of communication, there is no less need for caring, no less longing for happiness, no less occasion for the practice of justice or temperance, and no less necessity for the pursuit of wisdom and compassion than when those community pioneers met together in Sebec. According to its ritual, a Masonic lodge is a certain number of masons duly assembled, having the Holy Bible, Square (symbolizing moral responsibility and right actions) and Compasses (symbolizing compassion and scope) with a charter or warrant empowering them to work.” From this description we understand that masons gather to accomplish a civic, moral purpose, that so assembled they make use of sacred and symbolic objects to inspire and instruct, and that their endeavors are ordered by rational laws and ancient customs. Of equal importance, we learn that a lodge is a certain number of masons, not a place contained within four walls, but an association of men with a moral purpose.
     Because all Freemasons believe that in the beginning there was God and that God’s Light of Truth and Divine Love are now and forever, the Order is sometimes confused with a religion. However, Freemasonry makes no pretense of having a divinely ordained mission to save souls or of possessing a divinely revealed credo. Such concerns Masonry leaves to the conscious of its members and to the business of the church to which they choose to belong..
     Piscataquis Lodge has moved its meeting place at least three times following its chartering in Sebec village. Moving to Milo in 1855, it met in Temperance Hall on

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Riverside Street (latter used as a drying shed by the excelsior mill). Its meeting and degree work became more and more frequent as men sought to become Masons before leaving for the Civil War. Brother Walter Sturtevant who commanded Company D of the Second Maine Regiment and Colonel Walter Morrill who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for gallantry at Rappahanock Station became master mason during these years. Then in 1878 the brethren entered into an agreement with A.G.Chase to construct a new hall—Chase Hall which many in Milo will remember. Again, in 1906, Piscataquis Lodge moved to its new building on Milo’s Main Street.
     With 162 members, Piscataquis Lodge continues its commitment to compassion, relief, the dignity of the individual and moral responsibility. Joining with the Lodge is a Masonic Family consisting of a Royal Arch Chapter, a Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, and an Assembly of Rainbow for girls.
     The brothers who first met in Sebec would be astonished at computers and television but little surprised that Freemasonry is still vitally relevant to the life of the community and the maintenance of a good society.

EARLY MILO HISTORY TO 1912 – PART 1
Local History Bonus
Reprints from MHS Breeze and other sources
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
     In the great State of Maine, that vast expanse of territory which can be truthfully designated as the health and pleasure seeker’s paradise, where the sun shines brighter, the cloud effects are more magnificent, the foliage richer and more varied, and more varied forests grander than in any other section of America, is the unique little hamlet of Milo. In this section of magnificent distances, lofty mountains, multitudinous lakes and vast woodlands, interspersed with fertile valleys and three running rivers, it is surprising to find a community which affords its people a combination of the pleasures and natural advantages of the country, together with the comforts of city life.
     Situated on the Bangor & Aroostook Railroad with direct connections north, south and west, with its territory traversed by the waters of the Piscataquis, Sebec and Pleasant rivers, thus affording rare water power possibilities, with a wealth of raw materials suitable for many lines of manufactures, in the immediate vicinity and in the midst of a section wonderfully fertile, this busy and wide-awake town of Milo has bright prospect for the future.
     Before the act of incorporation of the town of Milo there was more or less discussion as to the name to be given, and finally a meeting of the then and somewhat few inhabitants were called upon to decide upon a name. It was decided at this meeting that each individual should bring in a name at an adjourned meeting. Theophilus Sargent had been reading about wonderful achievements of the ancient Greek athlete, Milo, who was a native of Crotona in Magna, Graecia, Italy, and was celebrated for his wonderful strength. At the adjourned meeting Mr.

Sargent proposed that the town to be incorporated under the name of Milo. This proposition seemed to strike the fancy of everyone present and the name of Milo was unanimously accepted. And January 21, 1823, Milo was incorporated as a town.
     Among the pioneer settlers were Benjamin Sargent, Moses Snow and Stephen Snow, they locating here in the opening years of the nineteenth century. Benjamin Sargent came from Methuen, Massachusetts, and he was the first settler to bring his family with him. These old pioneers then began to provide themselves with homes, which were only log cabins and crudely built huts. The first frame building built many years after the incorporation if Milo, was a store which was situated on Sargent Hill, built by Allen Monroe.
(From: Thriving Milo, by Helen M. Wingate, HMS Breeze, 1912)
Continued next week………

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MEETING NOTES JUNE 26
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s gathering was attended by nineteen members and guests Jeremy Finson and his grandmother Kathy West. Jeremy said a great prayer wishing us the best on the Kiwanis Auction. Thank you, Jeremy.
     Did everyone notice the paper this week? That new printer is going to be great.
     Auction: Lots of great items - Back issues of the Newspaper, Milo Story Vol. II, William Sawtell and his books. Lots of help - baked goods for the food wagon, lots of things to be moved. Remember the Cruize-In is Sunday too.
     Two anniversaries this week: Peter and Sheri Conley June 28th Steph and Jerry Salley July 2nd. Is this number 25, Steph?
     Happy and Sad dollars this week were for baseball and chickens. How American is that!?
     Upcoming speakers: Paul Tukey on his magazine "People, Places and Plants, Sid Cook, and Paul Kusnierz.
     Guilford’s charter night conflicts with our auction so Paul Grindle has volunteered to go as a representative for the Milo-Brownville Club on the 27th.This weeks meeting was very brief, as our speaker was very ill. Sheena Lundin will visit us soon though and speak about Volunteer Services. Get well soon Sheena!!!!!!!!!!

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