Three Rivers News, 2002-07-16
TUESDAY, JULY 16, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 36
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES DIAL 911!!!

In this issue….
• SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE FOR THE THREE RIVERS NEWS
• SEBEC VILLAGE 5K RACE
• MILO/BROWNVILLE LITTLE LEAGUE

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL EVERY WEEK
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week. The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to:
Valerie Robertson
P.O. Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont Street
Milo, Maine 04463
     We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings.

NEWS FROM BROWNVILLE
BY SOPHIE WILSON
In a community characterized by high un-employment, low wages, and economic uncertainty, it has been amazing to watch people come together to support the Farley Family after their tremendous loss last weekend. The telephones continue to ring with folks wanting to give money, furniture, clothing, and supplies to this family of twelve - soon to be thirteen. Along with coordinating donations, Sue Coburn is also planning a Bean Supper to benefit the family on August 17, 2002 at the BJHS Alumni Building. For more information please call Sue at 965-8340. Those who would like to donate money to the family can mail or drop off donations at the Brownville Town Office, P.O. Box 659, 27 Church Street, Brownville, Maine 04414.
From the Police Department... The Brownville Police Department is encouraging people to remove keys from vehicles and make sure that they are locked when not attended. Also, members of the Police Department this spring and summer have picked up several lost bicycles. If anyone is missing a bike, please contact the Brownville Police Department at 965-8026.
Barrett Paving will be working to finish the paving project in the next week. Please do not park on the side of the road on streets that they are preparing

for paving. The crew will complete several streets each day and having to dodge parked cars will result in a less than desirable paving job. The Town appreciates everyone's patience and willingness to assist us in successfully completing the project.


Strawberry Festival
July 18, 2002
At The Park Street United Methodist Church.
Supper served from
5:00PM to 6:30 PM
Adults $6.00 children $3.00.
Take out available. Menu: Ham, Potato Salad, Green Peas, Cole Slaw, condiments, coffee, punch, & Strawberry shortcake for dessert.

BROWNVILLE FIRE FIGHTERS RECEIVE THERMAL IMAGING TRAINING
     Four members of the Brownville Fire Department recently returned from two days of intensive training in Caribou, Maine, sponsored by the Cole Family Foundation, about the use of thermal imaging cameras to assist with fire fighting. Chief Patrick Thomas, William Bickford, Roger Graves, and Daniel Thomas report that the information given in the classroom, along with a full day of hands on training illustrating the various usage of the camera, clearly demonstrated that this equipment can be used to increase the safety of firefighters, save lives of fire victims, and potentially reduce damage to property. Everyone was excited to bring a new thermal imager back to Brownville at the conclusion of the training.
     The Town of Brownville has been working over the course of the last year and a half to raise the $22,500 needed to purchase a camera for the Fire Department. This spring, the Cole Family Foundation awarded the Town's grant request for a camera. Under the terms of this grant, Brownville will raise a total of $10,075 by December 1, 2003 and the Foundation will provide the remaining funds needed to purchase the camera. To date, approximately $5,000 has been raised through various local fundraisers and through generous dedicated contributions from people in the Three Rivers Region.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

     Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, D & M, All-In-One Stop, Milo Exxon, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
     Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
     Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
     Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson


MEALS FOR ME. MENU

WED., JULY 17 SPANISH RICE, CORN GINGERBREAD W/ LEMON SAUCE
THURS., JULY 18 MACARONI AND CHEESE, FRESH BROCCOLI, SCALLOPED TOMATOES, FRUIT COCKTAIL
FRI., JULY 19 FISH CHOWDER, SLICED VEGGIES, BISCUIT, FROSTED CAKE
MON., JULY 22 SLICED HAM PLATE WITH POTATO SALAD AND FRESH SPINACH SALAD, CHOCOLATE PUDDING
TUES., JULY 23 PEPPER STEAK, RICE PILAF, ASPARAGUS, BLOND BROWNIE
WED., JULY 24

CHICKEN DIVAN, MASHED POTATOES, PEAS, CORNBREAD, SLICED PEACHES

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED

MILO/BROWNVILLE LITTLE LEAGUE
BY SCOTT AND JEAN LARSON

STANDINGS: (AS OF JULY 11TH)

TEAM
WON
LOST
CUBS
7
0
BRAVES
4
3
METS
4
3
RED SOX
1
5
A'S
2
3
ORIOLES
0
4

Wed., July 10, 2002 - At Milo, for the winning Cubs, Kiel Larson went 3 for 4 with 3 triples, Zach Kutz was 3 for 3, all singles, Wade Witham was 3 for 4 with 2 doubles and Jamie Nason and Brian Saunders were both 1 for 3 with singles.
For the Orioles, Mike Lawson, Chris McCleary and Erica Lyford all had good games.

INNING 1 2 3 4 5 6 FINAL
ORIOLES 1 0 1 0 0 0 2
CUBS 1 4 2 3 0 0 10
Pitchers and Catchers: Orioles- Lawson , Lyford and Chris McCleary
Cubs- Larson, Nason, and Witham

Thurs., July 11, 2002 - At the Brownville field, Brian Saunders was 2 for 3, Wade Witham went 2 for 4 and Kiel Larson was 1 for 3. Wade and Kiel each had an inside the park homerun.
For the Mets, Ryan Bailey was 1 for 3, Noah Bissel went 1 for 3 and Cody Andrews went 1 for 3 with an inside the park home run.
Pitchers: Cubs-Larson, Nason, and Witham
Mets- Bailey, Whitten, and Andrews
INNING 1 2 3 4 5 6 FINAL
METS 2 0 0 0 0 2 4
CUBS 2 6 0 0 4 0 12

LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULE FOR NEXT 2 WEEKS
(all games are at 5:30 pm)
Click here for team rosters!

Tues., July 16 Brownville

ORIOLES AT BRAVES

Tues., July 16 Milo

CUBS AT RED SOX

Wed., July 17 Milo METS AT ORIOLES
Thurs., July 18 Brownville Braves at A’s
Thurs., July 18 Milo

Red Sox at Orioles

Tues., July 23 Brownville CUBS AT A’S
Tues., July 23 Milo METS AT BRAVES
Wed., July 24 Milo BRAVES AT CUBS
Thurs., July 25 Brownville A’S AT ORIOLES
Thurs., July 25 Milo RED SOX AT METS
PLAYOFFS WILL BEGIN FOLLOWING REGULAR SEASON GAMES

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Norman Robinson had (a) tennis court, (b) hotel, (c) store, (d) garage in the village.
2. Don Vachon was best known as a(n) (a) brakeman, (b) conductor, (c) fireman, (d) engineer.
3. Ned Johnson had a (a) shovel handle factory
(b) dairy, (c) blacksmith shop, (d) barbershop.
4. (a) Moses Greenleaf, (b) Samuel Stickney, (c) Jefferson Lake, (d) Eder Thomas, went to California for the gold rush.

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5. Brownville's first town manager was (a) Lyle Towne, (b) Ernest Seavey, (c) Everett Gerrish, (d) Buddy Gerrish.
6. The Canadian Pacific stockyard was located nearest the (a) station, (b) YMCA, (c) the junction with the B and A, (d) underpass.
7. The underpass was built (a) before WWI, (b) just after WWI, (c) during WWII, (d) during the Great Depression.
8. (a) Farrin Brothers and Smith, (b) Frank Rossi and Sons, (c) the Bridge Construction Company, (d) Hinman, "straightened out" Buckley's Corner.
9. (a) Jack Brown, (b) Gene Brown, (c) Lewis Boober, (d) Bill Davis, set a rebounding record at BJHS.
10. There was a (a) restaurant, (b) library, (c) pool table, (d) jewelry shop in Dillon's Hall.
Answers: 1-c 2-b 3-a 4-c 5c 6-d 7-b 8-a 9-c 10-c

MILO PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDY MCDOUGALL
     I'm going to use the column this week just for new books. We've had a lot of backordered ones come in and I've bought new ones too.
Evanovich, Janet
Garlock, Dorothy
Jakes, T.D.
Mason, Felicia
Patterson, James
Page, Katherine Hall
Pearl, Daniel
Peters, Elizabeth
Pilcher, Robin
Pratt, James Michael
Quick, Amanda
Rendell, Ruth
Rice, Luanne
Robards, Karen
Roberts, Nora
Russo, Richard
Rule, Ann
Simmons, Dan
Spencer-Fielding, Julia
Steel, Danielle
Steel, Danielle
Trollop, Joanna
Vine, Barbara
Woods, Stuart
HARD EIGHT
HIGH ON A HILL
GOD'S LEADING LADY
TESTIMONY
THE BEACH HOUSE
THE BODY IN THE BONFIRE
AT HOME IN THE WORLD
THE GOLDEN ONE
STARTING OVER
PARADISE BAY
DON'T LOOK BACK
ADAM AND EVE AND PINCH ME
SAFE HARBOR
TO TRUST A STRANGER
THREE FATES
EMPIRE FALLS
LUST KILLER
A WINTER'S HAUNTING
IN THE BLEAK MIDWINTER
THE COTTAGE
SUNSET AT ST. TROPEZ
GIRL FROM THE SOUTH
THE BLOOD DOCTOR
THE SHORT FOREVER

Milo Free Public Library Summer Hours
Mon. Weds. Fri. 2-8:00 p.m.

Area Runners Participate in Sebec Race
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     Several runners in the Three Rivers area participated in the Town of Sebec’s 5K Road Race held on the 4th of July. The winner of the race was John Chase of Monson with a time of 19:05. Other area runners were Josh Chase of Dover, 21:50; Will Mallett, Sebec, 22:03; Gary Larson, Dover, 23:01; Robert Hogan, Sebec, 23:50; Teri Morrill, Milo, 26:37; Chris Steinke, Dover, 27:31; Terry Knowles, Brownville, 28:44; Kenneth Carey, Atkinson, 29:56; Heather Steinke, Dover, 32:38; Dan Steinke, Dover, 32:39; Jeff Seinke, Dover, 32:52; Marge Williams, Brownville, 33:04, and Lindsey Zimmerman of Barnard with a time of 33:23. Congratulations to all runners!

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Our family has a wonderful collection of the old Milo High School yearbooks called the Breeze. I believe that the first one may have been printed in 1897 and I have a copy of the 1898 edition. I hadn't looked at the collection for a long time, but have recently gotten them out and have had a good time looking them over. In 1898 they referred to the publication as a "school paper" and they were a little disappointed in the fact that they were only able to get enough literary and editorial writings to fill one "paper."
     The four year high school curriculum was printed inside the front cover and the courses included Algebra, Rhetoric, Civics, Latin or French, Com. Law, Geometry, Physical Geography, American Literature, Physics, English Literature, General History, Botany, Geology, Chemistry, Essay Work, and finally a class in Reviews. A grade of 75 was required to pass a course and ranks were based upon daily oral and monthly written work. English studies were substituted for Latin and French if parents desired it, and scholars were requested to study at least one hour out of school each day.
     I was struck by the fact that there weren't more math classes, but pleased to see that they held literature, history and sciences in such high esteem. My word...they actually taught Botany and Geology...I'm impressed! They had a pretty pitiful library in those early days of the high school, but the students who were putting together this paper hoped to use the proceeds from sales to cancel out a debt of $44.00 that was left when the school had bought a 30 volume "Library of the World's Best Literature."
     There was an editorial written about reading being a neglected area of daily study in the schools. The editor was totally offended by the fact that the teachers weren't careful to correct scholars in pronunciation. I quote, "so when a scholar gets up to deliver his graduation essay he will not call "just", "jest" "get," "git," or leave off the final "g" on all such words as "morning." Amazing, isn't it, that our speech patterns haven't changed in over 100 years!!

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     There was an editorial about trashy reading...blaming the parents for their lack of supervision in what kids were choosing to read and also blaming parents for being possibly too frugal when it came to what they spent on appropriate reading material for children to have at home. I couldn't believe it!! The whole thing sounded so familiar!!
     There was a lively editorial about ownership of school textbooks. Evidently, they had only in the couple of years prior been charging the students for their own books. By 1898 they had started buying books and distributing them to the classmates and then having them pass them back in at the end of the year. The writer found this offensive; he wanted to be able to keep the books rather than having to pass them in. "The neat tidy, careful scholar would not be obliged to give up his book at the end of a term and the next term use a book that some dirty-fisted little rascal had used to chew and wipe his nose on the preceding term, while the careless, dirty, slovenly boy had a new book, so to speak." In all of these years it never occurred to me the filth that must be on our kids schoolbooks! Has it ever occurred to you? Yuck, it's givin' me the creeps!!
     Enough about the Breeze. We had a wonderful Milo High School Alumni Reunion this past weekend. There were 6 of my classmates there, and they literally turned the lights off on us, as we were the last ones to leave the building. We had such a nice visit! We're planning a little reunion in the fall. You won't be surprised to learn that we want to gather in Portland and take the train to Boston. We'll go down early Saturday morning, take in the city, stay over night in a nice hotel, then return on the train sometime on Sunday. Doesn't it sound like fun?! I can't wait!
In honor of the old-time story about the yearbook, I thought I'd give you one of my Mammie Horne's recipes. This is exactly how it is written in her own hand on a recipe card.

Edna D's Sugar Cake (My Dad thinks it might have been Edna Daggett's)
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 flour
1 teaspoon soda
2 teaspoon cream tartar
Salt (little) sift these dry ingredients together
1/2 cup melted butter
Break 1 egg in a cup and fill the cup up with milk. Turn over first mixture and beat. Lastly add 1 more egg. Use any kind of flavoring. The recipe ends there. I'm guessing an 8" X 8" pan and baked at 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz
     Suppose we were able to drill a hole completely through the Earth so it comes out on the opposite side. We know this isn’t possible because of the molten center, but this is a thought question. If you jumped into the hole where would you go?

Venus
     Venus, known as our sister planet, was named after the Greek goddess of love and beauty. It is the second planet from the sun (67,200,000mi.) and the sixth largest. Its diameter of 7521 miles makes it slightly smaller than the Earth.
     Venus is the brightest object in the sky except for the sun and moon. In ancient times it was thought to be two different stars. If it shone in the morning it was called Eosphorus and in the evening Hesperus. Once it was determined to be a planet, it was thought to have life. In fact in 1686, a Frenchman insisted its inhabitants looked like the Moors of Grenada. He said they were small and burned by the sun. This didn’t seem to bother them as they were always in love and fond of music.
     Venus has been visited by 20 space probes. The latest of them was Mariner in 1997. Most of the probes which were to land stopped functioning as before they landed or soon after because of the adverse conditions. There is no water on the planet and very little in its atmosphere. Most of the air is carbon dioxide with some sulfuric acid. The pressure of its atmosphere is about 90 times ours. There are high winds in the upper atmosphere measuring about 130 mi./hr, but near the surface there is little wind. The surface temperature is over 800 degrees Fahrenheit-hot enough to melt lead.
     Venus is tilted almost 180 degrees from vertical. The Earth is only tilted 23.5 degrees. Its rotation is very slow. It takes 243 of our days for it to rotate once. The rotation is so slow there is no measurable magnetic field.
     The surface is pock marked with craters from collisions with meteorites and it has more volcanoes than any other planet. There are over 1000 major volcanoes and over 100,000 in all. There is no indication of plate tectonics or movements of large pieces of the surface like we have on Earth. On Earth mountain chains clearly indicate these movements.
     In July Venus is an evening star. It can be observed in the west after sunset. It is visible longer than Mercury because it is further from the sun.

Answer: First of all we would fall toward the center of the Earth. Gravity is caused by the mass of the Earth. As we fell, more and more of the mass of the Earth would be above us pulling us back so we would slow down. A person actually weighs less in a deep mine. Momentum would carry us through the center and part way out the other side. As we started to leave gravity would pull us back so we would change direction and head back toward the center. Assuming no friction after oscillating back and forth a few times, we would eventually end up in the

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center. Now the question is what would we weigh when we stopped at the center?

A Historical Review
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2002)
Reprint of Piscataquis Observer article of July 15, 1981
Museum Named for Silas Harriman
SEBEC: On the north road, in Sebec, there is an amalgamation of an old building, and some older and newer artifacts. This is the Harriman School Museum. The Sebec Historical Society refurbished and opened the Museum in 1968. The Museum, like the original school, was named after Silas Harriman an early settler of the town.
     In, 1966, a group of people in Sebec organized for the purpose of preserving the history of the town. They culminated their organization to incorporating the group, thus forming the Sebec Historical Society. Their first project turned out to be the restoration of the Silas Harriman School.
     Members of the historical society initiated a drive to raise funds for the repainting of the school. The corporation received almost $100 in donations, which set the members and other volunteers to work on fixing up the building. The building was painted, cleaned on the inside and work was done on the grounds, as the members worked to complete their task.
     The museum was opened to the public on July 28, 1968. An open house was held on that day, and over 300 people showed up for the event.
     The building’s age is not known exactly, but the deed to the land was given for the purpose of building a school on June 27, 1860. This ranks the building among the oldest in the area. This was not the only one room schoolhouse in Sebec.
     The Sebec Historical Society believes that there have been as many as sixteen one room schoolhouses in Sebec. The building was closed as a school in 1933, when there were only four students.
     The museum is not only a school museum; it serves as a museum for quite a few other artifacts. Hung on the walls around the room of the Museum are portraits of past Sebec residents. In one-corner stands an antique table saw, which was originally owned by a carpenter who built most of the older houses in Sebec. Next to the saw sits a stone from the old bridge in Sebec Village which was torn down in recent years. A teacher’s podium sits at the head of the room, facing rows of chairs. People in the area and abroad donated all of these artifacts. The building serves not only as a museum to commemorate the school, but to commemorate all the history of Sebec.
     When the society was incorporated, there were 11 members. Membership has risen to 123 members. Approximately 100 visitors came to the Museum every year. It is open on Sundays during July and August [1981] from 2-5 p.m. The society asks no charge.

Early Milo History to 1912 – Part 3
Local History Bonus
Reprints from MHS Breeze
And other sources
Submitted by Myrna Ricker

     There are now (1912) five churches, and four school buildings, together with many stores, depots, mills, manufacturing plants, railroads and various other improvements in Milo. However, no mention of Milo, would be complete were attention not given and credit accorded to the machine shops at Milo Junction.
     The first meeting was held in what was then a schoolhouse and now includes part of a dwelling house occupied by Fred Inman, having been moved across the road several years ago. The first church built was the Free Will Baptist Church which is still in use at the present time built by the late William Owen. The second schoolhouse built in Milo was the one which has been remodeled into the Primary school building. Another interesting thing to us is to learn that the children were accustomed to go to school by spotted trees, while now we have streets and sidewalks.
     One of our first preachers was Elder Richards, a Universalist. He also taught school in our town for a number of years, living north of the part, on what is now called the Brownville road. The early preachers who had no home in the town were called “circuit riders.” The early teachers boarded around, from one pupil’s house to another.
     There are now many different societies in Milo, electric lights, a bank, blacksmith shops, a veteran taxidermist, telephones, a post office, and a large hotel.
     Milo, past and present, affords an interesting study to the student of modern industrial life. Its satisfied and prosperous people, its well-kept homes and attractive surroundings breathe a spirit of peach and contentment. The labor problem does not enter into the lives of the workmen, as there are apparently no existing grievances. With these conditions as we find them and the truth apparent that willing, loyal, and contented service of the subordinate in the most valued asset to the employer, should not the lesson and example of what has been accomplished in this little hamlet of the Maine woods prove worthy of emulation?
     From the early beginning the population has steadily in- creased until today (1912) Milo is the largest town in the county of Piscataquis, with the largest number of voters, also the largest in valuation, with its splendid water power, its excellent farmlands, together with its geographical position, the thrift and industry of its people, this town will undoubtedly continue to grow, and become one of the leading towns, perhaps one of the leading cities, in Maine.
(From: Thriving Milo, by Helen Wingate, MHS Breeze, 1912)

THE ‘BOAT PEOPLE’
AKA ‘THE BIRTHDAY CLUB’
By Nancy Grant
     The Riverside Birthday Club held its latest outing on July 10th to celebrate with Sheila Ellis. The club was treated to a ‘sundown’ cruise on the Hobbstown float, skillfully piloted by Bob Ellison with Tanya Ellison as the first mate. Even the angry skies and

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cool weather didn’t stop the captain and crew as they were prepared with umbrellas, throws, jackets, and other items to keep warm and dry. The waves splashing upon the deck made for a few anxious moments but as the cruise continued up the river, the sun came out and the whitecaps smoothed out quite nicely. A highlight of the evening was enjoying the sight of a loon guarding her nest on the riverbank.
     Laurel Harris, cousin of the guest of honor, helped to provide a wonderful dinner at the cottage of Bob (also a cousin) and Tanya. In honor of the occasion, a custard pie, complete with whipped topping and candles, was served. Attending the festive gathering was Bob and Tanya Ellison, Laurel Harris, Sheila Ellis, Linda O’Connor, Jean McKusick, Nancy Grant, and Doris Washburn. The ‘Club’ wishes to extend their heartfelt thanks to the Skipper and First Mate for their hospitality.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
MILO-MARCH 25, 1942
Milo Couple Hears From Three Sons in Service in One Day
     Last Tuesday was a ‘Red Letter’ day for Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hatt, as they received letters from all three of their sons in service, two of whom are overseas.
     The first letter in two months from Edward Ludger Hatt, U.S.Army Air Forces, stationed in the South Pacific, told of his promotion to technical sergeant. Capt. Kermit Hatt, U.S.Army Air Forces, wrote from India that he was well. The third letter was from Petty Officer First Class Fred Hatt, instructor of parachute troops at Lakehurst, N.J.
June 10, 1942 - Milo Club Closes Season
     The members of the New Idea Club of Milo held their final meeting of the club year last Thursday evening following a luncheon at the home of Mrs. H.C.Bundy. Those attending were Mrs. Sue Jenkins, Mrs. Onata Dean, Mrs. Anne Mills, Mrs. Pearl Day, Mrs. Cora Dutch, Mrs. Thelma McEachern, Mrs. Nora Hamlin, Mrs. Fannie Treworgy, Mrs. Agnes Bundy, Mrs. Laurel Carde, Mrs. Lovina Johnson, Mrs. Stella Doble, Mrs. Clara Pullen, Olivia Doble, Mrs. Flora Durgin, Mrs. Carrie Peakes, Mrs. Martha Gould, Mrs. Marguerite Hamlin, Mrs. Grace Macleod, Mrs. Martha Billings, Mrs. Adelia Leonard, and Mrs. Louisa Billings.
SEPTEMBER 14, 1942 – LETTER FROM A SOLDIER
THANKS, STUDENTS!
Dear Students and Teachers of Milo High School:
     Today I received my fourth letter from your organization, and will use this paragraph to tell you all how much I appreciate the letters and the fine work you are doing for the enlisted men of Milo. Mail call at the barracks is of course one of the best parts of the day and each soldier listens intently for his name to be called. It certainly is a treat for me to receive one of the big fat envelopes from Milo High. All the other boys in the barracks know as well as I do what the envelope contains, as I’ve advertised the idea and they think it is a fine gesture. Thanks a lot for all the past letters and “Keep them coming.”
     Army life is carried on a Scott Field the same as at any other army camp but perhaps a little less strict as far as routine is concerned because we are in school seven and a half hours a

day. My day begins at 5 a.m. and from 5 to 7 we have to eat chow (breakfast) and clean the barracks. From 7 until 11:30 we have our morning session and from 12:50 until 2:45 p.m. the afternoon session. Half of the day is taken up in what is known as Theory, the rest is taken up in receiving code. Theory is quite dry and has to do with the fundamentals of radio; and code is very interesting. Each student tries to attain the highest speed he possibly can. In Radio terms 16 words per minute is passing grade and will assure one of being an operator but speeds of 50 W.P.M. are not uncommon. At present I’m taking 20 W.P.M. and I have about thirty-five more school days to go. Part of the course will be taken up with Tactical Procedure which means learning to operate and keep records of actual flight but is restricted material so I’ll not be able to describe it.
     Being here at Scott Field was rather a stroke of good fortune as at the time I was drafted, men were needed in this particular branch of the service; through a series of examinations I qualified for radio and—here I am! I really should feel it a privilege as we have no marching to do except to and from school which takes about twenty minutes a day. About the only other requirements are: 30 minutes of calisthenics and a turn around the obstacle race which takes about fifteen minutes. We are usually done by 4 p.m. and have the rest of the time to ourselves.
     Two weeks ago I went on an excursion down the Mississippi River which, of course, was a treat. The Mississippi is wide but very muddy. I’ve always heard it referred to as the “Muddy Mississippi,” but never appreciated the fact until I’d seen it. It is a grand old river but I wouldn’t swap it for “Sebec stream”—in fact, what part of this country I’ve seen will not compare with the old state of Maine!
     After graduation here, which will be around Oct. 23, I don’t have the least idea where I’ll go, nor do I know what I’ll be doing otherwise than some form of radio work. But in any event keep up the fine work you are doing and I’ll do my part!
          Sincerely,
               Pvt. Charles W. Horne 134
               368 T.S.S. Bks. 228
               Scott Field
               Illinois
P.S. Cadet Carl Davis is stationed about two miles from me. I have seen him once and it was good to see someone who speaks my language.

P.E.T.S
Public Service Announcement
     P.E.T.S (Prevent Euthanasia through Sterilization) an animal welfare organization was founded in the Corinna-Dexter area in 1991. With the generous aid of Dr. Harold Sherman, they have helped hundreds of pet owners through their low cost spay/neuter program, thus preventing the needless death or starvation of thousands of unwanted dogs and cats.
     It is estimated that one male and one female cat and all of their offspring can produce 376 cats in three short years, 66,000 in six years, and an extraordinary 11 million in just nine years.
     Since its inception in 1991, the P.E.T.S. group has also cared for, and endeavored to place in suitable homes, many stray and abandoned cats and dogs.
     P.E.T.S. is now joining with the Abandoned Feline Fund of Dover-Foxcroft founded by Mary Shapleigh and Bob McDuffy. Together these organizations will continue their low cost spay/neuter program and pet placement

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program with the generous support of the Foxcroft Veterinary Service for those people who demonstrate need.
     New programs include an educational program for area schools, which will encourage and teach the proper treatment of animals and the importance of spaying and neutering, and will promote positive pet ownership. P.E.T.S. is also developing literature to inform the public of the great need to reduce the pet over population. Here in the Dover-Bangor area shelters euthanize thousands of animals every year.
     For more information about P.E.T.S. contact:
Sue at 379-2809 Jennifer at 924-7495
Mary at 564-8092 Julie at 943-5083
Lori at 564-8233 Sally at 876-2752

     Donations for the P.E.T.S. programs are desperately needed. Donations can be mailed to P.E.T.S., Dexter Regional Federal Credit Union, West Main Street, Dover-Foxcroft, ME, 04426. The P.E.T.S. group is seeking foster homes for the pet placement program.
Thank you Julie Gallagher for submitting this important information.

IN MEMORIAM
CARL R. RICKER

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MEETING NOTES JULY 3
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s gathering began with eighteen members present and guests Ben and Colby Darling, grandsons of Edwin and Ethelyn Treworgy. Another visitor was Ethan, nephew of Joe and Chris Beres.
     We received a very nice thank you note and certificate from the Penquis Cruisers for providing the food wagon for their event.
There are no interclubs as of yet, but we are planning to go to Guilford later this month.
     Updates: The Kiwanis Newspaper is doing great. How about that new printer!
     Window fans have been purchased for the Town Hall project and a quote has been received for carpeting the balcony and upstairs lobby.

NEED COMPUTER HELP?
     Seth Barden, an invaluable part of this newspaper and co-creator of The TRCMaine website, is available to help you with ANY computer problem. He can make your computer do what you want it to do! He can work on any PC, so if you have a computer problem, call Seth at 943-2425 or check out his personal site at www.sethen.com.

Digital Photography
Picture, Slide, & Negative Scanning
Graphic Design
Video Editing
Computer Troubleshooting
Mac & PC Setup
Web Design

All in all, the Kiwanis Auction was a huge success. We had a great turn out of help and in spite of the showers all had a good time. We had a great deal of leftover clothes that will go to the missions in the Ukraine.
     Happy Birthday to Bill Sawtell on July 5th.
     Eleven Happy and Sad dollars were given this week. Some for vacations, the auction, and our visitors.
     Bill Sawtell introduced this week’s speaker, Sid Cook. Sid graduated from Milo, is a retired teacher, a history buff, and did a tour in Vietnam. He spoke to us about this segment of his life. I can't begin to do Sid's mesmerizing talk justice. He told of his frequently moving 65th, 101st Airborne Infantry Unit. How lucky he was not to have been wounded as many others were. He told about Vietnam from a historical point of view but also from a first hand point of view. One aspect that some of us had never thought of was the animal threats: tigers, elephants, and snakes, let alone fighting for your life.
     Sid came home, like many others, without any support for what he had been through. Sid has channeled his feelings by organizing reunions with ‘buddy's of buddy's’ from the war. He has a newsletter and a website. These make him feel helpful and are helpful to lots of others. Many Vets do not speak of their service and can't or won't share the experience with their families, but they will open up to someone who has been in their shoes. This is a great effort on Sid's part and I hope that all who want or need this camaraderie seek out this help. Sid compares this war to others in a historical aspect; he did what he was trained to do. He wishes the war hadn’t happened, but he is proud to have served his country. We can all thank him and the many others that did the same. God Bless you Sid and the USA.

MEETING NOTES JULY 10
     This week’s meeting started with nineteen members.
     Updates: Thank you note from HOBY for our donation, Interclub scheduled to go to Guilford on July 25, and the Coffee House on July 6th a great success - 120 attended.
     Happy Birthday to Brian Salley, July 14th and Dennis Dorsey on the 15th.
     Nine Happy and Sad Dollars this week; an Anniversary, Ted Williams, House sale, CoffeeHouse and our speaker.
     We had a wonderfully interesting speaker for this weeks meeting. Paul Tukey, editor and publisher of People, Places and Plants, and New England Journal of Golf, spoke and shared a video. The video is a pilot of a new gardening show which hasn't been viewed by many. Hopefully this show will air on channel 2 this spring, but lots of details need to be finalized. Paul is very familiar with this area, has relatives here and his mother Charlotte intends to retire here.
     The magazines, which are fantastic, target the New England area and the Plant magazine has really taken off. The video featured the Lupine Festival in the New Hampshire White Mountains, veggie gardening, and High Bush Blueberries. This video was jam packed with tips and ideas so the show should be a huge success.
     Afterward Paul touched on composting and container gardening. If you're into gardening, look for this great magazine, "People, Places, and Plants".
Thank you Paul, for taking the time to speak; we enjoyed every word!!

MAINE:
~ Has 3,500 miles of coastline
~ Once known as the “Earmuff Capital of the World”
~ Has at least 28 cities or towns that begin with the word “North”, 23 with the word “South”, 22 with “West”, and 28 with “East.”
~ Lobster was so common that in the 18th century it was used for fertilizer. In the 19th century, oysters were the luxury food of the day, and lobster was considered a poor man’s food.
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A new feature to the Three Rivers News is the TRC Page. Every week, it will feature the current week's community calendar, and some other features of our site.

Community Calendar


Milo High School, Class of 1962 Reunion

The class of 1962 held their 40th reunion at the Milo Town Hall on Friday, July 5th 2002. There were 13 class members present and six spouses. The affair was catered by Everett & Freda Cook, and good time was had by all. During the reunion, it was decided to have another in the fall, in the hopes of enticing a few more classmates to come.

Back Row – Left to Right : Carroll Witham, Richard White, Martin O’Connor, David Badger, Willis Tibbetts, David Cook, & Larry Foss.
Front Row – Left to Right : Fred Trask, Sheryl Henderson Drinkwater, Alice Chase Hatch, Donna Leathers Renoll, Betty Stanchfield Hansen, & Jeanette Burton Towne


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