Three Rivers News, 2002-08-20
TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 41
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

REMEMBER, FOR ALL EMERGENCIES DIAL 911!!!

Quilt Raffle
     The Comprehensive Plan Committee of the Town of Brownville is having a quilt raffle that will include a Queen Size Quilt with Quilt rack. Tickets are $1.00 each or six for $5.00.
     Quilt made and donated by the Monday Morning Quilters, Brownville Jct., Quilt Rack made by Dennis Green, Brownville.
Location and Dates of sales are:
August 30th – Maine Savings FCU
September 27th – Maine Savings FCU
For more information or to buy a ticket contact
Margaret Williams at 207-965-8120

Penquis Schools Registration
     If you need to register your children for any school in the MSAD #41 district, you can do so now by going to the school your child will be attending.
     The guidance office at Penquis Valley is open and is located in the middle school complex. Elementary students can be registered in the principal's offices at the appropriate schools. Please register your students before August 28, the first day of school.

BACK TO SCHOOL
     For those of you thinking about back to school supplies, here is the list of items needed for each class at Milo Elementary:
Mrs. Carey and Mrs. Walker ask that the kindergarten students bring pencils, (12), erasers, a small box of crayons (8-12 colors, please, not 64), a glue stick, scissors and a pencil box to keep things together.
     First Graders need to bring pencils (12), crayons (16 colors), 2 glue sticks and a set of washable markers.
     Second Graders are asked to provide 2 glue sticks, pencils, (12), crayons (16 colors), washable markers, and a wire-bound notebook.
     Third Graders will need a 12" ruler, pencils, (12), colored pencils, 2-pocket folders, one red and one blue, scissors, 2 glue sticks and a composition book.
     Fifth Graders will be asked to provide pencils (20), crayons (24 colors), black or blue pens (no gel pens), 12" ruler, small ruled notebook for assignments, 3 composition books, 3 colored folders with pockets, cap erasers.

Descendants of the Rev. Eleazer Carver Family Hold Reunion
Submitted by Katherine A. Osgood
     A reunion of the descendants of the Rev. Eleazer Carver family was held on July 26th, 2002 with a banquet at the Brownville Jct. Alumni building. The banquet was prepared and served by Everett and Freda Cook. A picnic was held on the 27th at the Down Home Bed and Breakfast.
     Many of the relatives of Sara A. Carver Allen and Christobel Carver Cook live in the Milo area but some came from California, Florida, and Connecticut. Nearly 60 people attended the two day event. As I was studying the genealogy of our family, it brought to mind many of the reunions that I had attended in the 1920’s and 1930’s. One memory is especially poignant and I would like to share it with you.
     First I will tell you who I am. I am Katherine Allen Osgood, daughter of Sara Allura Carver Allen and Abner F. Allen. I was born on August 30, 1920 at the home of my Aunt Christobel Carver Cook Speed’s home on Derby Hill. My mother Sara was the 7th child of Eleazer Carver and Marcella Tibbets Carver.

     My memory is of a very dear cousin, the 4th child of my mother’s brother Eleazer and Helen Sanborn Carver. My cousin’s name was Marcella, being named for our grandmother. Marcella was born on June 14, 1918. Her life was very short but she made an unforgettable impression on me. I did not realize the jewel that she was until these later years when I have had more time to reflect on the past.
     Our families lived quite far apart; on either side of the river and on opposite sides of the town, so we didn’t get together very often. One day we were playing together at my sister’s farm home where there was a large wood shed with plenty of room to play. It happened that a few days earlier a load of wood called slab wood had been delivered. The slabs were large round pieces of tree limbs with the bark left on. The bark was dark brown but the wood was pure white. It resembled a picture frame.
     Now, I have gone ahead of my story so I must add this important part. When Marcella was very young she had a life-threatening illness. She was taken to the Shriner’s Hospital in Boston where they removed one lung. The medical knowledge in the 1920’s was not as advanced as it is today. The surgery left her with a slight deformity so that she looked a bit smaller on one side.
Now to get back to the wood shed. When Marcella saw the slab wood, her eyes seemed to gleam and she picked up a piece and started to draw something. There were other children there besides myself and we were deeply interested in what she was drawing. I don’t remember what she drew for the other children but for me she drew a beautiful palomino horse, perfectly proportioned and exquisite in every detail. She was an artist with great talent even at 12 years old. I kept that drawing for many years. As time went by it became lost but stays etched in my memory.
     At school one day, she went with me downtown on our lunch break (we could do that back in the 30’s). I had a few pennies and we spent considerable time in Ida McKinney’s store choosing penny candy. Suddenly we realized that we should be getting back to school and we had to hurry so as not to be late. High Street was a real challenge for Marcella. I ran ahead but as I turned to look back, I saw her painfully taking each step. I felt so sorry that I decided to wait for her even though I might be late.
     Not long after that I heard my parents talking about her. She was sick again and in the hospital. Then the sad news came that she had passed away on October 15, 1933. It was such a loss of a great talent and keen mind. She was the only girl in a family of seven boys.
     I will never forget Marcella.

STATEMENT OF POLICY

   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
   Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
   We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week. The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to:

Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463

   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

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NEED COMPUTER HELP?
     Seth Barden, an invaluable part of this newspaper and co-creator of The TRCMaine website, is available to help you with ANY computer problem. He can make your computer do what you want it to do! He can work on any PC, so if you have a computer problem, call Seth at 943-2425 or check out his personal site at www.sethen.com.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Axel Carlson's wife was a (a) teacher, (b) nurse, (c) secretary, (d) maid.
2. Axel Carlson was blown off the (a) first Onawa trestle, (b) second Onawa trestle, (c) third Onawa trestle, (d) Wilson trestle.
3. Carolyn Porter was the daughter of (a) John Lewis, (b) Cal Herrick, (c) Ernest Ladd, (d) Charlie Foulkes.
4. Brownville's first white settler John Heath settled in (a) Brownville Village, (b) the Stanchfield Ridge, (c) North Brownville, (e) the Tannery District.
5. The Rollinses had a(an) (a) hat company. (b) soda company, (c) taxi service, (d) cleaning service.
6. Constable Charlie Foulkes built camps at (a) Katahdin Iron Works, (b) Lake View, (c) Ebeemee, (d) the Rips Road.
7. Brownville's other constable was (a) Walter McClain, (b) Fred Essency, (c) Carroll Conley, (d) Palmer Wilson.
8. BHS was built in (a) 1856, (b) 1867, (c) 1870, (d) 1872.
9. Jimmy Hay and John Ray were (a) teamsters, (b) brakemen, (c) YMCA secretaries, (d) country singers.
10. The "High Road" was (a) Van Horne Avenue, (b) Ryder Avenue, (c) Front Street, (d) Railroad Avenue.

Answers:
1-d 2-b 3-b 4-c 5-a 6-c 7-a 8-d 9-c 10-c

Remembering Elvis Pressley's Death
BY BILL SAWTELL
     On August 16 the world commemorated the 25th anniversary of the passing of Elvis Pressley. I was in Paris at the time and couldn't understand just why radio stations there were playing his music all day.
     Then, as I got out of a cab, I read the headlines of a newspaper on sale at a kiosk: "Elvis Pressley est mort" (Elvis Pressley dies.). Then I wept and went back to my room to reflect.
Elvis had never been my favorite (I preferred Roy Orbison). But when I learned of his death, I realized he had meant more to me than I thought. How could anyone live through the fifties, sixties, and seventies and not be impacted by this great man?

MORE MEMORIES OF ELVIS
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     My memories of August 16, 1977 are very vivid. I was 8+ months pregnant with Katie. We were staying at Kirby’s folks’, Paul and Denice Robertson’s house because our newly purchased dome home was being renovated. My mother, Ginger and her husband Charlie Stevens were living upstairs in an apartment over Paul and Denice because their home burned a few months earlier and it too, was being renovated.
     That summer was the hottest summer in the history of the world. Baxter Park had burned, the temperature had been above 90 degrees for weeks, and I was FAT!
     I was lying on the couch downstairs when the door to the upstairs apartment opened and there was my mother, crying as if the world was ending. Now, this is the woman who got through her house burning down with the attitude “at least no one was hurt”. Mama was doing the kind of crying that makes you turn into a stammerer.
     “El-EL-El”…she sobbed.

     “What, what is wrong!” I screamed. My head whirled with horrible thoughts of what could have happened to whom; was it my brothers, my Grandparents, Kirby?
     “El-El-Elvis is dead!” she finally got out.
     Now, my mother LOVED Elvis. I was raised to the songs of her favorite album, Blue Hawaii. She followed every story about him, and dreamed of seeing him in person. As destiny would have it, she and thousands of other folks in Maine had tickets to see Elvis’s concert that was to be in Portland the next day. My heart ached for her and all the others who were grieving: not only for his death, but for the fact that they were so close to seeing, in person, the man of their dreams.
     Twenty years later, a few days after Mama’s funeral, my brothers, Joel and Charlie and I were discussing life, and how much we missed Mama, and how unfair her dying was. Joel casually remarked,” At least now, she can see Elvis”. And suddenly we all felt better. That is the vision I hold in my mind--Mama hanging out with Elvis, (the skinny, healthy, young Elvis, wearing that white suit), at the greatest concert of all time. And Elvis is the lucky one.

LITTLE LEAGUE PLAYOFF NEWS
BY SCOTT AND JEAN LARSON
GAME #1 August 6, 2002 RED SOX VS. CUBS
     At the Brownville field, the Cubs took their first loss of the season. The Red Sox won, 4-2, in 8 innings. This was one of the most exciting games of the year.
     It was a pitcher’s duel up to the bottom of the fifth inning, when the Cubs’ JAMIE NASON scored one run. The Red Sox’s LEE DOLLEY then scored the tying run in the top of the 6th.
     The game went into extra innings and the Red Sox added 3 runs in the top of the 8th, with scoring by JOSH DILLION, LEE DOLLEY, AND NICK EMERY.
     At the bottom of the inning, WADE WITHAM scored by hitting a double and taking advantage of a passed ball.
Final score: Red Sox 4-Cubs 2. What a great game!

INNING 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 HITS RUNS
RED SOX 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3
2
4
CUBS 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
1
2

GAME #2 August 7, 2002 A’s vs. the Red Sox
     At Milo, the Cubs scored 6 runs in the 4th inning to put the game away. KIEL LARSON went 3 for 3, ZACH KUTZ and WADE WITHAM WERE 1 FOR 2, TIMMY NASON was 3 for 3 and his brother JAMIE WAS 2 FOR 3.
     For the A’s, ALEX LONDON had the lone single.

INNING 1 2 3 4 5 6 HITS RUNS
A'S 1 0 0 0 0 0
1
1
CUBS 3 0 0 6 0 -
11
9

GAME #3 August 8, 2002 Braves vs. the Cubs
     At the Milo field, the Cubs went down in defeat to the Braves, in a hard fought game that went into extra innings, thus eliminating the Cubs from the playoffs.
     For the Cubs, KIEL LARSON, WADE WITHAM, TIM NASON, and JAMIE NASON each had hits.
     For the Braves, BRAD BROWN, and TYLER ELSINHEIMER had a single and a double, while CODY HOWE had two hits.
     This was another great game, with the Braves scoring 4 runs in the 7th inning and holding on at the bottom for the victory.Final score: Braves 11- Cubs 7

INNING 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 HITS RUNS
BRAVES 1 4 1 1 0 0 4
4
11
CUBS 2 1 1 0 2 0 1
6
7

Pitching: Braves: BRAD BROWN, KYLE GEROW, TONY GABEARO Cubs: KIEL LARSON, JAMIE NASON, WADE WITHAM

A final note from Scott Larson:
     I would like to thank Murrel Harris and Dean Bellatty for running the league.
     The umpiring was very, very, good at both the fields. At Brownville it was Eli Zwicker, Crystal Cail, Brandon McKenzie and Dean Bellatty. The Milo umpires were Travis Ellis, Nick Morillo and Murrel Harris.
     Again, a special thanks to all! Good luck to all of the teams left in the playoffs.          Scott Larson

P.S. Thanks to Val Robertson for putting the articles in the paper.

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Editors note: I have so enjoyed typing and reading these articles. We are so blessed to have such wonderful opportunities for our area’s young folks. Those of you who read of the recreational opportunities for the kids will notice seeing the same names of involved adults over and over. It is people like Travis Ellis, Crystal Cail, Brandon McKenzie and Nick Morillo, not to mention that Murrel and Dean made growing up around here such a great thing. I know I’ve cited this many times, but it is my all time favorite quote:” It takes a village to raise a child” and we have some darn nice villages, producing some pretty great kids.
     # 1 Brian Zwicker takes the throw at home plate as Wade Witham slides home during the Mets vs. Red Sox Little League playoff game on Saturday. It was a great day of baseball.
     # 2 Bill Sawtell, local author, historian and supporter of area athletics was asked by Brownville Recreation Director Dean Bellatty to throw out the first pitch of the Little League Tournament held in Brownville on Aug. 10. Catching Bill's fast ball was Mets catcher, Cody Andrews.

SKOWHEGAN MOTOCROSS RACES
Sunday - August 11, 02 Local racers:
     TREVOR LYFORD, for the first time, came home empty-handed from Skowhegan. He was running a real strong race in his 1st Moto with his 4-wheeler but ran into some serious trouble on his third lap.... his back left axle broke completely off sending his tire rolling along beside him. He wasn't hurt and managed to still steer it about 40 feet before coming to a stop. Jimmy Foss retrieved the tire out of the woods while Trevor’s Dad pushed the ATV off the track. Trevor was a little shaken up but said he will definitely return in 2 weeks to try to regain some points that he didn't receive from today's race.
     Trevor also raced his pw50 dirt bike in 1 moto and finished 6th out of 16.
     KYLE FOSS had a good showing in his 1st Moto, finishing an impressive 5th place out of 19 other dirt bikes. He finished 8th in his second Moto.
     DUSTIN BISHOP ran in two different classes finishing in 5th place out of 25 in the 125 youth. KOLE STEVENS returned to the track this week and did a great job, finishing 6th.
     MIKE BISHOP was back racing this week and finished 7th place in his class and for the first time racing, JUSTIN MORRILL did a super job finishing 9th in his class. Considering how extremely hot it was.... all the boys did a tremendous job.
     For race pictures you can click onto www.mainedirtbikes.com Next race is August 25th ...GOOD LUCK TO ALL!

ANNUAL SEBEC RIVER PARTY HELD
BY JOE WAYNE ZAMBONI
     The Sebec River Association held it's annual picnic at the "Rips" on Saturday. There were approximately seventy people of all ages in attendance. Everyone enjoyed a fun afternoon of conversation, food, swimming and boating. The Sebec River is one of the fine jewels Milo has to offer, and it has always amazed me that there are people in this community who have never experienced its natural beauty. There is talk of starting the Sebec River Canoe Race up again after a lapse of several years. It is a very fine course starting at Sebec Village, traversing the challenging Rips Rapids and then finishing up at the park in Milo. The dam owners would probably agree to release water at the Sebec dam for the race which would make the "Rips Run" a more exciting challenge. Canoe/Kayak racing has become a very popular sport and a race could be combined with other planned summer events.


MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., AUG. 20 VEAL PARMESAN, SPAGHETTI, PEAS, SLICED PEARS
WED., AUG. 21 BOILED DINNER, HAM, POTATO, CARROTS, CABBAGE, TURNIP, GELATIN
THURS., AUG. 22 FISH BURGER DELUXE, POTATO WEDGES, GREEN BEAN SALAD
FRI., AUG. 23 BEEF STROGANOFF, NOODLES, MIXED VEGGIES, CHOCOLATE PUDDING
MON., AUG. 26 TOMATO SOUP, TUNA SANDWICH, CUCUMBERS, LEMON CAKE
TUES., AUG. 27

TURKEY TETRAZZINI, BABY CARROTS, PUMPKIN PIE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. A $2.50 DONATION IS SUGGESTED AND APPRECIATED

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     The Milo Free Public Library Safa-Read Summer Reading Program held its final party on Friday, August 16 at 10:00 a.m. in the Milo Town Hall dining room. There were 59 present for the party including adults and children.
     There were 62 children enrolled and 2819 books were read. Angel Hulsey read 1200 books. Angel will be a 6th grader in the fall. The person who read the second greatest number of books was Faith Thomas reading 78 books.
     The child who listened to the most books was Telos Wallace who had 218 books read to him.
     There were 5 Safa-Read mascots and the following children won them:
Benji the Bengal Tiger - AUSTIN FOGG
Ellie Elephant - KINEO WALLACE
George Giraffe - CAITLYN DURANT
Leo Lion - RANDALL HATHORNE
Zeb Zebra - ALAN YANBUL
     Two 12 year old volunteers, Aleesa Byrne and Kyle Gero, helped throughout the summer reading program. They were presented with thank you gifts. Aleesa received a canvas tote bag and Kyle received a T-shirt - each with the library READ logo.
The judges for the poster contest were Merna Dunham, Allen Monroe, and Gayle Shirley.
Preschool: 1st prize BEN MORRILL
2nd prize ALEXIS MARINO
3rd prize JAROD WEBB
Kindergarten 1st prize CONNOR WEBB

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2nd prize ALAN YANBUL
1st and 2nd Grade 1st prize Peter Morse
2nd prize BROOKE MORRILL
3rd prize KATELYNN PELLETIER
     Refreshments were served after the prizes were given out. Each child in the program also received a reading certificate.
     Those who helped at the party or gave food were trustees Helen Carey, Joanne DeWitt, Melanie Hussey, Shirlene Ladd; past library staff Katherine Osgood, substitutes Tracy Morse and Nancy Scroggins, volunteers Aleesa Byrne, Kyle Gero and Walter Macdougall. A very good friend of the library, Joyce Hogan, took care of the kitchen as she has done for many years for the summer reading program party. Staff members Pamela Flanagan and Judith Macdougall were also there.
     Each week various members of the community came in to read for story time on Wednesday afternoon. The Milo Free Public Library really appreciated the time and effort given by the community readers. They were Jane Jones, Kathy Dixon-Wallace, Phil Gerow, Nancy Scroggins, Tracy Morse, Neil Hamlin, Karen Durant and Debbie Walker.
     Children who participated in the program were: ERELL AREFEIN, AARON GOODINE, COLBY ROBINSON, CORA BAILEY, ASHLEY GOODINE, LOGAN ROBINSON, DREW BELLATTY, JENNY GOODINE, ASHLEY STANHOPE, LAURYN BELLATTY, RANDALL HATHORN, JOSH STANHOPE, JOSHUA BROWN, KENDRA HERBEST, KATELYNN PELLETIER, KENDRA CHASE, NOAH HILL, EMILY STUBBS, JESSICA CLEMENT, ANGEL HULSEY, EMMA LOUISE TAYLOR, JOSHUA CLEMENT, ELIZABETH MACINTIRE, FAITH THOMAS, CODY DUNHAM, BREANNE MCKINLEY, HOPE THOMAS, ALLISON DURANT, GRACE MARCHANT, LUKE THOMAS, CAITLYN DURANT, ALEXIS MARINO, NATHANIEL TUCKER, KEITH EMERY, CRYSTAL MILLS, KINEO WALLACE, AUSTIN FOGG, BEN MORRILL, TELOS WALLACE, JOYCE FOSTER, BROOKE MORRILL, CONNOR WEBB, SHELBY FOWLES, PETER MORSE, JAROD WEBB, CAITLYN GERRISH, ALYSSA MURANO, ALAN YANBUL, CHELSEY GERRISH, JULIUS ANTHONY MURANO, HARLEY GILMAN, and NICOLE PADILLA.

A Historical Review
Arthur B. Carey, Jr. and the Milo Water District - Part 2.

Reprinted from news articles written from 1979-1990.
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2002)
...Continued from last week...
     Arthur B. Carey, Jr. wrote in his 1984 annual report to the Town of Milo that he planned to retire by June 30, 1985.
     Water Superintendent Retires after 37 Years is the title of an article written for the Bangor Daily News by Phil Gerow.
     Milo -- A retirement coffee was held Thursday morning, May 16, at the Milo town Hall to honor Arthur B. Carey Jr., manager of the Milo Water District, for 37 years of service. Carey, the son of Arthur and Elsie Carey of Milo, was the oldest of five children. He graduated from Milo High School in 1941 and worked for the B.F. Sturtevant defense plant in Massachusetts for 1 year. He returned to Milo and was steam locomotive mechanic for the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad at the Derby Shops from 1942 to 1948. When the diesels came into use, he was laid off. He was hired in July 1948 by Bion Jose, general manager of the Milo Water District, as superintendent of the district. In June 1958, Carey was appointed general manager, a title he held until his retirement.
     Carey worked for Jose before Jose became Milo town manager, and worked with seven other town managers O.T. Rozelle, Millard Quimby, Carl Carlson, Warren Cookson, Dale Green, Stephen Law and the current (1985) manager, William Brockman.
     When he was hired, there was just Carey & Jose; now the district has three full-time employees, Frank Perkins, Charles Grinnell, and David Ogden. Carey said that in past years, he has had as many as 25 part-time employees working during the summer time.
     Carey said that all three of his brothers had worked for him when they were younger: Alasco, Galen, and Herbert. Carey remembers that in the 1950s his crews laid 13,000 feet of sewer pipe and 9,000 feet of water mains. He said that during his tenure, every short street in Milo

had been increased from 1 1/4-inch-diameter pipe to at least 2-inch, and in some instances, 6-inch mains.
     Carey said the greatest accomplishment of his career was in 1979, when a half-million-dollar building, a 500,000-gallon underground, covered reservoir, and a district shop that replaced two railroad boxcars were all built. He said that the pumping station, installed in 1909, was also replaced in 1979. At the completion of the project, the building was dedicated to Carey. When he began work, the controls were manual; now they are automatic.
     Carey said that he had seen rated increased during the 37 years from $4.65 a quarter for 900 cubic feet minimum to $24.00 a quarter for 1,200 cubic feet. he said that sewer rates were $1 a quarter in 1948 and are now (1985) $12.00.
     Carey has served for 19 years as a member of the Milo Fire Department, where he was also elected an officer. He is a member of the Piscataquis Lodge of Masons and a past member of the Milo Lions Club. Carey attends the Park Street United Methodist Church. [Also, a member of the Maine Water Utilities Association.]
     At the retirement coffee, Charles Horne, Water District Trustee chairman, presided. Daniel Nutter, chairman of the Milo Board of Selectmen, presented Carey with a plaque. The E.J. Prescott Company. a water works distributor, presented Carey with a lamp made from a water meter. Carey was also presented a retirement check from the Water District by Horne.
     He was presented with a money tree from town employees, selectmen, coworkers, employees of DOT, the Milo Town office, and relatives and friends. Carey said he was pleased that his parents, both in their mid-eighties, were able to attend the festivities. The coffee was arranged by Lura Williams, Water District secretary, assisted by Frank and Dawna Perkins and the trustees.
Note: Arthur B. Carey, Jr. died Nov. 9, 1990 in Milo.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Whew! Hot enough for ya? We have spent the entire week trying to figure out what to eat that isn't a hot heavy meal...and how to keep cool. The keeping cool wasn't such a hard thing as we are fortunate enough to have a camp on Schoodic Lake that is relatively close by. We've gone out to camp many of these hot nights. Tonight, as a matter of fact, I got directly into my bathing suit and to the shouts and cheers of my family ran the length of the wharf and jumped in. My grandchildren were right behind me and we all had such fun in the water. My husband had gone in first to test the temperature, and I took his word for it that it was warm, warm, warm. My four-year-old granddaughter has learned to swim just like a fish this summer. Her mother found her a bathing suit at Sam's Club that has a built in life preserver. The most wonderful bathing suit we've ever seen for a little kid. She has gotten so much confidence. Now, mind you, we haven't tried her without the suit yet...but I'm betting she'll do just fine. She's got the finer points of swimming right down pat. She's not afraid to go right underwater and she comes up swimming for all she's worth.
     I'm still reeling from the news about Ames Department Store closing. What will we do for a nearby department store? Here I am again...carrying on about the lack of places to shop, but my goodness people, WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO? I mean, you could scoot over to Ames for a quick pair of sneakers for your grandson...I can't tell you how many times I've done that. Ames has had the cutest curtains at the best prices for the longest time. Their craft section is wonderful, and their bedding and other linens are always reasonably priced. We've even bought furniture at Ames! I'm just so disappointed.
     It's been a week of ups and downs. I was glad to get back to work. I point a little fan right at my face and it draws the cool air in from the darkened halls of the school. Soon the halls will be lit and filled with busy sweating children. Let's hope things have cooled down a bit before then! One of my childhood friends lost his Dad this week. He and I had a chance to talk for a few minutes when we met by chance in the little hallway between The Head Shop where I had been having my hair done, and Neil Hamlin's office where he had been meeting. He reminded me of where we were standing and we talked and talked about old memories of that building and the wonderful store that once occupied that space. He told me that he had many ideas for old memories that I could use in my column. As luck would have it.... I was beginning to think that I wouldn't do the column anymore, and he encouraged me to keep at it, and he'd help

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me with ideas. If you're reading this John, I'm going to hold you to that offer.
     We've had corn on the cob three times in the past week and a half. I always shuck my corn and place it in a kettle with just a little bit of water. I try to lift the corn up a bit out of the water by laying it on a little metal rack of some sort. I've even been known to lay a pair of tongs into the bottom of the pot to lay the corn on. I sprinkle a little sugar into the water and turn the corn on when we are approximately 10 minutes away from dinner. The water will come to a boil rather quickly and we let it cook for 9 minutes only! We are so incredibly fussy about the doneness of our corn, that an entire pot of corn can be spoiled for us if we let it cook even a minute too long. Of course we use real butter (but we try to put it on sparingly these days). We both like corn to pop off the cob into our mouths. I'm not sure that my Dad is as happy with the way we fix our corn, but since I'm the cook...I do it my way. If you are cooking a big kettle of corn, you might need to give it another minute or two.
     We've been slicing cukes and tomatoes for a couple of weeks, too. Boy are those cukes wonderful swimming in a dish with vinegar on them. Mom used to peel her tomatoes, but I'm too lazy to do that. I just slice them in big thick slices and serve them with a sugar bowl beside them. A little sprinkle of sugar over the top just enhances the flavor.
     In honor of the season I have decided to share two pickle recipes that I used to make every year...but haven't done for years. They are so good. For the last several years I have had to be satisfied with homemade pickles that I could beg or buy off of people who had either way more time or way more ambition than I had.
     Cheryl Hamlin gave me this recipe years ago.

Bread and Butter Pickles
1 1/2 gallons of sliced cukes
6 to 8 onions sliced in rings
1/2 cup of pickling salt
Cover with ice and let stand for 3 hours; Mix and heat (good and hot)
4 cups sugar
3 teaspoons of celery seed
3 teaspoons of mustard seed
1 teaspoon turmeric
4 cups vinegar
     Drain the cukes and put into the heated mixture just until they turn color. Put the hot pickle mixture in hot sterile jars and seal. Cover the jars with a towel until they seal (I'm not sure if the towel idea was Cheryl's, but I always do it so that a cool breeze doesn't blow on my hot hot jars and crack one of them - makes sense to me!) I don't have a clue where this recipe came from, but I used to make it all the time. It's wonderful served on Saturday nights with baked beans. YUM!
Green Tomato Pickles
2 gallons sliced green tomatoes
12 good sized onions sliced
2 quarts vinegar
1-quart sugar
1-teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons dry mustard
1 teaspoon ground pepper
1 teaspoon ground clove
1 teaspoon ground allspice
     Mix the sauce in a large kettle and add the tomatoes and onions. Cook until tender and place in hot sterile jars and seal. I'd use the towel over these, too!
     If you haven't ever sterilized jars...this is how I do it. I approximate how many jars I'll be using. I always overdo - it pays to expect you are going to get more out of a batch of something, than to not have enough hot jars. I thoroughly wash my jars and the lids and rings. I always use new lids, but once in a while I'll reuse a ring if it's in good condition. I place the jars upside down in a kettle and put the lids and rings in and around the jars wherever you can make them fit and put a little water in the kettle. Cover the kettle and bring the water to a boil for about 5 to 10 minutes. I start this whole procedure about 15 minutes before I think my pickles will be ready to be packed. Lay out a clean towel or paper towels on the cupboard and be very careful removing the jars from the kettle to the cloth because you could easily be burned. I have some canning implements that I have collected over the years like jar tongs and a wide mouth funnel. These are a big help. I am very careful to keep my whole cupboard area clean and sterile while canning. I even launder my potholders ahead of pickle making.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Summer Flowers
Match common and Latin names of these flowers

1. Althaea a. Canterbury Bells
2. Ipomoea b. Snapdragon
3. Callistephus c. Marigold
4. Gypsophila d. Oats
5. Antirrhinum e. Carnation
6. Digitalis f. Baby’s Breath
7. Dianthus g. Hollyhock
8. Avena h. Morning Glory
9. Tagetes i. Foxglove
10. Campanula

j. China Aster

Vitamin B Complex
     At one time all the B vitamins were considered to be one substance. Research has shown that there are a number of chemical compounds that are similar in their actions that make up the group call the Vitamin B complex. There are many good sources of these vitamins. Some of them are: brewer’s yeast, meats, eggs, cheese, milk, whole grain products, brown rice, nuts, cauliflower, peas, potatoes, mushrooms, green leafy vegetables, figs, dates and cantaloupe.
     The first of the complex to be isolated was Thiamin or vitamin B1. This vitamin enhances circulation, assists in blood formation, carbohydrate metabolism, the production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach and is one of the antioxidants. Severe lack of this vitamin causes Beriberi. Symptoms include fatigue, forgetfulness, heart changes, labored breathing, nervousness, weak and sore muscles and severe weight loss. As with most of the B complex, it is destroyed by heating.
     Riboflavin or Vitamin B2 is an antioxidant. It is destroyed by exposure to light. Like most B vitamins, it can’t be stored in the body so a daily intake is necessary. Fortunately it is found in most plant and animal cells so it is readily available. Exercise raises the requirement for Riboflavin. A deficiency of this vitamin causes cracks in the corners of the mouth and lips, reddening of the tongue and eczema. It appears to have a role in the prevention of cancer and anemia. I am more than familiar with the analysis of this vitamin. I will always remember a biochemistry lab where we had to extract Riboflavin from fresh rat liver. The process involved grinding up the liver and mixing it with sugar before measuring out a specified amount. All went well until I used a pipette to draw out the amount needed. A pipette is a glass tube where one can measure volumes. I was in a hurry and instead of using a rubber bulb to draw the liquefied rat liver up the tube I sucked it up like a straw. Unfortunately there was a piece of rat liver that blocked the pipette. When I sucked harder I got a mouth full of raw liver. Ugh!!
     Niacin or Vitamin B3 metabolizes carbohydrates, fats and proteins. It aids in the production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach. It helps promote healthy skin and central nervous system. Insulin production is aided by Niacin. It is used to help lower cholesterol in some people. Taking large doses should always be taken under care of a physician because liver damage can occur. Another side effect from large doses is flushing of the skin. Niacin also assists in the production of insulin and the sex hormones.
     Folic acid is most noted for its help in preventing anemia. It works with Vitamin B12 in performing this function. It also aids the immune system and fights depression, anxiety and fatigue. It has a role in the production of DNA. In pregnant women it prevents neural tube defects and spina bifida in the unborn. Spinach is a great source of this vitamin.
     Pantothenic Acid or Vitamin B5 is known as the anti stress vitamin. IT helps in the conversion of carbohydrates and fats into energy. It fights depression, aids in the production of cholesterol, bile, red blood cells and antibodies. It aids in the conversion of Vitamin D into a useful form for the body. In addition if you need an excuse, lobster is a great source of Pantothenic acid.
     Pyridoxine or Vitamin B6 is involved in more body functions than almost any other nutrient. It maintains the proper sodium and potassium balance. IT has a role in cancer immunity and the prevention of arteriosclerosis by the prevention of the deposit of cholesterol in arteries. It aids in the prevention of hair loss. There also appears to be

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some line between this vitamin and carpal tunnel syndrome although this has not been proven.
     Cobalmin or Vitamin B12 along with Folic Acid prevents anemia by aiding the production of red blood cells. It is required for proper digestion, protein synthesis and cell longevity. Vitamin B12 can be stored in the body for future use. Up to a 5 year supply can be held. It is important that vegetarians use supplements for this vitamin because it is only found in animal products. It is released from these products by the hydrochloric acid in the stomach. It is found in beef liver, animal tissue, fish, milk and eggs.

Answers:1)g, 2)h, 3)j, 4)f, 5)b, 6)i, 7)e, 8)d, 9)c, 10)a

Milo Junction to Year 1907
Local History Bonus: Reprints from MHS Breeze And other sources
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
     Milo Junction in the year 1890 was but a small settlement which consisted of one small store and a few small houses.
     A pump station was built to supply water for the trains and was pumped by hand. Later the Katahdin Iron Works railroad was built to convey the iron, which was mined at Katahdin to the railway.
     When the railroad was built new homes and two small supply stores were erected. A station was also built which burned a short time later. The population of Milo Junction steadily increased and a new station was built. A short time later the road was changed to a shorter route and a new station was built, the old one serving as a dwelling house. When the station was built a coal shed was also erected.
     In May of 1904 the Bangor and Aroostook Railway Company began work on car shops. These shops consisted of several buildings among which are car repair, locomotive, blacksmith and paint shops; boiler room and roundhouse. In June of 1906 work was begun in the shops. The shops employ about one hundred and seventy-five men and the payroll consists of about three hundred names.
     During the period from 1904 to 1906 about seventy-five houses were built for the employees of the railway company, plus one large hotel and dwelling house for Mr. Stuart the General Superintendent of the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad Company. The shops and houses are lighted with electricity.
     A vestry was erected by the Methodist Episcopal Church in which they hold meetings. The vestry also serves as a schoolhouse for the small children of the Junction. It is expected that the church proper will be erected in the summer of ’07.
(From: Milo Junction – Author unknown – Breeze 1907)


PROTECTING YOUR PETS
By Nancy Grant
     Lyme disease is an ever-increasing threat to animals and humans. It is important to check yourself and your pets after being out doors. If a tick is found and removed with 24 hours, the chances of it transmitting Lyme disease or other infections are much less. Use fine-point tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible and pull gently to avoid squeezing the body of the tick. Clean the site of the bite, your hands, and the tweezers with disinfectant. It may be a good idea to wear protective gloves.
     NEVER use a burned match, petroleum jelly or nail polish to try to remove ticks. These methods are ineffective.
     (It is especially important to make sure your pets have shelter from the sun available to them AND plenty of fresh cool water to drink during these hot summer months.)
A MESSAGE FROM THE MAINE ASSOCIATION FOR PUPIL TRANSPORTATION AND M.S.A.D. #41 BUS DRIVERS…

SCHOOLS WILL SOON BE IN SESSION IN ALL AREA SCHOOLS – AUGUST 28TH IS THE FIRST STUDENT DAY!

SCHOOL BUS + KIDS = CAUTION + PATIENCE
Please remember…
*Where there’s a school bus there are most likely kids!
*School buses make lots of stops, be aware of kids everywhere and be patient!
*It is against the law to pass a stopped school bus when the red lights are flashing. This includes schoolyards and parking lots!
*School bus drivers can only see to the extent of the mirrors. Stay out of the blind spots. Use extreme caution if you decide to pass a moving school bus.
*Remember the driver of the school bus faces many distractions, please be on alert and use caution when you approach a school bus.
*School Buses stop at all Railroad Crossings.

IN MEMORIUM
Max E. Place
Virgil V. Larouche

“The Simplest Things”
By Paul Kinne

The simplest things in life
Truly mean the most to me
So I tell you now
Read my writings
And then you will see

The new sunlight
On an early spring morn
The beauty of a single rose
Down to even the smallest thorn

Having your loved one near
To hold you close
And wash away your fears

To watch a dancing flame
Burning on its wick
Letting the hot wax
Slowly trickle down the candle stick

Sitting on the edge of a stream
Your body totally relaxed
The water rippling
And all the colors around with a vibrant gleam

Spending time with a true friend
Knowing that no matter what
They will always be there to the end

To stand at the top of a mountain
And look down over the land
Having your little brother at your side
Reach over and take your hand

Watching the sun set on the ocean shore
To step back and realize
That life gives you so much more

These are just a few of the things
That are special to me
So now you know
Some of the things that I see.

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HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
1943 – MILO BOY WAS GUEST OF QUEEN ELIZABETH
     Harlon D. Thombs, who was graduated from Milo high school in 1933, received the thrill of his life shortly after he arrived in England when he was invited to dine at Royal English High School. Later he attended a play at Royal Castle and talked with Queen Elizabeth. He wrote about it as follows:
     “Bowker and I are still trying to realize that it happened. Our Special Officer received an invitation for two American enlisted men to be guests at a Royal School for the children of people working in King’s castle and the Park near it for Thanksgiving. The school was founded by Queen Victoria and is still under the management of the Queen. Permission was granted by the Queen for the Headmaster to entertain two men on Thanksgiving and to fly the American flag on the school’s single staff for the day. (I hope you realize the significance of such an act). We went to the school on Wednesday to deliver a flag. While there an old lady who has spent her whole life as a maid to Royal Princesses, came to call. She was one of the most interesting people I have ever met, has known all the Royalty of the past generation. I can’t tell how I felt. I was talking with people who knew Royalty better than I know some of my cousins.”
     “Thanksgiving Day we arrived at the school and there was Old Glory flying in the English sun. It was thrilling. We were introduced to the children and I talked for 20 minutes about Thanksgiving – difference this year – fine hospitality given our men by a people who have experienced so much. Then Bowker answered questions such as “What sports are played in America” and “Do Americans chew gum” etc.
     “For dinner there was a small table set for four with an American flag in the center. We were served a turkey with all that goes with the bird. A meal fit for a King.”
     “Later we were honored with a priceless gift, a set of Mauny Money sent to us by the King’s own moner.” (On Holy Thursday at Westminster Abbey a set is presented to as many ages persons as the King has years). In addition the Headmaster told us he would try to get us passes for the dress rehearsal of his play in one of the King’s castles.
     Later – “It has been a day what I can never forget. Three of my service friends and I went to see the play. The Queen, accompanied by the Duchess of Kent was among the many celebrities present. The main attraction was the presence of the two Royal princesses taking the lead, also the two children of the Duchess of Kent in a clever little act. During the finale the American flag as well as the British, was brought in, with the express permission of the Queen. When the play was over we were taken I an adjourning room and when the Royal party came through, the Queen and the Duchess stopped, shook hands and chatted with us individually for some time. Believe me, none of the pictures of the Queen are too good. She is the most gracious and charming woman I have ever met. The Duchess was lovely in her mourning. None of us were at all ill at ease while the Queen was talking to us.”
     “If you find the above statement hard to believe, then we are all in the same boat. It all seems so unreal, I am hoping so one pinches me – I am afraid I will wake up. I have been honored far above deserts.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MEETING NOTES AUGUST 14
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s gathering began with fifteen members present.
     Updates: Out of 222 Kiwanis Newspapers printed last week, 219 were sold. Four people receive the paper by mail subscriptions. The carpet lying will begin in the Town Hall balcony this week and the first Senior citizens barbecue will be at Pleasant Park on August 15. Hopefully another will take place in two weeks at another location.
     Eleven Happy and Sad dollars this week: health, throwing the first pitch at a baseball game play off, start of school, school shopping done, and a sad dollar for the passing of Sheriff Ed Reynolds.
     The Kiwanis New England district convention is being held this year in Danvers MA. At the convention a silent auction will be held to raise moneys for a college fund set up for the children who lost their parents on Sept 11, 2001. We are sending an assortment of goodies from Stanchfield Farms and author William Sawtell donated his book about Katahdin Ironworks. These gifts should represent this area nicely.
     Upcoming speaker: August 28 - Superintendent David Walker.
     This week’s speaker told about the Bangor Public Libraries Subscription databases. Barbara McDade presented a computer-aided program about all the information available on line through the Library access. Genealogy, Grant information, EBSCO Database, and Poem Finder were a few examples that Barbara demonstrated. Genealogy had a general reference screen along with an access to Bangor Daily News and the New York Times. The Foundation Center Search has all the information you could ever want or need about applying for grants and the EBSCO Database is designed for all ages to research data. Encyclopedia Britannica is part of this database, which also features a search, designed for younger children to use. Poem Finder could help you locate poems of short stories just by putting in any line of the poem or story. Also an explanation of the poem is available along with the authors name and other poems written by them. Don't forget E-Books (electronic books). Which brought up a discussion, will hard copy ever go away… we think not? Can you climb into a hot tub to soak your cares away and read an E-Book? Can you cuddle up in your bed or in your hammock with an E-Book? Not the same. Books are not going away. Lots and lots of information is available at your local library...go and enjoy. If you go to Bangor Library, stop and say ‘Hi’ to Barbara. She really knows her databases.

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A new feature to the Three Rivers News is the TRC Page. Every week, it will feature the current week's community calendar, and some other features of our site.

Community Calendar


Local Museums
The local historical societies’ museums are open for the summer!

Milo Historical Society Museum
12 High Street, Milo
Tuesdays & Fridays, 1p - 3p

Brownville Historical Society Museum
72 Church Street, Brownville
Tuesdays & Saturdays, 10a - 3p

Harriman School Museum (Sebec Historical Society)
North Road, Sebec
Sundays, 2p - 4p


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Would you like your business or organization listed on our site? The service is free! We provide a listing of businesses, clubs & organizations, churches, and schools. Just fill out the following form or fill out the form on our site at www.trcmaine.org! Also, please list any upcoming local events that should be in our community calendar!!

Fill out this form!

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