Three Rivers News, 2002-09-10
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 44
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, LET US HONOR AMERICA WITH RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS. MAKE A NICE MEMORY FOR A FRIEND OR NEIGHBOR TO HELP ERASE SOME OF THE HORRIBLE ONES.



ONE NATION, UNDER GOD.

Photo courtesy of Seth Barden
TRUE VALUE SHINES
     The photo above doesn’t do the new paint job at Milo True Value justice, but it does give you an idea of how great the building looks. John and Barbara assure me that the “Milo a friendly town” sign will be up next week. We will run a photo of the finished project.

In this issue…
A map of Milo, with the new street names.
A new column, Bea Kind

"A FRIENDLY TOWN"
     Has anyone else missed seeing the sign that always hung above the True Value store? You know, the one that says "Milo, A Friendly Town". its absence is one thing that inspired me to write this new column. We should take that saying and work on it as a community (just like they are working on painting the buildings) and be more friendly and giving! All of us have something to offer and each of us can make a difference in someone's life. In the next week try to do one of the following things to brighten someone's day.
- Bring a neighbor’s empty garbage cans back to the house on trash day.
- Hold a door open for someone going into the store.
- Really mean it when you ask someone "How are you today?"
     These may seem like little things, but you will find they not only brighten a strangers day, but they will also put a smile on your face......and we all know that smiles are contagious.
By: Ms. Bea Kind

REMEMBRANCE SERVICE
     There will be a Service of Remembrance held at the Milo United Methodist Church at 7pm on September 11th. Clergy participating in the service include Rev. Michelle St. Cyr of the United Methodist Churches, Rev. Nancy Moore of St. John's and St. Augustine's Episcopal Churches, and Rev. Ernie Madden of the United Baptist Church. The service will include scripture readings, prayer, hymns, personal reflections and candle lighting. Please plan to attend this special service commemorating a very special event.

SNACK SHACK HAPPENINGS
BY LAUREL HARRIS
     The concession stand at Elmwood Park will soon be adding hamburgers, cheeseburgers and french fries to its menu, thanks to the hard work of Louie Ellison and Herb Carey.
     Louie donated the items necessary to construct a table for the new equipment, then he and Herb donated their time to build the table.
     Louie and Herb are always there when you need something built or a big favor done! THANKS GUYS!!

CORRECTION CORNER – In the story last week about the World War II Veteran receiving a special diploma, John Willinski’s rank attained was as 2nd class Petty Officer, not Chief Petty Officer. We apologize for the misinformation.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
   Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
   We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week. The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to:

Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463

   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

AREA SCHOOL NEWS
MEDICATIONS IN SCHOOL
BY SUE CHAFFEE
     The school year is off to a "fast-paced" start and I would like to thank parents who have taken the time not only to read the letters from the Health Office, but also to comply with the required guidelines. It makes it much easier for us to give care to your child at school if all of the necessary paper work is complete.
     We do, however, continue to have medications arriving at school in containers other than the original. Please know that by Maine State Dept. of Education Guidelines for Medication in Schools, we cannot give your child any medication (including over the counter drugs like Tylenol) without written permission of the
parent/guardian. Unless we are able to reach you by phone to make some other arrangement your child will not receive his/her medication. Phone orders are not permitted.
     Also a reminder that the school only provides Regular Strength Acetaminophen if your child has written permission on file. If you give permission for Liquid Tylenol, Chewable Tylenol, Ibuprofen or anything other than Regular Strength tablets you will need to provide the medication.
HEAD LICE
     With the return of children from summer break the head lice have returned as well. There have already been several cases detected and children have been sent home for treatment. Routine classroom checks of all heads are no longer proving effective since head lice is rarely spread in school. It is very important that you check your child's head on a regular basis. If you have questions at any time, or

are not sure what you are looking for please call me at your child's school. I have collected much new information on the most effective methods of dealing with this particular health issue. Remember, head lice are not a serious health risk, they are a nuisance for sure, but should never be a source of embarrassment.

MILO ELEMENTARY TERRIFIC KIDS
From the classroom of:
Mrs.Barden - Our terrific kid this week is REBECCA GLIDDEN. Rebecca is a wonderful role model for her classmates. She is very cooperative, hard working and pleasant. We are very happy to have Rebecca in our room. Way to go Rebecca!!!!
Mrs Mills - Our terrific kid has been very helpful to others in the room. He has been kind, caring and considerate. DARREN LEWIS is our terrific kid.
Mrs. Dunham - Our Terrific Kid is a very enthusiastic learner. He comes to school each day with a bright smile on his face. His work is always neat and on time. We love having KLAY STEVENS in our class.
Mrs. Dell'olio - LUCAS is a great active listener and is an extremely polite class member. He sets a great example for his peers.
Mrs Hayes - The students have chosen a terrific kid that is respectful, nice to others, finishes his work and doesn't fight. We are proud of COLTON LARRABEE and we are happy to have him in our class.
Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey - EMERY TARNOCZY and DERRICK JOHNSON are our Terrific Kids. Both these boys have been very good listeners and hard workers that take pride in their work. We are proud of them.
Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Carey - Our first Terrific Kids of the year are MAKAYLA KELLEY and CODY ANDRICK. Makayla is a fine new Milo Elementary citizen. She is adjusting well to her new school and her new friends. She is truly Terrific!
     Cody is also a new Milo Elementary citizen that we can be proud of. He is a good listener and is learning the rules of his new school without a problem. We love our new friends, Cody and Makayla.
Mrs. Whitney - Whitney's Terrific Kid this week is JONATHAN RUBLEE. He took our class mascot to Schoodic Lake over the Labor Day weekend and showed him a terrific time. Thanks, from the class!!!

BROWNVILLE 5TH GRADE IS “ADOPTED”
     Again this year the Brownville 5th grade is being "adopted" by the American Legion Auxiliary. We are VERY grateful to these ladies for supplying many of the items we need throughout the year. It's wonderful to have the support of so many people in our town.

MILO BAPTIST CHURCH TO FEATURE SPEAKER
     On Sunday, September 15, 2002, Thomas Obey and Linda Dodge will be speaking at the United Baptist Church in Milo at 7:00 p.m. They will be presenting information regarding The Shepherd Godparent Home located in a quiet neighborhood in Bangor.

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The home will be open to pregnant girls ages 13 to 17 and will give each girl the opportunity to make her own choice as to parenting her baby or giving her baby up for adoption.
     The home provides counseling, educational opportunities, and preparation for parenting. Folks at the home can help with the adoption process if desired. Room, meals, counseling, and education are provided, at no cost, through the generosity of donors and churches that support this ministry on a regular basis.
     This informational meeting is open to the public and all are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the meeting. For more information call 947-8725.
     The Shepherds Godparents organization is in the process of furnishing the home. If you are able to help, call 947-9220.
     For more information about this venture, tune into WHCF FM radio at 88.5 on Thursdays at 11:00am.

AMERICAN LEGION YARD SALE
BAKE SALE…YARD SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2002
AT THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION HALL
POST 41
WEST MAIN STREET
MILO
FROM 9AM-TIL DUSK
(OR UNTIL EVERYTHING IS GONE)
ANYONE INTERESTED IN DONATING ITEMS CALL 943-7303 AND ASK FOR JIM
BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM TIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!!!

AMERICAN LEGION YARD SALE
BAKE SALE…YARD SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2002
AT THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION HALL
POST 41
WEST MAIN STREET
MILO
FROM 9AM-TIL DUSK
(OR UNTIL EVERYTHING IS GONE)
ANYONE INTERESTED IN DONATING ITEMS CALL 943-7303 AND ASK FOR JIM.
BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM TIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30SEE YOU THERE!!!

MHS Class of 1948 to Meet
     The Milo High School Class of 1948 will hold its next bi-monthly meeting on Thursday, September 12 at Freda & Everett Cook's Bed & Breakfast on High Street. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. with one of Freda's delicious breakfasts and the usual socializing and updates on communications from classmates. We will also make some initial plans for our 55th reunion on July 5, 2003 and consider holding a luncheon meeting at the American Legion Hall in October 2002.


MEALS FOR ME. MENU

MON., SEPT. 9
HAPPY BIRTHDAY KATIE!!! BAKED CHICKEN, BAKED POTATO, SQUASH, BUTTERSCOTCH PUDDING
TUES., SEPT. 10 MACARONI AND CHEESE, GREEN BEANS, BASIL TOMATOES, STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE
WED. SEPT. 11 PEA SOUP, SLICED HAM ON RYE, POTATO SALAD, FRESH ORANGE
THURS. SEPT 12 ROAST TURKEY WITH GRAVY, RED POTATOES, LIMA BEANS, FROSTED CAKE
FRI. SEPT. 13 VEAL SCALOPPINI, BUTTERED NOODLES, FRESH BABY CARROTS, APPLE PIE
MON. SEPT. 16

SPANISH RICE, GREEN PEAS, TOSSED SALAD, SLICED PEARS

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND! FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.

YOGA IS FOR YOUR BODY AND SPIRIT
BY CINDY MCCLEARY
     A new 8 week session of yoga will start on We., Sept 4th. Classes will be held at the Milo Elementary School from 6-7 PM. This class will emphasize stretching and toning your muscles, ligaments and joints, which are extremely important in keeping the body’s joints supple and “well-oiled”. Working through full range-of motion increases flexibility and makes every day chores and movement easier.
     Pilates moves will increase strength throughout the body, but concentrates on core muscles. Relaxation offers the body and mind a chance to let go of the day’s worries and frustrations, leaving you feeling not only relaxed, but renewed. A perfect recipe to shape up and chill out!
     Please bring a yoga mat and dress comfortably.
Price: $30.00 for eight 1-hour sessions. If you have any questions, call Cindy @ 943-2630.

YOUR BODY/YOUR MIND
     This new class is designed to address the “Total You”. The class will open with nutritional information, tips, recipes, weight discussion and a question and answer period. After the the discussion will be a full work-out including warm-up, cardio movements, resistance training stretching and a cool-down.
This 8-week session will teach you:
- How to read food labels
- how the body takes in and uses the food we consume
- why diets don’t work
- how to change our relationship with food
- how VERY important movement and exercise are to our bodies and minds.
     If you have an interest in this class, please call or e-mail Cindy at 943-2630 or marykgirl@midmaine.com We are looking for a start-up date by the end of September, so your quick reply would be appreciated.

A Historical Review:
Woman Notes 97th Birthday
Written for the Bangor Daily News
by Phil Gerow, 02-24-84 (Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2002)
MILO - A woman who "never thought much about growing old," Elsie Monroe celebrated her 97th birthday on Tuesday, Feb 23, in the home that her father renovated from a barn. It is the same home where she and her late husband, Guy, lived for more than 50 years.
     Mrs. Monroe was born in Willimantic in 1887, in a home that was also built by her father. She was one of three children. She lived in Willimatic until the family moved to Clinton Street in Milo, when the street "had only two houses on it." The street today has many homes. The once "large open field" has become a very busy residential area.
     She married Guy E. Monroe in 1911, and has always lived on the property where her home is now located. She first lived upstairs in the family homestead, then moved to her present location when the barn on the property was renovated and became her home.
     Her late husband worked for the Bangor and Aroostook Railroad until 1921. At that time, a strike took place, and there was no work. He then worked for the American Thread Company. When he left the thread company, he became self-employed and worked until he was 83 years of age. For several years Monroe and Ralph [Sidney] Bragg did painting and odd jobs together.
     Mrs. Monroe's only son, Roy, was born in 1913. He and his wife, Dorothy, reside in the original family home, next to the house where Mrs. Monroe lives.
     Mrs. Monroe has daily help. Kelley Sawyer assists her during the morning hours, and Greta Wright comes in to help at night. Mrs. Monroe uses the aid of a walker on occasion.
     Her mind is bright and alert. She recalls the "good old days" and yet, is much aware of what is happening today. She said she enjoyed listening to the radio and her talking books. her sight has been improved recently with a cataract removal and an implant operation.
     Sunday, Mrs. Monroe enjoys the religious programs that are on television. Other than that, she does not watch TV much at all.

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     Mrs. Monroe attended schools in Willimantic. Her parents boarded the local teachers, so Mrs. Monroe would go to school many times with the teachers, even though she was not yet school age.
     She recalls the days of being able to pick berries. She said she liked to have her pail full, but she liked to have her belly comfortably filled with berries.
     In her earlier days, she did a great deal of picture taking. She also did her own developing and still has the original equipment. During the interview, she showed pictures of the former American Thread Mill in Willimatic, most of which today has been torn down.
     In her younger days, Mrs. Monroe enjoyed doing "fancy work." She has many items today that were done years ago. She talked about the work that would go into some of the items, and how much these items mean to her.
     She also talked about the family camp at what is called the "Rips." Sne enjoyed using the motor boat. In those days, most individuals had what is today known as an inboard type.
     Other than her eye surgery, Mrs. Monroe said she has never been hospitalized. She misses the railroad. She said she used to be able to travel to Bangor for shopping. The next day, if an item needed to be exchanged, all she would do was "hop on a train, return the item, and come back the same day." She feels the youth of today are missing a great deal by not having the opportunity for train rides.
     Mrs. Monroe recalls learning the alphabet via reading a book she had in her youth. She still can recite the book, verbatim, today. The book was done in poetry style, with four words for each letter. The words were not the common "cat and dog" type words, however. They were most unusual words such as "raspberry, javelin, Zoolite."
     Mrs. Monroe has always had a love for animals. At one time she had her own horse, and would use a horse and wagon for travel. Her home has been a haven for stray cats and dogs. Even today, she was concerned for the latest acquisition.
     She attended the Free Baptist Church and sang in the choir in her younger days. She has always been quite musical. She and her sister [Ida McKenney] both played the piano and Mrs. Monroe would sometimes write the music they would play.
     She was a member of Pleasant River Grange in Milo. She calls herself a "stay at home," being very happy with her family ties. Thursday, Mrs. Monroe received two birthday cakes along with many cards.
     She also had visits from friends and neighbors. Her son, Roy, said that the late afternoon would bring visits from the neighborhood children. He said his mother enjoyed visits of this type; and she was looking forward to having the children help her celebrate.
Note: Elsie M. Monroe, 97, died at her residence, May 15, 1984.

Disclaimer: Something about the "Historical Reviews." The Historical Reviews recently submitted to the Three Rivers News, are from newspaper clipping saved for many years. The contents of the articles are reprinted for the enjoyment and pleasure of those who care to read them. The reprints are retyped very much as originally written by others, many years ago. I accept no responsibility for errors or omissions. Thank you, C.K. Ellison, 2002.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Isn't the True Value looking WONDERFUL!!!! It's always so nice to see our old Main Street buildings looking cared for. They've picked out stylish and comfortable colors that compliment the architecture and ambiance of our downtown. It looks absolutely stupendous! We all should stop in and compliment John and Barbara on their choices of color, style and good taste.
     Blueberry season has almost gone by....and apple season is close behind. Years ago my Dad bought a piece of property down in

Orneville very near where Everett Worcester has his blueberry business now. Dad's property was loaded with blueberries. For a few years we would go down there and pick as many as we could possibly lug home. One year, however, our neighbors the Deckers had gone down....pails in hand to do some picking and just as they got settled in, a big bear reared up on his hind paws...scared them all to death and that was the end of all of our berry picking in that spot. My mother only had to be told the story to deem it too dangerous. Some people might have had to have experienced it themselves....but not Mom. She took Frannie's word for it that it was mighty scary.
     One other time we all got into the boat and motored across the lake to pick blueberries over on the other shore. We took a wonderful picnic with us, and the afternoon promised to be fun filled. After the picnic, we picked a few pails full of blueberries and headed home. We hit something with the motor on the way out of the little cove we were in....broke the shear pin....didn't have a spare and had to paddle for what seemed to be miles until someone came along and towed us back to camp. So much for that picking spot. It would seem that this wonderful tradition was just not to be enjoyed by our family.
     The summer before my son graduated from high school he worked with Nathan Chaffee at a blueberry factory "downeast." Quite an experience for two young men from Piscataquis County. They didn't have to do the backbreaking raking of the blueberries, but they did have to work in the factory doing just about every other job imaginable to process them. It was quite a learning experience. They both earned about $1,200 in the few short weeks that they worked there, and that money had to see them through their senior year of high school. Nathan's dear grandparents let the boys stay at camp with them for the duration of their migrant experience....feeding them good home cooking, and keeping an eye on their comings and goings. It was a great experience, but Tom decided that he'd worked his first and last year on the blueberry barrens.
     Despite the rather difficult times we've endured coming by our blueberries, we have managed to find safe places to procure them over the years....but that safe place has been either a peddler coming to the door or going to a farm stand to buy them. I have two wonderful recipes to share with you. I hope that you enjoy them.
     The first recipe is one that I got from Jan Bamford who lives in Sedgwick. She had this recipe published in a Country Cooking Cookbook and it's out of this world!!

Blueberry Pudding Cake

2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup milk
3 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted
TOPPING:
3/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup boiling water

     Toss the blueberries with cinnamon and lemon juice; place in a greased 8-in. square baking dish. In a bowl, combine the flour, sugar and baking powder; stir in milk and butter. Spoon over berries. Combine sugar and cornstarch; sprinkle over batter. Slowly pour boiling water over all. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-50 minutes or until the cake tests done. Serves 9.
     This second recipe that I have for blueberries is from my friend Deanna DeWitt. She told me that this recipe came from her mother's collection. It's melt in your mouth and you won't be sorry that you tried it. It's by far the best blueberry cake recipe I've ever tried. This recipe was also published in the Skip Cookbook many years ago. It's a small cake, but definitely worth the effort.

Blueberry Cake

2 eggs separated
1 cup sugar (divided)
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1/2 cup shortening
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/3 cup milk
1 1/2 cups floured blueberries

     Separate eggs, beat the whites adding 1/2 cup of sugar to keep the whites stiff, set aside. Cream the shortening, add salt and remaining sugar. To this add unbeaten egg yolks,and beat until creamy. Sift flour; measure and sift together with baking powder; add to the creamed mixture alternately with the milk. Fold in blueberries and then fold in the beaten egg whites. Turn into a well greased 8X8 inch pan. Sprinkle the top with a mixture of 3 tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Quiz: Fruits
1. Cranberry a. Musa
2. Pear b. Fragaria
3. Apple c. Prunus
4. Fig d. Ribes
5. Banana e. Vitis
6. Strawberry f. Malus
7. Currant g. Ficus
8. Blackberry h. Vaccinium
9. Grape i. Pyrus
10.Cherry

j. Rubus

Ice Age Formations
     A number of ice ages have occurred in the last 2 to 3 million years. They occurred during the Pleistocene Epoch of the Quaternary Period of geologic history. We are still in the Quaternary Period in what is known as the Post Glacial or present.
     What caused the glacial periods and the question of whether they will return again, are still being debated. I will present two theories, which from my standpoint seem equally plausible.
     The first one was offered by a European scientist around 1938. He presented a theory that said the glacial ages were caused by the convergence of three recurring cycles that happened to coincide. His theory suggests that it is the coolness of summer rather than the coldness of winter that creates ice ages.
     The first of these cyclic happenings is the wobble of the Earth. The earth wobbles similar to a top that is starting to slow down and instead of remaining perfectly upright it starts to tilt while spinning. Of course this wobble is much slower than a top but it is responsible for the tilting of the earth by 23.5 degrees one way or the other. I mentioned this is a previous article about the seasons. If one holds a sheet of paper in line with a flashlight beam it has a round light on it. If the paper is tilted the light spreads out into an ellipse so that no part of the paper is getting the same amount of light it got being held perpendicular to the paper. In the case of the earth, it means that there is less light and heat reaching a particular part of the earth from the sun. The greater the tilt the greater the difference between winter and summer temperatures. This is a 41,000-year cycle. This is the time it takes for one complete wobble.
     The second cycle is the precession of the equinoxes that explain our seasons. If the precession is so that the summers receive less heat then it helps prevent the melting of snow and ice. This is a 23,000-year cycle.
     The third is the fact that the earth changes the shape of its orbit around the sun. In a previous article I mentioned the terms perihelion and aphelion or the closest and farthest distance the earth gets from the sun. Well at times the orbit is nearly circular with little difference in distance to the sun and at other times there is a significant difference so that the orbit is much more like an ellipse. This variation in the shape of the earth’s orbit has a cycle of 100,000 years. Scientists feel this change is partially due to the line up of the other

planets and the fluctuation of their gravitational pull on the earth. If summer occurs when the earth is furthest from the sun and the insolation (incoming solar radiation) is low then it also prevents the melting of ice.
     When all these cycles cause low insolation then the ice age occurs. It is because of these naturally occurring cycles that there is confusion now about whether humans are causing the global warming we are experiencing or whether it is part of this natural peaking of the cycles to give us maximum summer warming.
     Within the last ten years another theory has been suggested as to the cause of the ice ages. The Earth as well as the entire solar system is part of the Milky Way galaxy. Dr. Niv Shaviv of the University of Toronto feels they are caused by changes in the flux of cosmic rays. If you have seen drawings of the Milky Way, you have observed that we are a spiral galaxy with arms radiating out from the center. We are in one of those arms. It appears that these arms do not act like they are made of solid material and they come and go in waves as they travel around the center. As energy waves rotated around the center of the galaxy, these “arms” travel with them. These energy waves cause creation of starts and also cause some stars to explode. The explosion causes spurts of cosmic radiation that can lower the average temperature of the Earth as much as 12 degrees Fahrenheit and thus bring on an ice age. Dr. Shaviv’s work in tracking the position of these waves over the last 70 million years show correspondence between our position inside various arms of the spiral to the time of the ice ages. If Dr. Shaviv’s theory is correct, we don’t have to worry about another ice age for tens of millions of years until we are in another one of these arms.
     As with all theories, it will take time to test them. In the case of the ice ages the testing will require a longer time than any of us will be around so it is up to you whether you would like to accept either of these explanations or maybe a combination of both.
Answers 1) h, 2) i, 3) f, 4) g, 5) a, 6) b, 7) d, 8)j, 9)e, 10)c

Life on the CP Extra Gang
(continued from last week)
BY BILL SAWTELL
     In the summer of 1964, some 20 young men from Brownville and Milo went to work for the Canadian Pacific extra gang. These included Tom Lockhart, Art Stanhope, Walt Rendzia, Richard Melanson, Jim Bragg, Gordon Joslyn, the late Chick Clark, and the late Butch Heal, and yours truly. We went all the way to the Quebec border that year, taking out old ties, spikes and plates and putting in new ones.
     We were paid $1.38 an hour, less $2.25 per day for meals, which included a sumptuous breakfast of large pans of beans and eggs. At noon a vehicle came out with hot piping soup and sandwiches..
     The bigger boys cut in three the old ties, which were pulled out by tongs and thrown on the side of the railway, while boys used cable affairs to replace them with new ones, sliding them under the lifted rails by a cable affair.
     After the new ties were put in, the plates were put on, to be spiked in place. Walt Rendzia and I put on the plates, a somewhat exacting job that required little strength.
More to come….

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTEWLL
Choose the best answer.
1. Max Cohen came to Brownville from (a) France, (b) Germany, (c) Russia, (d) England.
2. Which Brown is oldest: (a) David, (b) Jack, (c) Eugene, (d) Shirley?
3. The Browns came from (a) Lake View, (b) Sebec, (c) Williamsburg, (d) Katahdin Iron Works.
4. Smiths' Lunch has been open (a) nine years, (b) 11 years, (c) 13 years, (d) 15 years.
5. (a) automobiles, (b) mobile homes, (c) bowling alleys, (d) air planes were once assembled in Brownville.
6. Brownville's first white settler later moved to (a) Sebec, (b) Lake View, (c) Lagrange, (d) Atkinson.
7.Francis Brown was Moses Brown's (a) son, (b) brother, (c) nephew, (d) cousin
8. Audrey Green attended (a) BHS, (b) BJHS, (c) MCI, (d) John Bapst.

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9. There was(were) (a) one , (b) two, (c) three, (d) four tennis courts in Brownville,
10. Brownville's band Rivertown (Entity) first played at (a) Brownville Elementary School, (b) the Alumni Building, (c) the Pit, (d) the Riversedge
Answers: 1-c 2-b 3-c 4-d 5-a 6-d 7-c 8-a 9-c 10-d

ESTABLISHING A FREE HIGH SCHOOL – PART 2
Local History Bonus Reprints from MHS Breeze And other sources
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
     The village schools were now beginning to be considered of some consequence. Another school was added, an Intermediate, and the ground floor of the old I.O.O.F. hall was used for this purpose. This building will be recognized as the tenement near the present Primary building. So, then, pupils attended the “small” school, “Hall” school, “big” school and “high” school, if they chose. But still onward the star of progress took its way. When the State legislature made its offer of aid to towns wishing to establish free high schools, Milo was prompted to take advantage of it, and Milo High School had its birth.
     Proud of having taken such a step, the town’s people next decided to build a new schoolhouse. So 1893 brought the handsome new edifice which is familiar to all of us as our High School building (now remembered as the former Grammar School Building). Joyfully the children trooped to the new house and settled into their places as Primary, Intermediate or High School scholars. Joyful at the sight of a new building, but reluctant to leave the pretty grounds around the old school. But Arbor Day 1901 saw a movement in the right direction, and pupils of the future will thank those who care for the trees that need attention so badly. Each class has taken pride in leaving a memento in the schoolroom and on the grounds. (It was) a matter of regret for any class to fail to perform similar work, the latter, especially.
     The Donald sisters in the lower grades, and George Gould as principal of the High School shared the gratitude of the pupils for their new quarters.
     1895 saw the first class day exercises, when under Prof. Gould, Ethel Brown, Nora Hodgkins, Clara and Mae Mitchell, Caleb Ford and Wendall Hobbs graduated. (Note: Caleb Ford is also mentioned in the town’s annual report for 1895, whereas, Alumni records show Carroll B. Ramsdell.) This class is represented in the Alumni Association, reorganized in the spring of 1903, by one member. Let us enter a plea for the cultivation of loyalty to Milo High School.
     In 1897 there was a period of confusion, if not exactly that, a period of rearranging and settling into new places, for the Sub-Primary and Grammar Schools were introduced, and the little old red schoolhouse which had been abandoned, was attacked, and transformed into a neat little building containing the Sub-Primary and Primary rooms.
(From: Glances Backward, by an Alumnus – Breeze 1904)
CONTINUED NEXT WEEK…

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     We recently had another unexpected gift. The library received a gift of money from the Ayuda Club. They have given gifts regularly but this will be the last one as the Ayuda Club has now disbanded. As I have no way to send a thank you note to be read at the next club meeting, I thought I would take this opportunity to thank them in this column. With part of the gift I bought a Maine book-A Mug Up with Elisabeth by Melissa Hayes and Marilyn Westervelt. It is a companion reader for people who have enjoyed the Elisabeth Ogilvie books. It contains biographical chapters, chapters about her writings, and chapters concerning the geography, the characters and flora and fauna in her many books.

     I had funds enough for a second book so chose a juvenile book-When the Moon is Full-a lunar year by Penny Pollock. It takes the reader through the year month by month, giving the Native-American name of each full moon with a poem of explanation and woodcut illustrations. Although the book was in the juvenile section of the store, I think all ages would enjoy it.
     I would like to thank the Ayuda Club for their generous gift. We are sorry they had to disband, as they will be very much missed in the community.

Here is a continuation of the gift books from last week:-
MUSEUMS OF THE WORLD
The Andes - Athens - Budapest - Cracow -Dresden - Egypt - Pompeii - Leningrad - Sao Paolo - Yugoslavia

WONDERS OF MAN
Chateaux of the Loire - The Colosseum - El Escorial - Florence - The Forbidden City - Hagia Sophia - The Hague - The Kremlin - Machu Picchu - Statue of Liberty - Tower of London - Versailles - Vienna

Library Winter Hours
Mon, Wed, Fri : 2:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Sat : 2:00 - 4:00 pm

MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
SEPTEMBER 9 - 13
Monday – Chicken nuggets, mashed potato, corn, dinner roll, pears, and milk every day.
Tuesday – Juice, egg muffin, hash brown, and applesauce.
Wednesday – Spaghetti & meat sauce, garden greens, roll/butter, and mixed fruit.
Thursday – Fishburger, carrots/dip, french fries, and icy juice.
Friday – Turkey sandwich, lettuce/tomato, California blend veg., and apple crisp.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
From the Tri-River Photo News – Milo, Maine- October 2, 1958
Civil Defense Days Coming Oct. 9 – 12
     A State Civil Defense exercise will be held from Thursday, Oct. 9 through Sunday, Oct. 12, for the purpose of testing the efficiency of control centers on town, county, and state level, as well as the cooperation of citizens.
     Essentially, the exercise will be an intensification of the national exercise last May.
     The first day, Thursday, the 9th, will be the only time at which active cooperation on the part of citizens will be needed. Milo and Brownville control centers will be manned on this day, from the time of the alert signal, which will come at any time, until 8 p.m.
2 Signals to Sound During Day
     Two signals; an alert and a take cover’, will be sounded some time during the day. The alert will blow first-a long continuous blast from 3 to 5 minutes-and will signify that a simulated attack is imminent. At that time persons should tune their radios to a Conelrad frequency (640 or 240) for official directions, after which, they may continue in with their business.
     The second signal will be a series of short blasts, which means that the simulated attack is approximately half an hour away, and that everyone should take cover immediately in the best available shelter.
Friday – 10th
     School children will be bringing Civil Defense material home from school, including a warning-sound card, bookmark and various pamphlets.

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Saturday – 11th
     Boy Scouts will deliver a handbook for emergencies, as part of a National program designed to cover every family in the United States.
Sunday – 12th
     Clergy have been asked to include the moral and spiritual implications of Civil Defense in their sermons.
Local Civil Defense Directors
     Milo – Phil Bradeen; Brownville – Ernest Sevey; Atkinson – Frank Murch; and Sebec – William Peterson.
     SEBEC – Mrs. William Hamlin LO 4-7724 Velma M. Johnston LO 4-7477
     Miss Diane Preble, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Preble, a student at Foxcroft Academy, attended the Dirigo Girls’ State, Colby College, in Waterville last week.
     Miss Roberta Nason, Linda Nason and Susan Watters are recovering from the measles.
     Mr. Fred Burow spent the weekend with his family. He is employed in Cutler, Maine as a welder on construction.
     Master David Weatherbee has returned to his home in Dover-Foxcroft after spending a week with his grandparents, Mr. & Mrs. S.B.Dickson.
     Wm. Peterson, Jr. is confined to his home with the measles.

MILO HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1968
     The ‘planning committee’ will meet at the Muddy Rudder Restaurant in Brewer on September 23rd to begin organizing the 35th reunion of the last class to graduate from good old Milo High. The reunion will take place in 2003. Any and all class members are more than welcome. If you will be able to attend the meeting please contact Nancy Grant (Willinski) at msnancy@midmaine.com by September 16th so reservations can be finalized. Hope to see you there!

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

MEETING NOTES SEPTEMBER 4
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s meeting began with twenty members present.
     We received a very nice thank you note from Lt. Gov. Howard Kesseli. The products we sent out to Danvers, MA for the New England District Convention were a huge success. A silent auction was held and $3,200.00 was raised for the scholarship fund to benefit the children of 9/11.

     Updates: newspaper is doing well with 209 issues ‘sold’ this week; the carpeting is almost done in the Town Hall balcony; a Coffee House is in the works; the August 29th Senior Citizens Barbecue was well attended at Quarry Pines and the next one is September 12th at Milo Heights.
     Amber and Jeff Gahagan have an anniversary on the 7th and Murrel and Laurel Harris celebrate theirs on September 9.
     Ten Happy and Sad dollars were contributed this week with the most unique one being for a brother who is leaving for college so the sister gets the car!
     September 12 will be the regular business meeting and on September 18, Senator Paul Davis will be our speaker. Don’t forget installation will be the last Wednesday of the month.
     Her father, Kiwanian Neil Hamlin, introduced our speaker for today’s meeting. Neil said he searched long and hard for a speaker. He decided he wanted to hear more from his daughter about what she did this summer. Jean gave a very interesting talk about the Maine Interns Research Center. (Forgive me Jean if I didn’t get this quite right.) This center, located on a reserve in Wells, Me., is run by private funds. It is actually an old farmhouse and homestead dating back to the 1600’s. Land was sold off over the years and neighbors in the 60’s decided they wanted to protect this parcel. It was bought, made into a trust and a reserve. Each summer camps are offered for eight to eleven year olds along with high school juniors who qualify the chance to perform various summer jobs at the site.
     Juniors must make written application and pass an interview. Also, housing is limited. Jean stayed in a converted barn. It had a shower and a kitchen, what more could you want? She helped with many things and learned a great deal about marine biology herself. Salt-water marsh pans (pools of water) were studied intensely. Many fish species were actually tattooed for identification. Grass hussack, dragon flies, water quality in the rivers, and bird banding were some other areas touched on. Children learned about ecosystems and environments through games and scavenger hunts.
     One activity was making fish print t-shorts. Use your imagination! Jean spent seven weeks this summer in gorgeous Wells. She thinks she had the perfect summer job.
     Jean, we all thoroughly enjoyed hearing about your great experience. Hopefully your father listened also.

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A new feature to the Three Rivers News is the TRC Page. Every week, it will feature the current week's community calendar, and some other features of our site.

Community Calendar

New & Improved!
The Regional Maps on the TRC Website are now new and improved! They have an updated look, cover the entirety of each town, and are even interactive! Starting next week, we will be placing versions of these maps on this page each week. Make sure to check them out!

Region Maps

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