Three Rivers News, 2002-09-17
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2002
 VOLUME 1 NUMBER 45
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

     On Sept. 11, students at Brownville Elementary opened the day remembering and honoring the victims of 9/11. Walter Lougee, grandfather of Dylan Lougee, presented each student with a small American flag. The students then gathered outside to sing some patriotic songs and observe a moment of silence.

Candlelight Vigil Planned
     A candlelight vigil will be held to honor the memory of Pearle Cogswell, a recent victim of domestic violence. The vigil will take place at the Milo Town Hall at 6:30, Tuesday, September 17. The observance will include a time of meditation, music and an opportunity for those who wish to speak to do so. It will end with a candle-lighting ceremony. Everyone is welcome to attend.
     Womancare provides a 24 Hour Helpline, Advocacy, Support Groups, Emergency Shelter, Transitional Housing, and assistance with Protection from Abuse Orders, as well as other Family Court matters to those effected by Domestic Violence.
     As a community based agency, Womancare is also an educational resource providing presentations in schools, for business and medical professionals, clergy, and community groups concerning all aspects of Domestic Violence.
     Services are available at 8 Winter Street, Dover-Foxcroft and at our Outreach offices in Dexter, Greenville, and Milo. Womancare is funded in part by the Maine Department of Human Services.
     Please contact Womancare for more detailed information, or visit http://www.kynd.com/~wmncare/index.htm

BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM TIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!!!

PENQUIS CAP TO HOLD CLASSES
INTERNET SAFETY CLASS OFFERED
     Sgt. Glen Lang from the Maine State Police Computer Crime Task Force will present information on safety issues; safety programs (those to use and those not to use). web sites, and others monitoring your computer.
Cost: None
Date: Monday, September 23
Time: 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Location: Penquis CAP, 50 North St., Dover
Penquis CAP, 262 Harlow St., Bangor
Penquis CAP, 119 Main St., Lincoln
To register: Call Penquis CAP at 564-7116

Home Buyer Education. This 12-hour certified training course helps potential homebuyers make prudent home purchase decisions. The course promotes financial literacy through the use of qualified trainers, including attorneys, realtors, bankers, home inspectors and budget counselors. Components of this course are Budget and Debt Management Counseling and Financial Crises Counseling. A multi-unit class is offered on an as-needed basis. The regular homebuyer class is a prerequisite of the multi-unit class.
Fee for this course is $10.
Call Penquis CAP at 973-3555
Saturdays, September 14 and 21
8:00 am-3: 00 pm
Penquis CAP, 50 North St., Dover

CDA Advisor Training. Open to people who have college degrees in early childhood education (or a related field) or who already have earned their Child Development Associate (CDA) certificate. This 3-hour session will cover the observation instrument used by the CDA Advisor when observing the CDA candidate in the child care setting.
Cost: $10
Date: Saturday, September 28
Time: 9:00 am -12:00 pm
Location: Penquis CAP, 262 Harlow St., Bangor
Penquis CAP, 50 North St., Dover (v)
Penquis CAP, 119 Main St., Lincoln (v)
To register: Call Penquis RDC at 941 -2840 ext. 103

PIPES AND DRUMS CONCERT
THE WEST EDEN PIPES AND DRUMS CORPS, OF BAR HARBOR, WILL BE PERFORMING A BENEFIT CONCERT ON FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20TH, AT 7:00 PM, AT THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH IN GUILFORD.
ADMISSION IS BY DONATION AND IS TO BENEFIT PINE TREE HOSPICE.

RABIES CLINIC
There will be a rabies clinic held on Saturday, November 9, at the Milo Town Hall. The clinic will be held from 10:00 am until 11:00am and all dogs and cats are welcome. The cost for the shots are rabies- $6.00, and distemper- $10.00.
The clinic is sponsored by the towns of Milo and Brownville and by the Foxcroft Veterinary Hospital.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY

   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
     Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463 or e-mailed to val04463@verizon.net or call 943-2324.
   Nancy Grant, 10 Belmont St. Milo, Maine 04463, or e-mailed to msnancy@midmaine.com or call 943-5809.
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
   We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week. The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to:

Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463

   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

Maine’s Fiscal Problems Rooted in Spending Habits
By Senator Paul Davis, Assistant Republican Leader
     There has been much in the news lately about taxes. Some claim taxes have been cut far too much and thereby causing the problems with the state budget. About a week ago a leading member of the Democrat Party was on WVOM radio and claimed that cutting or reducing the sales tax, the snack tax, and the hospital tax, along with several other programs, created our current budget problems. While I have respect for my Democratic friends, I believe that they are wrong and that the real problem is the state’s spending habits.
     Let’s take a moment and look at what’s been cut. The sales tax was cut from 6% to 5%. It was not because of legislative action. Several years ago (in the 1980’s) the Legislature put a trigger on the revenue side of sales tax collections. The law called for a reduction in the sales tax of 1/2 % if revenues exceeded 8% more than the previous year’s revenues. The first time this happened was in 1998 just before the elections and it was allowed to go into place. The second time was in 2000 and Gov. King included it in his budget and at the same time repealed the trigger to be sure it didn’t happen again.
     The snack tax was done away with because of pressure from a citizen’s petition that was presented to the Legislature. The hospital tax, a tax on people in the hospital, was repealed by the Legislature. The homestead exemption was put into place by the Legislature with a lot of rules and regulations and increased work in town offices. The business equipment tax reimbursement (BETR) was put into place to help our businesses. This reimburses our industries for their personal property tax on equipment. I have had it pointed out to me by business leaders that most other states don’t have a personal property tax at all. These hardly constitute evidence of a Legislature overly eager to reduce taxes.
     The real problem is not with the lack of collections of tax money from the people, quite the opposite, in fact. Our two-year state budget has grown from $3.6 billion in 1996 to $5.3 billion today. Clearly, spending is the problem.
     I would point out average property taxes have increased 300% since 1980, and during the same period the amount of money collected from personal income taxes has increased a staggering 800%. Meanwhile, inflation has increased only 130%. The only attention the income tax has gotten was in 1997, when the Democratic Party, after taking complete control of the Legislature, repealed a sales tax-like trigger on the personal income tax. Our personal income tax would be considerably lower if the trigger had been kept in place; the state budget would be considerably lower as well, and we might not be in the mess we are in currently.

Nearly everyday the media screams of job losses, Maine being the highest taxed state in the U.S., 49th out of 50 states in business friendliness. Everywhere I go I hear about the jobs being lost and opportunity lost. We need to put Maine on a far more competitive edge than it is now. Comparisons can be made. Maine’s income tax is at 81/2%, NH with none, Mass. with 5%. Maine sales tax is at 5%, NH with none, Mass at 5% with exemptions on clothing and many other things. All of this needs to be kept in mind when we are thinking of reforming taxes. We have to change the way we do things or we will continue our economic downtrend. Specifically, we need to reign in spending.

Cook School News
     Our first Terrific Kid Assembly was held on September 5th. SABRINA FADHILLAH (Ms. Ivy's class), LAUREN CROCKER (Mrs. Carter's class) and BRIAN LIPPENCOTT (Miss K's class) were recognized for their outstanding work habits and excellent behavior.
     Kathy Foss awarded Bus Certificates to RICHIE RUSSELL, DILLION LECLAIR, and TYLER TURNER. Thanks for your super effort on the bus. Mrs. Harmon led us in singing Mrs. Carter's favorite song, "You're a Grand Old Flag" and the "Terrific Kid" song.
Reading Is Fundamental Gift
     Our Reading is Fundamental program was chosen to receive 100 hardcover books for classroom use that are valued at $1,700. This exciting gift results from a generous donation from the Coca-Cola Company. Coca-Cola had a desire to develop a program with Reading Is Fundamental to promote children's literacy across the country. Their donation, the largest corporate gift in RIF's history, has provided 3,500 of these collections to be distributed at selected schools throughout the country. A wooden bookshelf to permanently house the books was also part of the gift.
     The books and the bookshelf have arrived!!!! Many of our favorite titles and authors are part of our new collection. The books will be shared by our three classes. Students will borrow books on a weekly basis. Mrs. Lavigne has generously volunteered to catalog the books and set up the lending library.
     Our school was selected for this award due to our successful book distributions, motivational activities and our site's responsible reporting. What an exciting gift!!!!

September 11th
     Our students remembered September 11th with a special assembly held as we gathered around the flagpole in front of the school. Red, white and blue were the colors of the day. JUSTIN OTTMANN explained (while MIKE DRAKE and PATRICK NORWOOD demonstrated) that the flag is hoisted briskly and lowered to half-staff. LOGAN GRANT, KRISTEN MORSE and ALYSSA GRAY informed those in attendance about the colors of the flag.
     BRYAN RUSSELL, JIMMY GLEDHILL and RICHIE RUSSELL each rang a bell in remembrance of the attack sites. We recited "The Pledge of Allegiance" and sang "The Star Spangled Banner", "American Child", and "God Bless the USA" loudly and proudly. It was a beautiful event.

"A FRIENDLY TOWN"
     Just how powerful are communities? Let’s take a test. If we are in fact "A Friendly Town" lets prove it - in a way that most of us can notice or measure the progress - yet a simple act.
     If we were all to bring a shopping cart from the parking lot into the Farmers Union with us and to return it when we are done, wouldn't that make everyone's life easier? Are you really so busy that you can't take 15 seconds to run the cart back in? Yet, how many times have you gone into the Farmers Union parking lot and seen 5 or 6 carts parked next to or up against a car? Often I am sure! I know I have!
     Ok, that is your homework for the week....take those carts with you and return them when your done!
     All of us should make note as to how many times we see carts in the parking lot and if we can each make a difference.
By: Ms. Bea Kind

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MOTO CROSS NEWS
SKOWHEGAN- September 8th turned out to be a very hot day. There were many local boys racing again.
     JUSTIN MORRILL, KOLE STEVENS and DUSTIN BISHOP raced in the 125 youth race. KYLE FOSS finished 6th overall out of 21 bikes in the 85B 11 & under class. JUSTIN ARTUS flipped his bike and was taken to the hospital to be checked out but returned to the track in good spirits and was okay to race his final moto in the 65cc. and did a great job.
     KOLE STEVENS laid his bike down on a corner and came away with a scraped up arm. but he was okay and continued to race in the 2nd moto riding the best he has yet.
     And finally...TREVOR LYFORD raced very well and came home with a 2nd place trophy in the ATV youth. With only (1) point race left in Skowhegan, Trevor should finish in 2nd place in the seasons overall points standings.
     There will be races this Sunday Sept. 15th over to Sebois Stream, September 15th and the final points race in Skowhegan will be September 29th. GREAT JOB BOYS!


MEALS FOR ME. MENU

MON., SEPT 16 SPANISH RICE, GREEN PEAS, TOSSED SALAD, SLICED PEARS
TUES., SEPT. 17 HONEY BAKED CHICKEN, MASHED SWEET POTATO, BROCCOLI, TAPIOCA
WED. SEPT. 18 HAMBURGER DELUXE, MACARONI SALAD, SOUR CREAM AND CUCUMBER SALAD, CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE
THURS. SEPT 19 BAKED HAM W/FRUIT SAUCE, MASHED POTATO, PEAS AND CARROTS, BROWNIE
FRI. SEPT. 20 CRUNCHY CHEESY FISH, OVEN BROWNED POTATOES, CORN, FROSTED CAKED
MON. SEPT. 23

VEGGIE QUICHE, SPINACH, PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Ralph Berg sold (a) magazines (b) Cloverine Salve (c) ballpoint pens (d) insurance while attending Husson College.
2. Brownville Junction was once called (a) Katahdin (b) Henderson (c) Ryder Town (d) Canadaville.
3. Ladd's Mill was (a) on the west bank of the river (b) on the east bank of the river (c) in North Brownville (d) on Pleasant Street.
4. (a) Dr. McDonough (b) Dr. Harden (c) Dr. Stanhope (d) Dr. Hayes was killed in a train accident.
5. Chautauquas were held in (a) the summer (b) the fall (c) the winter (d) the spring.
6. Carolyn Thomas and Allan Butterfield are experts in (a) sports medicine (b) politics (c) chemistry (d) physics.
7. Mesach Jones was a foreman at (a) the Merrill Quarry (b) the Crocker Quarry (c) the Highland Quarry (d) the Wilder Quarry.

8. Verdi Hamlin played worked and played baseball at (a) Katahdin Iron Works (b) Lake View (c) Knights Landing (d) Williamsburg.
9. Beauty queens, boxing, roller-skating, and dancing were all associated with the (a) YMCA (b) Dillon’s Hall (c) the Prairie Pavilion (d) the Grange Hall.
10. "Taffy” was a Welshman. Taffy was a (a) brain (b) tiger (c) singer (d) thief..."
Answers: 1-c 2-b 3-a 4-d 5-a 6-c 7-a 8-b 9-c 10-d

Life on the CP Extra Gang (Continued…)
BY BILL SAWTELL
     In June 1964, shortly after the BJHS and MHS graduations, some 20 young men from the Milo-Brownville area took bunks in the bunk car at Brownville Junction. Soon we were heading west and learned the names of many fascinating little hamlets as we went. Barnard, Benson, Onawa, Bodfish, Skinner, Tarratine, Holeb, Lowelltown, and Boundary to name most of them.
     Later, I learned of the interesting histories of some of these places. Holeb had a large water tower and a mill. And Onawa is well depicted in two books, The Onawa Bestiary by Henry W. Sherrard III and Onawa Revisited by yours truly.
     Our first overnight stop was the yard at Greenville Junction. One evening, my BJHS teammate Gerald Kirby and I were playing pass with a baseball. Gerald was noted for his great bat and his powerful arm. One of his throws went astray hitting one of the Canadian machine operators (Howie) in the side of the head. I cringed, thinking that Howie was seriously hurt, but, to our pleasant surprise, Howie picked up the ball and handed it back to us with a smile.
More to Come

More Old Fashioned Recipes from the Bangor Daily News, 1942
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2002)
Honey Nut Bread
     One-half cup coarsely chopped nuts, 2 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 egg (beaten), 1/2 cup honey, 1/2 cup milk, 2 tablespoons melted butter.
Add nuts to sifted dry ingredients. Combine beaten egg, honey, milk, and melted butter, and add to first mixture. Stir until ingredients are just moistened. Bake in greased bread pan in moderate oven, 350 degrees, for 40 to 50 minutes.
Bean Loaf with Tomato Sauce
     One and one-half cups dried beans, 1 small onion (chopped), 3 tablespoons fat (melted), 1 cup soft bread crumbs, 1 egg, 1 1/2 teaspoons fat, 1 cup evaporated milk.
     Wash dried beans, cover with cold water and soak several hours or overnight. Cook the beans in this water for one hour or until tender. Drain, mash, add remaining ingredients and mix well. Shape into loaf and put into well-greased baking dish or bread pan. Bake in moderate oven about 30 minutes. Serve with...
Tomato Sauce
     Two tablespoons fat, 2 tablespoons flour, _- teaspoon salt, and 2 cups canned tomatoes. Melt fat, add flour and salt. Gradually add tomatoes. Cook on low flame, stirring constantly until thickened.
Tuna Bake with Cheese Swirls
     Three tablespoons chopped onion, 1/3 cup chopped green pepper, 4 tablespoons fat, 1 teaspoon salt, 6 tablespoons flour, one can of condensed chicken or celery soup,
1 1/2 cups milk, one 7-ounce can tuna fish, 1 tablespoon lemon juice.
     Brown onion and green pepper in fat, add salt and flour (blend), add soup and milk. Cook until sauce is thick and smooth. Add flaked tuna fish and lemon juice. Pour into greased baking dish and cover with...
Cheese Swirls
     Roll standard biscuit dough 1/2 inch thick, cover with finely cut spreading cheese or grated American cheese and finely chopped pimiento. Roll and cut in 1/2-inch slices. Place on creamed tuna

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cut side down. Bake in hot oven (400) 15 minutes. Reduce heat to (375) 15 minutes.
Molasses Drops
     Cream a cup of fat (anything but butter) with a cup of dark brown sugar. Add 1-cup molasses, 2 eggs (beaten), 1-cup sour milk, and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Beat 2 minutes.
     Mix in 5 cups flour, 2 teaspoons soda, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon each ginger, cloves and nutmeg and 1/4 teaspoon mace.
     Chill dough several hours. Drop portions onto greased baking sheets. Flatten and press raisins on the tops. Bake 12 minutes in a moderate oven, 350 degrees.

CRUIZERS HELP AT TELETHON
BY SUSAN AND FRED WORCESTER
     Eight members of the Penquis Cruizers were up early on Labor Day and on their way to Bangor to participate in the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon at WABI-TV5. Some of those lending a hand were answering telephones and others were working behind the scenes in the telethon's mailroom. Everyone thought it was a unique experience and that it was very interesting to see how those events happen.
     The Cruizers also presented a check for $250 to the cause.

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     Information from Biographies of Milo, Maine 1945
By Frank Keniston
     Milo's library didn't just magically appear one day on the corner where it sits today. It's history began early in the last century by far thinking ladies of the W.C.T.U. (Women's Christian Temperance Union). The first public library was established by the ladies of the W.C.T.U. Much credit goes to these women for providing that library and the beginning of the Carnegie library that we enjoy today.
     The library for the first few years was in the home of Mrs. Mary Hobbs. Mrs. Hobbs obtained books from the state in August 1902. In August 1909 the books were moved to a room in the Odd Fellows building and the organization was formed under the name of the W.C.T.U. Public Library Association. Through the years the Association felt that their rooms were no longer adequate and went about securing a Carnegie Library Building. They applied to the Carnegie Corporation and were promised the necessary funds, provided that the town would purchase a building lot and vote a sum of money for maintenance of the building. Mr. B.W. Pineo made a personal call on the Carnegie Corporation and obtained the amount of $10,000 for the building.
     Trustees were elected and on July 27,1921 they formed the Milo Free Public Library Corporation. A library building committee was chosen and ground was broken for the foundation of the new building on May 1922. When the building was assured, the W.C.T.U. dissolved their association and turned over to the newly formed corporation the sum of $1279.26 and all books, magazines and furnishings, a generous gift.

     The library was opened in 1923. The W.C.T.U. library records showed that there were 500 books on its shelves. In 1945 our Milo Free Public Library had 7548 books available to patrons. Today our library has 18,000 books available. The first librarian of the Milo Free Public Library was Florence M. Cotter who served until 1947. She was followed by Katharine H. Thompson and L. Grace Clapp succeeded her.
     Our most recent library director was Catherine K. Ellison who retired in June of this year. Our library has many years of history behind it and is the result of much hard work by many dedicated people.

Library Winter Hours
Mon, Wed, Fri : 2:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Sat : 2:00 - 4:00 pm

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     9/11/2002 - I'm glued to the TV. I've been watching since I got home from work. I'd missed the daytime programming, but I didn't want to miss the evening shows. 60 Minutes was airing a riveting interview with George W. Bush. It's called "The President's Story." Then there was the show 9/11. Unbelievable footage of the saga of the closest firehouse, and what they went through. It's been a day of high emotion. The students at the Brownville Elementary School had a little program of remembrance this morning. Students stood around the outdoor flag that waved at half- mast...with hands over their blessed little hearts they pledged allegiance to the flag. One generous grampy brought each of the students their own flag to wave and pledge allegiance to. The staff and students sang songs of patriotism and they had the opportunity to share their feelings. One dear little boy, whose hand was raised, was called upon. "I'm sad and crying," he shared. Indeed, we're all crying. Who wouldn't be? It was a very moving experience that I'm so glad I didn't miss. After spending a year with our backs stiff with resolve to avenge the deaths of all of those innocent people, it was nice to have a day that we could reflect and cry.
     Enough about sadness.
     This year my husband and his former Milo High School classmates celebrated their 40th year reunion. Actually, they celebrated twice...once earlier in the summer, and then for some who couldn't attend in July...again this past weekend. We had been invited to the Ebeeme Pond cottage of Jeannette and Peter Towne. Jeannette and Carroll had gone all the way through school together and graduated in 1962. Their class hasn't been as devoted to reunions as some classes, but they've had several that I have attended and they were wonderful gatherings of old friends. They are starting to retire now, that class of '62. As unbelievable as that seems, it's happening before my very eyes. My husband measures his remaining work time in months now...25 and counting. Do you realize how quickly 25 months are going to pass? A blink and those months will have passed.
     The Towne's entertained us royally. They have a neighbor who owns a float boat. The boat pulled up to the dock and we all got on. What a wonderful tour of those small ponds and thoroughfares we enjoyed. An eagle and several loons entertained us on our trip. Many of us had fond memories of Beeme, and one of mine was spending time there as a small child with my parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. My grandfather and grandmother brought their sons up summering on Beeme Pond. When the boys grew up they brought their wives and children to their beloved camp. The Hornets Nest. Across the pond we'd row with all our gear crammed into the bottom of the boat. Sometimes Dad would have to make two or three trips. There was no road into my grandparents’ camp in those days. Many wonderful weekends, and all of the summer vacations that

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Dad took, were spent at camp. There is a wonderful shoreline in front of the Hornets Nest and I still love to go there in the summer to relive those carefree days of my childhood summers.
     Dad likes to tell the story of being a young man spending his weekends at camp. He and his friend Bob Henderson, whose family had a cottage a few away from theirs, used to row over to the landing...walk out to route 11.... and then walk a couple of miles on the main road to the dance hall at the Prairie. What an adventure those nights must have been for those two young men! Most people wouldn't cross a street to go to a dance these days, much less trudge as far as they did (return trip in the dark - and probably in dress-up clothes).
     We feasted on appetizers for most of the afternoon during the reunion. After the boat ride, the Townes treated us all to a wonderful cookout. Peter donned the chef's hat and cooked the burgers to perfection. Jeannette brought out the salads that she had made and then it was all topped off by a delicious dessert.
     Once, Jeannette's sister Eloise told me about her mother's homemade mayonnaise. I didn't ask Jeannette if she made her salad with her mother's recipe...but she made lovely salads and I'd like to think that because I have her mother's recipe to share with you, that her salads were made using it.

Vera Burton's Homemade Mayonnaise

1/2 cup sugar
2 eggs beaten
2 Tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon mustard
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup sour cream or sweet milk
1/2 cup vinegar
A drop of butter coloring if desired (like anyone would have a clue where they might get some of that. Do you suppose you could substitute yellow food coloring?)
Cook in a double boiler until thick.
     We had Poke Cake for dessert. You can make Poke Cake by using any flavor of cake mix and any flavor of Jell-O that you think would compliment then frost with cool whip. Jeannette's cake had green Jell-O. It was wonderful. I don't have her recipe, but my recipe for Poke Cake is:

Strawberry Poke Cake

1 package of white cake mix
1 - 3 oz. package of strawberry Jell-O
1 - 10 oz. Cool Whip
1 10 - oz. frozen strawberries
3/4 cup boiling water
1/2 cup cold water
     Thaw strawberries and drain. Make white cake using directions on the box. Use a 9 X 13 to 9 X 15-inch cake pan. Let the cake cool. In a mixing container that you can pour from, dissolve the Jell-O in the boiling water, and then add cold water. Make holes in the cake (I use the handle of a wooden spoon for this job) and pour the Jell-O mixture into each hole. Refrigerate the cake for an hour to firm the Jell-O. Add the drained strawberries to Cool Whip and spread over top of cake. Keep refrigerated until time to serve.
     We were a small group. We had a wonderful time. Can't wait to do it again. Thank you Jeannette and Peter, for hosting a day of reminiscing, food, and fun.

RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE
Submitted by Walter Oakes
     On Monday, September 9, 2002, the Milo-Brownville Knights of Columbus and the Piscataquis Lodge #44 of the Free Masons held their annual Red Cross Blood Drive at the Milo Town Hall. They had 70 people show up to give blood and 56 were able to donate.
     We had a number of first time donors that included Mike Anthony, Robert DuBois, Paul Gray, Jean Hamlin, Tony Merrill, Nick Maioriello, Sonja Salley, Ashley Sheldon, Seth Simonian, and Jack Webb.
     Stephen Rhoda received his six-gallon pin; James Copeland and Joe Beres received their seven-gallon pin; and Mary Bridges received her eight-gallon pin. Valerie Robertson has now given 93 pints of blood.
     Laura Stanchfield was the winner of the door prize, a tractor bank.

"Thunder From The Heavens"

Thunder from the Heavens
Burning metal falling from the sky
Thunder from the Heavens
Brave souls who are willing to die

Thunder from the Heavens
Blood pouring down like rain
Thunder from the Heavens
Charred earth left in dusty stains

Thunder from the Heavens
They're lost in blazing fires
Thunder from the Heavens
Memories forgotten with desires

Thunder from the Heavens
Iron giants sunk beneath the waves
Thunder from the Heavens
Looking ahead to the future it paves

Thunder from the Heavens
We pray for no more
Thunder from the Heavens
We beg for no more war

Written and Copyrighted by Paul Kinne, Jr.

Establishing a Free High School – Part 3
Local History Bonus Reprints from MHS Breeze And other sources
Submitted by Myrna Ricker
     In 1901 the schools were graded and Milo schools stood ready to be recognized as up-to-date, progressive and thorough. The school year opened this fall with still another additional grade. A wing was added to the Primary building for the Intermediate school and another Grammar school added, until now a course of ten grades, comprising the Sub-Primary, Primary, Intermediate, first and second Grammar schools, finished by four years in the High school ought to turn out boys and girls with no inconsiderable preparation for life work, and make a diploma from M.H.S. carry weight. That it does so is shown in the increasing number of pupils from out of town that are attending.
     The High school curriculum had been arranged and rearranged to suit the growing needs of the school and will continue to improve as necessity is seen to require.

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     Every year, except ’97, has seen a class graduated, numbering from three to nineteen members. These have become lawyers, doctors, teachers, business men and women, some have made good wives and if others have not yet found their vocation it is not to the discredit of M.H.S.
     Thus, then, is the account of the development of Milo High School. The citizens are proud of her, and the pupils are proud of her and she is worthy of it all.
     Be loyal to the dear old school and let your loyalty be apparent. Milo High School has a reputation to uphold and it rests upon the members of the school and the Alumni to uphold it.
     Consider the honor of the school as you do your own; be zealous for her, and be jealous for her, reflecting credit upon your school and class, making that chapter which you add to her history be as interesting and as valuable as you can make it.
(From: Glances Backward, by an Alumnus-Breeze1904)

MSAD SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
SEPTEMBER 16 - 20
Monday-
Hamburger/bun, potato smiles, mixed veg., fruit, and milk every day.
Tuesday- Pancakes, baked ham, potato oval, and banana.
Wednesday- Italian sandwich, macaroni salad, sliced cucumbers, and brownie.
Thursday- Turkey/gravy, mashed potato, creamed corn, dinner roll, and Jell-O/topping.
Friday- Taco, lettuce/tomato, rice, and pineapple chunks.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
From the Tri-River Photo News – September 9, 1947
Piscataquis Lodge – No.44 – A.F. & A.M.
OFFICERS – 1823
Moses Greenleaf………………………………W.M.
Jason Hassell………………………...…………S.W.
William Morrison……………………………...J.W.
Ephraim Moulton………………………..…..Treas.
Eben Greenleaf………………………………...Secy.
Moses Morrill…………………………………..S.D.
Josiah Towle……………………………………J.D.
Jonathan Robinson……………………....Steward
John W. Thompson…………………..…...…Tyler

February 23, 1947
     Dr. Nathaniel H. Crosby, family doctor, responsible citizen, and “rare individual”, who tonight was honored by neighbors and friends for his 57 years of medical practice in Piscataquis county, found himself “practically speechless” as praise and gifts were heaped upon him. The six-foot four-inch physician, who still drives a Model A Ford, bright blue in color, sat quietly while colleagues in the medical profession and his peers in the community paid tribute to his devotion to his profession, his inspiration to budding physicians, and his kindliness and sympathy to his fellow man.
     And as his neighbor, Frank Thompson, on behalf of the community, presented “Dr. Nat” a purse “to buy any pesky thing you want, so long as you enjoy it.” Dr. Crosby thanked him “from the bottom of my heart” and only wished “that my wife might be with me to share in this honor.”
     Dr. Crosby has two children, Luthan of Milo; and a daughter, Miss Claire Crosby, a teacher at the Hinkley school. There is also a granddaughter, Mary Patricia Crosby.

MARINE REPORTS FOR NEW DUTY
By Nancy Grant
     Gunnery Sgt. Ryan O’Connor and his wife Casey (Mitchell) left Monday, September 9th, for a three-year tour at Camp Pendleton, California. They have been on a six-week leave after spending the past two years stationed in Okinawa, Japan. Ryan’s duties will be in the field of logistics with the First Marine Division.
     They are planning a stop in Colorado to visit with family during their cross-country drive.
Ryan and Casey are expecting their first little recruit in March of 2003!

LOST:
     A big, overweight, shorthaired tiger cat named Squeak. He has white hair on his tummy and is a 10-year old neutered male.
     ALSO: A little, shorthaired, gray tiger cat named Wally. He is a three-year old neutered male with a broken tail tip.
     Please call 943-2400 if you have seen either cat!

MY THOUGHTS ON 9/11
BY AMBER BENOIT

They hurt this whole nation
It was on every station
The burning of the towers
Challenging our powers
They played on our sorrows
We will make them cower
We love our freedom
Over is our boredom
We will fight for what we believe in
And win.

The children lost
They will boast
About the people killed
And the anger they filled
Within us.
The world will respect us
For fighting the terrorists
With our fists.
The world will be dim
When we win.

I write this
For all the people lost.
Who were going about
Their daily lives
And died, all in an instant.
It’s so sad.
Terrorists are so bad!


NEW FROM MSAD #41 ADULT EDUCATION
Submitted by Victoria Eastman

COOKING FOR FUN
AND
PHOTOGRAPHY
CALL 943-5333 FOR MORE INFORMATION

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COMING SOON!
The Milo/Brownville Kiwanis Club will host a Coffeehouse at the Milo Town Hall on October 5th at 7p.m. Featuring the
Doughty Hill Band

KEY CLUB NEWS
BY TRISH HAYES
     The Key Club had its first meeting of the new school year on Thursday, September 12, 2002. There were 28 potential members in attendance. There were many new faces in the room and I’m hopeful that they will return and become new members. There were ten freshmen that attended today’s meeting. Their willingness to become involved in community service is commendable! After graduating 18 Key Clubbers last June we certainly need their help! The officers did a great job of keeping the meeting moving, introducing the new members to Key Club and its objectives and accepting nominations for Bulletin Editor(s) and Class Officers.
     Many thanks to Sonja Salley and Amanda Martin for stepping forward to take on the job of Bulletin Editors. They will be responsible for ensuring that the Key Club bulletin board located near the office is kept up to date and for producing a club newsletter.
     The election for Class Officers will be held next Thursday, September 19th. Kiwanis guests for breakfast on Wednesday, September 18th will be Colby Chase and Sonja Salley. Thanks to Mrs. Stephanie Salley and Mr. Dennis Dorsey for attending today’s meeting.
     As Mr. Dorsey and I were leaving the school we ran into past Key Club President Jeremy “Bud” Webb. Bud serves as a Military Police Officer in the Marines and is home for 30 days on a recruiting mission. It was nice to have a chance to visit with Bud and find out what he’s been up to.
     It’s great to be back and I’m looking forward to another year of service with the club. The officers have some exciting plans for community service and are anxious to get started. If today’s meeting was any indication, they are off to a great start! We hope you’ll join us at a meeting when you have the opportunity. We meet each Thursday at 11:19 in the library.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

SEPTEMBER 11 MEETING NOTES
BY JANET RICHARDS, SECRETARY
     This week’s meeting began with twenty members present.
     After the Pledge of Allegiance, led by Eben DeWitt, Herb Dunham asked for a moment of silence in memory of those who lost their lives September 11, 2001. Herb then led a very touching and truthful prayer for all those who survived and to remember the good in others.
     Updates: The newspaper is selling about 200 copies a week and running in the black, the Town Hall balcony project is nearly complete, a vacuum will be purchased and shared costs of a new refrigerator are in the works. Also, a CoffeeHouse is planned for October 5 featuring the Doughty Hill Band. The Senior Barbecue will be September 12th at Milo Heights with the last one in LaGrange in a couple of weeks.
     Roy Bither's birthday is September 12th. We miss you Roy.
Nine Happy and Sad dollars this week, most all for the memory of the 9/11 victims, wonderful to live in the USA, freedom of the press, rescue workers, and fire fighters.
     Upcoming speakers: Senator Paul Davis on September 18 and installation of officers on the 25th.
     Today was a business meeting. Todd discussed what was accomplished at the September 5th Board Meeting.

1. Treasurer Jeff Gahagan will soon be presenting the Kiwanis Budget for next year. Trish Hayes, Key Club advisor, presented the Key Club budget.

2. September 12th will be the first Key Club meeting. The Key Club will be participating October 26th for Make-A-Difference Day and Trish also discussed some policy changes.

3. Carpeting project at the Milo Town Hall almost complete.

4. Pursuing 501C3 status for the Club.

5. Donation to Circle K tabled pending more information.

6. Voted to let the newspaper expend up to $200.00 for operating costs without Board approval.

7. Clarified Secret Santa moneys.

8. Declined donating to the Teen Challenge of Maine.

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A new feature to the Three Rivers News is the TRC Page. Every week, it will feature the current week's community calendar, and some other features of our site.

Community Calendar

New & Improved!
The Regional Maps on the TRC Website are now new and improved! They have an updated look, cover the entirety of each town, and are even interactive! Each week we are placing a different map on the back page of the Three Rivers News.

Region Maps

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Print Issues: Copyright © 2001 - 2012 Three Rivers Kiwanis Club
Website: Copyright © 2002 - 2012 Three Rivers Community Alliance