Three Rivers News, 2002-12-17
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2002
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 6
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

SANTA CLAUS IS COMING TO TOWN!
The Three Rivers Kiwanis would like to invite all area children to visit Santa. He will be at the Milo Town Hall on December 21st from 10:00 am until noon.

5th ANNUAL CHRISTMAS DINNER
     Freda and Everett Cook would like you all to know they are planning their annual Christmas Dinner at the Milo Town Hall, on Christmas Day at noon. The festive meal is free to anyone who would like to attend, so make your plans now.
     The turkey dinner with all the fixings will be served by members of the PVHS Key Club.
     Freda and Everett would like to send a great big “thank you!” to the area merchants who have donated items for the scrumptious meal.

TOWN OF MILO HOLIDAY HOURS
TOWN OFFICE CLOSED:
DECEMBER 18, 2002 FROM 8:00 AM-10: 00 AM
FOR STAFF MEETING
DECEMBER 24, 2002 AT NOON
DECEMBER 25, 2002
JANUARY 01, 2003

Class of 1948 to Meet
     The Milo High School Class of 1948 will hold its next bi-monthly meeting on Thursday, December 19th at Freda & Everett Cook's Bread & Breakfast on High Street. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. with one of Freda's delicious breakfasts and the usual socializing and then some initial planning for our 55th reunion on July 5, 2003.


BLOOD DRIVE
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2002
3:00 – 7:00
PENQUIS VALLEY MIDDLE SCHOOL GYM
Sponsored by the PVHS Key Club
Please help us meet our goal of 50 units!
For an appointment please contact Trish Hayes at 943-7317

THANKS FROM THE METHODIST WOMEN
     Our fair was a big success and we want to say thank you to all who made it happen. The beef stew and home made pies were delicious and we had a variety of cookies, candies and other home cooked goodies for sale which were quickly sold. Again, thank you to all who helped and all who made the effort to come see
what we had to offer.
          Carolyn Sinclair


THANKS TO THE “CLAUS’S”
     SOME PEOPLE COME INTO OUT LIVES, LEAVE FOOTPRINTS ON OUR HEARTS, AND WE ARE NEVER QUITE THE SAME. SO IT IS WITH TWO JOLLY ELVES WHO FOR EIGHT YEARS, HAVE FLOWN INTO THE MILO RITE-AID BECOMING A FOCAL POINT IN OUR HOLIDAY SEASON.
     MR. AND MRS. SANTA CLAUS, YOU HAVE BROUGHT SMILES TO OUR FACES AND SPARKLE TO OUR EYES AS YOU HAVE PATIENTLY AND LOVINGLY HEARD THE HOPES AND WISHES OF OUR CHILDREN WHO HAVE VISITED YOU HERE OVER THE YEARS. WE ANTICIPATE YOUR VISITS FOR YEARS TO COME. YOU HAVE TAUGHT US ALL WHAT ‘COMMUNITY’ REALLY MEANS.
     TO OUR ‘OFFICIAL’ PHOTOGRAPHER, VAL (SUSIE) RICKER, WE COULD NOT HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL WITHOUT YOUR EFFORTS. YOU ARE TRULY A ‘PROFESSIONAL’.


THANK YOU, FROM THE CREW AT THE MILO RITE AID

GIFT GIVING IDEA
     Looking for that special gift that keeps on giving? Would your loved one like to refresh mind and body from a busy stressful holiday season? Give a gift of YOGA to that person in your life who enjoys this exercise technique or for the person you know who would greatly benefit from an evening yoga.
     Please call for your GIFT CERTIFICATE today. I would be happy to deliver!
Cindy Herbest, 943-2630

A subscription to the three rivers news makes a great gift!!
     As our holiday gift to you we are offering a reduced rate on subscriptions to the three rivers news. A 52-week subscription is only $25.00, and a 30-week subscription is only $15.00!
     No matter what the age of that far-away person on your Christmas list, they would enjoy reading news from home, as would the person on your list who has a hard time getting out to pick up their copy.
     Call val at 943-2324, or Nancy at 943-5809. We will include a note telling your lucky LOVED ONES OF YOUR GIFT.


     The Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church Thrift Shop will be open December 18th. Hours are 10 A.M. to 1 P.M. We will be having a $2.00 bag sale. The thrift shop will be closed December 25th and January 1st, for the holidays.
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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., DEC. 17 SPANISH RICE, GREEN BEANS, VANILLA PUDDING
WED., DEC. 18 PASTA PRIMAVERA, CORN, LEMON YOGURT SQUARE
THURS., DEC. 19 CHRISTMAS DINNER:
ROAST BEEF, GRAVY, BAKED POTATO, PEAS AND ONIONS, OLIVES AND PICKLES, PIE
FRI., DEC. 20 FISH STICKS, MASHED POTATO, CARROTS, FROSTED CAKE
MON., DEC. 23 BAKED HADDOCK, NEWBURG SAUCE, RED POTATO, PEAS, FRUIT COCKTAIL
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30

Brownville Sports Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. The Railroaders beat (a) Milo (b) Greenville (c) Dexter (d) Calais to win the EM title in 1959.
2. (a) Bill Bellatty (b) Sonny Cobb (c) Mike Knox (d) Jack Brown was sick in the state championship game that year.
3. The best known golfer of the Butterfields was (a) Allan (b) Cary (c) Billy (d) Buffy.
4. The stage was on the (a) south (b) east (c) north (d) west end of the BJHS gym.
5. Albion Farnham pitched for (a) UMaine (b) Colby (c) Bates (d) Husson.
6. Which was a "favorite" in the Railroader locker room: (a) firm grip (b) tough skin (c) coca cola (a) rock music.?
7. The first paid swimming director was (a) Doug Drinkwater (b) Phil Adams (c) Carroll Conley (d) Dean Bellatty.
8. A colorful foul ball chaser was (a) Rudy Lundin (b) Ronnie Stone (c) Ronnie Davis (d) Steve Knox.
9.Leading cheerleader of the championship year (1967) was (a) Ruby Rendzia (b) CeCe Miller (c) Irene Caron (d) Gayle Artes.
10. Debbie Coburn was a star in (a) basketball (b) soccer (c) cross-country (d) softball.

Answers: 1-d 2-a 3-c 4-b 5-b 6-b 7-b 8-a 9-c 10-b

"A FRIENDLY TOWN"
     Have you noticed that this time of year you can see the magic in a child's eyes? How wondrous it is to believe in the season and all the fun filled times that are involved. Children are so honest and see life as very simple and carefree. We all need to find that carefree state in our everyday lives.
     I know I have told you to enjoy the season, but now I am telling you to view it through a child's eyes. You can do this in many ways. Watch a line of kids at the mall waiting to see Santa.... Notice the sparkle in their eyes. They believe in magic.... You should too. Take pleasure in the lights, the good foods and especially the children and what Christmas means to them.
     Merry Christmas to you and your loved ones!
Aunt Bea Kind

     Sgt Donald M. Martin JR with the United States Marine Corp stationed at Camp LeJuen N.C. re- enlisted this month with the help of an old friend from home, Capt. Robert Canney, USMC from Parris Island S.C.

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NEWS ABOUT TOWN:
MILO REC. NEWS

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

TEAM W L
DEMERS' 2 0
GRAY'S 1 1
COLE'S 1 1
BANKER'S 0 2
GAMES ARE MONDAYS AT 6 PM
Dec 16, Gray’s vs Cole’s, then the winner plays Demers’.

     Recreation Basketball for boys and girls began Dec. 14th. Here are the schedules for the rest of the games.

Girls
DATE TIME PLACE TEAMS
Tues. 12/17 6pm Bville Grant's vs Grave's
Thur. 12/19 6pm Bville Bailey's vs Grant's
Sat. 12/21 8am Milo Grave's vs Bailey's
Mon. 1/6 6pm Bville Grant's vs Grave's
Thur. 1/9 6pm Bville Bailey's vs Grant's
Sat. 1/11 8am Milo Grave's vs Bailey's
Tues. 1/14 6pm Bville Grant's vs Grave's
Thur. 1/16 6pm Bville Bailey's vs Grant's

Boys
DATE TIME PLACE TEAMS
Tues. 12/17 7pm Bville Bailey's vs Grave's
Wed. 12/18 6pm Bville Bailey's vs Grant's
Wed. 12/18 7pm Bville Reuben's vs Brewer's
Thur. 12/19 7pm Bville Grave's vs Grant's
Sat. 12/21 9am Milo Bailey's vs Grant's
Mon. 1/6 7pm Bville Brewer's vs Bailey's
Wed. 1/8 6pm Bville Grant's vs Brewer's
Wed. 1/8 7pm Bville Grave's vs Reuben's
Sat. 1/11 8am Milo Grave's vs Brewer's
Sat. 1/11 1pm Bville Reuben's vs Grant's
Tues. 1/14 7pm Bville Grave's vs Bailey's
Wed. 1/15 6pm Bville Bailey's vs Grant's
Thur. 1/16 7pm Bville Reuben's vs Brewer's
Sat. 1/18 8am Milo Grave's vs Grant's
Sat. 1/18 9am Milo Reuben's vs Bailey's
Tues. 1/21 6pm Bville Bailey's vs Brewer's
Tues. 1/21 7pm Bville Grave's vs Reuben's
Thur. 1/23 6pm Bville Grant's vs Brewer's

SNOW REMOVAL PLAN FOR THE TOWN OF MILO
When the Snowfall Starts:
     An important step in dealing with snowfall is street and roadway salting and sanding as soon as the snowfall begins. This prevents the snow from becoming compacted and frozen to the road surface. Top priority is given to the Town’s main roads. These are the heaviest traveled and are the major arteries running north and south and east and west, which is why they are given priority.

Tues., 12/17 7PM BrVille Bailey’s vs Grave’s
Wed., 12/18 6PM BrVille Bailey’s vs Grant’s
Wed., 12/18 7PM BrVille Reuben’s vs Brewer’s
When the Snowfall Continues:
     When two to three inches of snow have accumulated, the plowing of the snow from the roadway begins. Our first responsibility is to keep the main roads open. These roads are the key to maintaining a steady flow of traffic, since most residents live within a mile or so from these roads. The plows then continue to plow all streets on the route to “open up” each one in sequence. If the storm continues the plow trucks remain in that same pattern until the storm abates. When that condition occurs, the trucks then begin to “widen out” all roads by pushing the accumulated snow back to the curb line and clearing the intersections.
     Remember, if possible, wait until the roadway has been plowed and “widened out” before clearing out the end of your driveway. There is no practical way to plow the road without depositing snow into your driveway. The men who operate the plow trucks are well trained and dedicated to working around the clock during such storms, to keep the roads open and passable. Don’t be misled by plow trucks riding with their plows up. They may be going in for fuel, repairs, or be headed for another area.
     To help reduce the possibility of a broken mailbox post, Milo Highway plow operators are urged to take precautions to avoid hitting mailboxes. However, experience has shown that with reduced visibility during a storm, and the height of the snow banks, it is not always possible for a driver to see a mailbox in time to avoid striking it with the wing or with the heavy snow that comes off the end of the wing. Any installation within the road right-of-way, including a mailbox, is placed there at the owner’s risk. Therefore, owners are encouraged to put mailboxes at the maximum distance from the roadway pavement. We also recommend supporting mailboxes by slings (rope or chain) to avoid any inadvertent damage.
After the Storm is Over:
     Crews continue to monitor all roads for icy spots and drifting snow. Usually an application of sand and salt is applied to all streets and roads so the riding surface remains driveable. The major routes receive an application of salt and calcium chloride to speed up the melting action. As soon as possible, usually within 24 hours following a snowstorm, the crew removes the snow from the sidewalks, Main Street, west side of Park Street and the north side of lower West Main Street.
How You Can Help:
• Make certain your vehicle is ready for winter driving.
• Reduce your speed. This is the #1 cause of winter accidents. People have actually tried to pass a sander or plow on too many occasions. Also, please keep a safe distance behind plow trucks. Remember, if you can’t see the side mirrors the driver cannot see you.
• Do not drive in winter storms unless absolutely necessary.
• Before your final driveway clean up check the street If the
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street is clean and full width, you are safe. If not, the plow truck will be back and will fill you in. Please understand that the Town cannot shovel or plow out the end of your driveway, nor can the Town crews plow private property. It is a violation of State law to push or blow snow across a street or road or onto a sidewalk. Remember overnight parking is prohibited on Town streets, between the hours of 12:00 midnight and 7:00 a.m. from the first of November to the first day of April.
• Finally, please be patient! Whether it is your driveway for which you are responsible or the 43 plus miles of road that the Town is responsible for, snow removal is an arduous and time-consuming job. Your highway workers do not get a shift change. If a storm is of long duration, the workers continue around the clock until the job is done. We strive for the safest streets and roadways at a reasonable cost and in the shortest period of time.

IN MEMORIUM
ESTELLE MCSORLEY
BROWNVILLE - A. Estelle McSorley, 95, wife of the late Sam McSorley, died Dec. 11, 2002, at a Dover-Foxcroft nursing home. She was born Nov. 10, 1907, in Brewer, the daughter of Charles and Belle (Cowing) Decker. During World War II, she worked at the shipyard in South Portland and later was employed at Milo Community Hospital as a nurse's aide. Mrs. McSorley was a member of the Derby Mothers Service Club, the Gold Star Mothers, and she attended the Park Street United Methodist Church in Milo. She is survived by two sons, Roy McSorley and his wife Pat of Elliotsville, Barry McSorley of Sebec; three daughters, Dolores Colter of Plainville, Conn., Donna Paul of Brownville, Gail Burlock of Milo; two brothers, Charles Decker of Milo, Carl Decker of Sanford; 14 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren, 22 great-great-grandchildren, several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by a son, Charles; three grandsons, Johnny, Brian, and Mike; two granddaughters, Shannon and Renae; a sister, Lois Grondin; two brothers, Maurice and Neil. Many friends, as well as her family will fondly remember her. Graveside services will be announced in the spring by the Lary Funeral Home.

GERTRUDE M. AMERO
MILO and RIDGEFIELD, CONN. - Gertrude M. Amero, 87, wife of the late Blanchard Amero, died Dec. 7, 2002, at her son's home in Ridgefield, Conn. She was born in Ashland, March 28, 1915, the daughter of James and Gertrude (Berube) Brasslett. Gertrude was a communicant of St. Paul's Catholic Church in Milo. She was predeceased by one granddaughter, Deborah Lupinacci; three sisters, Bell Berube, Olive Moulton, Cecile Delaite; three brothers, Tim, Angus and James Brasslett. Gertrude is survived by a son, Ronald Amero and wife, Gloria of Ridgefield, Conn.; a daughter, Theresa Neptune

of Niantic, Conn.; four sisters, Laura Knox of Kenduskeag, Clarida VanDyne of Falmouth, Theresa Tibbetts of Howland, Esther Carle of Orono; five grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, many nieces and nephews. Friends are invited to call 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12, 2002, at the Lary Funeral Home, Milo. A Mass of Christian Burial was said 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 13, 2002, at St. Paul's Catholic Church, Milo, with Fr. James Robichaud, celebrant. Burial will be in the St. Joseph's Cemetery, Old Town.

Area School News
BROWNVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S CHRISTMAS PROGRAM
     The Brownville Elementary School will be presenting their Christmas Program at an assembly beginning at 1:00 p.m. on December 20th and lasting until school is dismissed at 2:15. Each class will be performing and there will be a special presentation by the Brownville Elementary School Chorus. Santa usually finds his way to the Brownville School on this afternoon, too.
     Each classroom will provide Christmas cookies and punch. This is always a festive occasion for the students, staff and parents and grandparents of the Brownville School Children. Hope to see you there.
     Dancers from Milo and Brownville Elementary displayed their skill at the recent Terrific Kids Assembly. The girls, who've been taking lessons from Mrs. Gillis, danced to "Rockin' Round the Christmas Tree". They did a really GREAT job!

Christmas Limericks

There is a Santa Claus
Who broke all the laws
Now he's in jail
Sitting on a pail
Maybe he'll grow paws

by Torin Johnston - Brownville Elem.

Yesterday I saw Santa Claus
But for some reason he had paws
He could be a cat
Or maybe a bat
Anyway we had to applause.

by Jesse McLaughlin - Brownville Elem.

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     Students in the Brownville 5th grade were busy last Friday working on Christmas projects with the help of Mrs. Sheilah Bissell. Mrs. Bissell helped them to make pinecone decorations and jarred M & M cookie recipes. The class really appreciates Mrs. Bissell taking the time to help the class.

     Middle School Boys – First year PVMS basketball coach, Mike Harris coaches on the sidelines while leaning on his crutches. Coach Harris broke his foot the day before defeating Greenville at Penquis. The boys are now 1-1.

     Middle School Girls – Mindy Dolley grabs a rebound for the PVMS girls. The girls are working hard this season but lost this one to Greenville.

COOK SCHOOL NEWS
     A Terrific Kids assembly was held at the Marion C. Cook School on December 5, 2002. Mrs. Bradbury welcomed Mrs. Blanchard as our Kiwanian friend.
     The following students were honored as Terrific Kids:
SHALENE CODY (Ms. Ivy's class) TAYLOR SEVERANCE (Mrs. Carter's class) BRYAN RUSSELL (Miss K.'s class)

     Excellent bus students recognized by Kathy Foss were: ALVIN LITTLEFIELD LAUREN CROCKER and JUSTIN OTTMANN. We are very proud of all of our students.
     The 4th and 5th grade students sang " The State of Maine Song" and "The County Song." These songs are part of their Maine Studies unit. Special thanks to Mrs. Harmony for providing the wonderful music.
     Our Holiday program will be held on December 19th at 1 pm. We hope to see you there.

MILO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL NEWS
     The bus students for the week are: in Milo - JAMIE PERRY and CODY HERBEST and in Brownville - ACE MILLER
     Mrs. Dawn Russell was notified recently that the Fifth Grade Outing Club was awarded funds through the Maine Community Foundation to support their program for the year. The Outing Club is an after school activity for district fifth graders. The club meets monthly with a focus on developing the social skills necessary to develop a community. Students have the opportunity to engage in recreational activities using local facilities.
     This year they have gone biking, swimming and done a community service project raking leaves and doing yard work for citizens. They began the year with a weekend at Camp Kieve in Nobleboro where they did some preliminary work in becoming a caring community. This is an annual kick off to the club. The club participates in several other activities during the year such as skating, using the climbing wall, hiking, etc. The final activity of the year is a camping weekend in Bar Harbor. As fifth grade students enter their adolescent years and face transitions in their school and personal lives, this activity allows them to establish some positive peer relationships. The lessons they learn about problem solving and resolving of conflict are valuable to them as they begin the difficult teen years.
     Mrs. Russell is the co-advisor for the group, assisted by Mrs. Sue Elaison, the MSAD # 41 Guidance Counselor. Other adult advisors include: Linda O'Connor, Jeannine Lavigne, Patricia Stanhope, Patty Ottman and Tom Witham. In the past the club has benefited from financial support from the district's federal Safe and Drug Free Schools monies and contributions from local clubs and private citizens. This year the group will receive funds from the H. King and Jean Cummings Charitable Fund and the Robert N. Haskell and Gladys M. Stetson Fund. These funds are managed through the Maine Community Foundation. This foundation works in partnership with charitably minded individuals to strengthen Maine Communities. For more information about the foundation, visit the website at www.mainecf.org or call 1-877-700-6800.
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MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     This week the rug arrived for the children’s area. What a difference it has made. The rug has really finished that section, and the children’s area now looks like a cozy little room. The rug has really tied everything together. Patrons have been impressed and have commented very favorably.
     As most of you who have been reading this column know , the library has three computers connected to the internet available to patrons. However, we now have computer contracts which must be signed by everyone before they can use a computer for the first time. Anyone under the age of 18 must have a parent sign with them. To save time and disappointment it would be best if a parent came in with their minor child the first time the child wished to use the computer. Also, please note library computers, unlike school computers, are not filtered.
     This is a list of the books I have just ordered. They should be here soon. We hope you see some you’d like to borrow.

Baldacci, David

THE CHRISTMAS TRAIN

Brown, Rita Mae HOTSPUR
Brown, Sandra THE RANA LOOK
Clark, Mary Higgins HE SEES YOU WHEN YOU’RE SLEEPIN
Clark, Mary Higgins KITCHEN PRIVILEGES
Cornwell, Bernard VAGABOND
Crichton, Michael PREY
Dunn, Carola MISTLETOE & MURDER
Guiliani, Rudolph LEADERSHIP
Kellerman, Faye STONE KISS
McBain, Ed FAT OLLIE’S BOOK
McCulloch, Colleen THE OCTOBER HORSE
McCulloch, David JOHN ADAMS
McKinley, Tamara WILDFLOWERS
Michaels, Fern KENTUCKY SUNRISE
Patterson, James 4 BLIND MICE
Pearson, Allison I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT
Reeve, Christopher NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE
Rooney, Andy COMMON SENSE
Steel, Danielle ANSWERED PRAYERS
Stirling, Jessica SISTERS THREE
Tapply, William A FINE LINE
Truman, Margaret MURDER AT FORD’S THEATRE
Turow, Scott REVERSIBLE ERRORS

THE CHRISTMAS TRAIN

A Historical Review - Part 1
Collection of Dolls Numbers nearly 150
Piscataquis Observer, August 8, 1979
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2002)
     MILO: "Dolls are not child's play, especially the china ones," says Dorothy Trask, and she should know since her collection numbers nearly 150. She says, "The history of dolls and their creators make interesting reading."
     Her love and interest in dolls goes way back to her childhood, and was revived when her daughter, Gayle, was at the doll playing stage. "Gayle never received a doll in the original clothes. I always made complete wardrobes for each before she received them." After Gayle outgrew her dolls,

her mother's interest smoldered only to be fanned into life again when in June 1965, an entire section of Woman's Day magazine was devoted to dolls.She obtained other books on doll repair and the making of them. Then in 1975 she found three dolls in the house the family purchased and put her knowledge to use in their repair and in making new clothes. Last fall, she attended a doll auction and suddenly realized they could be more than child's play.
     Soon after she repaired an old china doll belonging to a granddaughter, dressed it in period clothes and then the fever was on. In February she purchased her first replica kit of a Bylo doll, which she says, "wasn't too challenging. The clothes I made were much harder than the assembling of the doll kit."
Soon she tried molding a leg needed for a doll repair. Having been involved in ceramics for a period of years, she tried ceramic but did not find this too successful. She found working with plaster of Paris more satisfying.
     Next, she experimented with wig making, sanding, repairing, painting, restoring eyes to working condition, but she says, "The dressing in period clothes was the fun part. I found these patterns a real challenge since they do not provide directions." An accomplished seamstress she can more or less design her own patterns and make up her own directions.
(Continued next week)

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM

     The above picture is what I've been talking about. This was the way it was. This was the vehicle that carried Santa up Main Street after he arrived on the train. If you want, I can produce a picture of him stepping down off of the train. It was awesome and so memorable that I still can see him in my mind's eye with all of the little excited children gathered around him. I will borrow some long ago written words that described the scene:
     Dateline Milo, Dec. 17 - Milo's younger generation is filling the toy department of a local store to overflowing while waiting to interview Santa Claus, following the jolly old saint's triumphant entry into town aboard the new locomotive of Piscataquis Voiture 454, Forty & Eight. About 700 excited youngsters cheered Santa's progress through Brownville Junction, Brownville, and Milo, while the train crew engineer Kenneth Rhoda and fireman Paul Valente, both of Milo, added to the happy din with the locomotive's squealing whistle and clanging bell.
     And another depiction of an exciting scene: Santa's arrival blew the lid off Milo's annual Christmas season

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community festivities in a well filled program to be climaxed by midnight Christmas Eve services in local churches. Santa will make a daily appearance at a local department store for the youngsters until shortly before he leaves on his annual round-the-world flight Christmas Eve, and will officiate at the yearly Christmas matinee next Saturday followed by a celebration at the community tree near the Milo fire station. Gifts of candy, furnished by the Owen H. Towne Post, VFW, Joseph P Chaison Post # 41 American Legion and the Milo Fire Department will be distributed from the tree by Saint Nick.
     And the final article that I found that depicted Milo's wonderful holiday spirit follows: Dateline Milo, December 11 - With a hearty "toot" of the whistle and clang of the bell the "40 and 8" locomotive which brought Santa into the center of Milo's business district, Saturday afternoon, was greeted by hundreds of enthusiastic youngsters from miles around, all anxious to meet the bewhiskered gent once again. An informal reception and impromptu greetings were extended Santa by the crowd awaiting him at post office square, while Christmas recordings were played by a loud speaker system installed in one of the local stores.
     Santa, besieged on every side by his many small friends and a few "oldsters," made an official tour of the business district before reporting to his established headquarters at a local dry goods store toyland, where he will be each afternoon this coming week from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. This first afternoon was an extremely busy time with Santa personally interviewing over 250 youngsters, each receiving a gift and candy cane brought with him from the northlands.
     The Christmas lights, to be displayed every night until after December 25, lend a festive air. Another event taking place during the holiday week is the "old fashioned Christmas" concert to be held in the town hall, Thursday evening, December 22. the Milo Community band and some of the best musical talent in town will be featured in this program sponsored with other holiday events by the Milo Board of Trade.
     Climax of the holiday activities will come Saturday, December 24 at 1:30 p.m. when there will be a special matinee at the Milo theatre, sponsored by the management. This will be followed by the community Christmas tree party given by the Milo Fire deparmtnet at the town hall. For the out-of-town children, there will be a matinee at the theatre, on the same day, at 10 o'clock in the morning.
     Santa, en route to Milo Saturday, made visits at Brownville Junction High School gymnasium where he was accorded similar greetings and welcomed about 300 youngsters, while at Brownville his arrival was heralded by over a hundred with the same enthusiasm.
     Could you get 10 kids out to greet old Santa nowadays? Could you get enough of Milo's best musical talent interested in doing a show? We know the answer to that. We don't have a theatre to show a special matinee anymore.....and we can only vaguely remember a little department store that sported it's very own Toyland. Gee Christmas, where are you?
     Here's a happy Christmas recipe that I got from Happy many years ago. I make a batch of it about every year.

Peanut Brittle
2 cups sugar
1 cup corn syrup
1/2 cup water
1 cup margarine

2 cups peanuts (I use the dry roasted kind)
1 teaspoon baking soda
     Combine sugar and syrup and water in a 3-quart saucepan until the sugar dissolves. When it boils, blend in butter after it reaches 230 degrees, stir continuously (on my stove this takes about 9 minutes). At 280 degrees add the nuts and stir to 305 degrees (hard crack stage). Remove from the heat and quickly beat in the baking soda. This will make the mixture foam up. Pour the mixture into 2 cookie sheets that have been well greased with butter. Work to the sides with a fork. Let it cool before you crack it. I bend the pans back and forth a couple of times, or I pound the pans down on the counter once or twice. I usually put this in a covered tin to keep it fresh or to give as a gift.

Incarnation

On an ancient evening's starry night,
With heaven's host just out of sight,
The Lamb of God from womb within
Could find no place within the inn.

And wrapped in humbled garments wrought
Was placed within a wooden trough.
The Great Lord God in infant form
Became mere flesh among us born.

From, Out of my Mind, Musings of a Maineiac
Thomas Russell Poole
Morris Publishing and Amazon.com

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Uranus
     Uranus (pronounced YOOR un nus) is the seventh planet from the sun. It is named for the Greek god who was the son and also the husband of Gaia. He was the father of Cronus (Saturn) and of the Cyclopes and titans.
     Uranus is the farthest planet that can be seen with the naked eye and then you have to know what to look for. For many years it was mistaken for a star. It was noted in the writings of John Flamsteed in 1690 and thinking it was a star called it 34 Tauri because it was found in the constellation Taurus. William Herschel, a British astronomer, first discovered the fact that it was a planet on March 13, 1781. He called it Georgium Sidus after his benefactor King George III of England. At that time some people preferred to call it Herschel after its discoverer, but Bode another astronomer suggested the name of Uranus to be consistent with the use of names of Greek gods. It wasn’t until around 1850 that the name Uranus was agreed upon.
     The diameter of Uranus is 31,763 miles making it the third largest planet. It is fourteen times as heavy as the earth but it is only 1/4th as dense. Uranus is 1,784,800 miles from the sun and it takes 30,589 days to make one trip around the sun. For its size Uranus rotates very rapidly with the length of the day being 17.2 hours. Its rotation is retrograde. That means it spins backward from the earth. Only Pluto, Venus and Uranus retrograde in their rotation. A very unique feature of Uranus is that it is tilted over 90 degrees so that the sun is directly over both poles as it revolves around the sun.
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     Voyager II visited Uranus in 1986 and most of the information we know about the planet comes from the information we received from this space probe. The atmosphere is 82.5% Hydrogen, 15.2% Helium and 2.3% Methane gas. The color of a bluish green is caused by the methane in the atmosphere. It filters out all the other colors and prevents them from being seen. The planet itself is rockier than its fellow giants of Jupiter and Saturn are. It is composed of solid hydrogen, ammonia and water along with rocky material. The photos of Uranus made by Voyager II and later the Hubble telescope show only very faint surface features. The winds at the surface blow at 90-360 miles per hour.
     Uranus has 11 rings. These are very faint compared to Saturn’s. The 9 main rings were discovered in 1977. It also has 22 moons. All of the moons have been named after characters in the works of Shakespeare and Pope. Two of these Titania and Oberon were discovered by Herschel in 1787. Ariel and Umpriel were discovered in 1851 and Mrianda the last of the major satellites was discovered in 1948. A lesser satellite Puck was discovered in 1986. The lesser satellites, Cordelia, Ophelia, Bianca, Cressida, Desdemona, Juliet, Portia, and Rosalind were discovered by Voyager in 1986. Cordelia and Ophelia are shepherding satellites keeping the major ring from spreading. The other lesser satellites Caliban and Sycorax were discovered in 1997 and Stephano, Prosporo, and Setebos were discovered in 1999. The last two have not been named as yet.

NATIVITY SCENE IN CHARLESTON, MAINE
BY REUBEN LANCASTER
     My daughter has a farm in Charleston, Maine located just south of the Correctional Center, the former radar site. On her farm she has many varieties of animals and birds and nothing goes homeless that is brought to her. Unexpected births are an everyday occurrence; she is a relatively calm person and handles crises such as births very nicely. Nothing could have prepared her for what happened one December night, just before Christmas, a few years ago.
     Ann had worked an eight hour shift at my store in Milo, Maine and then driven home, a distance of about twenty miles, arriving there shortly after ten PM. She fixed herself a coffee and with a few crackers to snack on, she settled down to work on wreaths and garlands. She has a natural ability for this sort of thing and her work was in great demand. She worked on this for about two hours and then, since she usually took out the debris on her way to collecting more fir tips in the morning, she just left everything as it was, garlands and wreaths hanging from every chair and table.
     As she was turning out the lights, a car drove into her yard. Now even though she was alone in the house, she had her Great Dane watchdog with her, but she was still a little cautious about going to the door. She watched as a husky young man jumped out of the car and came running up to the door and started banging on it. This was enough to start the dog barking and lunging at the door. The man started frantically shouting for her to let him in so he could call for an ambulance, as his wife was about to have a baby. She hesitated for a moment wondering if it might be a trick from some escapee from the Correctional Center. Just at that moment a very obviously pregnant woman struggled from the car and started up the walk to her front door.
     Ann quickly opened the door and directed the man to the phone; the dog had already been silenced and sent to the kitchen, and Ann went out to assist the lady. The woman was in a terrible state and informed Ann that the baby’s head was already starting to emerge. She grabbed a sheet from a bureau drawer and a rubber blanket from her closet. She spread them on the couch amid the wreaths and garlands and went back for towels to wrap the baby in. The phone rang, it was the hospital and they were going to talk whoever was available through the birth. She glanced around and low and behold the husband was holding the baby in his hands, so she informed them there was no need as the baby was already there and the husband was clearing the air passages according to the pre-birth clinical instructions. It was a beautiful little girl. She was wrapped in a towel and since the husband was getting a gray-greenish color, she asked him to go out and move his car so that the ambulance could get close to the door. He had done a wonderful job and was so tender with the baby it amazed Ann and she confided that she was sure he needed a breath of fresh air about then.
     Shortly after that the ambulance arrived and away they went to the hospital.
     Ann further recalls ,”Even though I had been making wreaths and garlands and the living room smelled of evergreen, it hadn’t felt like Christmas. The last of my children had moved out the previous September and I wasn’t even going to bother with a tree that year. Added to the fact that someone had dropped off five cats a few days before for me to find homes for, those added to my own three assured me that a tree full of shiny colored balls wouldn’t have much of a chance of survival. The rather odd thing was that none of those animals stayed in the room or bothered the least bit, the dogs didn’t bark or growl almost as though they empathetically understood that this was an emergency. I have always jokingly said that I have had everything under the sun either born or dropped off at my home except a human baby. I can no longer say that: however, after holding that little girl and hearing her coo at me, with the smell of the fir balsam throughout the living room, I decided God must have wanted me to enjoy Christmas after all.”
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MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
DECEMBER 16 – 20
Monday-
Cheese burger, potato wedges, beets, fruit, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Calzone, rice pilaf, salad greens, and cookie.
Wednesday-B.L.T. sandwich, cheese sticks, vitamin sticks, and peaches.
Thursday-Christmas Dinner-Roast Turkey with gravy, Mashed potato, Peas, Glazed carrots, Stuffing, Cranberry jelly, Dinner roll, and Jell-o/ topping.
Friday-Chicken nuggets, macaroni/cheese, assorted vegs. and assorted desserts.

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     I feel very humbled reading that wonderful story by Reuben. I have read it five times, and I cry each time. There are so many kind people in our world, and each day is an opportunity to hear about one. Re-reading that story has made my week. I remember reading it years ago, but until your kids leave the “nest” it’s hard to realize the void left. Here’s hoping that each one of you is surrounded by your family and friends this Christmas; that is really all that matters!
     Speaking of nests, the hens are laying like crazy! Saturday, we gathered a full dozen eggs. Some of them are still on the small size, but five or six have been double-yolkers! Last Tuesday, I sold my first dozen to Irene Larson, and it was so exciting! She said they were delicious and I believe her, even though as much as she’s heard me talk about my darlings, I don’t think she would dare say any different.
     I always thought chickens laid their eggs in the night, but my girls are mid-morning layers. I have to make several trips a day home to check the nests, as I would hate to have the eggs freeze and be ruined. We did lose eight eggs. Kirby was cleaning out the goat’s day pen and the eggs were in the straw the goats were supposed to be using for a bed. The goats had been acting a little hesitant about going in their shelter, so I imagine some time they had been scolded by the hen for getting too near her and the eggs. They do make a racket while their laying. It’s as if they are squawking “ You mean you expect me to do this every day for the rest of my life?!”
     The roosters have come to terms with each other. I kept them separated until last Thursday, as that was the first day I could spend a few hours watching them to see how they would react to each other. All seemed fine so I went in the house to start supper. Ten minutes later I went back into the yard and saw a huge pile of reddish and white feathers. I immediately searched for Puffy the mystery bird, even though he doesn’t have red feathers. He was fine, and both roosters looked fine, so I remained baffled.
     An hour or so later, the mystery was solved. I was noticing that Elvis the rooster had claimed the top part of
the yard, and Mr. Rooster was strutting his stuff at the bottom of the yard. I thought this was a great compromise and was feeling quite proud of my diplomacy tactics when I heard a rather excited clucking. Up by the garden, Elvis was “courting” one of the black and white Barred hens. From the corner of my eye, I saw a flash of red and next thing I knew Mr. Rooster dive bombed Elvis and sent him sailing. Needles to say, the feathers were flying. Now I’m not one to take sides, but I must admit that sometimes the shameless “courting” of Elvis did seem a bit brazen, so I couldn’t blame Mr, Rooster for putting a stop to it. But it seems Mr. Rooster is as shameless as Elvis, and he started his own “courting” session. And in an odd variation on ”What’s good for the goose…” Elvis flew at him and knocked him off his feet. No one seemed to be getting any permanent damage, besides a few lost feathers, so I decided to let them fight it out. Within a few hours they were both resigned to the other, and I haven’t seen any tussles since. MEN !
     The goats are doing really well. They have become quite “fluffy” and are starting to look like miniature buffalo. I think their “fluffiness” is due in part to their winter coat, and in part to my new favorite mid-day pastime. After all my work is done for the day, around 3PM, I sit on the garden bench, in the middle of the yard, and dole out pieces of bread to all my critters. The chickens come running as I throw the crumbs, then the goats jump up on the bench to try and eat the loaf I’m picking from, and the dogs frantically try to beat the chickens to the bread. I sometimes go through four loaves of day old bread, with the goats getting most of it. I guess we’ll just have to take longer walks to burn off some calories.
     As I write this, all of the chickens and both of the goats are snug and warm in their stable. The goats occupy one side, with a couple of shelves to sleep on, and a heating lamp hung from the ceiling to keep the chill away. The chickens have four 6-foot roosts to perch on and their own heating lamp to snuggle under. It’s a great feeling to know that despite the howling wind and freezing rain, all of my babies are snug and dry.

A TASTY MISTAKE!
     One day in the 1930’s, Ruth Wakefield, the proprietor of the Toll House Inn, in Whitman, Mass. made a delicious mistake. She had added chunks of a Nestle Semi-Sweet Chocolate Bar to the batter of her Butter Drop Do cookies, thinking that the chunks would melt evenly. She was mistaken but her failed experiment for chocolate cookies became more famous than she could ever imagine. In 1939, Nestle introduced the little morsels we know today, making it easy to bake her ‘mistakes’. Her recipe is still included on every bag of Nestle Semi-Sweet Morsels.

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ADOPT-A-CAT
Submitted by Victoria Eastman
     Here is a brief list of cats still needing homes. Financial assistance is available for those cats in need of neutering.
ABANDONED KITTIES:
1. Female calico, younger than two years.
2. Classic Maine Coon, male, brown tiger with long hair.
3. Big, beautiful, black and white, shorthaired male, probably two years old.
TIME IS SHORT…
     Electricity will be turned off in the home where the owners were forced to leave their kitties. Another owner cannot take her pet with her to the nursing home where she’s moving.
1. Male, longhaired silver tiger cat approximately two years old.
2. Male, white with gray tiger markings, shorthaired cat about two years old.
3. 12 – 13 year old, neutered, male, longhaired, black cat with a very nice personality.
To give a cat a home, please call 943-5083.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
     This is the first installment of an article received from Albert ‘Zeb’ Harmon about the early days of the American Thread Company.
     A Brief History of American Thread’s Spool Making in Maine
     The American Thread Company was incorporated March 10, 1898, when thirteen independent thread and yarn manufacturing companies were merged, including The Willimantic Linen Company of Willimantic, Connecticut, and The Merrick Thread Company of Holyoke, Massachusetts.
     The first wood spools for the use of companies, which were eventually consolidated to make up The American Thread Company, were manufactured in Egypt, Maine (Now part of the Town of Franklin) by The Merrick Thread Company. The mill at this location was established sometime during 1883. By 1888, birch handy to the mill became scarce and it was decided to establish a new mill in the wilderness near the southern end of Schoodic Lake, later called Lake View.
     The first trees were felled and the work of clearing land for the mill site began in September, 1888. At first, supplies for Lake View were delivered by team to a point on the lake shore about two miles above Lake View, then known as “Gerrish Landing’, and from there were transferred by boat to Lake View. Later, the highway from Lake View to the county road at Highland Quarry was laid out and built. In the year 1889, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company extended their Atlantic Division across Maine so that their mail line passed within 150 feet of the Lake View Mill.
     In 1889, the spool mill was built, together with boarding houses, dwellings for company employees, a general store, and auxiliary buildings. The first birch was cut at this location during the season of 1889 and 1890. The Lake View Plant was operated until August 1925, when it was closed and later dismantled in July 1926.
Continued next week…


The water tower at the American Thread Company


THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

DECEMBER 11 MEETING NOTES
BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy welcomed twenty-one members and guests Ginny Foss, Erika Lyford, and Nicole Ballard, all representing the Penquis Valley Middle School Student Council. Also joining us for breakfast were Key Club President Amanda Smith and Key Club Vice-President Shawn Burke. Rounding out the full house was an interclub from Orono-Old Town. They were quite surprised to find they had arrived before the president. Welcome all.
     Roy Bither led us in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham helped us pray for all during this holiday season.
     Trish Hayes was our inspirational reader today. She told us about the true meaning of Christmas and the birth of Jesus as seen through the eyes of a five-year-old child.
     Correspondence from the Dover-Foxcroft Kiwanis Club was distributed and read.
     Happy birthday wishes go out to Scott Harmon and Heidi Finson on the 11th, Sarah Gahagan on the 15th, and Murrel Harris on the 16th.
     Eighteen and a half happy and sad dollars were contributed this week for California, missing Frank, the elves shopping trip, birthdays, visits, over-sleeping (wonder who that could have been?), early risers (same as

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the over-sleepers?), report already done and passed in, and for basketball games.
     Committee reports for Nancy are due ASAP with information on the number of people, total hours, and a brief summary of the work accomplished.
     Volunteers for the Terrific Kids assemblies this week are Frank, Todd, and Val.
     Trish briefed us on the activities of a busy Key Club. They are selling snacks at the home basketball games with three down and only thirty-three to go! Nancy volunteered to help the Key Club at the Jayvee game and Stephanie will help at the varsity game on December 18. They will be in force at the Blood Drive on December 18 at PVHS and a large contingent will travel to Manna in Bangor this Saturday to donate 40 cassette players and help wrap gifts. Val and Roy will attend their weekly meeting this Thursday at 11:15 am in the high school library.
     Janet filled us in on the Secret Santa project. A group of eight converged on Reny’s and Wal-Mart Tuesday evening to shop for 82 children and four families. $2100.00 has been generously donated so far this year. A heartfelt THANK YOU to all who helped us help ‘our’ children!
     Ginny Foss, Erika Lyford, and Nicole Ballard, representing the middle school Student Council, presented the Kiwanis Secret Santa Program with a check for $100.00! A special thank you for your thoughtfulness.
     The Reading Is Fundamental book distribution will be December 18 at 9:30 am at the Milo Elementary School. Heidi expressed her appreciation for all the help received from Debbie Knapp and to Lois, Ed, and Chris for volunteering their time to read and pass out books.
     Edwin informed us that the follow spotlight has arrived and will be used in the Town Hall balcony. Edwin said it would be much easier to use than the old one, as it is not as heavy plus the fact that the old one doesn’t work. A guessing game was played to see who could come the closest to the cost of a replacement bulb for a new projector. Kathy won with a guess of $500.00. The actual price tag is $529.00!
     The newest Town Hall project will be cleaning and painting the dressing rooms as well as removing a wall. Don’t panic, this work will not begin until January 2003!
     The Steering Committee will meet to discuss the purchase of a 12-foot square screen and a projector at a

cost of about $6400.00. This would leave an operating fund of approximately an equal amount.
     There has been discussion in previous meetings concerning the Club’s policy regarding the types of programs to be sponsored. The issue voted on today was “Kiwanis will sponsor only programs that will reflect positively and not negatively on the Club’s reputation. No involvement will be requested of the Key Club for any program that involves alcohol.” There was a motion made and seconded to accept it as read and it was approved.
     No meetings on December 25 or January 1, 2003. The next Board meeting will be on January 2, 2003 at Angie’s at 6:30 am.
     Edwin gave a brief report of the minutes of the Board of December 5th. It was voted to sell the old copier, as it needs at least $150.00 in repairs. Copies can be made at PVHS or the Elementary school for two cents a page and Jeff offered to have copies done at Maine Savings if needed. The Lifeskills program at the high school also offers copying services.
     New projects considered: Possible financial and hands-on involvement with Town Hall kitchen renovations. Chris, Val, and Ethelyn will check with selectmen regarding new wiring and other work needed. Possible help toward an elementary music program for all three elementary schools with David Walker being approached to see how we might help. It was mentioned that Merna Dunham volunteers weekly for this program. Kathy Witham told of a karaoke machine being used at the Brownville School. Support for reading to kids at the libraries, Headstart, and nursery and elementary schools was discussed. Those agreeing to read to children were Ed, Nancy, Todd, Val, Kathy, Chris, Chris A., Aline, Lois, Roy, Heidi, Ethelyn, and Eben.
     Val informed us that she had been asked to cater a buffet for a group from Ox-Yoke at the Town Hall. It will be on Wednesday, December 18 from 10 to 1; she asked for a couple of helpers. The money will be donated to Kiwanis. Thank you Val.
     It looks like December 18 will be a VERY busy day!
     There wasn’t a speaker today as the second Wednesday of each month is a business meeting.
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The last page of the Three Rivers News is produced by TRC. It contains the current week of the community calendar and various other features from the site.
Currently we are showing off our new Region Maps, with a map a week on the back page.

Community Calendar

We Need Your Help!
Do you know of any regular events that aren’t in our calendar? Contact us! If you know of any upcoming special event, please contact us so we may add it to the Community Calendar.
Call Seth Barden at 943-2425 or email us at info@trcmaine.org


Photo Album
Would you like to become part of a great service to our community? Submit your pictures today to be added to the TRC Photo Album! We are showing off pictures of the area, local scenery, seasons, and more! Just send your picture to info@trcmaine.org. We can also scan your pictures, so give us a call at 943-2425.


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