Three Rivers News, 2003-01-28
TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 12
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

THE TRC BULLETIN BOARD IS UP AND RUNNING!!!
     For all of you who want to know the up-to-the-minute happenings in the Three Rivers area, do we have the site for you! Our new bulletin board is the perfect place for you to post messages or just browse through the entries.
     For those of you unfamiliar with a message board and how it works, here’s a short primer: Click here to go to the Bulletin Board. Once there, you can register by choosing a user-name and password, then you are ready to read or post messages. You have the option to read and reply to topics already listed, or to start a new category.
     Some of the listed topics are: News, Comments / Suggestions, Each town, the three high schools of the area, past and present, The Three Rivers News, and many others.
     We hope you all find the message board useful and entertaining, and we can’t wait to read what you have to say.
     Editor’s note: If you tried to get through to the Bulletin board site last weekend and experienced difficulty, try again. I think the Sapphire Worm affected our site, but things should be back to normal now.

     Here is the picture of Alta Noble at her 94th birthday party that should have been with last week’s article.


     The Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church thrift shop will be open Wednesday, January 29th from 10 A.M.- 1 P.M. also Saturday, February 1st. 10 A.M.-1 P.M.
     Saturday we will be having a $2.00 Bag Sale. We have a great selection of winter clothing.


FATHER / DAUGHTER DANCE
     The Brownville Elementary PTO is having their annual Father/Daughter Dance on February 8th from 6:30 to 8:00 at the Brownville Elementary Gym.

CHURCH LADIES TO MEET
The Methodist Women's Ecumenical breakfast will be on held on Thurs. February 6, 8:00 AM at Smith's. All women are invited.

TIME FOR COOKIES
     There are only a few days left to get your Girl Scout Cookie order in to a local Brownie or Girl Scout Troop. The cookies are delicious, freezable, and help out a good cause. Money goes towards educating troop leaders, membership fees for some girls who couldn’t financially register, and upkeep of wonderful camps, such as our Discovery Camp in Howland. The girls earn an individual profit based on their sales, which is not only fun for them, but also teaches them salesmanship tools.
     If you are looking for a troop, please contact Karen @ 943-5654, Cindy @ 943-2630, or Teresa @ 943-7991

"A FRIENDLY TOWN"
     It is always a good thing to expand your horizons. Life is an adventure and never stays the same. Change is something that most of us don't handle well.... including myself. I try hard to accept other ways to do things, or to change my 'routine'. I think many of us are in so much of a routine, that we forget spontaneity. We miss out on many fun times because we are so hung up on how we usually do things. Knowing that change is hard for many, I am letting you know that Aunt Bea Kind is going to be off expanding her horizons and will not be back for awhile. I am going to be gone but would like you all to continue on with the philosophy that I have started. Maybe someone would like to send in articles to replace mine. I hope that you have all enjoyed my column.
     I also would like you to continue being friendly and enjoying your life in "Milo, A Friendly Town" Take Care! Aunt Bea Kind
     Editors note: While we will all certainly miss Aunt Bea, we understand and respect her choice to “spread her wings”. Your spot will always be open in our little paper, and we hope to hear from you from time to time.

WELCOME BABY GIRL AINSLEY!!!
     Alyson and Bob Ade of Milo are very happy to announce the birth of their baby daughter, Ainsley Victoria. Ainsley was born on Jan.21 at EMMC, weighing 7lbs., 5 oz., and measured 19 1/2 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Russell and Vikki Carey of Milo, great-grandparents are Tom and Chris Howard of Milo, Herb and Helen Carey of Milo, and great- great grandmother Grace Doble of Dexter. Paternal grandparents are Carrie Ade of Derby and Robert Ade of Brownville, great-grandparents are Reuben and Janet Lumbra of Derby, and great- great grandmother is Floris (Ploof) Lumbra of Dover-Foxcroft.

Correction: In the past few issues, I have mistakenly listed Shelby Fowles as Shirley Fowles in the Recreation Basketball news. Shelby is a wonderful ballplayer and I am sorry I was printing the wrong name. Thank you Grammie Sheila and Grampy Torrey for setting me straight!

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Tom Witham | Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., JAN 28 B-B-Q BEEF ON A ROLL, NEW ENGLAND BLEND, TOSSED SALAD, GINGER SLICED PEARS
WED., JAN 29 CHICKEN CUTLET, COUNTRY GRAVY, BAKED POTATO, SQUASH, COOKIE
THURS., JAN. 30 BAKED HAM, RAISIN SAUCE, MASHED SWEET POTATO, BROCCOLI, CHOCOLATE PUDDING CAKE
FRI., JAN. 31 CORN CHOWDER, SLICED TURKEY ON WHEAT BREAD, CARROT RAISIN SALAD, PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE
MON., FEB. 3 VEGGIE QUICHE, BAKED POTATO, SPINACH, DESSERT
TUES., FEB. 4 BAKED HADDOCK, SCALLOPED POTATOES, BEETS, CUSTARD
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41
HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30

Brownville Sports Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. BHS teams were the (a) Tigers (b) Cubs (c) Bears (d) Big Green.
2. (a) Doug Drinkwater (b) Jeri Jean (c) Mike Boies (d) Dean Bellatty was our first rec director.
3. (a) Buffy Butterfield (b) Allan Butterfield (c) Cary Butterfield (d) Billy Butterfield was best known for his golf game.
4. Jim Owens was a (a) pitcher (b) shortstop (c) left fielder (d) catcher in his last year at BJHS.
5. (a) Phil Adams (b) Carroll Conley (c) Fred Essency (d) Don Knox was the first swimming instructor.
6. Lori Jamison was known for (a) basketball (b) softball (c) cross country (d) soccer.
7. The Railroaders' only regular season loss in 1966-67 came at (a) Hartland (b) Milo (c) Higgins (d) Corinth.
8. Alan Kirby had (a) "vacuum cleaner hands" (b)springs in his legs (c) a rifle arm (d) flat feet.
9. (a) Mike Knox (b) Sonny Cobb (c) Jack Brown (d) Bill Bellatty was sick in Lewiston in 1959.
10. "Gramps": (a) Tom Durant (b) Harold Hale (c) Bill Sawtell (d) Carroll Conley

Answers 1-c 2-a 3-d 4-b 5-a 6-d 7-c 8-a 9-d 10-c

     This is a sketch from one of the Penquis Cruizers newsletters. Rick Brown drew it, and I think it expresses the sentiments of many of us! It says Spring is only 80 days away, and it is much closer now.

NEWS ABOUT TOWN
ATTENTION MHS CLASS OF "53"
     A meeting was held at the home of Pat Ricker on January 15. Ideas were presented and locations were discussed on where to gather for the 50th. Class Reunion. Those able to attend were Diana Burton, Juanita Brown, Amelia Nichols, Betty Clement, Alice Walden, Elaine Lewis, Marie Bradstreet, Patricia Leonard, Charlene Pender, and Charlene Robichaud. Refreshments were served by the hostess and a wonderful time was had by all!
     The next meeting will be February 12th. at Freda Cook’s for a 9:30 A.M. breakfast. Those planning to attend should give Freda a call at 943-2493. Every classmate is welcome!

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REC. DEPT. NEWS
BY MURREL HARRIS
The Elm Street ice-skating rink and warming hut will be open daily until 8pm. Please, if you are at the rink when the lights go out, make sure the door to the hut is closed and the light is turned off before you leave. Enjoy the skating facilities and show courtesy to others when using them.

GIRL’S REC. BASKETBALL FINAL STANDINGS

TEAM W L
GRAVES' 6 0
GRANT'S 2 4
BAILEY'S 1 5

     The girl’s single-elimination playoffs will begin Feb. 4, at 7PM at the Brownville Elementary School’s gym, with Bailey’s Vs Grant’s. On Feb. 6 at 7 PM, Graves’ will play the winner of the Feb. 4 game for the league championship.

BOY’S REGULAR SEASON FINAL STANDINGS

TEAM W L
REUBEN'S 6 2
BREWER'S 5 3
BAILEY'S 4 4
GRAVES' 4 4
GRANT'S 1 7

     The boy’s double elimination playoffs will begin Feb. 3rd at the Brownville Elementary School gym with Graves’ Vs Bailey’s at 6PM. At 7PM, Brewer’s will play Grant’s at 7PM. On Feb. 4th, Reuben’s will play the winner of the Brewer’s/Grant’s game, at 6PM.
The woman’s volleyball league has been formed, and the teams selected. The games are played Monday evenings at 6 and 6:30PM. Here are the team rosters:

TEAM # 1
CAPT. VIKKI STROUT
LAURA STANCHFIELD
LISA WARREN
JULIE STROUT
LYNN RUBLEE
CANDICE BEAUDOIN
DONNA NIENIC
MEGAN GRAY
TEAM # 2
CAPT. TINA DRINKWATER
SANDRA GRAY
JOY BLANCHARD
PENNY DRINKWATER
JESSICA BOHNE
ANGELA COLE
RONA AMES
TEAM # 3
LIANI NUTTER
ROBIN DEMERS
LAURA BANKER
GERRY RUBLEE
RETA HALEY
BECKY DOWNING
SHEENA HALL
TEAM # 4
ANDREA BEAUDOIN
DENISE STROUT
SHELLY CHAMBERS
DIANE LYFORD
PEG ELLIS
HOLLY THOMPSON
KENDRA MULLENS

AREA SCHOOL NEWS
HELP WANTED!
     The 5th Grade in Brownville is looking for some help. The class will be making a movie about Browville's History and using it as a service learning project. The students will be filming various sites around town and interviewing citizens in late February. They are also looking for pictures of places, homes, and citizens from Brownville's past to photograph and import into their movie. If anyone has pictures they think would be good for this historical project please contact Mrs. Weston at
the school.
     Personal photos from old family albums are also appreciated. The class plans to create this movie on the school

computers using the iMovie program. Then it will be burned onto CD's to be distributed to various organizations in the area. We hope to hear from many citizens who would like to help us.
     Editor’s note: I am envious of the lucky students who benefit from Mrs. Weston’s computer skills. The computer is a wonderful tool and the skills one learns at an early age make mastering it that much easier. I hope you are appreciated Mrs. Weston! (Many of you remember her as Lynn Zwicker; who would have known she would be a computer whiz !?)

D.A.R.E. PROGRAM BEGINS
     D.A.R.E. lessons have started for 5th graders at Brownville Elementary. Officer Todd Lyford will be working with students for seventeen weeks helping them to learn ways to resist drugs, alcohol, and peer pressure. D.A.R.E. is a valuable program and the students appreciate his efforts.

6TH GRADE JUNCTION
     The staff at the 6th Grade Junction would like to congratulate our new Students of the week; STEPHEN MORSE, MICHELLE CARPENTER and BRITTNEY NEWBERT. These students were chosen for their hard work and friendly attitude at our school.
     The American Black Bear is like Winnie-the-Pooh because they like to eat honey. Do you know what else they like to eat? Our students in the 6th Grade computer class are learning this and many more interesting facts in their research paper on Bears in North America. They are learning tools for using the Internet and search engines.
     Reminder to the parents that the next book report will be due on February 12. We would appreciate it if you would be sure that your child brings his biography book to school since we have a reading time after our lunch break.
     Our next 6th Grade PTO meeting is scheduled for January 23 at 6:30 PM. We are hoping for a good turn out from parents since we need to make plans for our field trip.
     The Book Club orders for 6th grade will be due on January 29. If you need additional order forms, please contact Mrs. Bell.

COOK SCHOOL NEWS
     The latest Terrific Kid assembly was held on January 23, 2003 in the school gym. Miss K. hosted the celebration. Mrs. Ivy (K/1) named SAMANTHA NOKE as her Terrific Kid. Samantha was all smiles as Ms. Ivy listed ALL the terrific things about Samantha. Mrs. Carter's (2-3) Terrific Kid was LILLIS NOKE. Lillis works hard on her assignments and is well behaved.

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TRAVIS ADAMS was Miss K.'s (4-5) Terrific Kid. Travis, his mom and Miss K. have worked hard to make sure that Travis completes all of his in class and homework assignments. Thank you Travis for doing your best

A Historical Review - Part 5 Maine Guiding Ain't What it Used to Be
Piscataquis Observer, Edna Bradeen, 08/08/79
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2003)
     It was an easy run to Allagash Fall, with a carry to the upper landing about a quarter of a mile, but with low water and careful use of a pole, a guide could drop to the lower landing and cut the carry in half.
     This is a very pretty spot and some used to camp there. It is 14 miles to Allagash Village with a few interesting places to explore and fish. Bib Brook deadwater was a stopping place and its cold springs coming out of the clay bank brought big trout in close after the water warmed up. One time I was in a hurry to get out and followed an Allagash Village guide down to Twin Brook Camp Ground in the dark with just his white shirt to guide me.
     Once out of the last short stretch of Allagash Village you were in the main St. John River and almost at once hit some brook rapids then in a turn at Cross Rock, named after a white quartz rock formation in a ledge bluff; then Golden, and finally Rankin Rapid which was the only heavy water rapid on the whole trip and could be motored through or if your party wanted a thrill to end their trip here was their choice. You were in and through it pretty quick and in sight of St. Francis Village. There was very little chance to camp at this stage of the trip as the shores were close to the houses. The St. Francis River joined the St. John and we used to go up it to Glazier Lake sometimes camping at its mouth on the Canadian side. I consider the St. Francis River trip the most beautiful of any in Maine.
     The run from St. Francis to Fort Kent was very easy if you had good water, mostly following the Canadian shore. A few camp sites were on sand bar islands and could be easily used on low water.
     Once we arrived at Fort Kent, a telephone call to the Express Co. would produce a team and one of those high-wheeled potato wagons to move all our gear to the Bangor and Aroostook Station on the Ashland Branch. Sanders store had a rate schedule with the Express Co. to land the canoes in Greenville Jct. I think the charge was less than $10. We checked our baggage on the sports and our tickets into Milo where the final travel was by car or truck.
     The day of the guide and his outboard boat had to come, more or less to and end when boats came in on trailers by the hundreds and the fishing could not stand the pressure. When the fish got so small that they would not clear the law, I quit the lake for good.

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     The second phase of our renovations have begun now that phase I or the children’s area is complete (more or less). Saturday evening Gregg and Matthew Russell, Keith Porter and Walter Macdougall worked hard lowering the shelves on the 4 previously juvenile bookshelves. The shelves needed to be adjusted to allow the adult books to be able to stand upright.
     Wednesday afternoon Pam and I worked busily putting the newest fiction and non-fiction on those shelves. This cleared our main desk and gives us much more room to work. In the evening we began to place the Maine books on those shelves too. How nice to see our Maine books again after they had been stored in boxes for seven months.
     The latest word I have had on the State of Maine income tax forms is that we should have them about the first of February. I will let you know via this column as soon as they come in.
     Pam, our assistant librarian, is taking two more ITV courses this spring. One is Children’s Literature and the other is Web Design. We think they will be informative for our library and look forward to putting them into use.
     We received several more memorial gifts in the name of H. Eugene Cotter, son of the first librarian, Florence Cotter. It was most thoughtful of his daughters to include our library as a beneficiary. Our community continues to benefit from Florence Cotter.

     We have just received a shipment of juvenile books. Here is the list.
AIRPLANES
Avi CRISPIN: CROSS OF LEAD
Bond, Felicia THE DAY IT RAINED HEARTS
Brett, Jan WHO’S THAT KNOCKING ON CHRISTMAS EVE?
Brown, Marc ARTHUR, IT’S ONLY ROCK AND ROLL
Creech, Sharon RUBY HOLLER
Danziger, Paula IT’S A FAIR DAY, AMBER BROWN
Demarest, Chris FIREFIGHTERS A to Z
Harris, Bill THE WORLD TRADE CENTER:A tribute
Kirk, Daniel THE SNOW FAMILY
Kline, Susy HORRIBLE HARRY AND THE DRAGON WAR
Krensky, Stephen ARTHUR AND THE DOUBLE DARE
London, Jonathan FROGGY PLAYS IN THE BAND
Numeroff, Laura IF YOU TAKE A MOUSE TO SCHOOL
Parish, Herman CALLING DOCTOR AMELIA BEDELIA
Shannon, David DAVID GETS IN TROUBLE
Stine, R.L. BEWARE!
SEA ANIMALS

Library Winter Hours
Mon.- Weds.- Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
How a Television works
     A television is a complex machine so I will only try to explain what you see on the screen. The actual picture is displayed on the front of what is known as a cathode ray tube. Some of the newer TVs have LCD or liquid crystal diodes that light up to give the picture and some are done with plasma displays. These are a little more technical and will not be displayed here. Most people still have the “old fashioned” ones that I will discuss.
     At the back of the tube is an electron gun that shoots electrons toward the screen. It space between is a vacuum to prevent air from slowing down the electron beam. The front of the TV is coated with a substance called a phosphor on the inside of the glass. A phosphor is a chemical substance that glows when hit by electrons. It is similar to the coating on the inside of a florescent light bulb.
     Electron beams can be deflected by magnetic fields. This works well in TVs because with out the beam being deflected all we would see is a dot in the center of the screen. There are two electromagnets placed just inside the electron gun. One controls the horizontal and one the vertical position of the electron beam. The strength of the magnetic field of the magnets dictates where the beam will appear on the screen. A signal is sent from the television station to control these electromagnets. The beam is started in the upper right and moves across the screen until it reaches the other side. At this time the TV station shuts the beam off and quickly brings it back to the right but down a little lower to scan across the screen again. This procedure is repeated until the beam has hit the entire screen. There are around 525 lines in a normal TV. Signals from most TV stations now scan just the odd lines and then go back to do the even lines. This seems to give a steadier picture.
     The television station controls the intensity of the beam as it moves so that we see a picture. Part of the reason we see a complete picture is that the phosphor glows longer than the beam is present but that is not the entire reason. The other reason is our brain and its response to images. How many of you have seen images of animals and such in clouds on a summer day or have seen what looks like something we know in the grain of wood? This is because our brain has adapted to combine individual dots of light into shapes that we can identify. This is probably most easily seen in newspaper photographs where we can see the individual dots of black or gray if we look close but when we stand back we see the actual photo we are supposed to see. The second thing our brain does for us is that it can combine still pictures to make it seem like motion. How many of you remember the books where if you feathered the pages a series of cartoons made it seem like the characters were

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moving? This is what our brain does with the TV or for that matter at the movies.
     Today a television station sends a signal to our TV to cause the beam to completely scan the front of the TV 30 times a second. That makes the beam move were quickly or 15,750 lines a second! Our brain will see a moving picture as long as the picture changes at least 15 times a second.
     What about color TVs? First of all there are three electron beams at the back of the tube called the red, green and blue beams. Secondly the screen is coated with three phosphors so that each one will glow in its color when struck by its beam. Thirdly there is a metal screen called a shadow mask perforated with very small holes aligned with the phosphors on the screen. If all three beams shoot at once we see white. If none of the beams shoot we see black. All other colors other than red, green and blue are produced by a mixture of the three beams of varying intensity.
     Digital TV known as DTV or HDTV works more like a computer screen which by the way cannot be used as a TV screen. A discussion of digital TV will have to wait for a future article

Traditions of a Milo-ite
Our old neighborhood - Part 3
BY KATHY WITHAM
     The Long kids lived directly up the street from the Greenlaws and, of course, Lorraine's and my friendship goes back to our first day of school at Chase Hall and continues today. They had Myron, Lorraine, Sheila and the novelty of a new baby in that family...Dickie. There was a path that went from Clinton Street to Albert Street between Decker's house and Larson's house. Lorraine and I kept that path beaten down over all the years that we went to school (K-12). If we crossed the path at night, our mothers would watch from their respective porches until we got safely from one place to the other. I've told many stories in this column about Lorraine.....and there are probably hundreds more that could be told. The Long kids father had a Henry J. car. The car radio was tuned to the R.F.D. Dinner bell when Flash would give us a ride back to school after lunch. Flash loved to sing, and we loved to sing with him. We learned all of those old country classics. Lorraine had an older brother who could build anything. He even built her a playhouse with an upstairs.
     Lorraine had an expansive back yard, which we fondly referred to as "down back." You can't imagine the adventures that we had "down back." "Down back" was the whole plot of land that stretched from the end of Albert Street over to Prospect Street. It had woods, fields, brooks, a little cabin, paths and potential galore. The first picnic of the year was always held "down back." On the land that is now Marilyn and Terry Bailey's back yard there was a little picnic area called Kenniston's. Many school picnics were held at Kenniston's, but Lorraine and I felt like it was our own personal property.
     My parents were great friends of Pearl and Sheldon Poole who lived just up the street from us. The Pooles had three children. Sharon was the oldest and a few years older than me. Tommy was next, and he was a year older than me. Dicky was the youngest and he was Charlie's age. Tommy used to draw cartoons a lot and was very clever at that. Dick was a musician and loved to play the drums. I believe he's made a career in music. Once the boys built a little radio station down in their cellar. The call letters spelled out a very naughty word. I don't remember if it was the FCC or their mother who shut the station down, but it was lots of fun while it lasted.
     The Pooles had a big slate sink in their kitchen and more than once I can remember going into that house and experiencing the smell and sight of freshly baked bread

cooling on the slate sideboard. Often times Pearl would send me home with a loaf of that wonderful smelling bread as a special surprise for my Mom.
     The Hamlins lived next door to the Pooles, sharing a driveway. Their side by side garages opened up a whole world of creative play for us kids. One of our favorite neighborhood games to play was army. Hamlin's and Poole's garages served as opposing headquarter and medic quarters. The girls were only allowed to be nurses, patching up the wounded. It was great fun and everyone got to participate. The Hamlins had four kids. Cynthia was the oldest, Stephen was my age, Carla and Julie were younger. Their father, Carl, used to boil down maple sap in the spring in a big rig he'd built out in his driveway. How fascinating was that for us kids?! We'd watch that procedure by the hour, and wait for that wonderful spring day that Althea would make a huge pan of biscuits and have them ready when we got home from school. Hot biscuits drizzled with fresh maple syrup for an after school snack - for an entire neighborhood - couldn't be beat. It was the kind of experience that fond memories are made of.
     The Masterman children lived a few houses up from the Pooles and Hamlins. They had Bonnie who was older than me and Johnny who was Charlie's age. I can remember Bonnie holding my hand on the way to school when I was a little Kindergartner. When I look at my own little granddaughter, who will be starting school this fall, I can see a lot of myself in Brianne as she confidently struts-her-stuff around that same neighborhood that I grew up in. I understand now that holding the hand of an older and more worldly wise fourth grader must have been a comforting thing for a little girl.
     The Keef kids and the Grindle kids lived up at the head of our street. Standing sentry on each corner of Clinton Street were the homes of the Sangillo and the Crosby kids. By my calculations proud parents sent approximately 30 kids to school each day off of Clinton Street alone. That doesn't include the Barker, Nutter, Ellison or Swazey kids who lived right in the neighborhood on Water Street.
     There were some transient families who lived in our neighborhood, too. The Marquis kids and the Ricker kids, by turns, lived in the house that Tinker and Sara Richards brought their children up in. The Richards kids came along when I was a teenager, and Donnie and some of his friends were just old enough to be a pesky nuisance to a teenaged girl driver....refusing to give up the roadway...the nerve of them. The Mayo boys and a family by the name of Scott lived in the home where Bob and Bertha Larson brought up their family of little girls diagonally across from us. Arthur and Marion Carey eventually bought the London's house across the street from us, and raised their daughter Ardie in that house. They were wonderful neighbors and beloved friends.
     We were a lucky neighborhood of kids when you figure that we had our very own "swimming hole" right at the end of our street. Hot summer days found us all swimming at the end of Clinton Street with our Moms watching from the big rocks that lined the banks of the river. Down the street we'd all pad with our bathing suits on....flip flops on our feet...towels over our arms....and lugging an assortment of stuff like face masks, snorkels and inner tubes. If you close your eyes and take a deep breath you might be able to conjure up the memory of the smell of a rubber inner tube on a hot summer day. When I was a very young teenaged girl I was allowed to go to the river along with Laurel and Lois where they had discovered a nice little abandoned dock that was nestled in some bushes and slightly hidden away. We could sunbathe
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on that neat little wharf. The girls were a couple of years older than me, and you can't imagine how privileged I felt, that I was allowed to tag along with them.
     If my memory serves me correctly, the Clinton Street kids were a very competitive bunch of kids. We played a lot of board games and were all quite adept at card playing. An older cousin taught Charlie and I the rules of cribbage at a very young age. We also loved to play double solitaire and canasta. There was a card table set up on our porch that sported either a Parcheesi or a monopoly game at all times. There was never a time in my childhood that I ever said, "I'm bored." We all had tons of imagination, and there certainly wasn't ever a lack of someone to play with.
     Had enough nostalgia for one month folks? Okay then, I'll end this three part series. For those of you reading this who grew up in the best little neighborhood in America...e-mail me with your memories at <khwitham@prexar.com> I'd love to hear from you. If you are reading this and you weren't of the privileged few, e-mail me and tell me about your neighborhood. Why do you think your neighborhood had us beat?!
     This week's recipe: Valerie Cowing's recipe for Peanut Butter Pie (Val grew up a stone's throw from my old neighborhood. She may even consider it her neighborhood - and she was close enough so I'll let her.)
1 - 8 oz. pkg of cream cheese
1 1/3 cups sifted confectioners sugar
2/3 cup of peanut butter
2/3 cup of milk
1 large container Cool Whip
9-inch graham cracker pie shell
1/2 cup chopped peanuts
     Beat the cream cheese and sugar until fluffy. Add the peanut butter. Beat in the milk. Fold in the cool Whip. Sprinkle with peanuts and freeze until firm. Yum Yum!

M.S.A.D. #41 Adult Education
Located in the buildings behind P.V.H.S.
Spring Courses – 2003
     To register for classes, please call 943-5333
visit www.penquis.com and click on Adult Education
Algebra
     Do you need Algebra before enrolling in college? Algebra classes start Tuesday, January 28 from 6-9 p.m. for 15 weeks. Instructor is Denise Hamlin. Course fee is $15. Waived for diploma or GED students.
Basic Computer Level 1 - Are you still afraid of computers? Are the manuals that came with your new computer difficult to understand? This 6-week hands-on course will make it easier for you. This introduction to basic computers will help calm your fears, cover beginner word processing and Internet overview. Wednesdays from 6:00 – 8:30 for six weeks. Jan. 22, Jan. 29, Feb. 5, Feb. 12, Feb. 26 and March 5. Instructor is Lynn Gerrish. Fee is $15.
Basic Computer Level II – This 6-week course in our computer lab continues to build on beginner skills and covers how to set up and maintain a computer, change the desktop settings and more. Wednesdays from 6-8:30 p.m. March 12, March 19, March 26, April 2, April 9, April 16. Instructor is Lynn Gerrish. Course fee is $15.
Computer Open Lab - Do you have computer questions, but don’t want to take a regular computer class every week? Open lab provides time for adult learners to stop by with technology questions, try out the computers, work on independent projects and check e-mail. Open lab is on Wednesdays from 3-5 p.m. beginning January 22. There are 12 computers available in the Adult Education computer lab. Facilitator is Edie Miles, who will be on hand to answer questions and help with programs. No fee.

Even Start Family Literacy Program – MSAD #41 and MSAD #68 Adult Education Programs are working together with families. Parents can earn high school credits, work toward their GED or brush up on basic skills. Teachers work with families in Even Start Learning Centers as well as home visits. Transportation is available. If you, or someone you know, have a child between the ages of birth and age 8 and would like to be more involved in your child’s education, please call Diane Curran at 943-2246 for more information. No Fee.
GED Preparation - We can help you prepare for the GED if you need to brush up. Please call the Adult Education Office at 943-5333 for more information. No Fee.
GED Testing –You must be a Maine resident, at least 17 years of age and not enrolled in a public school. Please call the Adult Education Office at 943-5333 for more information. No Fee.
Learning Center – Our adult learning centers are open Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The learning centers are designed for adults to earn high school credit in English, math, social studies, science, art, health and computers. All work is done independently at the student’s own pace. Facilitator is Kamille Morgan. No Fee for diploma or GED students. Call 943-5333 to register or for more information.

Learning Centers

Center Location Day Time
One Even Start Bldg. Wed. 12:30-7pm
Two Even Start Bldg. Thur. 12:30-7pm
Three Even Start Bldg. Friday 10am - 1pm

Personal Care Assistant – Milo ITV is offering a live Personal Care Assistant Class through EMTC. Students who successfully complete class will be state certified. Students MUST pre-register for the class. State date is Monday January 27. Please call 943-5333 to for more information or to register. Cost is $200.00
Personal Photo Album – This class will focus on creating a “scrapbook” photo album that is creative and fun. Begins Tuesday, January 28 from 6:00-8:30 p.m. for 10 weeks at Penquis Valley High School. Instructor is Robin Porter. Fee is $15. Students must buy own materials.
Photography– Learn about cameras (including digital), use and care along with all aspects of photography, composition, and techniques for landscape photos and portraits. Eight weeks. Mondays from 6-8 p.m. starting February 24. Instructor is Laura Vryhof. Course fee is $15.
Quilting – This class is for the beginner or intermediate. Participants may choose either Tuesday or Wednesday night class. Each class meets from 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Penquis Valley High School beginning either Tuesday, January 21 or Wednesday, January 22 for 12 weeks. Instructor is Sandra Haley. Fee is $15. Students must buy own materials.
Wilson Language Program – Do you know an adult who has trouble with reading? This is an independent learning program for adults who are learning to read. Call the Adult Education office at 943-5333 to make an appointment. No Fee.
Writing for Fun or Money – More fun than you’ve ever had - writing stories, poems and more. This creative writing class will start Feb. 25 and run for six weeks on Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m. Talk with published authors. Instructor is Victoria Eastman. Fee is $15.

Weight Watchers will hold an open house on January 28 at 5:30 pm. Those who attend this meeting will decide future dates. Representative is Judy Anne King.
ADA Notice
     Any person with a disability who requires auxiliary aids or services in order to fully participate in Adult Education is requested to contact 943-5333.

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UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     January is almost done, and I couldn’t be more excited about February! No, I’m not talking about the Tournament, and I’m not talking about the Fishing Derby or the President’s birthdays. For me February means the Guinea Fowl are coming!!
     There may be some of you who ask, ”What in tarnation is a Guinea fowl?” If you live in Brownville Jct. you are probably familiar with the quirky birds, as one has been living on the side streets for a couple of years, and that stray sweetie is the reason for my new obsession.
     I first heard of the fowl from Tom Belvin. Tom volunteers for Meals for Me., and is a wealth of stories and information. One day, about two weeks ago he asked me if I had any interest in a Guinea Hen. As a Guinea hen was obviously an animal, my answer was, “Sure,…. what is it?”
     Tom told me a bird had taken up residence on North Street and some of the neighbors were less than happy with the droppings left on their cars. He assured me the bird was well fed and had plenty of shelter, and I forgot about it for a few days.
     That Sunday, I received a call from a woman in Jct. and she asked me if I was the blonde bird-lady. Having been called worse things, I decided, sure, I’m the blonde bird-lady. She said she had talked with Tom and that the bird was hanging around her house and I could come try to catch it and have it if I wanted to. I thanked her and immediately got on the Internet to research and to see what I would be in for if I caught a Guinea Hen.
     What I learned was that the Guinea Fowl was native to Africa, was a hardy bird and that they were called “The Watchdog of the Barnyard” because they screeched a loud warning anytime any strange entity entered their yard. They get along great with chickens; in fact, they are basically wild chickens with an attitude.
     Kirby had gone to the store and as soon as he got home I asked, “Want to go to Junction and help me catch a Guinea Hen?”
     He replied “Where?”
     Now that is my kind of man ! He didn’t say, ”Catch a what…?” or “We don’t need a Guinea Hen!”
     So we loaded into the car with my butterfly net, a pillowcase, and a box and headed for North Street.
     Well, Guinea hens are very quick and very smart and can fly …high. We chased the bird, but it outsmarted us at every turn. When we finally got it cornered, it flew up over our heads and perched on the peak of a three-story house. We realized we were no match for the Guinea, so we had to leave…birdless.
     The gray and white Guinea looked very well fed, and completely healthy so we are comfortable that it is fine where it is; the neighbors are the ones who will have to learn to live with it.
     But…I decided I needed some Guinea fowl and went back on the Internet to see where I could get some eggs. As I mentioned in last week’s article, I have an incubator, and I’m dying to use it. I finally found a women in Texas who has Guineas that are laying eggs, and I have a bid in on Eggbid.com, a poultry variation on E-Bay. If all goes well, I will have 12 Guinea eggs next week, around the 29th of January, and 28 days later, I could have some keets, as the baby Guineas are called.
     So wish me luck, by this time next week, I could have an incubator full of eggs and as it’s my first time, I hope all goes well. I can’t wait to have up to a dozen of the world’s noisiest birds living in my bedroom .

Adopt-A-Cat
SUBMITTED BY VICTORIA EASTMAN
     What wonderful companions cats make. Please make a friend today with one of these kitties by calling 943-5083.
     A big, beautiful, white and black, shorthaired, neutered, two year-old male. He would do best with one or more other kitties in your home.
     This kitty was abandoned in the Milo Trailer Park. She is a big, shorthaired, charcoal gray and white female. She has been declawed, probably spayed, and is about two years old.

MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
JANUARY 27 – JANUARY 31
Monday-
French toast sticks, baked ham, potato oval, applesauce, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Hot meatball sandwich, rice pilaf, salad, and cookie.
Wednesday-Macaroni/cheese, hot dog, spinach, dinner roll, and fruit.
Thursday-Hot turkey sandwich, mashed potato, peas, and assorted desserts.
Friday-B.L.T. sandwich, cheese stick, oven fries, carrot sticks, and fruit.

REUBEN REMINISCES
SUBMITTED BY REUBEN LANCASTER
     If you are traveling north from Bangor and haven’t got a date,
     Just take the Milo exit and leave the interstate.
     You will travel by some gravel pits and by Rodney Cummings cement place,
     And then up through the “Hoss Backs”; and by an old mill race.
     You straighten out in South LaGrange, still on the Bennoch Road,
     That trail laid out so many years ago, to shorten up the loads.
     There is a beautiful church there, and just across the way
     Is a short and narrow street, leading down to the B. & A.
     It is here the “cut off” started and wound its way up through the woods,
     Saving time and money for Aroostook County goods.
     It meanders on through Medford to Schoodic Lake’s east shore,
     Past Rand Cove to West Seboeis, where it joins the main line once more.
     The rails and ties have long since gone and their place there is road,
     The clear cut areas on either side speak of many a heavy load.
     Through the village of LaGrange, where Grandfather’s Civil War statue stood,
     Then up that winding fire station hill and through the Boyd Lake woods.
     A chopper mill now grinds away at the top of ‘Cookson Hill’,
     Down at the bottom you take a right to go to Medford by way of ‘Paddy Hill’.
     Now you still have that momentum gained when you came down off the ridge,
     So you better slow down a little as you cross the ‘Piscataquis River Bridge’
     Looking up stream to the left, it’s quite easy for you to see,
     Where the beautiful ‘Sebec’ joins it, on its way down to the sea.
     Looking down stream to the east, is a very tranquil sight,
     About a quarter mile of slow moving water, where trout and salmon bite.
     Just out of sight around the bend, is the ‘ox-bow’ with its majestic charm,
     Encompassing one hundred acres of bottomland, known as ‘The Old Town Farm’.
     Pleasant River flows down its east side, as you may already know,
     Completing the other half of that magnificent “oxen-bow’.
     As ‘the town of three rivers’, Milo has certainly earned its name,
     As the waters from ‘Ebeeme’ to ‘Borestone’, down through its gullet drain.
     As we travel on toward Milo, the road gets pretty god,
     Especially in that area where the ‘Milo Drive-In’ stood.
     Now we are fast approaching that which we set out to discover,
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     That mini-mall of Milo, where helicopters oft times hover.
And when you reach that hallowed place, with the pictures, painted bold upon the wall,
     It’s time to stop and visit, it beckons one and all.
     The picture on its outside wall, was put there for a reason,
     First to beautify the place and then to depict ‘Maine’s’ four seasons.
     Also as a conversation piece to let all the people know,
     ‘Reuben’s Mkt.’ was the place to stop and shop and find out where to go.
     Reuben was well acquainted with all the local folds,
     And had a vast supply of all the latest jokes.
     When out-of-staters ask how to find him, down at Kittery’s toll gate,
     The reply was always just the same, “Take the Milo exit and leave the interstate,
     And once you are inside and have lots & lots of time,
     Just ask him for a true experience and hear ‘The Story Teller’ unwind.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
MILO IN BRIEF – The conclusion of the story submitted by Albert Harmon.
     The twentieth century brought the greatest spurt of growth in the Town’s history, with nearly 1500 new citizens added to the population between 1900 and 1910. With a population of 2556 in 1910, Milo had grown to a level comparable to its position sixty years later. During this decade, two firms that would long dominate the Town’s economy moved to Town. The American Thread Co. established a wooden spool operation in 1902, providing 220 new jobs and what was then a substantial weekly payroll of $3000. The Bangor and Aroostook Railroad moved its car building and repairing shops to Milo Junction, renamed Derby. A whole new village was established to house the new settlers who came to work in the Derby shops. Part of the village included company owned houses and a hotel. By the mid 1920’s the (1908) new high school had been doubled in size, a new brick library had been erected, and a new town hall complete with auditorium and dining room had been built.
     The depression in 1929 signaled the beginning of the end of Milo’s growth. Although the 1940 census (3000) showed a gain of 88 over 1930 (2912), the town began a slow but steady decline as the depression wore on. Milo had been victimized by its over dependence on wood resources industries, by its relative remoteness from major transportation routes and by out-migration of many young adults to metropolitan areas down state and out-of-state.
     The arrival of the 1970’s, opened a new chapter in Milo’s history. A new wave of in-migration from the same metropolitan areas that had drawn Milo’s citizens was beginning. The new arrivals were leaving behind the high taxes, stiff regulations, pollution, and crime that had gradually developed in the cities and suburbs.
     The Town of Milo has known futures varying from becoming the largest town in the area to becoming an obscure way station between the coast and the mountains. The future that is confronted by Milo today goes to neither extreme, but it provides hope and incentive for citizens to make Milo a town providing both economic vitality and small town serenity.
     (Excerpts from Milo Comprehensive Plan prepared with assistance and materials from Milo Historical Society.)
HAPPENINGS IN MILO – OCTOBER 4, 1951
     Philip Kittredge of Millinocket was a weekend guest in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M.B. Kittredge, returning home Sunday morning.
     Miss Mary L. Ingalls and Mrs. Helen Shaw have sold their home on Pleasant St. to Harold Kroemer, and have moved to the Cole rent on High St. formerly owned by Perley D. Wells.
     Frank Edward Kelley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Kelley, is an appendectomy patient at the Osteopathic hospital in Bangor.
     Mrs. Flossie Chase and sister, Mrs. Grace Allen, attended the county Baptist basket meeting at Dover-Foxcroft recently.
     Dr. H.M. Burry was in Rockland last week to attend the semi-annual parley of the Maine Chiropractors Association held at the Hotel Thorndike.

REMEMBER WHEN?
     Can you guess the year these movies played at the Milo Drive-In?

Milo Drive-In
Milo, Maine
SHOW STARTS AT 7 O’CLOCK
Program week of October 7
SUNDAY – MONDAY
AVA GARDINER          KATHRYN GRAYSON
HOWARD KEEL
IN
“SHOWBOAT”
(TECHNICOLOR)
TUESDAY – WEDNESDAY – THURSDAY
FRED MacMURRAY          ELEANOR PARKER
IN
“A Millionaire For Christy”
This Is America: MacArthur Story
FRIDAY – SATURDAY
PAUL DOUGLAS          JOAN BENNETT
IN
“The Guy Who Came Back”
ALSO
“Jungle Headhunters”

Answer in next week’s issue…

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From the weather book kept by Mrs. Mabel McCleary.
JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 3, 1966
Jan. 28-Windy & snow – 12° at 7:30 am and 10° at 9:30 pm.
Jan. 29-Sunny – 10° at 7 am and 14° at 10:30 pm.
Jan. 30-Damp snow all day – 16° at 8 am and 20° at 9 pm.
Jan. 31-Clear – 16° at 7 am and 12° at 10 pm.
Feb. 1-Sunny – 12° at 7 am and 22° at 9:30 pm.
Feb. 2-Nice day – 18° at 7:15 am and 22° at 9:30 pm.
Feb. 3-Cloudy – 24° at 7:30 am and 24° at 9:30 pm.

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THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

JANUARY 22 MEETING NOTES
BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Ed Treworgy greeted eighteen bundled-up members this morning! Chris said it was even too cold for him to run and Lois was pleased just to have a vehicle that started! Julie Andrews also braved the frigid temperatures to join us for breakfast. Hats off to all! Friends and hot coffee; life is good!
     Roy led us in the Pledge of Allegiance today and Herb led us in a thoughtful prayer.
     Chris Almy was our inspirational reader today with a story from “God’s Little Devotional Book” that began in a rather serious and sad way. Miss Jones, an aged spinster, who never went to jail or became intoxicated, passed away. The local editor pondered over her epitaph and in the end left it up to the sports editor to compose it. This is what he wrote: Here lies the bones of Nancy Jones – For her life held no terrors. She lived an old maid. She died an old maid. No hits, no runs, no errors.
     If we don’t try, we don’t do…if we don’t do…we can’t bless others. We each have a contribution to make to the lives of others. Give your best effort today. It’s your best shot at scoring in the game of life.
     Birthday wishes go out to Joe Zamboni on the 24th and anniversary wishes to John and Maggie Robinson, also on the 24th.
     Eight happy and sad dollars were donated today for Italy, hockey tickets up for grabs, cold weather, truck starting, and spring training.
     There will be a Reading Is Fundamental meeting on Monday, January 27, at 2 pm at the Derby Community Building. A possible change in book distribution will be discussed.
     Trish brought us up-to-date on the Key Club activities. They are continuing the snack sales at the basketball games and plan to attend the Lt. Governor election in Greenville on Sunday, January 26. A Kiwanis interclub attended the meeting last Thursday and Roy and Edie will attend this week. Their meetings are held at the Penquis Valley High School library at 11:15 am.
     The Three Rivers News sales have climbed even higher and received over 300 hits last week on the TRC website; www.trcmaine.org.
     Edwin gave us the good news that Roy and Dot Monroe are now back at home. If anyone has a spare microwave they could use please let Edwin know.
     Next week’s meeting will be held as usual at Angie’s at 6:30 am. Our speaker will be Andrea Beaudoin, proprietor of the Red Earth, presenting the benefits of massage and aromatherapy.

     Today’s speaker was Andrew Harmon, the personable son of Milo natives Ernie Harmon and Carla Hamlin Harmon. He received his Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Maine and is now studying at Husson to earn his master’s degree.
     Andrew spoke about the Adoption for ME program of which he is the Recruitment and Development Specialist in Northern Maine. This is a foster care and adoption agency, begun in 2001, under the umbrella of and funded by the Maine Department of Human Services.
     Andrew informed us that there is a great need for the placement of children in foster homes. These children are in need of temporary homes due to family issues. It is mandatory for a decision to be made within a year if the child is to return to the biological family or be adopted. If adoption, free in Maine, is the option, the biological family is required to terminate all parental rights to that child. Permanency is very important to the well being of children and it would be unfair, even traumatic, to the children if their future is uncertain. Andrew told us that teenagers are more difficult to place in foster homes. Every two weeks Channel 5 sponsors a segment called Thursday’s Child which profiles children in need of help. At present there are approximately 200 children waiting for new homes.
     Foster care is a professional job. Foster parents receive a daily subsidy and Medicaid is provided until the child is 18 years of age. There are also college funds available on a year-to-year basis.
     A person needs to be a resident of Maine, financially sound, in a stable relationship, and physically and emotionally able to care for a foster child. There are no age limits to become a foster parent. There is a 24-hour training session, broken down into shorter increments, after which a home study is done to determine safety for the child. Training is continual with the biological parents involved. The process to become a foster parent takes eight to twelve months. The adoption process takes about nine months with training for special needs. At this point the biological parents have legally given up all rights to the child or children. When the adopted child turns 18 they have the right to register to possibly locate their biological parents and the same right is given to the parents. Respite care providers are also needed. They provide a safe home for a weekend to children already in foster families.
     There are now 3000 children in group homes, foster care or ready for adoption and only 1200 foster families in Maine. Only two high special needs or four medium special needs can be placed with the same foster family at one time. Over 300 adoptions take place each year with 70% of them coming from foster care.
     To obtain more information about this worthwhile program please call 1-877-505-0545 or e-mail info@afamilyforme.org.
     Thank you very much Andrew for the information on how to help our Maine children.
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