Three Rivers News, 2003-04-08
TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 22
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

The Harlem Rockets Comedy Team
will be at the
Penquis Valley High School Gym on April 8, 2003.
Jobs for Maine Graduates, JMG, will be sponsoring the game between the Rockets and the
JMG senior boy All-Stars!
Children under 3 get in free!
Hope to see you there!

The Easter Bunny
is coming to the Milo Rite Aid
on Saturday, April 12, from 2 to 4 P M
Photos by Val Ricker will be available for $2.00 and all proceeds will go to the Children's Miracle Network at EMMC.


Class of 1948 to Meet
The Milo High School Class of 1948 will hold its next bi-monthly meeting on Thursday, April 17th, at
Freda & Everett Cook's Bread & Breakfast
on High Street. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. with one of Freda's delicious breakfasts and the usual socializing and then some final planning for our 55th reunion on July 5, 2003.
All classmates are urged to attend.


The 6th Grade will be having a bottle drive
on April 12th.
Anyone who would like their bottles and cans picked up can call the school @ 943-7148 and just leave your name and where you live and
we will gladly pick them up for you.

LIGHTING THEIR WAY HOME
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     Many of you driving around our area streets at night have noticed a single light placed in a window of some homes. Area residents have taken a cue from an Eastport woman, who called for folks to display a light in their window to light the way home for our servicepeople. It would be a nice gesture for others to display a light. The light would not signify your agreement or disagreement with the War in Irag, it would serve to show your support of our Military personnel and the risks they take for us.
     It could be a candle, a light bulb, or a lantern. It's an easy way to keep the light of hope burning, to let others know that they are not alone, and to show the way home to the young men and women who are in or near to Iraq.
     The lights will also serve to show area families who have loved ones involved in the war that we are thinking of them and their families. It takes but a single light to pierce the darkness, or to warm a heart. Let’s show we care!

KIWANIS STORY HOUR
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis and the Milo Free Public Library are pleased to announce the “Kiwanis Kid’s Korner”. The hour long sessions will include a story, an activity, and a light snack, It will take place at the Milo Public Library on Wednesdays from 3 PM to 4Pm, beginning April 9th through June 18th. Children in grades Kindergarten through 4th are encouraged to attend. Call Val Robertson at 943-2324 for details.

PVHS SENIOR PLAY
     The Penquis Valley High School Class of 2003 is pleased to announce that it will be performing “Into the Woods” by James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim as its senior play. Performances will be held at the Milo Arts Center at the Town Hall on April 11 and 12 at 7 pm.
     Tickets may be purchased at the door or from any member of the cast. $5.00 for adults, $3.00 for children, and $15.00 for a family of four or more.

INVENTOR HAS LOCAL ROOTS
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     Travis P. Cole, the son of Jerry and Marlene Cole of Milo, has patented an invention that he foresees becoming invaluable to landscapers, loggers, truckers, and heavy construction companies. The invention, called the "“Binder Bond”, has been specially created to be used in conjunction with a binder used to secure cargo. Its unique design prevents binders from coming loose and releasing the chains that are held by the binder. Cost effectiveness makes this product convenient to replace. Safety and peace of mind are the most important benefits offered by the “Binder Bond”.
     Travis, who now lives in Gilford, New Hampshire with his family (Michelle and their daughter, Shelby), began developing his

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idea several years ago. He was motivated to create the “Binder Bond” while working with machinery in his job as a landscaper and noticed that a binder would sometimes pop open.
     The original idea is being made available for licensing to manufacturers interested in new product development, especially in the logging industry. Travis is hoping to have the “Binder Bond” in full production and available to the public in the near future.
     Additional information about the “Binder Bond” can be obtained by contacting the Publicity/Press Department of Invention Technologies at (800) 940-9020 Ext. 285 or at products@invent-tech.com. We at the Three Rivers News wish Travis the best of luck and success with his invention. It sounds like a very useful apparatus, especially for the truckers in our area.
STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., APRIL 8 MEATBALLS AND MUSHROOM SAUCE, MASHED POTATO, MIXED VEGGIES, APPLESAUCE GELATIN SQUARE
WED., APRIL 9 HOMEMADE PEA SOUP W/ HAM, SPINACH AND CHEESE SALAD, BISCUIT, FRESH MELON
THUR., APRIL 10 CHICKEN TETRAZINNI, BROCCOLI, CORNBREAD, FROSTED CAKE
FRI., APRIL 11 BAKED HADDOCK W/EGG SAUCE, BAKED POTATO, GREEN BEANS, FRUIT GELATIN
MON. APRIL 14 CHEESE OMELET, CHEESE SAUCE, STEAK FRIES, BROCCOLI, PEACHES
TUES, APRIL, 15 VEAL PARMESAN, SPAGHETTI, GREEN BEANS, PEARS
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.

BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30

INTRODUCTION TO YOGA
BY CINDY HERBEST
     Does stretching and strengthening your body and mind sound good to you? Then this is your class…
     This class will teach you a practice that will stretch tight, unyielding muscles, strengthen tendons and ligaments along with muscles and mind, improve posture, reduce stress and align body.
     As you experience yoga’s many benefits first hand, you will desire this practice for a lifetime.
     Tues. April 8th - April 29th 6:45 – 7:45
$15.00 for the 4 week session ($3.75 per class!!!!)
     For more information call Cindy @ 943-2630


FREE
The Brownville Police Department still has free gun trigger locks available. If you would like one please stop by the Brownville Town Office or Contact Todd Lyford, Police Chief, Brownville Police Department, 965-8026.
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BROWNVILLE NEWS
BY LILLIAN MCCLEAN
     The Brownville Jct. United Methodist thrift shop will have a $2.00 bag sale on Wednesday April 9th.and also on Saturday. April 12th. Hours are 10 A.M. to 1 P.M.
     The Three Rivers Senior Citizens will meet April 11th. at 12 o'clock noon for pot luck dinner at the Milo Town Hall dining room.
     Stephanie Gillis’ class will entertain us.


Pleasant River Walk Committee To Meet
     The Pleasant River Walk Committee will be having their first spring meeting at the Brownville Jct Alumni Building on Tuesday, April 8, 2003, at 7:00 PM. The public is welcomed to attend and share their ideas. We will be discussing the upcoming season, scheduling shuttle service events, and other projects.


Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. The Pleasant River has (a) two (b) three (c) four (d) five branches.
2. Ote Abby was known for his (a) music (b) memory (c) strength (d) height.
3. Samuel Stickney took a (a) dog (b) cow (c) horse (d) grindstone on his back to Bangor.
4. Pauline Thomas was Brownville's first woman (a) fireman (b) select woman (c) telephone operator (d) mechanic.
5. (a) Milton Smith Sr (b) Ken Thompson (c) Joe Applebee (d) Art Stanhope drove the team bus to the state championship game in Lewiston in 1967.
6. Lefty Strout was signed by the (a) Red Sox (b) Giants (c) Dodgers (d) Braves.
7. Mesach Jones was a well-known foreman at the (a) Merrill Quarry (b) Crocker Quarry (c) Highland Quarry (d) Lewis Mill.
8. (a) Richard Melanson (b) Jim Melanson (c) Henry Hughes (d) Marvin Lundin was an officer in Vietnam.
9. The present population of Brownville is (a) 1456 (b) 1397 (c) 1259 (d) 964.
10. Brownville had its highest population in (a) 1890 (b) 1920 (c) 1950 (d) 1970.

Answers:1-b 2-c 3-d 4-a 5-d 6-d 7-a 8-b 9-c 10-c

MILO TOWN OFFICE SUMMER HOURS
MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
7:30AM TO 5:00PM
FRIDAY 7:30AM TO 2:00PM
THESE HOURS WILL BE IN EFFECT FROM
MAY 23TH, TO AUGUST 29TH, 2003. THE TOWN OFFICE IS CLOSED FROM 8 AM TO 9 AM EVERY TUESDAY FOR A STAFF MEETING.
HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY SUMMER!

AREA SCHOOL NEWS
6TH GRADE JUNCTION NEWS
AVON SALE A HUGE SUCCESS
BY MARILYN LYFORD
     The 6th grade did a very impressive job of selling Avon through Rose Clement.....and reached a remarkable total (exceeding) $5,500.00 in sales. That's going to be a job in itself, bagging everything up.
     We ask that the parents of any kids who sold Avon please come to the school when it comes in to help your child take home their orders. We hate to have anything lost on the bus trip home. We will be sending home a notice letting parents know when it will be ready for pick-up.

MILO ELEMENTARY NEWS
TERRIFIC KIDS
From the classroom of:
Mrs. Barden - Our Terrific Kid is a repeat performer. He is a polite listener and is always ready to help his teachers and friends. He loves to read and play math games. We are happy to have JONAH JOHNSON for our Terrific Kid.
Mrs. Mills - Our Terrific Kid has worked very hard at learning his
multiplication facts. Every spare moment, he has out his flashcards. Way to go!! He is a wonderful classroom helper at the end of the day -everything looks neat and in its place when he is done. His writing and reading skills are making great improvements. We are happy to have DARREN LEWIS in our class.
Mrs. Dunham - Our Terrific Kid is a very sweet and kind little girl. She works very hard to complete her daily assignments. She shows concern for all her classmates. She comes in each day with a warm smile for everyone. Our Terrific Kid is ERIN DAVIS.
Mrs. Dell'olio - JAMIE PERRY is our Terrific Kid. She's had a great week. It is wonderful to see her happy smile, and to watch her using, " Time Out, and "Talk it Out," skills. Nice job,Jamie!
Mrs. Hayes - Two students were chosen to represent our class for Terrific Kids this week. Both the young lady and young gentleman have worked hard, played fairly, showed responsible classroom and recess behavior and made us proud. We enjoy both of them and we are happy with the special gifts that COURTNEY LYFORD and COLBY WYMAN bring to our class. You are terrific friends! Thank you.
Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey - ALEXANDRIA BARNABY- This Terrific Kid is a wonderful helper. She puts her best effort in everything she does. No wonder she is a repeat Terrific Kid. JEREMY HERBEST- Jeremy has really improved in his daily work. He is trying hard to do well. Great job, Jeremy !
Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Carey - Our kindergarten class would like to honor two Terrific Kids this week that are both real GENTLEMEN! Here are some more clues: They both have FIVE letters in their names. They both have the little word "on" in their names. They both have last names that begin with the letter G. Can you guess? We are always happy to spend our days with our Terrific Friends: DEVON GERRISH and AARON GOODINE.
Mrs. Whitney - Whitney's Terrific Kid for the week of April 4 is CHRISTINA WALLS. She has been reading, reading and then reading some more. Great job and keep on reading! She has started her second Bunnicula book in reading class. The animal books are her favorites!
Joe Beres’ Bus Students of the week:
Milo Elem:. RAE JEAN HERBEST and RAVEN GARLAND.
In Brownville: P.J. NOKE.

Cook School News
     A Terrific Kids Assembly was held on Thursday, April 4th. TREVOR LYFORD (K-1), LAURA GRAY (2-3) and HEATHER MICHAUD (4-5) were awarded certificates by Mrs. Bradbury and Mrs. Robertson. Ms. Ivy complimented Trevor on his excellent behavior and work habits. Mrs. Bessey said that Laura can be counted on to help a friend who is feeling sad. Miss K.thanked Heather for her cheerful greeting each morning and for being an outstanding role model.
     DANIELLE ROBERTS, TAYLOR SEVERANCE and RONALD SMITH received Bus Awards from Kathy Foss.
     Mrs. Chapman named RONALD SMITH, ALYSSA GRAY and HEATHER MICHAUD Artists of the Week.
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Winners of the Move and Improve prizes were RACHAEL BAKER, BILLY PARKER, LAURA GRAY, KRISTEN MORSE AND RICHIE RUSSELL. Keep moving.
     After the Pledge, grades 4-5 sang "Take Me Out to the Ballgame."
     Mr. Sawtell has asked Miss K.'s class for help in researching the history of the Marion C. Cook School. The students are very excited about this opportunity and are hard at work. We thank Mr. Sawtell for allowing us to be a part of this project.

WISH YOU WERE HERE
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT
     This is a poem written by a group of young Marines in Kuwait on March 9th, 2003. They have since moved into Iraq and combat. They had been listening to news on the radio and heard about anti-war protests going on. I pray that those boys didn't go into combat thinking nobody was behind them.

"Wish You Were Here"
For all the free people that still protest.
You're welcome.
We protect you and you are protected by the best.
Your voice is strong and loud but who will fight for you?
No one standing in your crowd.

We are your fathers, brothers and sons
wearing the boots and carrying guns.
We are the ones that leave all we own
to make sure your future is carved in stone.
We are the ones who fight and die.
We may not be able to save the world,
Well, at least we try.

We walked the paths to where we are at
and we want no choice other than that.
So when you rally your group to complain,
take a look in the back of your brain.

In order for that flag you love to fly,
wars must be fought and young men must die.
We came here to fight for the ones we hold dear.
If that's not respected, we would rather stay here.

So please stop yelling, put down your signs,
and pray for those behind enemy lines.
When the conflict is over and all is well,
be thankful that we chose to go through hell.

Written by:
Corporal Joshua Miles and all the boys from
3rd Batallion 2nd Marines, Kuwait

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     On Wednesday, April 2, we had a surprise party at the library. It was Pam Flanagan’s, our assistant librarian, birthday and she was very surprised ! What fun! Nancy Scroggins, our substitute, organized it completely. Before Pam or I came into the library, Nancy had helium balloons floating above Pam’s chair, a cake on the desk and a party bag of chocolate bars nearby. As anyone who knows Pam can testify, chocolate is the way to that woman’s heart. The bright balloons floated above Pam’s chair all day, and patrons taking

their clue from the Birthday sign taped to the desk by Nancy wished Pam well as she shared chocolate with anyone who desired a piece. What a nice surprise Nancy prepared and Pam enjoyed her birthday all day long.
     Now we’ll get back to talking about books as we have quite a few to mention. For juvenile books we now have five Junie B. Jones, and FLAT STANLEY. I hope those who asked about this character (Junie B.) will be sure to come in. We also received a shipment of juvenile books from Penworthy. They include:

Floca, Brian FIVE TRUCKS
Inches, Alison RUN-AWAY ROLEY
Inches, Alison A SURPRISE FOR WENDY
Oke, Janette A COTE OF MANY COLORS
Oke, Janette MAURY HAD A LITTLE LAMB
Oke, Janette PORDY’S PRICKLY PROBLEM
Teitelbaum, Michael IF I COULD DRIVE A GRADER
Teitelbaum, Michael IF I COULD DRIVE A TOW

TRUCK
     Several of the above authors were very popular last summer so I ordered more of their books for this year.
     For adults we have received more backordered books.

Albee, Parker LETTERS FROM SEA-1882-1901
Connelly, Michael LOST LIGHT
Cornwell, Bernard SHARPE’S HAVOC
Godwin, Gail EVENINGS AT FIVE
Greeley, Andrew M. SECOND SPRING
Peters, Elizabeth CHILDREN OF THE STORM
Roberts, Nora BIRTHRIGHT

     Time is flying. If you need income tax forms, we have them---both FEDERAL and STATE of MAINE.
The Kiwanis will have a children’s story hour on Wednesdays, starting April 9th, from 3:00-4:00 here at the library. There will be stories, a craft and snacks. Children grades K through 4th are welcome. We hope to see many of them in our new children’s area at that time.

Library Winter Hours
MON.- WEDS.-FRI.---2:00-8:00
SATURDAYS- 2:00-4:00

Knighthood for a Maine Inventor:
Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim - Part 4
Maine Times, by John E. Cayford, Jan. 1974
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2003)
     Hiram's next big development was an electrical pressure regulator, which was exhibited at the Paris Exhibition of 1881. It was one of the outstanding contributions in the entire exposition. This won for Maxim the coveted French Legion of Honor, and the gold medal for scientific achievement for the company. Hiram had represented his company in Paris; however, they wanted him to proceed to England to take over the operation of the Maxim-Weston Company (the British office of the U.S. Electric Company). He found the entire works in a sad state, and it appeared that the managing directory was ready to sell everything and close up shop. Hiram tried vainly to reach the board of Directors, but they would not respond.
     One of the important Maxim patents, valued at more than $1,000,.000 yearly,was lost through the company's neglect to pay the usual annuities. Whereas, he had made the rough drawings of his automatic gun before leaving Paris. He wanted to use the company shop to make the first working model. The managing-director asked such a rental price that Hiram established his own private workshop at 57-D Hatten Garden. Here, Hiram worked day and night to develop the first fully automatic gun based on the principles dreamed by his father Isaac Maxim many years previous. The gun had simple functioning parts and worked on the recoil system. The barrel

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was manufactured by the Henry Rifled Barrel Company, makers of the famous Henry rifles.
     As soon as he had the first fully operational model constructed, it attracted attention in high British governmental circles. The weapon was first inspected by the British military Commander-in-chief, HRH, the Duke of Cambridge, accompanied by His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales. Lord Wolseley was the next to check it out and was greatly struck by it. However, he did suggest that the inventor produce some design changes, thereby allowing the gun to be used under varying conditions. His Lordship wanted specific design changes to increase the weapon's range and power. Hiram immediately set to work and after a number of variations produced the gun which was acceptable to the Royal Armory.(Continued next week)

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     I've got so much going on that I've had to put my different projects into folders. Of course you all probably know about the Kiwanis Variety Show. This will be held at the Milo Town Hall on May 9th and 10th. Chorus practices have begun with a wonderful mix of ages and voices. The music will appeal to everyone. There are some returning acts from previous shows, and there are all kinds of new acts and fun surprises for you all to anticipate.
     The logistics of putting this kind of a show together are monstrous. Ethelyn Treworgy has been the driving force behind the last two shows, and I can't begin to tell you how hard I know that she had to have worked to pull off such outstanding shows. Last year she and Edwin had the added burden of getting the Town Hall renovations ready in time for the show. This year we all have some great experience to draw on.....but we shall see....and so shall you....at least we hope. Mark your calendar for May 9th and/or 10th.
     The next thing that I have a folder for are the plans for the Antique Appraisal Fair that the Milo Historical Society is planning. Have you heard about it? It's going to be so much fun! On May 31st, the Historical Society, with help from their friends the Kiwanians, will host an Appraisal Fair at the Milo Town Hall. This is our first attempt at one of these.....but some of our members have attended them in other communities and we've talked to many many appraisers who are all enthusiastic and are looking forward to coming. It will be a fun day for people to get together. You need to search around your house and find those objects that you have always wondered about their value. We're going to charge $5.00 to have your first item appraised. Your second item will be appraised for a fee of $3.00 and if you have a third item, it will be appraised for 2 bucks. This is going to be a fun fund raiser for the Historical Society as well as for the community.
     The Milo Historical Society has carefully managed to preserve a great deal of the history of this community. There are hundreds of artifacts cataloged and on display at our facility on High Street. The museum holds regular hours during the summer months, but anyone who wants to have a look-see only needs to notify one of our members in order to

make arrangements for a tour. Every year we take students from all levels of the school system on tours in order for them to gather info to help them complete their Milo History projects. We're a small but dedicated group. Please help support our efforts.
     The third major project that I've made a folder for is the Milo High School Alumni Association's annual banquet, which will take place on Saturday evening, July 5th, at the Penquis Valley cafeteria. Lots of details need to be ironed out. Hard to believe that at nearly 56 years old I'm one of the younger members of this association. Hard to imagine a place in time when there won't be a Milo High School Alumni Association....but that time is coming, and in the larger scheme of life the association from its inception to the end will only represent a thin slice of time. When you put life into perspective like that, it definitely humbles you doesn't it. Little details, like a contract for the use of the facility - finding a caterer - deciding on a menu - making decisions about the decorations and the table settings - finding entertainment - keeping the directory up to date - writing the letter and gathering a crew to do the mailing to our 1,400 members - collecting the dues and selling the tickets - keeping the scholarship money straightened out - and a myriad of other details is all part of being an officer and being on the committee.
     There has always been a small group of devoted members of this group who have worked tirelessly year after year to bring this yearly tradition to the alumni of Milo High School. Without their commitment the reunion wouldn't have taken place. How committed am I to the Milo High School Alumni Association? Well, I've made a folder....that's a good start.
     Whew!!! Sounds like a busy spring. In between I've got birthday parties to host, weddings and showers to attend, a Wellness Conference to get ready for....not to mention spring programs to attend at school and graduations. Brownville Elementary's Spring Fling and the annual Kiwanis auction will also be added to the to-do list. Does this sound like a woman who's going to have time to go on any trips? I don't think it even sounds like a woman who can find the time for a quick trip to Bangor! YIKES!
     The snow is gone from the deck. This means it's time to check out the grill - fill the tank and begin to think about warm weather meals. I'm looking forward to my first potato salad of the season. A tad early, you say? Maybe, but I love living on the edge....can't you tell?
     Many years ago Ethelyn Treworgy gave me this absolutely wonderful recipe for a square that should be a must at any party. It follows:
Graham Cracker Squares
grease a 9X13 pan - line with whole graham crackers
Cook until it boils:
1 beaten egg
1 stick margarine
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup water
Remove from heat and add:
1 1/2 cup graham cracker crumbs
1/2 cup nuts
1/2 cup coconut
1 tsp. vanilla
1/4 tsp. Salt
     Spread this mixture over the graham crackers in the pan and top with another layer of whole graham crackers.
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     Frost with: 1/3 stick of soft margarine, confectionery sugar, 1 tsp. of vanilla and some salt. If you get it too stiff, use a few drops of milk. This is meant to be a thin layer of frosting.
     Refrigerate these bars. They are unbelievably good.

“SUPPORT THE TROOPS” RALLY HELD
     The Milo American Legion sponsored a rally to show support for our troops. The rally was held on a cloudy Saturday, March 29, 2003, at the American Legion Hall. Ninety-six people signed the guest book but 135 to 140 supporters stood in the mist to wave the American flag and encourage drivers passing by to honk their horn. Approximately 1800 flags were given out to those standing on the roadside and to drivers who slowed down to accept a flag. Six hundred flags were donated by Walter Lougee, from the World of Flags, and 150 by the Legion. Almost a thousand flags, many by the boxful, were given anonymously by people just wanting to help and show their support! It was an inspiring sight to see so many flags waving high.

IN MEMORIAM
MARGARET E. KOELSCH
     BROWNVILLE - Margaret E. Koelsch, 61, wife of the late William C. Koelsch, died March 30, 2003, at her residence. She was born June 15, 1941, in Rahway, N.J., the daughter of Charles and Alma (Robbins) Thomas. She was a member of

Aldworth Chapter No. 39 OES and the Brownville Community Church, where she had served as organist. Mrs. Koelsch is survived by two sons, William Jr. of Milo and Charles of Brownville; two daughters, Debbie Burns and Carol Lemmon, both of Brownville; her father, Charlie Thomas of Milo; two brothers, Charles Thomas Jr. and Robert Thomas, both of New Jersey; two sisters, Joanne Clickner and Judy Thomas, both of Virginia; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. A memorial service was conducted Saturday, April 5, 2003, at the family residence, 73 Stickney Hill, Brownville, with the Rev. George Ganglfinger officiating. Arrangements are in the care of the Lary Funeral Home.
JOSEPH G. GUERRETTE
     MILO - Joseph G. Guerrette, 84, died April 2, 2003, at a Bangor Hospital. He was born April 30, 1918, in Saint Agatha, the son of Joseph F. and Mary Guerrette. Surviving are two sons, Joseph F. Guerrette and Arthur Bailey and his wife, Jean; daughter, Marjorie Stone and her husband, Bob; sister, Adrianna Saucier; grandchildren, Roy Stone and his wife, Dorothy, Roderick Stone, Bobbie Jo and Willie Williams, Donna Bubar; and many friends. A graveside service will be held later in the spring at a time and date to be announced. Arrangements by Memorial Alternatives, 1225 Broadway, Bangor

WRITER’S GROUP FORMING IN MILO
     On Tuesday, May 13, 2003, anyone interested in writing stories, poems, essays, memoirs or more is welcome to meet at The Restaurant (formerly Angie’s) to share writing and ideas. This will be a monthly meeting from 5 to 7 pm. For more information please call Victoria Eastman at 943-2400.

ADOPT-A-CAT
SUBMITTED BY VICTORIA EASTMAN
     GOOD NEWS! Last week’s Lynx colored cat found a home in Monson!
     Available for adoption after April 10, when she will be spayed and have her first shots, a petite, solid black, shorthaired female cat. “She’s a real beauty!”
     Please contact Victoria Eastman for more information.

MILO TOWN HALL ARTS CENTER HOSTS ART SHOW
SUBMITTED BY MARY SHAPLEIGH


Left - Amanda Kahl, first place winner.
Right – Hillary Sproul, second place winner.

     District #1, Maine Federation of Women’s Clubs, Minnie McCormick, president, sponsored an art show at the Milo Town Hall Arts Center on Sunday, March 30th. Area students from Penquis Valley High School in Milo, Foxcroft

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Academy in Dover-Foxcroft, Katahdin High School in Sherman Station, and Piscataquis Community High School in Guilford displayed their artwork for judging. We were happy to greet about 60 visitors and students at this second annual art show. Many thanks to all who helped make this effort possible.
     A special thank you to Edwin Treworgy, president of Three Rivers Kiwanis Club and his wife Ethelyn, for making the easels to display the artwork.
     The clubs represented in District #1 are Cosmopolitan and Miosac of Dover-Foxcroft, Pamola Women’s Club of Sherman Station, and the Patten Women’s Club of Patten. Co-chairwomen for the event were Judi Walter of the Cosmopolitan Club and Merna Dunham, Member at Large of District #1.
     Winners from Penquis Valley High School were Amanda Kahl, first place, and Hillary Sproul, second place. Certificates were awarded to each student displaying artwork and monetary prized were presented to the winners.
     The Maine Federation of Women’s Clubs, which is a member of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, has 44 clubs and 1 union, 1500 members in 7 districts around the state from Patten to Westbrook and Lubec to Kezar Falls. Artwork from around the state will be displayed and judged at the annual meeting of MFWC, which will be held in Bar Harbor on May 14 through May 16. Winners at the state level will be awarded monetary prizes at that time.

HOW DID WE EVER SURVIVE?
E-MAILED BY JED LADD, COLORADO
     My Mom used to cut up chicken, chop eggs and spread mayo on the same cutting board with the same knife and no bleach, but we didn’t seem to get food poisoning.
     My Mom used to defrost hamburger on the counter AND I used to eat it raw sometimes too, but I can’t remember getting E-coli.
     Almost all of us would have rather gone swimming in the lake instead of a pristine pool (talk about boring), the term cell phone would have conjured up a phone in a jail cell, and a pager was the school PA system.
     We all took gym, not PE...and risked permanent injury with a pair of high top Ked’s (only worn in gym) instead of having cross-training athletic shoes with air cushion soles and built in light reflectors. I can’t recall any injuries but they must have happened because they tell us how much safer we are now.
     Flunking gym was not an option…even for the less than athletic! I guess PE must be much harder than gym.
     Every year, someone taught the whole school a lesson by running in the halls with leather soles on linoleum tile and hitting the wet spot.
     How much better off would we be today if we only knew we could have sued the school system. Speaking of school, we all said prayers and the pledge and staying in detention after school caught all sorts of negative attention. We must have had horribly damaged psyches.
     I can’t understand it. Schools didn’t offer 14 year olds an abortion or condoms (we wouldn’t have known what either was anyway) but they did give us a couple of baby aspirin and cough syrup if we started getting the sniffles. What an archaic health system we had then. Remember school nurses? Ours wore a hat and everything.
     I thought that I was supposed to accomplish something before I was allowed to be proud of myself. I just can’t recall how bored we were without computers, Playstation, Nintendo, X-box or 270 digital cable stations.

     I must be repressing that memory as I try to rationalize through the denial of the dangers could have befallen us as we trekked off each day about a mile down the road to some guy’s vacant 20, built forts out of branches and pieces of plywood, made trails, and fought over who got to be the Lone Ranger. What was that property owner thinking, letting us play on that lot? He should have been locked up for not putting up a fence around the property, complete with a self-closing gate and an infrared intruder alarm.
     Oh yeah…and where was the Benadryl and sterilization kit when I got that bee sting? I could have been killed!
     We played king of the hill on piles of gravel left on vacant construction sites and when we got hurt, Mom pulled out the 48-cent bottle of Mercurochrome and then we got our butt spanked. Now it’s a trip to the emergency room, followed by a 10-day dose of a $49 bottle of antibiotics and then Mom calls the attorney to sue the contractor for leaving a horribly vicious pile of gravel where it was such a threat.
     We didn’t act up at the neighbor’s house either because if we did, we got our butt spanked (physical abuse) here too…and then we got butt spanked again when we got home.
     Mom invited the door to door salesman inside for coffee, kids choked down the dust from the gravel driveway while playing with Tonka trucks (remember why Tonka trucks were made tough…it wasn’t so that they could take the rough Berber in the family room), and Dad drove a car with leaded gas.
     Our music had to be left inside when we went out to play and I am sure that I nearly exhausted my imagination a couple of times when we went on two-week vacations. I should probably sue the folks now for the danger they put us in when we all slept in campgrounds in the family tent.
     Summers were spent behind the push lawnmower and I didn’t even know that mowers came with motors until I was 13 and we got one without an automatic blade-stop or an auto-drive.
     How sick were my parents? Of course my parents weren’t the only psychos. I recall Donny Reynolds from next-door coming over and doing his tricks on the front stoop just before he fell off. Little did his Mom know that she could have owned our house. Instead she picked him up and swatted him for being such a goof. It was a neighborhood run amuck.
     To top it off, not a single person I knew had ever been told that they were from a dysfunctional family. How could we possibly have known that we needed to get into group therapy and anger management classes?
     We were obviously so duped by so many societal ills, that we didn’t even notice that the entire country wasn’t taking Prozac! How did we survive?

MSAD # 41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
APRIL 7 – 11
Monday-Cheese burger, school bun, oven fries, Calif. Blend veg. peaches, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Oven fried chicken, mashed potato, corn, dinner roll, and pumpkin cookie.
Wednesday-Roast pork/gravy, rice, broccoli/cheese, dinner roll, and fruited pudding.
Thursday-Juice, egg muffin, hash brown, and applesauce.
Friday-Breadsticks, cheese/sauce, carrots/dip, and yogurt.
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HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
MILO-1950
     The Milo United Baptist Church Sunday School Class was organized in 1911. A group of men and women met monthly for suppers and the 45 members supported many civic enterprises for a number of years.
     In 1950 the Sunday School Class included Mrs. Ethel Gilpatrick, Mrs. Harriett Tuck, Mrs. Linnie Hamlin, Mrs. Carrie Hamlin, Mrs. Edith Richards, Mrs. Eva Christie, Mrs. Blanche Christie, Mrs. Maye Doble, Mrs. Agnes Sawyer, Mrs. Flossie Chase, Mrs. Alice Rowe, Mrs. Genie Harris, Mrs. Gertrude Hamlin, Mrs. Ruby Mace, Mrs. Elsie Stocker, Mrs. Lottie Carpenter, Mrs. Ovata Dean, Mrs. Minnie Plummer, Mrs. Iva Greenough, Mrs. Flora Durgin, Mrs. Elizabeth McLaughlin, Mrs. Mary Dean, the Rev. Richard Cummings, E.M.Hamlin, O.E. Hamlin, the Rev. L.A. Perry, Mrs. Doris Perry, Mrs. Pearl Canney, Mrs. Catherine Thompson, Mrs. Barbara Cummings, Mrs. Bertha Smith, Mrs. Gertrude Golden, and Mrs. Effie Hamlin.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
BY NANCY GRANT
     During the past two weeks in 1966 Mrs. Mabel McCleary was ‘Downeast”, either in Fredericton Jct. or St. John, New Brunswick, visiting her family. She didn’t record the weather in Brownville Jct. while she was away.
APRIL – 1966
April 8-Little snow am-some rainPM-34° at 7 am and 34° at 9 pm.
April 9-Snow-34° at 7:30 am and 32° at 9 pm.
April 10-Sunny AM-34° at 6:10 am and 32° at 9 pm.
April 11-Fair AM-rain PM-30° at 6:30 am and 34° at 9 pm.
April 12-Mostly Cloudy-36° at 6:45 am.

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     I’m going to resist the urge to complain about the weather although if you could have heard the squawking and cackling of the chickens, this Sunday morning, when the door to the coop was opened and they saw 6 inches of snow on the ground, you would know how I feel. We have three boxes full of baby birds in the bedroom, and it would be nice to imagine that the weather is going to warm up enough to get them living outside.
     The baby chicks aren’t too hard to take care of. I clean their 2 boxes out twice a week and they only need to be fed and watered twice a day. The “baby” ducks are another story. First of all, the 6 Pekin ducks are HUGE! They can look over the top of a 3-foot high box! One or two of them have gone from peeping to making a sound that is like a person clearing their throat. When they actually start quacking, they are going outside, even if a glacier is moving through to signal the start of
another Ice Age. The ducks need to be fed 5 or 6 times a day, and they splash their water dish empty as often. Now, after allowing for all of that food to help the ducks double in size every day (OK, maybe I’m exaggerating a bit), all of that food going in has to come out. That “recycled food” mixed with the water they splash all over and carry around on their feet makes for a disgusting mess in the cardboard box. I clean them out everyday, and sometimes twice a day. That can get a little tedious.
     But the ducks are soooo cute and entertaining. It was Kirby’s birthday Saturday, so I thought up a special treat for him. I turned the space-heater on in the bathroom, drew a nice, warm tub of water, then called him in and proceeded to put all 13 ducks into the tub!! They splashed and dove under water and had the time of their young lives. It’s amazing how well they took to it…like a duck to water, I guess. We took pictures to send to Katie and she was amazed at their size and their swimming ability.
     They’ve mastered the bathtub, if only I could get them to use the toilet.
     Sweet Little Beagle Dog is still with us, and yesterday Kirby mentioned that we should name her something more suitable, so I guess, if you are keeping count, you’ll have to put our dog total at 5. Actually, we have had offers for homes for her, but she is so sweet!! Maybe Kirby and I aren’t cut out for this job of housing the stray dogs for Milo and Brownville. We’ll give her owner another week or two to realize we have her, then, perhaps we’ll find her a new home.
     We had a bit of a mystery to solve last week. My 30 hens went from laying more than 2 dozen eggs a day, to one dozen. I thought perhaps the return of the cold weather had done something to their “egg-clocks”, or perhaps a raccoon or skunk was getting them. On Thursday, when I went to the coop to gather eggs, I noticed it was just the middle nests that were eggless and that there were 4 or 5 empty shells on the floor of the coop. As Radar stood there watching me, I noticed the empty nests were exactly the same level as Radar’s head. I mentioned the missing eggs to Kirby, and he said he had seen Radar trying to get at some eggs I had lying on a counter. We both looked at Radar, with his shiny, shiny black coat and the mystery was solved! Now I make sure the big door to the coop is closed during the day and only the teeny chicken door is open. I also make sure to give Radar a raw egg or two with his breakfast. I guess people aren’t the only ones who appreciate the flavor of eggs from the World’s Happiest Chickens!
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THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

APRIL 2 MEETING MINUTES
BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy greeted twenty-four members this morning and guests Dot Brown, Cheryl Hamlin, and Shirley Wright.
     Roy Bither led us in the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham asked for peace and thoughts and prayers for those in harm’s way.
     Virgil Valente was our inspirational reader today with a story of an unexpected life-saving experience. A man was diving by himself and had developed cramps. He kept thinking that he didn’t want to die alone. While his mind screamed out, “Help me”, he felt a lift from behind. An eye came into view from around his side and he realized it was a dolphin. With his arm over the dolphin’s back, the gentle creature carried him slowly to the surface and into shallow water. The diver shed all of his gear in relief and joy and returned to the dolphin’s side. They played for a while then he stood quietly beside the dolphin that had saved his life, contemplating the events of the day. He didn’t die and he HADN’T BEEN ALONE!
     A letter from Minnie McCormick was received in appreciation for the donation of $100 to be used as prize money for the winners of the art contest held last Sunday at the Milo Art Center. A newsletter from the Dover-Foxcroft Kiwanis Club was distributed.
     A belated happy birthday goes out to Pat Ricker for March 29th.
     Edwin announced Eben DeWitt’s candidacy for Lieutenant Governor in 2004-2005. Can we expect a landslide victory?
     Fourteen happy and sad dollars were donated to the Administrative Fund for a rescued soldier, Red Sox, robins, Eben’s candidacy, 3 Stooges, kindergarten registration, ease of a satellite dish installation, Yankee’s, and a really nice group at breakfast.
     Trish Hayes updated us on the Key Club activities, service awards on April 10, painting the bathrooms at the high school on April 19 at 10 am, six members along with Trish and Dennis Dorsey leaving Friday morning for the conference in MA, and taunting us about the Kiwanis bell being in Key Club custody!
     Eben invited people to join him in forming an interclub to visit Dexter on Friday.
     The Three Rivers News is SELLING OUT EACH WEEK! The need of at least twenty more issues being printed weekly is at hand.
     Planning and rehearsals are going well for the May Variety Show.
     Paul Grindle is ready to meet with his community calendar committee.

     Val Robertson and Chris Beres have a new program ready to be set into motion pending acceptance by a board vote on April 3rd. They are planning to have readers at the Milo Free Public Library from 3 to 4pm each Wednesday. Crafts and snacks will also be included. All are welcome to participate and they would even help with the snacks and craft ideas.
     Carl Wilson talked to us about the upcoming event with the Harlem Rockets Comedy Team. They will be competing against the JMG senior boy all-stars on April 8, 2003 at the Penquis Valley High School gym. Advance tickets are available.
     April’s speaker chairperson Chris Almy introduced our speaker today, Milo’s Police Chief Todd Lyford. There has been much talk about the Milo and Brownville police forces combing efforts to save money in both towns. Todd informed us that Brownville voted in a $74,000 budget at their recent town meeting and Milo budgeted $116,000 to cover expenses in Milo. Sharing police officers will save Brownville about $30,000 and about half that much in Milo. Todd said he works 30 hours a week for Milo and 12 hours for Brownville with each town sharing the expense for his insurance, pager, etc.
     Reserve officers are on duty during weekends and weekdays while the full time officers work at night. At the present time there is one officer serving both Milo and Brownville during the daytime and an officer in each town at night. This could mean a short delay if an officer is in one town and has a call to go to the other. This could be subject to change. Todd informed us that the ideal ratio of officers to the population is 1:1,000. With a combined population of 3,500 and four police officers, Todd feels we are in pretty good shape.
     He also told us that both towns are standardizing as much as possible to save on costs. They have the same type of uniform, use dark blue Crown Vic’s for both towns, utilize the same radios and patrol logs, and look to expanding the Milo computer system to network with Brownville. This would make for smoother operations and communications in the local area.
     Todd also said that this arrangement meant working with two boards of selectmen and keeping the payroll straight but he reported no problems to date. There also have been ideas of combining other departments of the two towns to further savings.
     Chief Lyford expressed his appreciation for all the public support he and his fellow officers have received.
     Thank you.

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