Three Rivers News, 2003-04-29
TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 25
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

BENEFIT DINNER PLANNED
     American Legion Post #92 in Brownville Jct. is organizing a benefit dinner for Wanda Conlogue. Wanda, who was recently diagnosed with leukemia, is at Eastern Maine Medical Center where she is currently undergoing treatment. Wanda and her husband Hazen, along with their two sons, are long time residents of Brownville Jct. Wanda is the owner/operator of Hair Affair, a popular beauty salon in town.
     The pork roast dinner will be held on May 10 at the Brownville Jct. American Legion Hall on Railroad Avenue. There will be 3 separate sittings for the dinner beginning at 1:00; the second will be at 2:30 and the third at 4:00. Advanced tickets are $10.00 for adults and $5.00 for children under 12. Tickets at the door will be $12.50 and $6.50 for children under 12. Tickets can be purchased from any Legion member. A Legion member will be present at the Hall on Thursday May 1st, and 8th, from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM to sell tickets. The phone number for the Hall is 965-1953. You can also call 965-7031 or 965-3631 for any inquiries regarding the dinner or contributions for Wanda.

SATURDAY, MAY 10TH, IS THE ANNUAL NALC MAIL CARRIERS FOOD DRIVE
Please leave your non-perishable items by your mailbox, or drop them off at the Post Office.
Needed items include canned foods, paper goods, peanut butter, macaroni, etc.
Collected items will be used to stock the shelves of local food cupboards.
Thanks in advance for your generosity!!!

BAKED BEAN SUPPER
TO BENEFIT CHARLES HUFF

On Saturday, May 10th, 2003
from 5:00 PM until 7:00 PM
At the Piscataquis Valley Fair Grounds dining Hall
in Dover-Foxcroft.
Sponsored by the Piscataquis valley Fair Association.
Adults: $5.00, Children under 12, $3.00
For more information, or to offer assistance, call;
Anita Edgerly at 564-3097, Susie Ricker at 943-2692, or Deanne Merrill at 943-2650.


EXERCISE CLASS
EVERY MON., WED. AND FRI., FROM 9 AM UNTIL 10 PM
AT THE MILO TOWN HALL. $2.50 PER CLASS.
COME JOIN US AND HOME SOME FUN,
WHILE GETTING FIT!
INSTRUCTORS, CAROL WITHAM AND APRIL YORK

Presenting, for your reminiscing pleasure:

"Lost In The Fifties Tonight"
Three Rivers Kiwanis
3rd Annual Variety Show
May 9th and 10th
Milo Town Hall at 7:00 P.M.
Tickets: $5.00
Proceeds to benefit R.I.F
Refreshments on Sale


Dear Three Rivers community:
     I want to thank you and all the people who have kept all of the men and women of the military informed on all the weekly events back home. I would like to personally thank everyone who has e-mailed me or sent out Birthday cards. They made a very dreary day turn into something that will be a memory. This may not be my first birthday at sea, but it will always be remembered for what you all have done. Thank you very much.
Scot Perkins


There will be a Rabies Clinic at the Milo Town Hall On Saturday, May 1st, at 10AM.

Overeaters Anonymous meets at the Park St. Methodist Church, Milo on Wednesday evenings 7:00-8:00 PM


Due to unforeseen technical difficulties, Tony Hamlin’s story was unavailable for this week’s edition. I promise to get it in next week! Val


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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES. APRIL 29 CHICKEN DIVAN, MASHED POTATO, MIXED VEGGIES, ICE BOX PUDDING
WED. APRIL 30 SPAGHETTI CASSEROLE, PEAS AND MUSHROOMS, SLICED PEARS
THUR. MAY 1 BAKED HAM, RED POTATO, WAX BEANS, FROSTED CAKE
FRI. MAY 2 TOMATO SOUP, SEALEG SALAD SANDWICH, FRESH SPINACH SALAD, MOLASSES COOKIE
MON., MAY 2 BAKED FISH W/EGG SAUCE, RED POTATO, CARROTS, OATMEAL RAISIN COOKIE
TUES. MAY 6

MEATBALLS AND GRAVY, BUTTERED NOODLES, PEAS, TAPIOCA PUDDING

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.

BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30

A Cat Named Post Office Continued
BY BILL SAWTELL
     Post Office is lactose intolerant. He can eat nothing but special feline food. Yet how he begs for tuna fish oil or tuna fish! I feel miserable denying him some of his favorite foods. But I don't want to be an enabler.
     Many animals may prey on Postie. When he goes out the door, I caution: "Watch out for the coyotes, the foxes, the raccoons, the fishers, and the eagles. When he stays out late, I fear for him until he jumps up on the window sill-his signal that he wants in.

     Postie has another potential danger: traffic. He rarely crosses the road now. So that may be not an issue-one less thing to worry about.
     Postie is a very sensitive putty, especially to sounds, such as the ringing of the telephone, rustling, and squeaky noises. He has toys, but rarely plays with them, preferring to lie on my chest or doze off in an easy chair on an afghan. He knows he's got it good.
     When he comes in out of the rain, I wipe him off with my shirt or a towel. And when he comes in out of the cold, I warm his paws with my hands.
     Postie loves company, having no inhibitions whatsoever regardless of how important the occasion is, He likes to roll on his back in the sand of the yard and bask in the sun.
     For years, people advised me to get a pet. Now I have one.

CHILD ID CARDS DISTRIBUTED
     The FBI estimates that at least 2300 children are reported missing every day.
     If a child is missing, time is of the essence. It is critical for parents to have the ability to provide accurate and detailed information to the authorities as soon as possible. It is not the time to be searching for recent photos, fingerprint cards, etc.
     The Brownville Jct. American Legion Auxiliary is concerned about the safety and well being of the children of our town. The Auxiliary focused on this issue Saturday, April 19, when they distributed Child ID Cards and Safety Shoe Labels to interested parents.
     The Child ID cards contain everything the authorities need to know to begin searching for a missing child. Each card has a photograph, physical description, identifying marks, a fingerprint and contact information. The cards are meant to be carried by the parent in a wallet or purse in order that they are always readily available.
     The Safety Shoe label is a unique label, which solves the problem of young children carrying identification, which is not practical, or wearing identification, which is not safe. Although they seem useful, it isn't safe for your child to wear an ID bracelet, necklace, or wristband. If abducted, any visible identification will be immediately removed. But typically, abductors won't change a child's shoes. The labels are put on the inside bottom of the child's shoes. They are designed so that they won't come off even with sweaty or wet feet.
     Because we love our children and are concerned for their safety, the Brownville Jct. American Legion Auxiliary will be bringing other safety programs to our area in the future.

Pictured in the photo – from left to right are:
Auxiliary members, Deborah Emery, Leeanna Kinson, Theresa Lovejoy, parent, Rose Clement with her children Josh and Jessica.

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OUR MAINE IDEA
BY VICTORIA EASTMAN
     Beginning May 1st, local crafts people and artists will have a new opportunity to sell their products. Our Maine Idea, formerly Cat’s Corner in Sebec, will offer a variety of spaces to display crafts, gifts, and antiques.
     Our Maine Idea will also be a fine source for scrap-booking supplies as well as a tourist information center. For more information or to rent a space, call owner Kim Hill at 564-7009.

MONDAY MORNING QUILTERS
     The Monday Morning Quilters is a group of women who quilt each Monday in Brownville Jct. Lorraine Fitzpatrick says that the group will also meet through summer on Thursday evening at 5:30 beginning April 24.
     The group is starting to work on a Mystery Quilt pattern. Each week, for 7 weeks, a clue will be given to each lady giving instructions on how to put that clue together. Only two ladies know what the finished quilt will look like. The rest of the ladies will just have to make each clue, having faith that when all the clues come together, they will have a pretty quilt. They hope that this will be fun and will help to give new insight into the color, value, and contrasting fabrics that they work with. The group usually has about a dozen quilters.

METHODIST CHURCH NEWS
BY CAROLYN SINCLAIR
     The WWJD Puppet Company of Lincoln, Maine will be performing the musical production "Come Worship" at the Park Street United Methodist Church on Friday, May 2, at 7:00 PM. All are welcome to come and enjoy an hour of praise and worship with this talented group.
     The WWJD Puppet Company uses high-energy music accompanied by puppetry and other creative arts to produce moving and powerful shows for the entire family. Plan to attend this production; you won't be disappointed.
     On Saturday, May 3rd, there will be a tag sale held in the family room at the Park Street United Methodist Church from 9:00 AM-12:00 noon. There will be something for everyone. Come and see.
     On Thursday, May 1st, at 8:00AM, the women will meet for their monthly breakfast at The Restaurant in Milo. All women are invited to attend this time of fellowship.


Spring Antique Appraisal Fair
Saturday, May 31, 2003
10 AM to 3 PM
Milo Town Hall Arts Center
1 Item - $5 | 2 Items - $8 | 3 Items $10
Lite lunch available for sale!
AREA SCHOOL NEWS
Cook School News
     At our April 17th assembly, Miss K. and Mrs. Robertson awarded Terrific Kids certificates to DANIELLE ROBERTS, RACHAEL WOOD and JIMMY GLEDHILL. Ms. Ivy reported that Danielle is a wonderful student and a very good friend. Mrs. Bessey said that Rachael has worked very hard to complete her work and has had an improved attitude. Miss K. noted that Jimmy has been a Terrific Kid every week of every year he has been in our school. Jimmy is a super role model. Congratulations to all of our Terrific Kids. We are proud of you!
Smoothie Tasting
     A smoothie tasting was held in the 4-5 classroom. Students practiced their fraction skills while following the recipes and making enough servings for all. The students made and tasted Fruit Smoothies, Orange Smoothies, Purple Power Shakes, Strawberry Slushes and Chocolate Banana Shakes. The smoothies were shared with all the students and staff in the school.
     The Orange Smoothie was the favorite followed closely by the Chocolate Banana Shake. The project was part of our nutrition unit focusing on healthy snacks. Many thanks to Mrs. Harmony who did the shopping for us.
ACES is Coming On May 7th
     The Maine Governor's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports is once again sponsoring ACES, All Children Exercising Simultaneously. This event highlights the benefits of being physically for kids of all ages and encourages it as a lifelong fun habit.
     On May 7th, Students across the nation will be walking (or taking part in other physical activities) for 30-45 minutes beginning at 10:00 am. You are welcome to join us for our school walking session.
Quilts for the Linus Project
     The Kiwanis Club of Three Rivers sponsored a project to make Linus quilts that go to children who have had a traumatic experience happen to them or to someone close to them. Sixteen women from this area participated in workshops, which were held on three Wednesdays at the Milo Town Hall dining room. Many enjoyable hours of sewing were had by these women while they created quilts of many designs and bright colors for these children in need of comfort.
     The Kiwanis purchased much of the material used for the quilts, but the women as well as others donated cloth. The Kiwanis thanks all of them for their willingness to give of their time and energy to such a worthwhile project.
     Many thanks to Alana Washburn, Doris Washburn, Judy O'Connor, Madeline Decker, Myrna Ricker, Jean Hanson, Rona Ames, Sandra Gray, Sylvia Black, Dottie Brown, Gwen Bradeen, Dawna Perkins, Beverly Tucker, and Trelba Rollins for helping Pat and Ethelyn. They made thirty-seven beautiful quilts, which were presented to Merlene Sanborn (coordinator of the Linus project) at Kiwanis breakfast on Wednesday April 23 by project chairmen Pat Ricker and Ethelyn Treworgy.
     The Brownville 5th Grade was recently notified that their appearance on the PBS show "Zoom" would initially run May 23 at 5:00. The show will also be rerun a couple times during the summer. "Zoom" is a PBS show which features children involved with service learning projects.
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MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     Kiwanis presented their third weekly story time and even though it was school vacation, there was a good-sized group to enjoy snacks, a story and a craft. This week the reader was Kathy Witham and the craft was a mouse paper bag puppet.
     For Junie B. Jones readers more new books have arrived and will be ready for the Wednesday Kiwanis Kids Korner. We have received the following new titles so far with 5 more titles on backorder. All the Junie B. Jones books are by Barbara Park.
JUNIE B. JONES AND HER BIG FAT MOUTH
JUNIE B. JONES AND SOME SNEAKY PEEKY SPYING
JUNIE B. JONES AND THE MUSHY GUSHY VALENTINE
JUNIE B. JONES HAS A PEEP IN HER POCKET
JUNIE B. JONES IS A BEAUTY SHOP
JUNIE B. JONES IS A GRADUATION GIRL
     But the Junie B. Jones books are not the only juvenile books we have received lately. These books were ordered and are all ready to circulate.
BEAVERS: BEAVER MAGIC FOR KIDS
CHILDREN’S CLASSIC POETRY
COME ALONG, DAISY
DAVID GOES TO SCHOOL
DOES A KANGAROO HAVE A MOTHER TOO?
EDWARD IN THE JUNGLE
I’M SORRY
IT’S A FROG’S LIFE
IT’S AN ANT’S LIFE
LITTLE PRAIRIE HOUSE
PINKERTON BEHAVE
QUACK, DAISY, QUACK
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS BOOK OF SCIENCE
RAGGEDY ANN AND ANDY AND THE CAMEL WITH THE WRINKLED KNEES
THE STORY OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
THE STORY OF DAVY CROCKETT
TARZAN
TURTLE, TURTLE, WATCH OUT
THE VIKINGS
YOURS TILL BANANA SPLITS (humorous autograph book rhymes)
     Backordered adult titles we have received are the following.
Clark, Mary Higgins THE SECOND TIME AROUND
Jaffe, Rona THE ROOM MATING SEASON
Sparks, Nicholas THE GUARDIAN
Woods, Stuart DIRTY WORK

Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds. -Fri.---2:00-8:00
No Saturday hours beginning May 24
Winter hours
Mon.-Weds. -Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00

A Historical Review
"Marion" Found After 43 Years
Divers Sight Steamboat
Piscataquis Observer, 8/28/1975
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2003)
     Sebec Lake - In 1932, Captain Harry Coy guided his snow white steamboat, "The Marion", into Buck's Cove on Sebec Lake to what would be its final journey. The Marion was the last steamboat to chart the highways of Sebec Lake and for "sentimental reasons" Captain Coy decided to lay the ship to rest in Buck's Cove. The steamboat sank in secrecy, never to be seen by human eyes ever again. Not until this month. Forty-three years later three eager scuba divers have uncovered the silent sinking of the Marion. Piscataquis County Sheriff Dept. Deputies Clyde Whitten and Frank Brawn and Officer Dale Clukey of the Dover-Foxcroft Police Dept. are involved in a treasure hunt search of the Marion in secluded Buck's Cove.
     "We were some tickled the day we found it," recalls Whitten after he and Brawn almost ran into

the sunken steamboat while on diving boards under the surface. After finding out the appropriate location from Whitten's father Duane, who talked with Captain Coy following the secret sinking, the two divers joined Sheriff Frank Murch in the search for the missing Marion.
     Whitten explains the threesome dropped a buoy in Buck's Cove to use as an approximate mark. After searching the area for nearly two hours without success, the divers decided to call it a day and haul the buoy aboard. But as the divers approached the buoy, Brawn was almost hit by a pipe. Suddenly Whitten's eyes opened as wide as a steamboat whistle as the Marion was anchored at his feet about 18 feet from the surface.
     Clukey joined the two divers for their fourth dive since finding the Marion. Equipped with their diving gear and companion Herman Bayerdoffer, the treasure seekers pushed off from Early's Camps in Willimatic last Wednesday, Whitten insists the three divers are training after completing a YMCA scuba diving course in Bangor last winter. But there's more to thins than training. It's a downright thrill.
     It still took the crew about a half an hour to find the Marion below, but shortly after noon the three jumped off Bayerdorffer's boat, bidding farewell to him and his friend Dale Chase. The search had begun but this was no ordinary "Sea Hunt" rerun. The three concentrated on hooking the engine of the Marion in an attempt to lift the huge engine thus making the steamboat lighter, possibly light enough to allow the boat to rise from its muddy bed. While two divers swam inside, the remaining diver would watch the operation, paying close attention to the whereabouts of his mates. From time to time, the divers came topside bringing up waterlogged articles as *salvaged (*illegible).
     "There was wood still in the wood box," says an amazed Clukey. The three chatted and recalled their hour dive and the events that occurred. However, the divers were not alone as four large-size bass peeked from the Marion's deck while the divers touched their way into the historical ship. They explained Bayerdorffer hopes to build a steamboat from the Marion's remains. Brawn adds, "He might be able to restore the model." "What we'd really like to see is the whole thing lifted out of the water," remarks Clukey.
     Still, there is magnet attraction among the divers that appears to be an unexplainable sense. A sense to see something that hasn't been seen by two other men since Coy sank the vessel but as far as they know no one has seen the Marion since the 1940's.
     But why do the men take their spare hours to don their gear, make the long journey to Early's Camps just for an hour dive to look at a sunken wreck. With a twinkle in his eyes, Whitten answers, "It's got a lure to it. We just wanted to see it."

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Ahhhhhh! The windows are wide open and I hung a load or two of freshly washed bedding out on the line today. No bugs, except for the huge mud wasp that I killed in my kitchen this morning. What's with those things, anyway? I swear to God there is a nest of them lurking somewhere in the back of our house. Every spring we get them. They are so huge and slow that they're easy to see and consequently easy to pick off.
     I absolutely love spring, and if you go up by the tree farm on Park Street you can even see some little tiny green buds blossoming on those trees. My husband and I celebrated our 33rd wedding anniversary this past weekend, Dad's birthday is this week, and my birthday will be coming right along in a couple of weeks. Lots of fun things to celebrate in the springtime. We bought a new DVD player for a combination anniversary and birthday gift. We've used it twice and
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with any luck will be able to remember how-to for a week or two. I'm so lame when it comes to running electronics that it's pitiful. I used to be a whiz at things like that...but now I'm an idiot. Does it have to do with getting old? I always thought it was foolishness that my parents couldn't.....and wouldn't.....learn to use the modern electronic devices that we were so crazy to get when we were younger.
     They didn't want a VCR or a microwave. "What is wrong with you that you can't remember how to use this?" I'd whine and cry when they'd call for assistance every two or three days trying to watch one of the movies that we'd bought them. Indeed, we did buy them the electronics (whether they wanted them or not), and expected them to use them. We finally found a microwave that they could figure out.....you turned a dial like timer and it automatically started. You either cooked or you thawed. Yep, they could do that.
     CD players were like something from out of space to them. Dad would say, "What does "POWER" mean?" My smart-mouthed reply would no doubt totally irritate him, and at that point I'd have lost him anyway. Disc, shuffle, remote, mic......all terms that meant nothing to them. So many of our best laid plans to entertain them went awry.
     I'm trying to figure out how I'm ever going to get everything done when I retire. When I have a week's vacation I have so much to do every single day, that I have to wonder how I will get to all of my promised projects when I finally call it quits at work. It's very easy for me to get involved in community projects and interests. I volunteered to read to the little children at the Milo Public Library this week. I guess they get quite a crowd of children for this after-school program. I wonder how many there will be on a vacation week? In any case we'll be ready for them.....If You Give A Mouse A Cookie....a mouse craft....and a snack will await all of the little ones who venture out this week.
     The book is very revealing. It reminds me of myself. When the mouse gets the cookie he wants milk with it. After the milk he has to check for a milk mustache and then he notices his hair is long and he needs to trim it. He then makes a mess cutting the hair and has to clean that up. One thing leads to another and before you know it he's thirsty and needs a glass of milk. And the milk leads to....you guessed it....another cookie. I'm a great hand for doing one little thing and it leads to something bigger, better, greater and way more consuming than the small thing that I started out to do. That's the way of life don't you think?
Take my dining room for instance. At first I just wanted to re-wallpaper and paint the woodwork. On looking the situation over, however, I've decided to tear the whole room apart...sell some of the furniture....purchase new. I want a complete make-over. Now I've opened up a whole new kettle of fish. YIKES!! A complete make-over would mean sanding down the hardwood floor and buying a new rug, too. Oh well! We've tackled the big jobs before. This one just happens to be smack dab in the middle of my house. There isn't any getting anywhere without going through the dining room. My husband thinks it's all a plot to justify not doing the spring cleaning just now. Maybe!
     I've got a gift for the first person who calls me and asks to take me up on this offer. Do you remember me telling the story about having my girlfriend make me a batch of sour pickles? It was last fall....during pickling season. They were sour pickles and they were out of this world. She made me a full case of pint jars plus a gallon jug full of them. I donated the gallon jug full of them to the Veteran's Day dinner that the Kiwanis put on for the local Veterans on November 11th. They were met with rave reviews. I gave my Lori Lee a few jars of them for one of her Christmas presents, as she loves them too. The rest of the jars have been brought out as needed, and we've been eating on them all winter long. Recently, I took stock of how many jars I had left and there were three. Let me just say this about that. Those pickles are so sour that even I can't eat one without my glands totally puckering up. I remember now that when we used to make those pickles years ago....they would get really strong and I would take the remnants of them to my brother-in-law who could...and took great pleasure in...tolerating them. My brother-in-law is gone now, so if you think you'd like to try them, give me a call. The first caller gets the remaining jars.
     The other week I gave you a ham recipe. This past weekend I spent with my beloved cousins in Millinocket. We had a wonderful weekend of birthday and Easter celebration. I provided

breakfast on Saturday morning. We had sweet rolls (a recipe for another week), fluffy scrambled eggs, juice, coffee and this delightful and easy recipe.

Crock-pot Ham
3 lb. (or thereabouts) fully-cooked ham (boneless or with a bone as long as it will fit in your crock pot).
1/2 teaspoon pepper (I used fresh ground pepper)
2 jars (@ 6 oz. each) of fruit chutney or marmalade or apricot jam. (I used a combination of marmalade and apricot jam because, let me tell you, fruit chutney just isn't very easy to find)
1 cup of frozen small whole onions (from a 1 lb. bag - actually I used the whole bag)
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
     Place ham in a 3 1/2 to 4 quart crock pot or slow cooker. Sprinkle with pepper. Mix the remaining ingredients and pour over the ham. Cover and cook on low heat setting for 6 to 8 hours. I whipped this together and got it into the crock pot late Friday evening and it was falling apart ready in the morning. I removed the ham from the sauce....sliced it, and then poured some of the sauce into a large gravy boat to set on the table. We had the option of using some of the sauce over the ham or just eating the ham plain. It was totally yummy!

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Facts:
     Did you know that maple trees produce the most sap when the daytime temperatures are above freezing and nighttime temperatures are below freezing? A single maple tree yields 10 gallons of sap over the course of four weeks and it takes 30 to 40 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of maple syrup.

Static Electricity
     I am sure all of us have experienced getting zapped when we touch a doorknob or some other metallic object after walking on a rug. This past week I had an interesting experience. When I started to turn on my computer, a spark jumped from my finger before I hit the button and turned the computer on.
     This week I would like to give an explanation of static electricity. We all know that matter is composed of atoms. Atoms consist of a nucleus that is positive because it contains particles called protons and surrounding this nucleus are layers of electrons. These electrons, which are negative, not only hover around the nucleus, but also are capable of moving from one atom to another. If an electron shifts from one atom to another it leaves behind an atom that is now charged positive. The atom is called a positive ion because it is charged. The atom that picks up the electron becomes a negative ion.
     Most materials do not allow electrons to move freely on their surface. These are called insulators. Some materials, mainly the metals, do allow electrons to move about more freely and are called conductors. Insulators quickly show a static charge when electrons are added or taken away because the electrons tend to stay where they are added to a material or tend to leave behind a positive charge where they left because other electrons aren’t able to move in to take their place.
     When objects become charged positive or negative, they are attracted to objects that have an opposite charge and are pulled together just like opposite ends of a magnet. If a positively charged object is brought near a metal or conductor then the electrons in the metal move to get as close as possible to the positive object. If a negatively charged object is brought close to a metal then the electrons in the metal move as far away as possible from the object.
     Objects that are charged slowly lose their charge because of passing dust particles in the air and also because of radiation from the atmosphere. During the summer, when the air is not as dry, the moisture in the air prevents the buildup of static charge. It is the heat inside and dry air that cause us the problems we have in the winter.
     When we walk on a carpet we tend to pick up electrons from the carpet to become negatively charged. Since our bodies are able to conduct electrons around the extra ones from the carpet tend
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to be dispersed over the surface of our body. If we get enough extra electrons from something we notice our hair starts to stand on end. When we reach for a doorknob we are actually zapping the door with our extra electrons rather than the other way around.
     One can have fun experimenting with static electricity. All you need to do is tear a couple of pieces of a Styrofoam cup about the size of a dime and tie each of them to a thread. Now tape the threads so that the two Styrofoam pieces hang about a half-inch apart. You can rub the remaining part of the cup on your hair and touch it to the two hanging pieces. After doing this a few times they should have picked up enough charge so that they start repelling each other.
     Another nice trick is to stand a penny on its side and place a toothpick on top of it. If you comb your hair and bring the comb close to the toothpick you can make it jump off the penny. This will work even through a clear plastic cup.

MEMORIES OF THE ALLAGASH
BY CARL HAMLIN
     Stan Clark stood back and looked at the old Chevy pickup loaded with grub, pack baskets, fishing tackle, sleeping bags, and tents. On the homemade canoe rack was a Grand Lake Streamer canoe-type boat. Stan looked at it once, shook it, and said, “Don’t think she will ever make it. It was laced down with homemade bungy cords made out of loops of truck inner tubes. I had to admit it looked a little doubtful if it would ever see Chamberlain Lake campground. We all laughed and Stan and I piled in and headed north. Ed Berry, Norman Pinette, and Elmer Cunningham came behind. At least Stan and I had a backup if we had any trouble.
     We made Millinocket without trouble, where we stopped for a cold drink, gassed up, and checked the boats once more before the last ride to Chamberlain. These roads were private, so trucks had the right of way, and they took it. We used to put our canoes into Indian Brook and let them down to Eagle Lake. We camped at the Narrows on Eagle, by the pump.
     After setting up the tents and putting a big tarp over the table, we were anxious to try the fish. Norman and I headed back toward the end of the lake. We tied on a couple of black ghost streamer flies, and started to troll next to shore. We began to catch squaretail trout. In the next hour we caught and put back so many one-to-two-pound brookies that we got tired of reeling them in. Our streamers were in shreds, but they were still hitting them when we headed back to camp. I had never had fishing like that and Normey hadn’t either. We kept a couple of nice ones to fry up for supper.
     When we beached the canoe, we found the boys were all back and they came down to see how we had made out. They had all had some action, but nothing like we had. We cleaned the fish, dried them and put them in a cooler. Then we gathered some wood for a fire. Normey did the cooking and did a good job most of the time. Of course he and Stan were always feuding about the food. Once in a while something would come up a little black. I noticed that nobody else volunteered to do the cooking, though. That night we had baked potatoes cooked in the coals, fried trout, and a tossed salad.
     While waiting for supper, some of the boys had a little “toddy.” Stan said it calmed the nerves. After the dishes were washed (a chore Normey would have nothing to do with), we threw a few sticks on the fire and watched the evening settle over the lake. An awful lot of big fish were caught by that fire and big deer shot, always in an ash swale at about 150 yards. (That’s real good shooting!)

     As the fire died down, we unrolled our sleeping bags and turned in. It had been a long day. As we drifted off to sleep, the loons began calling back and forth. They were probably telling about the big fish they had caught that day! It was the music of the Allagash, wild and beautiful.
     Norman and I rolled out soon after daylight and got the fire going. I saw Stan stick his head out of the tent and could hear him moaning and groaning. I heard him say, “I ache all over!” He had brought one of those plastic mattresses and the air had gone out of it during the night, leaving him on the rocks most of the night. Norm and I got to laughing which didn’t help Stan’s disposition at all.
     After a good breakfast we wanted to get a good start on some early morning fishing. In our hurry to get settled the night before, we hadn’t stopped to check out the old steam railroad engines that were parked side by side on shore. They had been covered with a good building, but someone in Augusta sent a crew up to burn the old house, camp, and all other buildings in the clearing. They burned the buildings and the engines, too. Afterwards they painted the engines to keep them from rusting. We headed up the lake and checked out the engines and the big cable that hauled logs across Chamberlain.
     Ed Berry caught a big seven-pound togue that morning, and the rest of us did fairly well. We checked out a couple of brooks, but had no luck, so headed back to the campground. There were three canoes on the shore when we got back. The new guys asked if they could camp out at the pump with us. There was plenty of room, so they set up their tents and we shared the big table and the fire for cooking. They were a nice bunch of guys, all professionals: one lawyer, a couple of doctors, the owner of a boys’ camp, and a teacher.
     That evening we all sat around a nice fire, some having a little “toddy” and others swapping hunting and fishing stories. One of the doctors was sitting between Stan and me. I picked up a piece of cedar kindling and started to whittle with my hunting knife. I cut off a piece about three or four inches long and half an inch square. I cut notches on the corners and crosses on the side. The end was cut out in a sloping curve. Just before I finished it, one of the doctors said,” What is that, anyway?”
     I said, “Everyone up here knows what they are, and I assumed you did, too.
     He said, “I don’t know; what is it?”
     I told him, “ We call them an Indian nerve pill.”
     He asked, “What’s it good for?”
     I answered, “You take one back home with you, and some morning when your wife won’t get your breakfast, and you can’t find the car keys, and frustration has the best of you, when you finally get to your office, you take this out of your desk drawer, rub your fingers over it, smell the cedar, and think of the evening in front of the fire at the pump campground, remembering the hunting and fishing yarns, and you will calm right down.”
     “Really!” He said, “Can I have that one?”
     “No,” I said. “It is only effective if you make it yourself.”
     “I’m going to make one,” he said.
     He found a piece of cedar and spent a half hour copying the one I had made. When he finished it, he held it up to the fire and said, “You know a person could sell these, couldn’t he?”
     I agreed. I looked over at Stan and I thought he was going to explode. We all headed for our sleeping bags then, and on the way Stan said,” That was the biggest bunch of baloney I ever heard dished out.”
     The next day we broke camp, said “So long” to the other guys, and headed back up Eagle. After towing the loaded canoes up

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Indian Stream, we unloaded them and got the stuff up to Chamberlain. After loading up again, we headed up the lake. The wind came up and it was pretty rough. The Grand Laker was good for it, so we kept going. Norm was in the bow. He was a little nervous when it got rough. About every other wave would splash a little over the bow. When I looked at him, I saw he had picked up my nerve pill that I had left on the plank by the fire and was rubbing it like crazy. I said, “How is it working?” “Oh, great,” he said. Last summer he told me that he still had the pill.
     Norm took the long trail this past fall. He will be missed by all of his friends. Maybe he took the nerve pill with him—who knows? Oh, I forgot to tell you about Stan picking up the dri-ki, but that’s another story.

MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
APRIL 28 – MAY 2
Monday-Chicken nuggets, whipped potato, carrots, dinner roll, fruit, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Super sand., potato salad, cole slaw, and blueberry cake.
Wednesday-Macaroni/cheese, hot dog/bun, salad, and apple.
Thursday-Turkey/gravy, mashed potato, creamed corn, dinner roll, and Jell-O/topping.
Friday-Ravioli, broccoli casserole, dinner roll, and orange _’s.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
BY NANCY GRANT
From the weather book kept by Grammie (Mrs. Mabel McCleary).
APRIL AND MAY – 1966
April 29-Cloudy-32° at 7:30 am and 30° at 10 pm.
April 30-Sun AM cloudy PM-32° at 6:30 am and 46° at 9:30 pm.
May 1-Cloudy-38° at 6:30 am and 50° at 8:30 pm.
May 2-Sunny & windy-36° at 7 am and 36° at 10 pm.
May 3-Sunny & windy-28° at 6:15 am and 38° at 8:30.
May 4-Ground covered with snow-34° at 2:30 am.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

APRIL 23 MEETING MINUTES
BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
Members present:
     Ed Treworgy, Joe Beres, Chris Beres, Ethelyn Treworgy, Aileen Blanchard, Lorraine Schinck, Virgil Valente, Chris Almy, Roy Bither, Herb Dunham, Eben DeWitt, Kathy Witham, Val Robertson, Sandra Gray, Heidi Finson, Stephanie Salley, Todd Lyford, Pat Ricker, Frank Cochrane, Trish Hayes, Don St. Cyr. (21)

     President Ed Treworgy welcomed 21 members and 8 guests to the Kiwanis Club of Three Rivers meeting on Wednesday, April 23, 2003.
     Roy Bither led the group in the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham offered the prayer. Thanks to Sandra Gray for the inspirational reading.
     The following guests were introduced: Lt. Gov. Harold Sherman, Amanda Smith, Sonja Salley, Cheryl Hamlin, Dot Brown, Merlene Sanborn, Mark Sanborn, Steve Stanley – today’s speaker.
     Stephanie Salley informed the club of upcoming birthdays and anniversaries.
     Happy and Sad dollars were given for the wonderful time the quilters had making the Project Linus quilts, thanks to Ethelyn for heading up the quilt project, talent show is progressing nicely and for the library helpers.
     Ethelyn Treworgy and Pat Ricker presented 37 quilts, made by 16 local women, to Merlene Sanborn area representative of Project Linus. Project Linus delivers quilts and afghans to children touched by tragedy. Merlene thanked the ladies for the wonderful donation and presented them both with a certificate of appreciation.
     Trish Hayes reported that six members of the Key Club spent Saturday painting the bathrooms at the high school. They did a great job and this was a great school community project! A group of Key Clubbers will be serving dinner at Manna Food Kitchen in Bangor on May 1st and will also be helping at the Make-A-Wish Foundation’s walk/run on May 3rd.
     Val Robertson reported that the newspaper circulation is holding steady at 300 + copies per week. The website is averaging 450 hits per week. Several people living away have commented on how much they enjoy the newspaper and keeping up with the local news.
     Ethelyn Treworgy reported that the rehearsals for the variety show are going well and a great show is expected. She stressed that helpers will be needed and encourages everyone to volunteer.
     Stephanie Salley passed out sign up sheets for the community calendar. The cost of the calendar is $5.00 that includes 4 free listings of your choice for birthdays, anniversaries or other occasions. Additional listings may be purchased for 25¢ each. If you would like to purchase a calendar speak with any Kiwanian.
     Val Robertson reported that 35+ children participated in the weekly library program. The children are treated to a story time, snack and a craft project each Wednesday at the Milo Public Library. This new program has proven to be a success!!
     The guest speaker was Steve Stanley, State Senator and Chair of the Taxation Committee. Steve told the club that his committee is working hard to reform/restructure the tax program in the state and is working closely with the Governor. Of the 160 bills presented to the taxation committee 128 have been killed. The committee takes its responsibility seriously and is examining several options for reducing taxes including broadening the sales tax base while lowering the tax rate, taxing non-profits, and lowering the income tax rate. Surveys taken by the taxation committee as well as the Governor’s office have proven that the citizens of the state feel that economic development is a top priority. One of the options being investigated is offering “tax free” zones that would reduce or eliminate taxes paid by businesses in less developed areas of the state. The committee, working with the governor, hopes to have a tax package ready to present by June 1, 2003.
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Three Rivers Community Alliance
www.trcmaine.org

MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Three Rivers Community Alliance is to link and promote our communities on the world wide web for continuous improvement in governance, economic status, educational opportunity and social endeavor.

BULLETIN BOARD
One of the newest additions to our website is the TRC Bulletin Board. This is a message board where you can post announcements, discuss our communities, keep up on current local events, and where people from away can keep in touch with friends. We even have a section devoted entirely to Alumni from Milo High School, Brownville Jct. High School, and Penquis Valley High School. Come check it out!

INFORMATION NEEDED
We need your help! We need information for the following groups, such as regular meeting times, and contact information. We currently have only partial information in our listing:

Boy Scouts: Troop #115 Milo, Troop #112 Brownville; Girl Scout Troop #594; Cub Scouts: Pack #111 Brownville, Pack in Milo; Masons: Pleasant River Lodge #163, Piscataquis Lodge #44, Composite Lodge #168; American Legion Posts #41 & #92, ATV Trail Riders, Big Bear Snowmobile Club, Boyd Lake Road Association, Brownville Extension Homemakers Group, Brownville Jct. Service Club, Brownville Snowmobile Club, Brownville PTO, Cold Smoke Riders Snowmobile Club, Devil’s Sledders Snowmobile Club, Ebeemee Snowmobile Club, Knight’s of Columbus Council #6559, LA Sledders Snowmobile Club, LaGrange PTO, Milo PTO, 6th Grade PTO, Mt. Katahdin Senior Citizens, Order of the Eastern Star, Order of the Rainbow, Demolay, Schoodic Lake Association, Sebec Garden Club, Sebec Lake Association, Sebec River Association, & Three Rivers Senior Citizens.

Any and all information you have about these groups would be greatly appreciated! Please contact us with the following methods:

Isabelle Warren
TRC Internet Project
P.O. Box 163
Milo, ME 04463.
(207) 943-7367
info@trcmaine.org


THE TRC TEAM
Seth Barden - Director & Webmaster
Isabelle Warren - News & Development Coordinator
Catherine Ellison - Senior Resource Advisor
Melissa Herbest - Directory Coordinator
Val Robertson - Editor, Three Rivers News
Edwin Treworgy - President, Three Rivers Kiwanis
E.S. Buzz Small - Selectman, Town of Sebec
Sophia Wilson - Brownville Town Manager
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Print Issues: Copyright © 2001 - 2012 Three Rivers Kiwanis Club
Website: Copyright © 2002 - 2012 Three Rivers Community Alliance