Three Rivers News, 2003-05-20
TUESDAY, MAY 20, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 28
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

BENEFIT YARD SALE
     There will be a huge yard sale to benefit Wanda Conlogue and her family. The event will be held at the Brownville Junction Alumni Building on Saturday, May 31, from 9 AM ‘til 5 PM.
     If you have clean, saleable items to donate, you can take the to the Alumni on Thursday, May 29th, between the hours of 10 AM and 4 PM.

Spring Antique Appraisal Fair
Saturday, May 31, 2003
10 AM to 3 PM
Milo Town Hall Arts Center
1 Item - $5 | 2 Items - $8 | 3 Items $10
Light lunch available for sale!
This is an opportunity to find out how valuable that old piece of jewelry, furniture, or dish really is!
See you there.

HUGE YARD SALE
There will be a huge multi-family yard sale at the home of Marilyn Lyford
on Saturday, May 24th
from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. on Route 16 in LaGrange. There are too many things to list....but definately something for everybody.

FOOD SALE
The Brownville Jct. United
Methodist Church is sponsoring a food sale on Friday,
May 23 from 9:00am until sold out.
It will be held at Maine Savings FCU.


The Mount Katahdin Senior Citizens will meet May 20th., at 11:30 A.M., at the
Brownville Community Church for the Memorial Service. Potluck dinner will
follow immediately after the service, and all senior citizens are invited.


     Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harvey of Atkinson are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter Margaret Susan Harvey to Jeffrey Paul Crider II, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Crider of Brownville.
     Margaret and Jeffrey both graduated from Penquis Valley High School in 2001. Margaret has been attending Southern Maine Technical College in South Portland and graduated in May of 2003 with an Associates Degree in Early Childhood Education.
     Jeffrey has also been attending Southern Maine Technical College and graduated with an Associates Degree in Technical Graphics and Design. Jeffrey is employed with Cianbro Corporation in Portland. An August 2003 wedding is being planned.

YOGA SESSIONS TO BEGIN
     Come enjoy another session of Wed. Night Yoga, from May 21 – July 2.
     The 7 week session will be held at the Milo Town Hall from 6:00 – 7:00. The fee will be $26.00 or a $5.00 individual walk-in fee. If you have any questions please call Cindy at 943-2630.
Hope to see you there!
Cindy Herbest, Group Fitness Instructor

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., MAY 20 VEAL SCALOPPINI, BAKED POTATO, BEETS, CUSTARD
WED., MAY 21 MEATLOAF, GRAVY, MASHED POTATO, SQUASH, GELATIN JEWELS
THUR., MAY 22 MAC AND CHEESE, PEAS, BASIL TOMATOES, APPLE CRISP
FRI., MAY 23 FISH, CRACKERS, 3 BEAN SALAD, FRUIT COCKTAIL DESSERT
MON. MAY 26 ALL SITES CLOSED FOR MEMORIAL DAY
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!

PRIZEWINNER
     The Milo Post Office would like to announce that the winner of the door prize drawing for stamps, held on Customer Appreciation Day, was Fred Rolfe of Derby.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Rev. (a) Boutwell (b) Burlingame (c) Meisner (d) Loudon was also a politician.
2. Clinton Stickney had a (a) laboratory (b) museum (c) skating rink (d) grain and feed store.
3. Jimmy Hay was a (a) YMCA secretary (b) mechanic (c) blacksmith (d) meat man.
4. (a) Bert Dillon (b) Sam Cohen (c) A.C. Dougherty (c) Frank Rogers had the first automobile in Brownville Junction.
5. Celestia Vale Tukey was town clerk for (a) 23 years (b) 26 years (c) 31 years (d) 34 years.
6. Paul Conlogue played (a) first base (b) pitcher (c) shortstop (d) third base.
7. A library was planned for (a) 1915 (b) 1924 (c) 1929 (d) 1936.
8. The village dam lasted (a) 187 (b) 194 (c) 200 (d) 210 years.
9. White birch was taken in at the (a) north (b) east (c) west (d) south mill.
10. Lori Larson was Miss Brownville for (a) 1968 (b) 1974 (c) 1978 (d) 1980.

Answers: 1-c 2-b 3-a 4-a 5-d 6-d 7-c 8-b 9-a 10-b

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL MEETING OF THE MILO WATER DISTRICT
TO: TODD LYFORD, CHIEF OF POLICE OF THE TOWN OF MILO,
IN THE COUNTY PISCATAQUIS, STATE OF MAINE

GREETINGS:
     IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF MAINE, YOU ARE HEREBY REQUIRED TO NOTIFY AND WARN THE INHABITANTS OF THE MILO WATER DISTRICT, TO ASSEMBLE AT THE MILO TOWN HALL CONFERENCE ROOM ON MAY 21, 2003 AT 6:30 P.M. IN THE EVENING TO ACT ON THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES, TO WIT:

ARTICLE 1. TO CHOOSE A MODERATOR TO PRESIDE AT SAID MEETING.

ARTICLE 2. TO SEE IF THE DISTRICT WILL ACCEPT THE BOND COUNSEL’S RECOMMENDATION FOR TEMPORARY FINANCING FOR WATER PUMP STATION, INTAKE, RIVER CROSSING, RAW WATER FEED LINE AND LINE REPLACEMENT.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE TRUSTEES OF THE DISTRICT WILL BE IN SESSION AT THEIR OFFICE ON 62 MAIN STREET FROM 8 O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING UNTIL 5 O’CLOCK IN THE AFTERNOON, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2003, FOR THE PURPOSE OF CORRECTING AND PREPARING THE LIST OF PERSONS QUALIFIED TO VOTE IN THE DISTRICT.

NOTICE
     THERE WILL BE AN INFORMATIONAL MEETING WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2003, AT 7 P.M. IN THE DINING ROOM AT THE MILO TOWN HALL.
     THE DISTRICT WILL PRESENT AN OVERVIEW OF CONSTRUCTION PLANNED FOR THE DISTRICT TO BE STARTED 2003. THIS WILL ENCOMPASS RELOCATION OF WATER INTAKE AND PUMP STATION, NEW RIVER CROSSING AND REPLACEMENT OF OLD CAST IRON AND GALVANIZED WATER MAINS.

PENQUIS CRUIZERS GEARING UP FOR #14
     The Penquis Cruizers are getting things ready for their 14th Annual Cruize-In. This year's event will take place on June 22nd from 10am to 2pm at the JSI parking lot in Milo.
     If the weather cooperates, there will be a parking lot full of great cars to see and to reminisce about. There will be music, refreshments, raffles, and an auction. Goody bags and dash plaques will be given to those registering vehicles for the event. Admission will be $3 per person and children under 12 are free if they are accompanied by an adult.

Letter to the editor:
Dear Val and the Three Rivers Community,
     Scot's ship, the, USS Harry S Truman, will be arriving in Norfolk VA on the 23rd of May....Jamie Perkins, Britnee Genthner, his nieces, and I are going to be there to see it come in...we are all excited about the trip and the idea that some of our young men are coming home after this ordeal....I want to thank all the people of the area for remembering him and the others of the area in their prayers and thoughts....thank God that we live in a free country....
Have a great day !!!
Dawna Perkins

IN MEMORIAM
EUGENE V. 'SONNY' CARON
     BROWNVILLE JUNCTION - Eugene V. "Sonny" Caron, 62, husband of Billie (Connaughton) Caron, died May 13, 2003, at home after a short illness, surrounded by his loving family. Sonny was born Sept. 16, 1940, in Brownville Junction, the son of George L. and Vivian (Vague) Caron. Sonny graduated from Brownville Junction High School in 1958 and served in the U.S. Army for three years. He recently retired as a rural mail carrier after 35 years of service.
     He was a member of the Bernard Jones American Legion Post No. 92, the Pleasant River Masonic Lodge No. 163 AF and AM, where he had served as Past Master, the Brownville Junction High School Alumni Assoc., Ebeemee Snowmobile Club, and the Maine Rural Mail Carrier's Assoc. Sonny was known for his love of people and his sense of humor. He enjoyed his Tuesday nights at the Bingo Hall with his many "Bingo friends." He looked forward to "Hunting Camp," where he was famous for his biscuits. He liked to take snowmobile trips with friends in the winter and he seldom missed coffee with the guys before going to work. Sonny was always willing to lend a helping hand, when needed.
     Sonny is survived by his wife of 40 years; a son, Tim of Gorham; a daughter, Lisa and her husband, John Melanson, of Hamden; his two precious grandchildren, Kristi and Brad Melanson of Hampden, who were the "apples of his eye." He is also survived by a sister, Irene and her husband, Dennis, of Williamsburg; three brothers, George of Myrtle Beach, S.C., Charles and his wife, Shirley, of Brewer and Terry of Bangor; many nieces and nephews; as well as his faithful companion, "Sherlock." Sonny's family would like to thank the following people who were so thoughtful and considerate during his final days, Eli Zwicker Sr., Walter and Deanna Farrar, Vaughn, Bert, Ralph and Leon Farrar, Ken MacKinnon, Linda and Whit Coburn, Charles and Selma Larson, Dody Coburn, Larry Morrill, Nancy Cook, Roland Stubbs, Milton Smith, the members of Community Health and Counseling Services, and Dr. Henry Atkins and his staff. The

family was overwhelmed by the acts of kindness shown by so many. Funeral services were conducted May 17, with Rev. Michelle St. Cyr officiating. Masonic services followed. Those who wish may make memorial contributions to the Ronald MacDonald House, 654 State St., Bangor, ME 04401.

KENNETH G. ELLIS JR.
     KENDUSKEAG - Kenneth G. Ellis Jr., 73, husband of the late Joyce (Kelley) Ellis, died May 16, 2003, at a Bangor hospital. He was born May 1, 1930, in Brownville, the son of Kenneth G. and Clellie (Arbo) Ellis. A US Navy veteran, Mr. Ellis was a self-employed electrician. He is survived by two sons, Terry W. of Kenduskeag, Stephen G. and his wife, Dawn, of Corinth; two brothers, Clarence of Bradford, Donald of Brownville; two sisters, Pauline Thomas and Annette Ellis, both of Brownville. He was predeceased by a daughter, Pamela Ellis, and a sister, Lola Ellis. Graveside funeral services were conducted May 19, 2003, at the family lot in Evergreen Cemetery, Milo, with Rev. David McLeish officiating.

CLARA A. BROWN
     BANGOR and NEWBURGH - Clara A. Brown, 80, wife of the late Richard Alden Brown, died May 6, 2003, at a Bangor nursing home. She was born Aug. 21, 1922, in LaGrange, the daughter of Lynn and Sarah (Badger) Osgood. She was a member of the Retired Senior Volunteer Persons of Bangor, and the Hampden Congregational Church. She is survived by a daughter, Sara Brown-Harriman and her husband, Ralph Harriman, of Etna; a son, Leeland and his wife, Mandelene Brown, of Griffin, Ga.; two brothers, Arnold and his wife, Marjorie Osgood of Brewer, Clayton and his wife, Maravene Osgood of Sarasota, Fla.; a sister, Ester Brown of LaGrange; two grandchildren, Melinda and her husband,
     Dean Rowlands, Justin and his wife, RoAnne Brown; a great-granddaughter, Ashley Brown; several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by an infant daughter, Clarice Laurel Brown, and three brothers, Harley, Merlyn, and Arthur Osgood. Those who wish may make
memorial contributions to Westgate Manor Gazebo Fund, 750 Union Street, Bangor, ME 04401.

AREA SCHOOL NEWS
FROM BROWNVILLE ELEMENTARY
     The Brownville Elementary School held their Terrific Kids Assembly on Friday May 9th with many parents and guests in attendance. Those receiving Terrific Kids Awards were: FRANK WORSTER in Kindergarten, NICOLE PADILLA in First Grade, MATTHEW VACHON in Second Grade, our new students AUTUMN TYLER in Third Grade and SHELBY HALL in Fourth Grade. The Fifth Grade class of Mrs. Weston and Mrs. Bradbury had gone to Boston on their long awaited field trip.
     Mrs. Witham led the assembly assisted by her Kiwanian friend Mr. Witham.
     Move and Improve prizes were awarded to Allison Durant, Katlynn Averill, Shelby Hall, Phillip Cook and Jordan Nutting.
     We celebrated the birthday of Ryan Heath. Also, Mrs. Witham and Mrs. Chaffee performed the musical number that they were doing for the Variety Show for staff and students.
     Ryan Heath, Shayne McSwine and Jake McSwine did a juggling (with big balls) exhibition.
     Mrs. Lumbra explained about the significant recognition that the students were awarded by the R.I.F. Foundation. We will be having a huge celebration on May 30th as a reward for being such terrific readers in Brownville. Congratulations to all of the students at Brownville Elementary who are T - Totally Terrific every day of the week!!
     Editors Note: Kathy told the Kiwanis group about the prestigious award the Brownville RIF received. Congratulations to all involved for earning this national recognition!
     The 5th Grade in Brownville has been studying invertebrates and dissected squid on Monday. The students learned about the importance of squid to the environment as well as their internal and external parts. At the end of class they even fried some up and sampled it. Several decided they like the taste of lobster better.

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     The Early Childhood students of Mrs. Mary Jane Zamboni and Mrs. Tammy Murano at Brownville Elementary School held a Mother's Day Tea to honor mothers and grandmothers on Friday, May 9th. The school cafeteria was delicately decorated with pink and white table covers and lovely flowers. The children performed songs that they had been practicing for the Moms.
     Mothers were presented beautiful petite corsages made by the students themselves. After the program, refreshments were served and handmade Mother's Day gifts were presented. Mrs. Zamboni and Mrs. Murano would like to thank their capable Teacher Aides, Mrs. Teresa West and Mrs. Lisa Perkins for all their help on this project. Also, many thanks to Mrs. Witham, Mrs. Cheryl Hamlin, Mrs. Tanya Ellison, Mrs. Linda Lumbra, and Miss Amanda West who also volunteered their help the day of the tea.

OUR TRIP TO BOSTON
SUBMITTED BY JEREMY RUSSELL
     On May 9, at 5:00 am, I climbed on the bus. I walked down the aisle of the Cyr bus and when Tyler and Jake said, "Come sit with us", I did. On the way to Boston people kept opening the lavatory door and it smelled like fluoride. When we got to the Science Museum I went to the sound stairs and then to the Omni Theater. We saw Lewis and Clark. You haven't heard surround sound until you've been there! We climbed 294 steps up the Bunker Hill Monument, and then we went to the Old North Church. I had a lot of fun.
     This report is submitted by JOHN DAVID WESTON - Grade 5 Brownville
     When I was in Boston I liked the stairs that sounded like piano keys. We left here at like 5am and we got back around 11pm. When we were at the Omni Theater it was loud because when they were cutting down a tree it felt like it was crashing right down on top of us. It was about Lewis and Clark. Then we went on the Freedom Trail and saw the Old North Church.

Marion C. Cook School News
     SHALENE CODY, LEVI ENGSTROM and ALYSSA GRAY were honored at our May 15th Terrific kid Assembly. Ms. Ivy said that Shalene had worked very hard to complete her jobs and to improve her behavior. Mrs. Carter thanked Levi for being terrific her first week back. Miss K. noted that it was Alyssa's birthday week. Alyssa is extremely creative and artistic. Congratulations to all of our Terrific Kids.

     Students in Grades 4 and 5 have completed two hands on activities. They were very interested in the blown eggs that Mrs. Crossman had made for her grandchildren. Thanks to Val Robertson, the class was supplied with plenty of eggs and they were able to try this activity themselves. Alyssa Gray instructed her classmates on how to successfully blow out an
egg.

     Grade 4 and 5 students also had the opportunity to dissect a squid (or two) as part of a study of invertebrates. The students did an excellent job following directions and finding hearts, the brain, the siphon, the pen and many other interesting things. Mrs. Harmony fried some squid for the class. Many students ate several pieces. The staff did not. Thanks to Mrs. Weston for supplying us with the squid.

     Our Heartbeaters club rode bikes on the railroad bed at their May 15th session. Bike inspections were made before the trip began. All Heartbeaters wore a helmet. Bike safety had been discussed in health class and prior to the bike ride. Many thanks to Dave Ottmann, Mrs. Russell, Ms. Ivy and Mrs. Rhoda for riding along with us. The last Heartbeaters will meet on May 29th.

MOTO-CROSS NEWS
     The first race of the season was down to Minot, Maine at the Hemond's Motocross Park. Some of the local racers decided to make the long trip down and give the new track a try. Kyle Foss raced in the 85CC ll and under class and came home with a 3rd place trophy out of a whopping 28 bikes. Kyle finished 4th place in his 1st moto even after dumping his bike twice... then he finished 3rd place in his second moto which ended up being enough for a 3rd place trophy.

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Trevor Lyford also came home with a 3rd place trophy in the ATV youth class out of 13 ATV's. Trevor finished 2nd place in the 1st moto and got into the back of another 4-wheeler in his second moto but managed to work his way back up the field and finished in 4th place. Justin Morrill placed an impressive 6th place in his first moto but had bike trouble in his second moto and didn't take off with the pack. Because of the late start to all the races, they were slow in posting the final positions, so I can't say where Justin finished overall. There are many pictures on the website for anyone interested, www.mainedirtbikes.com It was a very long, hot day and the boys did a great job of sticking with it all day.....and they all seem to be ready for Skowhegan.

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     Here at the library spring and summer events are bumping into each other. The Kiwanis Kids Korner had its 6th session this past Wednesday and Edwin Treworgy was the reader. He read Stand back said the Elephant, I’m going to sneeze and Rooster’s off to see the world by Eric Carle. When I went down to take the count of the children, they were enjoying the stories as Edwin read. The steadfast adults were also there to provide snacks and help with the craft-Val, Brian, Dottie, Don, Helen and Frank. Upstairs the Junie B. Jones books continue to be popular for that age group, and I’m glad we are able to have so many titles. Of course, many other titles go out too.
     As the Kiwanis Kids Korner is counting down the programs for this spring, we know it is time to give some serious thought to our Summer Reading Program . Our theme this year is Laugh It Up @ Your Library. We will be getting posters to the schools soon. The sign-up week will be June 16-20, and the program will start June 23. We will be getting more information out in the weeks to come.
     Today Kathy Witham brought in a gift book—Hooray for You by Marianne Richmond. It is in memory of Logan DeWitt, the son of Stephen and Michelle DeWitt of Houlton and the grandson of Edwin and Ellen DeWitt of Milo. Thank you Kathy and Carroll.
     We have also purchased some new books for adults this week and they are ready to circulate. I had the opportunity to get some new Max Brand books. I was surprised to learn that Max Brand was his pen name. His real name was Frederick Faust. He abandoned his literary career at 51 to become a war correspondent in World War II and was killed while serving in Italy.
     The Max Brand books are:
THE GAUNTLET
THE GOLD TRAIL
THE MASTERMAN
THE OVERLAND KID
     New mysteries are:
Cannell, Dorothy THE FAMILY JEWELS AND OTHER STORIES
Hart, Carolyn SKULDUGGERY
Hart, Carolyn THE RICH DIE YOUNG
Dain, Catherine DARKNESS AT THE DOOR

Library Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
There will be no Saturday hours during the summer beginning May 24th

THE LIVERMORE DIARIES PART 3
SUBMITTED BY IRIS BUZZELL
     William Taylor Livermore was born in Sebec, Maine in 1840, the sixth child of David Livermore and Sarah Taylor Livermore. David Livermore owned property in the southwest corner of Milo, very near the Milo-Sebec line, on the banks of the Piscataquis River.
     William’s diary begins In August 1862, shortly after he was mustered into the 20th Maine Volunteers. Probably to pass time on the trip to Washington and Virginia, he began making a record of the

trip and he continued even as his unit went from one battle area to another. He gives an excellent picture of their living conditions and the thoughts he had about the war and about family back at home.

     Sept 10: Beautiful morning and plenty to do. The stumps, about 3 feet high and thick; the best of wood is red cedar there. There are hundreds of acres of woods cut down here.
     At noon we had it as smooth as a mowing field; 6 or 8 acres. Drilled in the manuel of arms and loading maneuvers. We fixed our tent and Melcher and I in the eve went to the right of the Regt., on a walk and when we got back the Co. had orders to pack knapsacks and to go out on picket. We packed up and in about 4 minutes we were marching. We marched about a 3rd of a mile to the front of our rifle pit and extended our pickets from Fort Craig, southward. We were not the advanced pickets. There were 3 lines in front of us. Every man was ordered to load his rifle and to halt every man at 20 paces. If he did not halt the second time, shoot him. I was on the third relieve and did not stand two hours.
     A. Carver was on the first relief and there was a man who came up to pass the guard and he ordered him to halt, and he thought Carver was fooling him and kept on. He ordered him twice to halt, and then cocked his rifle, and would have shot him in a minute but he stopped. There was firing among the pickets and we had orders for the rest of the Regt. to be ready to a minutes warning if the Rebels attacked as we are in the front. We are ready.
     Sept. 11: Came off at sunrise from picket. I like it first-rate. We are exempt from duty and I and Melcher have been pitching our tent. We have got the best one in the company. Our rubber blankets are made with slot holes to lace together our tents.
     Sept. 12: Called out for roll call at 5 in the morning and ordered to pack our blankets and to clean our knapsacks. We marched around by Fort Corcoran and 5 or 6 attached and through Georgetown and back to Washington.
     We encamped in a field of corn and apples and potatoes. The Confiscation Act took effect there. Corn was in the milk. We slept in a tent. The officers were well tired out. Some threw their blankets and coats. Some sick and some left behind, but do not know how many.
     Sept. 13: Called out in the morning, about 1 o’clock, and made coffee. Took 3 days rations, and took up line of march. We are all pretty sore, some are tired. We stop about once in every one or two miles, from three to fifteen minutes. It is a pretty street and some of the most beautiful places by nature I have ever seen. The growth consist of white oaks and maples and many other trees unknown to us. There is no underbrush at all and the trees are large and very shady. I have not seen a cradle knoll in Maryland. The growth is more level in the woods there. In the vales it is all grassed over with short thick grass. It is some hilly and we find plenty good water, much better than we found in Portland.
     Noon: We began to hear the cannonade as we drove the Rebels from Frederick, and there was a constant roar all the afternoon, until after sunset. We marched 25 miles and were glad to camp. A great many fell out. I can stand it as well as any. Layed down, and had a good nap.
     Sept. 14: Called out at 3 in the morning and made coffee in our dippers and broiled some pork, and marched at sunrise. The cannonading commenced at sunrise.
     We marched to Frederick, about 10 or 12 miles, and passed the railroad bridge that the Rebels blew up and tore down the telegraph wires. We passed over the heads of, I should think a hundred cattle, where the Rebels had killed them. Some of them they had to leave. We camped for the night by the Minica River, our brigade and two others. The cannonade is kept up until after sunset. At Harpers Ferry we can hear every gun just as plain as can be. There has not been a minute but you could hear the boom of a cannon. We had plenty of green corn and our Regt. drew 1000 pounds of beef. Just after we got here some Companies of our Regt. drew fresh Hogs!
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     We arrived in Middleton at sunset and were taken round the village to prevent us from seeing the wounded. The firing ceased at dark. We passed 170 Rebels, prisoners, and they were a hard looking set and appeared much better than I expected. We kept still except for joking them some. One fellow said he was going to take Washington, and we passed a barn full of them, and there were hundred in the village. The Rebels were in position of it yesterday. We can see trees and several houses riddled with cannon shot.
     We camped about 3 or 4 miles from the Blue Mountains, where the fight was today. We can see where the right of the Army is for we could see the light is thrown up by the campfires. The gunpowder smells strong and there are lots of dead and wounded in the village. We are marching on and I feel as shaky as a flock of partridges. They think we shall capture the whole army. I stand the marching well, but there is 15 of our Co. sick in the rear.

A Historical Review - Part 1
Maine Appalachian Trail
Project Nears Completion
Observer, Jay Sperling, 12/31/1980
(A TRC Fringe Benefit, submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2003)
     Its lovers know the nearly 300 mile trajectory of the Appalachian Trail through Maine as the treacherous, wildest, steepest, muddiest, buggiest, majestic, and all around most challenging stretch of the Appalachian Trail's entire 2000 mile length. For them, Maine's portion of the trail is the crown jewel of this national footpath; the ridges in Maine are the most beautiful, the ponds the remotest, and every cascading stream hides trout. What peak, they wonder rivals the soaring mass of Katahdin? Pausing beside the glacial quiet of Chimney Pond, bathed in jade light reflecting from Katahdin's awesome cirque, it is impossible to imagine a more fitting commencement for the Appalachian Trail.
     Even if you discount such claims to preeminence as local chauvinists, there can be no doubt that the preservation of the Maine section of the Appalachian Trail (the "AT") is of crucial importance to trail users, whether they be day hikers or determined end-to-enders.
     Sparked by the necessity of protecting the AT in Maine, and with the impetus given by the designation of AT as the first National Scenic Trail, the Maine Appalachian Trail Club (MATC) has intensified its efforts to permanently locate, survey and protect the in-state portion of the trail. Working under congressional mandate and closely watched by federal National Park Service, the club is orchestrating cooperative and concerted efforts by the Maine Dept. of Conservation's Bureaus of Parks and Recreation and Public Lands, the Land Use Regulation Commission of the Dept. and the major timberland owners to develop a protective corridor for the AT's northernmost extremity. The Land Use Regulation Commission has played a significant role in protecting the reach of the Appalachian Train running through Maine. All but a few miles of the AT traverse lands in the unorganized areas of the state which comprise LURC's jurisdiction.
     Beginning in 1973, LURC recognized the unique significance of the Appalachian Trail by applying special protective zoning to the corridor surrounding the trail. Protective interim zoning was adopted with the support of several landowners. Most of the trail was protected within a 200-foot corridor; however, the zone width varied in some locations to accommodate both landowners and user groups.
     Special protective zoning was carried over when LURC adopted permanent zoning districts and standards. Again a 200 foot corridor, centered on the treadway of the trail, was the normal zone width. However, the LURC Recreation Protection Subdistricts (P-RR) adopted by the commission were expanded to include larger areas around shelter sites and a small number of important side trails. The P-RR zoning helps to protect the trail and it's environment in a number of ways. For example, snowmobiling is restricted, road crossing are minimized and permits are required for timber harvest.
     Today, efforts are underway to bring donations of land rights along the trail to the state. The objective is to have a protective area with a 600 foot minimum width. The 200 foot core of this area would coincide precisely with the LURC 200 foot P-RR zone. Of course nothing is static. As extensive sections of the trail are relocated,

LURC continues to work with landowners and trail managers to simultaneously relocate protective P-RR districts.
(continued next week)
     Editors note: I would like to thank Kitty for her wonderful contributions to the Three Rivers News. Her articles are interesting and informative and a priceless part of our paper and website.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     For years when my mother's family got together one of the favorite snacks that we enjoyed was peanuts and teddies....or peanuts and chocolate babies. I don't know where the cousins came up with them the last couple of times that we had them....but the last time was a few Christmases ago. There on the counter....along with the chips and dips and sweet and sour meatballs was a candy dish loaded with our favorite childhood treat. In all of our travels, we've all searched candy stores high and low for teddies or babies. The search is over! The other day I found them. Can you believe it!?
     I found a website <www.nostalgiccandy.com> and I went there just for the heck of it....for the fun of it....just in case. There they were!!!! I'm not great at ordering things over the internet so I called the toll free number and the sweetest voice picked up the phone on the other end and took my order. The company I had reached was Debbie's Sweet Treats in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. They had those chocolate babies in my kitchen within the week!
     When I got home from work tonight I sat down to a little dish of peanuts and chocolate babies. I will find some Spanish peanuts....our original taste treat....for tomorrow.
     Well, one of my spring obligations is behind me. It seems good to have the Variety Show over with. I will miss the fun that we had at rehearsals, but I won't miss the worries about whether it was going to go smoothly or whether we'd make enough money to count it a success. It was both....and to all of the people who worked so hard to make it a success, my sincere thanks. The list of people who contributed is endless. I owe the most to Stephanie Gillis who made it all happen. The community owes her a debt of gratitude. She's talented and energetic and a showman (woman). Without her enthusiasm the show wouldn't have been possible. I've already enlisted her help for next year. I've also booked the Town Hall for the first weekend in May, 2004. So, mark your calendars now for next year's show.
     I also want to thank Chris Beres who was my co-chairperson. I think Chris knew that I wouldn't have the courage to take it on all by myself, so she gave me just the nudge that I needed to go ahead with the plans and preparations....right behind me all the way. She never missed a rehearsal and she was a willing sounding board for ideas. She shared my thrills when we'd find out about talent that was willing to participate...and she was there to share the disappointment when someone would back out. Then last week, when only hours remained for preparation, Chris was there with her talents and time to make it all come together for the community.
     The Treworgy's were right behind us with ideas and enthusiasm. They had originally thought that they would not be available at all for either night, but were able to catch the show on Saturday evening after their granddaughter’s graduation from Maine Maritime Academy. Edwin has instructed Seth Barden on the intricacies of the sound system...which is complex...and Seth did a wonderful job keeping up with the program. We had one or two little snafu's...but we didn't let them stop us from giving the audience the best that we had. Our audience was forgiving....and more than stroked our egos with applause and appreciation.
     We're lucky to have such adorable little children who are willing to perform and look sweet up on stage. With Stephanie's help we were able to enlist the help of lots of kids. Kids love to perform. Another year we'll try to have even more spots for them to do just that. Two of my grandchildren were in the show. Just so you know, my granddaughter was the bride in the Calendar Girl skit. My grandson was the Marine in the color guard at the end of the performance.
     I don't want to forget to mention my son Tom who put together the media presentation. He and I worked on that together. I

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hatched the idea and made the photos available to him through my affiliation with the Historical Society. He did all of the technical work. Another time we will have a huge screen to project our show onto. The brand new 12 foot screen has been installed up on the stage, but hooking it up to the power that raises and lowers it could not be completed before the Variety Show. We have that to look forward to, though. A full sized screen will add a whole new dimension to the entertainment options that we can enjoy as a community at the Town Hall. Just imagine the possibilities!
     My husband who ran the curtain, Fred Trask, who ran the lights, and Jeff Gahagan, who organized the refreshments that we sold, also need recognition. These were all big jobs...done to perfection...that tied these fine men down for two long evenings. And to all of the loyal Kiwanians who performed, set up and took down chairs, sold tickets and calendars, and prepared and sold the food....my eternal thanks.
     The proceeds of the Variety Show will go to the R.I.F. program in M.S.A.D. #41 schools. As a member of the staff of the school district....I speak for the whole elementary staff when I say "thank you all." The books that will be provided to the kids are invaluable and much appreciated. It's great that the community had such a great time raising this money!
     Here's Ruth Bell's recipe for yummy Date Squares. You may have had one at the Variety Show, as my friend Cheryl Hamlin (Ruth's daughter) cooked both nights for us.
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cup rolled oats (Old fashioned)
1 tablespoon water
1 recipe of date filling (given below)

Filling:

3 cups cut up dates
1 1/2 cups water
cooked to the consistency of jam.
     Cream shortening and sugar, sift dry ingredients and add to the above. Add oats and water. Mix until crumbly. Pat half of the mixture in a greased 9X13 pan. Spread the date mixture over that. Cover with remaining crumb mixture. Bake 350 in degree oven for 30 minutes. Cool and cut into bars.

Science Corner
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
The Immune System Part I
     We all know in general what the immune system of the body does. It either prevents us from getting sick or if we do, it fights the invading organism.
     There are a number of things that can cause illness. We have viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Even if you think you have no immune system, just think of what happens when you die. It doesn’t take long for the organisms to completely destroy the body.
     Why do we need an immune system? Everyday we come in contact with many organisms. Some are in the air. Some are in the water. Some are on the food we eat. Bacteria and viruses are everywhere.
     Often when we get a cut, we see it scab over and quickly disappear. This is because the immune system has taken care of any germs that happened to get into the exposed area. If the immune system happens to miss a germ, then the wound gets infected and shows signs of redness and puss is produced. Both of these are signs the immune system is working to destroy the organism before it has a chance to spread throughout the body.
     If black flies or mosquitoes bite us they inject a foreign protein and when the immune system attacks it then we get a swelling around the bite.
     Everyday we eat a lot of bacteria. Our saliva and stomach acid makes short work of most of them but sometimes a few get through and multiply giving us diarrhea or causing us to vomit.

     Allergies are another phenomena of the immune system. Allergies are caused when a person has an immune system that overreacts and works in unexpected or incorrect ways. Diabetes is caused when the body doesn’t recognize part of the pancreas and destroys the insulin producing cells. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused when the immune system attacks the joints.
     For the most part the immune system works well and allows us to repel most of the organisms that would like to get into the body. Today one draw back of a good immune system is that if you need an organ transplant, the immune system fights the implant and must be suppressed in order for the implant to survive in the body.
     The immune system protects the body in three ways. It creates a barrier to prevent organisms from getting in the body. Once inside the body the germ is detected and for the most part is eliminated before it has a chance to reproduce. And lastly if the germ goes undetected and reproduces, the immune system goes about trying to eliminate it.
     You might be asking what the difference is between a bacterium, a parasite and a virus. Bacteria are one-celled organisms. The human body on the other hand is made up of around 100 trillion cells. Bacterial cells that invade the body are for the most part much smaller than human cells, usually about 1/100th the size. Bacteria are able to grow and reproduce on their own. Under ideal conditions of warmth and moisture like those found in the human body, these bacteria can divide every 20 to 30 minutes. There can be millions of them starting from a single cell in a matter of a few hours.
     Viruses are entirely different. By itself it is not alive. It consists of a small amount of DNA inside a protective shell. It cannot reproduce itself. When a virus comes in contact with a cell, it injects its DNA into the cell along with any enzymes necessary for it to cause the cell to reproduce it. The cell then spends its time reproducing the virus packets and when it is full it usually ruptures it spreads the virus around to infect other cells.
     A parasite in humans is usually a one-celled organism that lives inside a host and reproduces itself. Examples of these are the malaria organism and the one that causes leprosy. Disease causing protozoa and fungi are also considered parasites.
     In closing this article I would like to point out that not all of these organisms are bad. We need bacteria in our digestive system to allow us to absorb some of the nutrients from our food. Usually doctors will prescribe an antibiotic to help the immune system fight an particular organism but they do not let you take it for a great length of time because it would kill all the bacteria found in our digestive tract. If this happens you need to take a bacterial cocktail to reintroduce the good bacteria into your system.
     Next week I will try to explain a little about the parts of the immune system.

MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
MAY 19 – 23
Monday-Chicken fajita, oven fries, carrot stix/dip, fruit, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Ham and cheese hoagie, potato smiles, pickle spear, and chocolate chip cookie.
Wednesday-Spaghetti/meat sauce, salad, dinner roll, and fruit.
Thursday-Teriyaki chicken, mashed potato, creamed corn, bread slices, and strawberries.
Friday-Roast pork, scalloped potato, corn, dinner roll, and birthday cake.


COLLEGE GRADUATION
The President, Faculty, and Graduating Class of the
University of Maine
announce that
Amanda Ruth Walker
is a candidate for the degree of
Bachelor of Arts with Honors
in Political Science
at the Conferring of Degrees
Saturday, the seventeenth of May,
Two Thousand and Three
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HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
     Can you guess what Maine landmark is pictured above? This is one of the older postcards belonging to Bob Jay of Milo.
     Bob also contributed the following family recipes.

Cranberry Jelly (Aunt Annie’s)
     Pour water over cranberries, do not cover, just so you see through it, boil and then strain.
     Put one-cup sugar to one-cup juice. Boil until it jells.

Green Tomato Mince Meat – Makes 10 qts.
1-peck tomatoes
1 _ pound butter
1-peck apples
6 pounds brown sugar
5 pounds raisins – through chopper
Be sure to drain tomatoes well
Put all together and cook 3 or 4 hrs.
When nearly done, put all kinds of spices in – bottle while hot.
Clover Honey
40 white clover
30 red clover
4 roses
5 pounds sugar
1 tsp. Powdered Alum
Four cups boiling water
Boil 5 minutes, put clover and roses in and let stand 20 minutes and bottle.
     Editor’s note: Bob was generous with his Clover Honey; it’s delicious on hot biscuits!

BACK ALONG WEATHER
BY NANCY GRANT
From Grammie McCleary’s weather book.
MAY – 1966
May 20-Cloudy Rain-50° at 6:30 am.
May 21-Nice day-50° at 7:15 am.
May 22-Cloudy AM Sunny PM-46° at 6:45 am.
May 23-Nice day-50° at 7 am and 60° at 8:30 pm.
May 24-Sunny-56° at 7 am and 68° at 8:30 pm.
May 25-Sunny AM Cloudy PM-60° at 6:45 am and 64° at 8:30 pm.
May 26-60° at 6:10 am.

CLASS OF 1968 REUNION AND OLD FASHIONED ALUMNI DANCE
SUBMITTED BY LOUISE RHODA
     It is hard to believe that five years has gone by since our last reunion! It’s even more difficult to understand where 35 years have gone since we graduated from good old Milo High!
     Our plans for July 5, 2003 have been made and we hope that all of our classmates will be able to join in and share a day of renewing friendships and remembering the fun times from our youth. Our former teachers are cordially invited to join us.

     The day will begin at David and Jenny Sharrow’s in Sebec Village with a time to visit from 1 to 4 pm. With good weather in mind, please bring your lawn chairs, something to share for the hors d’oeuvres table, and BYOB.
     We will then meet at the Penquis Valley Gymnasium for the evening banquet. We hope to have the largest class in attendance.
     We will complete our day with a good old fashion alumni dance at the Milo Town Hall from 8:30 pm to 12:30 am. Your favorite “oldies” will be brought to you by D.J. Darin Abbot. This is being co-sponsored by our class and the class of 1963. Tickets will be on sale at the door for $5.00 per person. If you would like to obtain your ticket(s) ahead of time, please send the money and request to Louise Rhoda, 303 Elm Street, Milo, ME 04463. Donations to help with the town hall rental and music would be greatly appreciated and may be sent at the same time.
     Banquet tickets must be purchased by June 21. They can be purchased at a cost of $11.00 each either through the Alumni Association or Louise.
HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!

THE OLD AND NEW MILO SWIMMING HOLES
SUBMITTED BY GINNY FOSS
     In regard to the “Old Swimming Hole” versus the “New Swimming Hole” in Milo, I remember both of them. The old swimming hole was at the end of Clinton Street, through Sawyer’s yard, which was all sand pit back then, and across the tracks. That is where the mothers took their kids when they were small and the mothers would sit on the rocks and watch us swim or more often they swam with us, especially on those hot summer days. I lived quite close to the swimming hole so we went quite often. There was a big rock (THE Big Rock) in the water that we’d walk or swim out to until it was almost over our heads and then we would step up on the rock. We were a big deal then. Shortly past the big rock was “THE Drop Off”. Only the good swimmers went past the drop off. Of course the younger ones would always wonder what was lurking in that dark area past the big rock. Probably something that would reach up and grab us. We were always on the look out for the bloodsuckers, although we knew they usually stayed in the grassy area on each side of the swimming area. We were experts on the life of a bloodsucker, so we thought. If one of us accidentally floated over the grassy area on our floats, we would suddenly panic and quickly paddle back to the “safe” swimming area that wasn’t even 10’ from the bloodsucker area.
     Along the shoreline there was a pile of big rocks. We used these rocks to put our towels and clothes on while we swam and after we would spread out our towels and lay down to tan. The boys always placed their sneakers on the ground beside the rocks. If they got kicked off the rocks it was hard retrieving them from the deep narrow spaces between the rocks. I recently took my grandsons to the old swimming hole and those big rocks are not so big anymore. My mother remembers when the rocks were not there. It was still the old swimming hole but too often the kids (probably the boys) would interfere with the operation of the train, sometimes making it actually come to a stop. The railroad brought in these big rocks and dumped them on the shoreline to discourage kids from swimming there. Of

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course it didn’t plus they could always walk the tracks down to the train bridge and swim there, jumping off the bridge into the river. My mother also remembers when there wasn’t any connection between Albert and Clinton Streets. There was a dump near the end of Albert Street across from where Kay Long lives now.
     There was a woman who lived near there that would throw the clothes she didn’t want anymore on the dump and the little girls in the neighborhood would get them and play dress up. They always checked out the dump for new clothes to play in. As we got older the “new” swimming hole opened in town, where the Milo Park is now. Sand had been hauled in and dumped down the riverbank and a float with a diving tower on it was put in the water for the kids. I was big enough to go swimming without my mother then. She remembers when there were changing rooms at the new swimming hole. A lot of kids would jump off the bridge and swim to the float. I was one of those kids and I thought I was so brave to jump off the bridge since a lot of kids didn’t dare to. I was always one to jump off the tower too, but I only dove off once and never dared to again. One day a younger girl, Shirley Grindle, asked me to take her out to the float since she couldn’t swim. Well, of course I said I would. When we got out over our heads she started to panic and grabbed me around the neck and I couldn’t swim and I knew I was a goner. Fortunately for me my friend Cheryl Folsom came paddling by on her inner tube and I grabbed it. She actually saved my life. Shirley didn’t make it out to the float that day. Another time I recall was when one of the big boys, Gerald Carey, liked dunking the smaller kids and holding them under. He was doing it to me and I was getting sick of it. Of course I didn’t like it. So the next time he dunked me and held me under I decided not to come up after he let go. I could hold my breath for quite awhile. After he decided to release me and I didn’t come up he got scared, pulled me up and kept asking if I was okay. He didn’t do it anymore. We always had a good time at both the old and new swimming hole. Too bad they are gone, especially in this Town of Three Rivers.

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON

     Well, as usual, we’ve had a busy few weeks here at the Robertson house. To add to the activity, we’ve had another stray dog for the last 8 days. The dog is a beagle, found in Brownville. He’s a young male, and has had no training and is not neutered

     He keeps us jumping (and yelling) as he isn’t house trained, chews everything he can get his mouth on, and runs away at any opportunity. He also chews through rope to escape being tied out, so we have to keep him in the chain-link kennel. BUT…he is the most lovable little fellow, and we can’t help but laugh at his badness! He is like a canine Dennis the Menace; every choice he makes turns out to be the wrong one. But how can you not love a dog that insists on sleeping with his head on your head? He has made every dog in the house mad at one time or the other. He tries to play with the little dogs, Chunky and Ziggy, and they want nothing to do with the beagle. I’ve actually seen Chunky bare his teeth this week and growl. I didn’t even know Chunky, the fat little Shihz Tzu, had the energy or ambition to growl!
     He insists on sleeping on or near the spot Radar, the black lab, has claimed as his. Radar has a lot of issues, as he didn’t have a very good life at his old home. He has made a few rules for his new home and he expects everyone to obey them, whether you are an animal or a person. Rule number one is: Don’t touch Radar’s food. Rule number two is: All food is Radar’s. Yes, that does make for some organizational miracles at mealtime. Most of the time, the animals eat when Radar is outside, then, Radar eats everything that is leftover, of which there is a lot. I don’t know how he stays so lean and fit, he eats a lot of food. I think it must be his constant stress and worry.
     Radar has one other rule, number three, and that is that he sleeps next to my pillow. Well, the beagle wants to sleep ON my head, so there is some bickering involved. Radar has a mean and nasty sounding growl that the beagle just ignores. That’s how arrogant the beagle is. All of this is a bit nerve racking going on at head level in the middle of the night.
     I would sure like to know why there are two homeless beagles from the Brownville/Brownville Junction area. Someone is very irresponsible and I sure wish I knew who was missing dogs, yet doesn’t report it.
     As you can see from the picture, the ducks are all grown up and as cute as can be. Their ”pond” is a huge horse-watering tank that has a drain plug in the bottom I can use to empty the dirty water. It drains into my vegetable garden, so I don’t feel as if I’m wasting the used water. It took a few days for the ducks to get used to walking up the ramp for a swim, but now, as soon as they are let out of their pen, they waddle over and take turns having their morning bath. They are so polite, and while some are swimming, the others are standing beside the tank on the ground, taking a “shower” in the water dripping out of the tank. I wish the ducks were capable of teaching the beagle some manners.

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THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

May 14 Meeting Minutes
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy greeted twenty-seven members and guests Donald Harris, Dillon Conley, Alex and Jade Zelkan, Key Club members Brett Gerrish, Krystle Parkman, Danielle Graves, Kate Hamlin, and Lindsey Small, and our old friends Roger, Don, Art, and Woodie from the Orono/Old Town Kiwanis Club.
     Roy Bither led us in the Pledge of Allegiance and Edwin spoke a prayer from the heart.
Nancy read the correspondence from the Kiwanis Foundation concerned with the June 7 election in Framingham, MA. Also received was information from the Penquis Leadership Institute inviting people to enroll in training that promotes community development by strengthening local leadership.
     Twenty happy and sad dollars were donated to the Administration Fund for four superintendents at today’s meeting, Ethelyn’s very special Red Jacket, 43 days remaining, a great Variety Show, good crowd, four inductions!, no golf for three straight days, thank you, track meet, Milo kindergarten thank you note, help with refreshment sale, and a lesson in the correct color of inspection stickers (no names mentioned but this person’s Park Street office has a lovely large window).
     We had the honor and pleasure of inducting four new members into the Kiwanis Club today! Eben gave a brief history of the Kiwanis organization and then welcomed Steve and Cheryl Hamlin, Dottie Brown, and Terrie Zelkan. We look forward to sharing projects and fun times with all!
     Community calendar sales are gearing up and Paul Grindle presented a challenge to everyone. He stated that he would donate one happy dollar for everyone who sells five calendars by his birthday on June 4! This gives us three weeks so let’s try to empty Paul’s wallet at the June 4 weekly meeting!
     Valerie gave us the great news that 315 issues of the Three Rivers News were sold last week, breaking the old record.
     The Variety Show realized almost $3000.00 for the Reading is Fundamental Program.
     An interclub is being planned for May 27 in Greenville. Reservations must be made by May 23 and those attending will leave at 4:15 pm from Trask’s Insurance.

     The Kiwanis Kid’s Korner library program is going very well with 40 children participating each week.
Joe Zamboni reported that he is examining all aspects for the Gazebo/Bandstand project.
     Todd Lyford has planned an auction meeting for 6 pm on Tuesday, May 20, at the Town Hall. It’s time to clean out and organize auction items in the storage bay.
     The slate of officers was read for the second week and will be voted on during the May 21 meeting. President-Joe Zamboni, 1st Vice-President-Murrel Harris, 2nd Vice-President-Chris Beres, Treasurer-Jeff Gahagan, Secretary-Nancy Grant, and Board members-Sheri Conley, Heidi Finson, and Janet Richards.
     Volunteers are needed to help set up and decorate The Restaurant on May 16 for the Prom dinner. Decorating will be at 3 pm and those waiting on tables should be there by 5 pm. The dress code will be black pants and white shirts; Kiwanis will provide the aprons.
     Kathy and Val are chairing the food sale for the Antique Appraisal Fair on May 31.
     Mark Awalt from JSI will be the guest speaker on May 21.
     Virgil introduced Key Club members as our guest speakers for today. As one of the Key Club leaders, Dennis Dorsey spoke about the convention in MA they attended in early April. He told us of being very impressed with the KPTI program and all the wonderful work they do. He and Trish Hayes attended training sessions that promoted active clubs. Dennis said that 1600 people were expected but a much smaller contingent attended due to a snowstorm.
     Brett Gerrish was one of the students who attended the convention. He told us that he was also impressed with the training sessions and plans to join the Circle K club which is the college equivalent of Key Club in high schools.
     Roy Bither, a founder and leader of various Key Clubs over the years, stated that he was immensely impressed with the Penquis club. They have worked hard to complete many projects during the school year. Roy also gave praise to the leadership of Trish and Dennis. Even though they are affiliated with Kiwanis, they are a service club in their own right.
     Thank you all for making Key Club the wonderful and respected organization it is today!

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