Three Rivers News, 2003-07-08
TUESDAY, JULY 8, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 35
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

     Rain might have dampened some things Friday night at the Kiwanis Auction, but not Sen. Paul Davis (auctioneer) and Kiwanians Todd Lyford, Paul Grindle, and Neil Hamlin. Everything just moved under the tent and continued....
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis would like to thank everyone who donated items, money, or time to the auction. This event is our biggest fundraiser, and the main reason we have the money to do the dozen’s of projects we do for the communities. A special “thanks” to Jimmy Sickler for providing the tents!

A LETTER FROM SEN. DAVIS
     Sen. Davis is a good friend of our area, and of the Three Rivers Kiwanis Club. When he speaks to our club, I am always impressed with his wit, sincerity, and knowledge of our government and of his constituents.
     I am so glad he represents our area, and I’m proud to call him a friend.

     Hi Val, I have enjoyed myself in Milo the last few days. The auction seemed to go well and I thoroughly enjoyed the chance to speak before your club.
     This is an op-ed I did. It has been sent out but hasn't been in any media as of yet.
My best, Paul Davis

GAS TAX INCREASE POOR WAY TO RAISE REVENUE FOR MAINE
BY SENATOR PAUL T. DAVIS, SR.
Maine Senate Republican Leader
     Driving from Sangerville to Augusta nearly every day during the past five years has made me very mindful of gasoline prices. Lately, I could not help but notice the hit my wallet has taken at the gas pumps. I suspect that I am not alone. Unfortunately, it is about to get worse. The state of Maine, along with the rest of the nation, has experienced unusually high gas prices during the past year. Some in the Maine Legislature, however, do not think that gas prices are high enough and have successfully pushed a bill through Augusta that will raise the tax on gasoline - brace yourself - automatically every year.
     The automatic tax increase, which is based on the rate of inflation, is a poor way to raise revenue and a real burden on Mainers, particularly those of us in rural Maine who travel long commutes to and from work each day. The tax hike will also hurt our businesses, which will be charged more for transporting goods to stores. Logically, this added cost will be passed
on to the consumers.
     Most Mainers would be shocked to learn how much they pay in taxes at the pump. You pay 18.4 cents per gallon in federal

taxes, along with the 24.6 cents assessed by the state of Maine (up from 19 cents per gallon just a few years ago), bringing the total to a whopping 43 cents in taxes for each gallon of gas purchased (50.1 cents for diesel). If you pay $1.40 a gallon, the actual cost of the gasoline is only 97 cents per gallon.
     I think everyone can agree that even by Maine's standards, this is a hefty percentage to pay in taxes, especially considering that neighboring New Hampshire's total state and federal gas tax is 36.4 cents per gallon.
     The Highway Fund is used to fix all of Maine's roads and highways except the Maine Turnpike. It is funded by Maine's gas tax. The tax pays for road construction, maintenance and repair, as well as the cost of building bridges. However, the Highway Fund is in a constant state of flux. During the 119th Legislature, it was short approximately $35 million and the gas tax was raised to make up the difference. This session, the Legislature actually took $65 million from the Highway Fund to make up for a shortfall in the General Fund. This does not seem like a responsible way to do government business.
     We all agree that the Highway Fund needs a stable and predictable source of revenue. Several years ago the Senate Republicans proposed that a portion of the existing sales tax paid on the purchase of vehicles be dedicated to the Highway Fund to supplement the gas tax. This measure would keep up with inflation, but most importantly it doesn't raise anyone's taxes.
     Maine has the highest tax burden in the nation. Increasing another tax of any kind is the wrong solution. Residents in rural counties already pay more for gas than consumers in southern Maine, and increasing the cost of gasoline will only make their burdens heavier.
     Fortunately we in the Legislature will have an opportunity to vote down this tax increase each year. It is my hope that Maine residents will let their local legislators know exactly how they feel about a tax increase being put on autopilot. There is no excuse to raise any taxes in Maine. We are paying dearly for years of excessive spending. Unfortunately the surplus years are behind us and with lean times ahead, we must tighten our belts and decide what our priorities really are and then meet them without raising taxes.

Open House Slated for Local Marine
     The Brownville Jct. American Legion, Auxiliary, and Sons of the American Legion will host an open house at the Legion Hall on July 12th between noon and 4:00 PM to celebrate the safe return home of Sgt. DJ Martin. Sgt. Martin spent the last 6 months in An Nasiriyah with the 2nd Bn. 8th Marines. Martin, the son of Donald and Christine of Brownville Jct., is married to the former Stacey Whiting of LaGrange and has two sons. Martin is currently stationed at Camp Lejeune. The community is invited to join in this opportunity to welcome DJ home and thank him for his effort in the fight against terrorism.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., JULY 8 SHEPHERD’S PIE, BROCCOLI, PEARS
WED., JULY 9 BAKED HADDOCK W/WHITE SAUCE, MASHED POTATO, CARROTS, FRUIT COCKTAIL
THUR., JULY 10 CREAM OF MUSHROOM SOUP, ROAST BEEF SANDWICH, BASIL TOMATOES, FROSTED CAKE
FRI., JULY 11 MEATLOAF, MASHED POTATO, PEAS, STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM
MON. JULY 14

BAKED HAM, MASHED POTATO, CARROTS, APPLESAUCE GELATIN SQUARE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Bilodeau's Restaurant was part of (a) the YMCA (b) the Prairie Pavilion (c) the Briggs Block (d) Dillon's Hall.
2. The first bank in Brownville was (a) the Kineo Trust Company (b) United (c) Merrill (d) Brownville Savings.
3. Eleanor Lamson married her (a) cousin (b) beautician (c) pupil (d) minister.
4. St Francis Xavier became a parish in (a) 1919 (b) 1929 (c) 1935 (d) 1943.
5. Jack Lewis was (a(n) (a) mechanic (b) blacksmith (c) artist (d) magician.
6. The tannery school was near (a) Schoodic Lake (b) Whetstone Brook (c) the cove (d) Williamsburg.
7. The Smith District School was (a) above Stickney Hill (b) on the Schoodic Lake Road (c) in North Brownville (d) in Katahdin Iron Works.
8. Alice Graves was aCongregational minister (b) teacher (c) beautician (d) telephone operator.
9. Horses were brought in from the (a) west (b) south (c) east (d) north.
10. Maine's first slate quarry was the (a) Crocker (b) Merrill (c) Highland (d) Abby Quarry.
Answers: 1-d 2-a 3-c 4-b 5-c 6-b 7-a 8-d 9-a 10-a

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     We've long awaited the wedding of my cousin's daughter. We love her, and have spent hours talking about her wedding arrangements. The bride's mother (m.o.t.b.) and I have been in constant communication through cyberspace (ain't it a wonderful thing?). I've known every detail of the wedding plans right from the beginning. We began calling it the "wedding of the year" many months ago.
     There were lots of behind-the-scenes things that blew my mind....not the least of which was the fact that in order to have the reception at the Page Commons on the Colby College campus you had to have liability insurance. I have since found out that having liability insurance for large gatherings such as a wedding reception is a fairly common occurrence. Never heard of such a thing, until now! The price was high....and they had to sign off on whether or not they would be covered for a terrorist attack. I was pretty sure that terrorists were the least of our worries that bright Saturday in June....but you never can tell. They asked if there would be any celebrities present....”of course,” says the m.o.t.b.,” my cousins will be there...they're celebrities!” You want to believe it!!! We were there, and what a splash we made!! The insurance representative asked with excited interest who we might be, and m.o.t.b. had to confess that maybe we weren't celebrities with national recognition and so could pass over that little extra bit of liability insurance, too. Shattered my ego, it did!

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     We booked rooms months ago at the Comfort Inn in Waterville. That's where the hub of activity for the three day extravaganza would take place. I'd like to add that these were beautiful accommodations. Each room had it's own coffee pot, iron and ironing board (you know that would impress me! Heck, there was even a coin operated washer and dryer at our disposal had we needed them) The best feature of the place, though, was the full breakfast that was served both Saturday and Sunday morning in the lobby...on little tables with linen napkins and tablecloths. They had eggs, sausage, pancakes, toast, coffee and juices - all free! The Comfort Inn is my kind of hotel! We arrived on Friday evening....met up with other relatives and went to dinner.
     After dinner we had been invited to the rehearsal party (An Hawaiian luau) that was already in full swing at a pub on the campus. We had been given directions to a parking lot that was fairly near the pub, but if there hadn't been a trail of incredibly raucous noise coming from the party, I'm not sure we would have been able to find it. We followed the noise, much like you would a trail of crumbs; up hill and down walkways, through archways and over stairways until we finally arrived at the Hawaiian paradise that was the rehearsal party. Claps and cheers went up from the wedding party and all the other guests as we arrived to join in the fun. Let the good times roll!! Everyone was dancing and having just a wonderful time. The above picture is of the "celebrities" singing the Hawaiian Wedding Song to the bride and groom.
     Saturday morning dawned bright and sunny....a perfect day for a wedding. I turned on the television to see what the weather looked like for the rest of the day. Incredibly, even though the majority of the eastern seaboard was covered with clouds and rain, Maine had a big sunshine pasted over it. Yay!! We truly rejoiced and sent prayers of thanks to God and Mother Nature for their benevolence. All the women struck off for hair appointments and the men for a round of golf. My cousin Joan and I decided we'd try to find someone to give us a manicure. We found a sweet little Vietnamese woman in downtown Waterville who literally performed miracles on our nails and made us feel oh so special.
     My dress had been a big consideration in preparation for this wedding. I had found a dress that I loved in Chadwicks catalog and had sent for it weeks before. I paid $59.99 for the dress and then another $10 to have it altered and hemmed. It was a plain yellow over-the-head, scooped necked, ankle length dress with slits up the sides...but with it came a sweet jacket with a darling collar and sewn-down pleats down the back. The buttons were small cloth covered down the front, and one in the back just as a decoration. I ended up wearing my very fancy gold shoes and carrying a little gold cloth purse. My accessories were pearls. A funny thing happened on the way to the wedding, however. It seemed that there were no fewer than four other women in MY dress! No two were the same color, thank God; and upon investigation, I found out that no two came from the same place nor cost the same price. Mine, of course, being the most expensive (she said with a cluck of her tongue).
     The wedding was at 4:00 p.m. at the Lorimar Chapel on the Colby campus. The bride had suffered a disappointment when she found out there would be major reconstruction of the outside entrance to the chapel going on at the time of the wedding, but we all entered another way and hardly noticed the construction. The aisle was long and gave us all a good view of the wedding party as they marched in. The bridesmaids wore exquisite gowns of a deep apple red. No two were alike. This was probably the most innovative idea yet. The bride had taken them to David's Bridal and given them a range of color and told them to "go for it!" Pick out the dress that you love and that looks good on you and as long as it's within this color palette....that's your dress! Isn't that a marvelous idea? Each dress was gorgeous and flattered the figures of

each girl. Innovative and thoughtful of the bride to not be intimidated by how good her bridesmaids might look compared to herself. It wouldn't have mattered what any of those girls had worn.....the bride was totally radiant...incredibly beautiful.
     After the ceremony the guests walked to the Page Commons where the reception was being held. I'm not sure how many of you might be familiar with the Page Commons, but it's a beautiful facility. There is the main floor, a mezzanine level and then a balcony level. On either side of both the mezzanine level and the balcony level, there are little alcoves. One alcove held the disk jockey and all of his equipment and in the other alcove was the exquisite wedding cake. The area on the main floor where the head table was situated had a cathedral ceiling. The mezzanine and balcony levels were in a semi-circle. Each level was set with tables accommodating eight guests. Out in the entryway, which was a really large room, was a table laden with appetizers....delicious dips and spreads, crackers and fruits. These foods kept the guests appetites in check until dinner was served later in the evening. Another table held the bar and yet another table held the sweetest little name and table assignment frames....white with delicate little flowers adorning the borders. The "celebrities" had been given floor seats....the m.o.t.b. didn't want to be too far away from us!! I don't know if it was because she didn't trust us to behave and wanted to be handy for a quick intervention, or if it was because she knew that we'd be having a great time and she didn't want to miss any of it. In any case we had premier seating and that was wonderful. Whichever the case, she was insured for everything short of a terrorist attack. I can't imagine what she was worried about.
     Another innovative idea was the guest book. As we arrived, there was a woman who had been hired to take Polaroid pictures of all of the guests...either individually or as couples. In moments the picture developed and we took it to a counter where there were 12 X 12 photo album pages all laid out for us to glue the picture on. Space was also provided for us to write a little sentimental message to the bride and groom. This was essentially their guest book and WOW, what a wonderful idea. I have spoken to the m.o.t.b. this week and she told me that she has poured over that guest book, looking at all of the pictures and sentiments a hundred times.
     It was late at night when we all trooped back to the hotel after the reception. We all had to admit it was the finest event we'd been to in many a year. The m.o.t.b. had, indeed, outdone herself and she made me proud to call her "cousin."

"About the bride and the cake that she baked
And of how she measured out the shortening with a very solemn air,
The salt and sugar also, and she took the greatest care
To count the eggs correctly.
And to add a little bit of baking powder,
That beginners oft omit.
Then she mixed it all together and she baked it for an hour.
But she never quite forgave herself, for leaving
out the flour."
Anonymous

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
By Judith Macdougall
     The Laugh It Up @ Your Library is in full swing now. New children are getting more familiar with all the details and do not feel as strange as they did at first. Joyce Hogan has been in now for two food drawings. These usually take place on Friday nights but , of course, we had one on Wednesday this week due to the holiday. There have also been two story times with Tracy Morse reading this week. Thank you, Tracy.
     We are always receiving new books due to backorders. One book I’d like to tell you we have is Complete Guide to Prescription & Nonprescription Drugs . We have had a lot of requests for it and now we have it. It is Edition 2003 and should be fairly up to date.

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     We have also received a large shipment of juvenile books. Here is a partial list, which I’ll finish next week.
ACTION JACKSON
ALL ABOARD!
ANANSE AND THE LIZARD
ARTHUR LOST AND FOUND
BENNY’S FLAG
THE BEST BOOK OF PIRATES
THE BEST BOOK OF WHALES AND DOLPHINS
BEVERLY BILLINGSLEY BORROWS A BOOK
BOSTON JANE: WILDERNESS DAYS
BRIGHT BEETLE
CAM JENSEN AND THE BARKING TREASURE
CAM JENSEN AND THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL
CAN YOU SEE WHAT I SEE?
CORNER OF THE UNIVERSE
DOUBLE FUDGE
FARFALLINA AND MARCEL( this is so sweet)
FIREBOAT
FIREWORKS, PICNICS AND FLAGS
GET READY FOR SECOND GRADE, AMBER BROWN
GET WELL, GOOD KNIGHT
GHOSTS AND THE SUPERNATURAL
GREATEST GIGGLES EVER
HENRY AND MUDGE AND MRS. HOPPER’S HOUSE
THE HOBBIT: AN ILLUSTRATED EDITION (like a graphic novel)
HONDO AND FABIAN
HORRIBLE HARRY GOES TO THE MOON
HOW THE FISHERMAN TRICKED THE GENIE
INDIA (Eyewitness)

Library Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Telephone 943-2612

THE LIVERMORE DIARIES PART 10
SUBMITTED BY IRIS BUZZELL
     William Taylor Livermore was born in Sebec, Maine in 1840, the sixth child of David Livermore and Sarah Taylor Livermore. David Livermore owned property in the southwest corner of Milo, very near the Milo-Sebec line, on the banks of the Piscataquis River.
     William’s diary begins In August 1862, shortly after he was mustered into the 20th Maine Volunteers. Probably to pass time on the trip to Washington and Virginia, he began making a record of the trip and he continued even as his unit went from one battle area to another. He gives an excellent picture of their living conditions and the thoughts he had about the war and about family back at home.
     Oct. 6: All quiet today and we are in our encampment and as well as usual. I lost my wallet last night with $5 and my pens. I was very sorry for I had calculated to keep enough to last me until I got paid. But that is not the worst loss that I could have met. No news.
     Oct. 7: Called out at 4:30 a.m. and packed up our things and went into the canal on picket. We occupied the same ground that we did after we crossed the river into Virginia. All was quiet until about 3 p.m., when a squad of Rebel Cavalry appeared in sight on the opposite shore. Our batteries threw 8 or 10 shells into them and they skedaddled. It was half a mile or more from where we were.

     I wrote to David and just then we were relieved and went back to our encampment, and got our rations. At 8 in the evening, our brigade marched about 4 miles down the river and halted for the night. We left W.H. Owen behind sick. I am well.
     Oct. 8: About 8 a.m. we marched half a mile from our night’s encampment and pitched tents. We are on the same encampment where Burnside left yesterday. It is on a hill, about 100 rods from the river. We have got the best tents we have had since we left Arlington Heights. We may stop here sometime or may leave soon.
     Our Second Lieut. joined us this morning. We like his appearance much. He belongs in Brownville and has been in Co. A Maine. E.L. Chase and H.B. Farris and Andrew Ricker are all well. Our Co. is available for duty; in all 55.
     I will draw this to a close for my book. Will not admit of a longer story and you must remember that it has been under difficult circumstances that I have kept this going along as well as I have. I had to write on my knee where ever I could get time. Sometimes I would get 3 days behind, because I did not have time to write. I have, nor could not if I had, tried to keep a very correct account, but what I have written has occurred under my observation and more interesting events that I have not written. But I thought you would like to look this over and write the mistakes as you read them for there is a great many. If I get home, I should like to look it over. I shall buy another as quick as I can find one.
     I suppose you would like to know whether they throw shells in cannon, fired, and burst. They do not throw shells in their little 8 pounders, but the shells are not round either. I will draw one as near as I can in the lower end. There is the stopper: (drawing insert) It goes in about 1 1/2 inches with deep threads screwed in and a hole in it for the fuse. The small shells are only filled with powder. They do not elivate these, but fire as they do a cannon ball, or perhaps they do a little, for they calculate for them to explode in the air.
     (Drawing in margin) I will try to give you an idea of a mortar. They set on an iron bottom. The one I have seen is about 8 or 10 inches thick, and as large over. They can turn them round as they please. I saw one of Commadore Porter’s mortar boats at Washington. The mouth of those looked like our big boiler but did not look as though they were more than 3 feet long.
     Oct. 14: We have got cloth tents, and we are glad because we were afraid we should not get them. We have got by far the best camp ground we have had.
     Oh, what a calamity is war to a country, where the army passes through here were expensive plantations that were well fenced. Hundreds of acres of corn and in a short time there is nothing but the land left. It is
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left in terrible shape. Corn destroyed, pigs, fowls, and everything that the boys can get to eat, taken. Dwellings turned into hospitals. Go to the rear, and you will see that we are planting graveyards on every hillside, and in every quiet valley. You do not imagine the cost of war in blood and treasure, the latter of but little consequence.
     Oct. 16: It is pleasant today and I am writing to Emma and my book is not filled up, and I want to send it, but I think of nothing to write.
     One man shot his thumb off last night on picket. They will all shoot themselves yet.
     I will right a few mistakes that I made or found out afterwards, or some that I can remember without looking over. I don’t think there was a man drowned on our passage from Boston to Washington. The battle of South Mountain instead of the Blue Ridge, and I called it a stream. You have probably hear of the stone bridge. There are hundreds more.
     I won’t fill any more up now for you will want the rest to practice on capital letters.

A Historical Review - Part 3
A Wilderness Experience the Quiet Beauty of Chairback
BDN, Tom Shields, 2/17/1983
(A TRC FRINGE BENEFIT, SUBMITTED BY C.K.ELLISON, 2003)
     The Hodsdon's camps, 12 in all, are located among 90-foot high pines on a cove on Long Pond. One of the log cabins, their library, is an octagon built in 1867 by a one-armed Civil War veteran. Since the building has twice as many sides, the logs are shorter and were easier for the ex-soldier to handle, so the story goes. Another building with a claim to fame is a sturdy, two-holed outhouse built by James Erwin, the previous owner of the camps and candidate for governor. "Not everyone has an outhouse built by the former attorney general of the state," Mrs. Hodsdon said with a laugh."
     Much of the year, their days are filled with “chores that never end" repairing the old buildings, shooing moose out of the garden, making maple syrup, cutting wood, tending fires, maintaining trails, sawing cedar shingles, writing business letters, cooking meals, and hauling guests in and out. They have two ties to civilization: a battery-operated television and a radio link to Folson's Air Service on Moosehead Lake.
     Among Tim's duties are waiting on tables and breaking trails for skiing. Once Tim and Duchess, his Labrador, were approaching the wood shed, where the dog's food was stored, when he caught a glimpse of what he thought was a raccoon inside. So with Duchess growling, they ran inside to scare the animal away. But it wasn't a raccoon -- it was a mother bear and her cub. Tim and Duchess ran one way and, fortunately, the bear and cub ran another way. "I really don't think there's as much reason to be afraid in the woods as most people think there is," Mrs. Hodsdon said. "That doesn't mean it's not scary sometimes, though." "If I encountered a pack of coyotes I would definitely be scared." Tim said.
     Tim, who hopes to write murder mysteries some day, spends four to six hours a day on his studies. Furthermore, this year he plans to study through the summer so he can go to high school next fall. And that will mean going to school in the "outside world." "Certainly through teaching him I've gotten to know a part of him that most parents don't get to know with their children," his mother said. "I'd always known he'd been a good student, but didn't know how interesting his mind was. Sometimes we just go out with a pile of books and just drift around in a boat -- a floating classroom," she said. "It's a wonderful way to review for an exam."
     Last month, his Calvert teacher gave him an assignment of writing an essay on a major problem facing the country. He chose acid precipitation, and he brought the subject very close to home. Biologists from the university of Maine at Orono had checked lakes and ponds in the area for signs of damage from acid rain and

snow. They found problems at East Chairback Pond, a short walk away. Not only was the fish catch declining, but also the fish are no longer reproducing, the Hodsdons were told. Tim used the findings for his essay. "The last problem you'd expect back here is pollution," Mrs. Hodsdon said.(continued next week)

IN MEMORIAM
WAYNE FARRINGTON GRANT
     DOVER-FOXCROFT - Wayne F. Grant, 34, died unexpectedly at his residence, June 27, 2003. He was born June 2, 1969, in Quonset Point, R.I. Wayne was a graduate of Foxcroft Academy, Class of 1988. He is survived by his father, Ted Grant and his wife, Sue, of Dover-Foxcroft; his mother, Pamela (Dority) Smith and her husband, Dwight, of Dover-Foxcroft; a brother, David Farrington Grant of Southwest Harbor; five sisters, Angela Marie Pearl and her husband, Jody, of Atkinson, Kandi Martin and her husband, Brent, of Dover-Foxcroft, Sheila Chene-vert of Winslow, Cathleen Curry and her husband, Greg, of Dover-Foxcroft, Christine Carey and her husband, Mike, of Milo; a daughter, Natasha; paternal grandparents, Herbert and Jane Grant of Dover-Foxcroft; maternal grandparents, Richard and Delma Dority of Dover-Foxcroft; a special friend, Gail Cookson Judd of Dover-Foxcroft; several aunts, uncles, and cousins. There will be no services at this time. Arrangements are in the care of the Lary Funeral Home.

BARBARA 'BARB' (PHILBROOK) JOHNSTON
     MILO - Barbara Johnston, 75, of Milo, wife of Donald Johnston, passed away June 29, 2003, at Mayo Regional Hospital. She was born Nov. 30, 1927, the daughter of the late Irving and Bessie Philbrook. She was a member of the Methodist church, a loving wife and mother who enjoyed cooking and taking care of her family. She also liked knitting, baking, playing bingo, going to the coast and going camping. She is survived by her husband of 57 years, Donald Johnston of Milo; her daughter, Diane Rideout and her partner, Leonard Kobylus of Milo; sons and daughters-in-laws, Larry and Kathy Johnston of Sebec; Bruce "Butch" and Vickilee Johnston of Milo; and daughter, Lori Ann Hall and her partner, Roy Applebee of Derby; brothers, Glen "Nick" Philbrook and his partner, Helga Nason of Sebec; Merle and his wife, Janice Philbrook of Milo; sisters, Arlene Hughes of Milo, Betty and her husband, Bill, of Milo; grandchildren, Tess, Missy, Lisa, Tina, Loretta, Wendy, Brandon and Sheena and eight great-granchildren; many nieces, nephews and cousins. She had many special friends including Barbara Walker, Margaret Campbell and Bud and Kathy Teele, who all brought joy into her life. She was predeceased by her brothers, Clayton and Raymond and sister, Hildred. There will be no funeral at the request of the family. A committal service will be held Aug. 15, at the Evergreen Cemetery, Milo.

     Phil Gerow models the hat he graciously lended out Friday night during the Community Band Concert. Donations were collected to go towards building the Community Gazebo/Bandstand fund.

Page 5

METHODIST WOMEN
BY CAROLYN SINCLAIR
     The ladies met on Thursday at The Restaurant for a fellowship breakfast. We got our day off to a good start with lots of laughter and good conversation.
How did Beth
ever reach the
age of 50 smoking
at such a young
age?

HAPPY
BIRTHDAY
BETH!

You are almost
as old
as me!

Love from
your sister
Susan!

OLD HOME
By Priscilla Arbo Clifford Osgood

On summer days, late afternoon,
As shadows lengthen o’er the lea,
I see the haven that I knew,
The Prairie farm, so dear to me.

I feel the kiss of softest breeze,
Still fragrant with the scent of pine,
And feel a joy deep in my heart,
That all that heaven once was mine.

The old dirt roads that led to home,
Though often scraped to smooth them out,
Were after every heavy rain,
Pock-marked and corduroyed, all about.

The wooden fences, gray with age,
Took on a weathered, bony look,
But served their purpose through the years,
As did the limpid, spring-fed brook.

No more may I traverse those fields,
Where Daddy mowed the ripened hay,
No more the fragrant, barny smells
Will fill my nostrils, day by day.

But all of these I may recall
When passing woodlands, mile on mile,
And driving past a farm in Maine,
Will trigger memories, and I’ll smile.

BENEFIT BAKED BEAN SUPPER FOR SUE COBURN AND ANDY GALLANT
     Sue Coburn was in a serious car accident recently and is now recuperating. She is always the first one to start a benefit when someone needs it so we are returning the favor.
     Little Andy Gallant was injured in an accident at his home in Brownville Jct. and he is also doing better.
     The supper will be held on July 19 at the Brownville Jct. Alumni Building from 4:30 to 6:30 pm. It’s only $5.00 for adults and $2.50 for children.
     Volunteers are needed for set-up on Friday night, help in the kitchen, servers, dishwashers, and cleanup. Eight cabbages, four large cans of crushed pineapple, forty pounds of potatoes, eggs, Miracle Whip, pickles, and hot dogs are needed. All donations are gratefully accepted. If you would like to help please contact Linda Coburn at 965-8421and leave a message if she isn’t at home.
THANK YOU

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HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
MAIN STREET, MILO
     These photos are reprints of postcards from the late 1920’s or early 1930’s.
     Life moved at a slower pace, the world seemed much larger, and many older folks might say they prefer the lifestyle of this era.


(Postcards courtesy of John & Eileen Willinski)

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

JULY 2 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTEDY BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy greeted fourteen members and many guests this morning. We were pleased to share our meeting with Faye and Judith Stevens, Wayne Clukey, who is being shared with us for the summer by the Dexter Kiwanis Club, Lt. Gov. Hal Sherman, and an interclub from Dover-Foxcroft, Joe and Bonnie Guyotte, Hoyt Fairbrother, Howard Kesseli, and Marilyn Vernon.
     Eben DeWitt led us in the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham spoke from the heart in asking for special prayers for those who have lost loved ones.
     Chris Almy read an inspirational message about tempers. When the head of a hatchet flies off the handle the handle becomes useless and the head can cause damage. The same can be said of people. When a person

loses their temper they cause damage and it takes much longer for the victim to recover from it than the person who flies off the handle! Don’t lose your temper, nobody wants it.
     Fifteen happy and sad dollars, four coming from Frank for returns, were donated for a GREAT auction, GREAT auction help, our many guests, Key Club help, Eben’s extra ticket, and Kathy being the female!
     Lt. Gov. Harold Sherman informed us that an amendment was passed at the recent International meeting increasing our yearly dues by $15.
     Buffy Olmstead left word that the Senior barbeques will be held on July 23 in LaGrange, July 30 in Brownville, August 6 at Milo Heights, and August 13 at Pleasant Park. There will be a sign up sheet next week for volunteers.
     Val reported that the Three Rivers News is up to 325 issues being sold weekly and receiving up to 500 hits online.
     There is a contest for naming the waterfront park, look for the link on the trcmaine website.
     A Milo Waterfront Festival is being planned for next year.
     The Community Calendars will be in by August 15.
     Jeff Gahagan is on vacation but left word that the auction alone brought in around $8,500!!!!!
     The Kiwanis budget is in the planning stage and Edwin welcomes any and all input and critiques.
     The Board of Directors will NOT meet this Thursday but the monthly meeting will be held on July 17. This is an important meeting, as the budget needs attention.
     Seth Barden, our scheduled guest speaker was unable to attend today’s meeting. Heidi Finson very aptly filled in with an inspiring talk about the Headstart Program. Heidi has been associated with Headstart for sixteen years. She said that it started as a summer program and involved entire families.
     She told us that this is a comprehensive child development program for children from birth to 5 years of age, expectant mothers, and their families. The goal is to increase the social, emotional, and physical growth of children during the time in Headstart. This includes a great nutritional program as well. Many have never been to the dentist or kept updated on their immunizations. An important health aspect is lead screening. All of the available health services lead to a healthier adult life. Parental involvement is encouraged and is a key factor in the program.
     Foster grandparents who attend daily give the children one-on-one attention that is especially satisfying to all. Teens are encouraged to volunteer their help as well. It can be a rewarding experience and could lead to a career in childhood development and/or education. Volunteers in the Aspire program can ensure their continuing aid by helping for a certain number of hours each month.
     The Headstart program is mandated to report child abuse and neglect as should all people. Children are
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not always removed from the home after a report of abuse and counseling is available for the parents.
     Heidi told us that Dads are more involved with the program and she is very pleased with the concern shown by many of the fathers.
     The children look forward to having someone read to them and all are welcome to attend the daily sessions. Heidi said that the Kiwanis sponsored Reading is Fundamental program for Headstart brings the world to readers through books. It is a safe and nurturing environment for the youngsters and many times all it takes is a smile and a hug to make it even better.
     You have put your special mark on the local Headstart program and every child involved has greatly benefited by your loving attention and dedication. Thank you, Heidi.

TRC Community Calendar


TRC GuestBook

Val has been insterting entries from our guestbook. Please check them out!

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