Three Rivers News, 2003-08-19
TUESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 41
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE


First row(from left to right): Marlene Willette Bedard, Teddy Hamel Giles, Marilyn Chase Kindamo, Olive Manzer Snow, Beverly McLean Jamison, Dodie Russell Bryant. Back row: Margaret Tanguay Russell, Roland Stubbs, Tommy Tweedie, Margaret Ann Washburn Oberg, Judith Brewer Stevens, Hugh Hamlin, Reggie Earley, and Pat Begin Ramsdell. Photo by Paul Giles

B.J.H.S. CLASS OF 1953 HOLDS REUNION
     The Brownville High School class of 1953 held their 50th reunion at Dodie and Bob Bryant”s cottage at Ebeemee Lake on Friday, August 8, 2003. They were entertained by the music of Ronnie Knowles and Helen. Dodie, and her daughter, Deanna Greenlaw, served dinner.
     A memorial service was held in honor of Charles Durant, Ronnie Forrest, Natalie Brown, and Freddie Carlson.
     Awards were given to: Margaret Ann Oberg for traveling the furthest, from Lexington Kentucky; Judith Stevens for being married the longest- 50 years; Roland Stubbs for having the most children; Teddy Giles for having the most grandchildren and great-grandchildren; Margaret Russell for changing the least, and to Pat Ramsdell for changing the most.
     The group was joined by: Barbara Grover Bell; former teachers and their wive; Noah Edminster from MA; Paul Giles; Tony Kindamo; Clyde Snow; Bob Bryant; Margaret Earley; Stan and Judy. Also attending were Ralph Richards from Buxton and Malcolm Buchanan from Charleston who were seated at the head table at the Alumni Banquet on Saturday where they received certificates and a skit was performed in their honor.

YARD SALE
AT MILO POST 41 AMERICAN LEGION
ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 30TH, 2003, AT 9AM.
THE LEGION IS LOOKING FOR GOOD SALABLE ITEMS FOR THEIR YARD SALE.
IF YOU HAVE ITEMS TO DONATE, CALL
943-8043
943-2542
OR 943-7482
AND ARRANGE FOR THE GOODS
TO BE PICKED UP.


Veteran's Memorial Park
Is the name chosen by the Milo selectpersons as the name of the Sebec River boat landing area. Thanks to all involved!!!
A special thanks to those who submitted ideas for the name.


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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., AUG. 19 VEAL PARMESAN, SPAGHETTI, PEAS, PEARS
WED., AUG. 20 FISHBURGER DELUXE, POTATO WEDGES, GREEN BEAN SALAD, PINEAPPLE CHUNKS
THUR., AUG. 21 BOILED DINNER: HAM, POTATO, CARROTS, CABBAGE, TURNIP, GELATIN
FRI., AUG., 22 BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, COLE SLAW, BROWN BREAD, FROSTED CAKE
MON. AUG., 25

MEATBALLS, MUSHROOM SAUCE, CORN O’BRIAN, PEACHES

TUES., AUG., 26 CHICKEN TETRAZZINI, BEETS, PUMPKIN PIE
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!
Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. ___Palmer Wilson (a) B) (b) R (c) W (d) S (name)
2. (a) Lynn Hoxie (b) Geraldine Heskett (c) Donna Jones (d) Mary Simco played in "Spotlight on Youth."
3. The best shooter of the Browns : (a) Jack (b) Sid (c) Gene (d) David.
4. Greta ______________Connors (a) Mary (b) Murray (c) Cheryl (d) Alice.
5. Carroll _. Conley (a) C (b) F (c) K (d) L,
6. (a) Ted Williams (b) Willie Mays (c) Mickey Mantle (d) Joe Dimaggio came through Brownville.
7. The BJHS Alumni Building is (a) 15 (b) 17 (c) 13 (d) 11 years old.
8. Barrett Graves was known in softball for his (a) fielding (b) long ball (c) base running (d) statistical work.
9. Who was not a BJHS Alumni Association president (a) June Vickers (b) Eddie Weston (c) Jerome Chase (d) George Dean?
10. The first west-east Canadian Pacific passenger train came through in (a) 1893 (b) 1895 (c) 1896 (d) 1901.
Answers: 1-b 2-c 3-d 4-b 5-d 6-a 7-b 8-b 9-a 10-a

Final Notes on my 1974 Moscow Trip
BY BILL SAWTELL
     The Russians I saw seemed robotic, especially in their sports play. There was little spontaneity, especially in their reactions.
     Coming back over the great circle path, we flew over the St. Lawrence from its mouth to Montreal. The Quebeckers aboard could look down and see landmarks in their towns and cities along the river, and, possibly even their homes. This showed me the magnitude of the love they had for their native province. It was impressive.
     I made the mistake of drinking the tap water in my toilet and was sick for weeks after.
     After returning to Quebec City, I received a card from a Valery Radimsky from Leningrad-the only contact I have had since.
     Mother and Ruthie were glad to welcome me home, and we played SCRABBLE often thereafter when my stint in Quebec was over.
     The great Red Army player didn't survive a second car accident. Vladislav Tretiak came to Montreal to coach Canadien goalies. And Alexander Yakushev became coach of the Russian national team.

BIBLE SCHOOL WELL ATTENDED
BY CAROLYN SINCLAIR
     Vacation Bible School was a big success with an average attendance of 45 children every day. They listened to stories from the Bible, played games, sang songs, enjoyed snacks, and enjoyed making sun catchers and lighthouses. On Thursday evening family and friends came to hear the children sing the songs they had learned and see the projects that they had done. A special thank you to all who helped, we couldn't have done it without you.

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DEAN REUNION
BY CAROLYN SINCLAIR
     The descendents of Guy and Mary Dean gathered at Range Pond State Park on Sunday, August 10, for a day of fun, food and fellowship. Family came from Massachusetts, Connecticut and many areas of Maine.
     Guy and Mary owned and operated a farm in Medford until their retirement in the early fifties. Many of their grandchildren and great-grandchildren still live in this area.
     Family from this area who attended the reunion include Robbie and Phyllis Robinson, Doug and Susan Robinson with Kristen,Hope and Lew Dyer, Penny Drinkwater with Timothy, Tina, Syndie and Dylan, Carolyn Sinclair, Gary and Robbie Grant, Paula Copeland with Chrissy Massey and Brayden, Bob and Lisa Robinson with Ryan and Derek, Mike and Andrea Witham with Anisa, Megan and Michael, Alyssa Wheeler and her mom Jennifer.

     We enjoyed catching up with all the news, being introduced to new babies and prospective brides. The traditional volleyball game was held. I'm not sure how it turned out, you might want to ask Lew about that. It was a great day and we look forward to next year when we meet again.

PISCATAQUIS BIRTHS
     CONKLIN - a daughter, Anna Jo Alice Conklin, to Joanna Wilkins and Doug Conklin of Milo on July 1, 2003 at Mayo Regional Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Joe and Sharon Lancaster of Milo. Paternal grandparents are Doug and Sophie Conklin of Milo. Great grandfather is Kenneth Mimay of Garland. Anna joins siblings Krista, Kevin, Val, Cody, and Makayla.

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     CHASE - a son, Ryan Curtis Chase, to Kristi Merrill and Jason Chase of Medford on July 24, 2003 at Mayo Regional Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Robert and Christi Merrill of Medford and Debbie Wakefield of Burlington. Paternal grandparents are Gordon and Tina Chase of Milo. Great grandparents are Beatrice Bryer of Milo, Curtis Chase of Milo, Charlene Pender of Milo, and Vesta LeBretton of Milo.
     ROSS - a son, Bryson Gene Ross, to Ann Leslie (Larrabee) and Eugene Louren Ross on July 25.


Marion C. Cook School
Open House
Monday, August 25th
12:30-1:30
Please stop in and visit your school and teachers.

A Historical Review - (Personal Narrative)
The Lamp - A Family Story
(SUBMITTED BY C.K. ELLISON, 2003)
     Once upon a time, long ago, when I was young, a favorite pastime was "going to the movies" at the Milo Theater, downtown. It was a cold winter's night, but the sky was clear. I don't remember the title of the movie of that night, but I will always remember the people who ran the theater: Ella Mills, owner (who was most often the ticket lady), various persons who ran the film equipment, and Carl Lutterell (whom I think was the manager). Ella being of small stature, sat upon a high stool in the ticket booth. Carl often walked the isle, which had the instant effect of quieting noisy teenagers (not me, of course). I most often sat half way down the center isle.
     My father, at home, former Mechanical Engineer on the B & A Railroad, Derby office, had retired early due to a heart condition. Even at my age, I always think of my father as "Daddy." He kept busy with many projects, upholstering our antique furniture, and transforming obsolete objects into something useful. So, apparently he had decided to work down cellar on making an adjustable table lamp from what was probably an adjustable shaving stand.
     This was back in the days when telephones were old-fashioned, and telephone operators sat at a switchboard, just above what used to be Daggett's Drugstore, the one next to the theater. Our telephone at home was the upright style with the receiver held in a clip on the left-hand side. It stood on a corner shelf next to the door which led to our front porch. The studio couch was nearby. The lamp my father was working on also had a clip on the left-hand side, but this clip was of sharp chrome metal.
     Suddenly, Carl Lutterell came to my side, and told me that my father had an accident, and I should go right home. He offered me a ride. I thanked him and said I could probably run home faster, which was what I did. In the meantime, one of the telephone operators contacted Dr. Bundy. Murray Littlefield's wife was probably the one on duty, although his sister Clara Littlefield also worked there.
     Home, I rushed into the living room, to see my father sitting on the couch holding a clean handkerchief over his left eye, and it was clearly soaked in blood. The wall by the telephone was blood splattered. My father said, "I think I've lost my eye, Kit." He told me he was leaning on the bit stock to drill a hole through the heavy metal, and the bit broke. Bit stocks were used before electric drills. One of the sharp prongs of the clip went into his flesh just below his eye, and the other went through his glasses, throwing pieces of glass into his eye. He had to be careful not to faint, or move his eye. I was to take him straight to Dr. Bundy's office. I backed our 36 Plymouth out of our garage, helped Daddy into his heavy overcoat and into the passenger side of the front seat. Soon we were at Dr. Bundy's office.

     Dr. Bundy had my father lie upon the examining table, and with a magnifying glass manually picked out every piece of glass. In the meantime Uncle Mel arrived at the doctor's office called by either Ella Mills or the telephone operator. Although the cut beneath my father's eye bled a lot, it didn't need stitches. Soon, all three of us returned to our house. My father was close to shock from the ordeal and felt cold, so he decided to lie upon the couch for a while before going to bed, and "would I warm up the house?" I lit the second oil burner in our converted from wood kitchen stove. I stoked up the coal furnace, then brought up a pail of spools from the spool bin down cellar, some edgings, and some hard wood for our living room wood stove. Soon the living room was very warm. Hot in fact. I opened the doors to the den (usually kept closed in the winter) and Uncle Mel began moving his chair back into the den more and more. Finally, he told me he thought he'd better go home, and left. Calls came from both the theater and the telephone operators to see how my father was. Within time, my father's eye damage healed with no loss of sight.
     Something about the Littlefield family: I was always partial to the name Clara Littlefield, because Clara was my mother's first name, and Littlefield was her middle name. Only three of our family members descended directly from Edmund Littlefield who came to America and settled in Wells, Maine in the early 1600's. His son, Francis, Sr., preceded him to America and first settled in the Massachusetts area before meeting up with his family again. Francis's daughter Mary, married Dr. John Kittredge of Billerica, MA. He was on my father's side. On my mother's side, my cousin Murray Kittredge, Gratia Kittredge, and I descended from Francis's brother John Littlefield... our grandfathers were brothers, our fathers were brothers, and our mothers were cousins to one another. We are the only known three of us who descended from Edmund Littlefield on both sides of the family. Also, I know of three Clara Littlefields, if you count my mother's middle name.
     Something about overcoats: My father's all wool overcoat was very heavy indeed. It also was unusually warm. Sometimes during the winter my father would elect to walk downtown and back. When I thought he should be coming up the hill, I watched for him from the front window. He would reach the telephone pole at the foot of our lot and lean on the pole to rest. This was my cue. I suddenly decided to go for a kick sled ride, taking my dog Tarzan with me. Tarzan rode down the hill sitting on the seat. "Want a ride home, Daddy?" I would ask. With that, my father sat down on the kick sled, I hooked one end of Tarzan's leash to his harness, the other to the front of the kick sled, and all together we went home with Tarzan pulling up ahead, and me pushing from behind. Tarzan loved that kind of sport, pretending he was a sled dog. I didn't shout "Mush" or that kind of silly stuff. I said, Getup and Whoa, and he knew where Home was. After my father's passing, I made his overcoat into a two-piece ski suit for my son... so it continued on for a while.

PUBLIC NOTICE FOR MILO
FROM KEVIN BLACK
Water Construction Project Update
     Construction will continue on D'Este Street where we are installing new raw water line. On Monday, August 18th, new water line construction will begin on Pleasant Street at the intersection of Pleasant and High Streets to Knowles Avenue. You can expect traffic delays over the next few weeks and possible temporary service disruptions. If you have any concerns, please call the Water District at 943-2501. We will keep you informed each week of progress of this construction project. The Water District would like to thank you for your patience during this time.
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Local Bean Hole Bean Suppers to benefit local charities.
     Beginning July 30th at 5 pm, the folks at Down Home Bed & Breakfast, Elm St., Milo, will be starting a new Wednesday night tradition by dishing up beans, hotdogs, salads, rolls and desserts to the public. The weekly meals, offered in their backyard, will cost $7 for adults and $3.50 for children. $1.00 for each plate will then be donated to a local group or charity.
     Take-out meals will also be available. For questions or requests for a week’s donation to your organization, call Gary or Sylvia Black at 943-5167.

THE COMMUNITY BAND WILL WRAP UP THEIR SUMMER CONCERTS WITH THE FOLLOWING PERFORMANCE:
Thursday, August 21
6:15 pm
Piscataquis Valley Fair, County Fairgrounds
Dover-Foxcroft

My Italy Trip Part 10
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Montecatini
     We got a wakeup call at 6:15. Our bags needed to be outside our door at 7. After a quick breakfast, we left Sorrento by bus at 8AM with our driver Chiro. He was our driver for the rest of the tour. We had our usual friendly argument about the temperature of the bus. Those of us from the northern climes liked it a little cooler. Actually, I think we put up a fuss more to tease Carla, the tour director, than anything else. We had a rest stop at 10 and stopped on the outskirts of Rome for lunch. They had rest stop areas like we have on the turnpike. For lunch I had veal and escarole. I had caramel custard for dessert. We had another rest stop outside Florence where I was able to pick up some more provolone picante cheese in shrink to bring home.
     We arrived in Montecatini Terme around 3:45 PM. Our hotel, The Grand Plaza, is situated in the center of town. The streets were narrow so the only time the bus could drive there was when it had to pick up or drop off luggage. Montecatini Terme is a relatively new town. It was started about 200 years ago. The old town, Montecatini Alto, is situated on a hill a short distance away. Montecatini is a spa town. There are a number of thermal springs with high mineral content. The waters are used by tourists for mudpacks for facials, massages and for drinking. We arrived during their winter so most of the spas were closed.
     The Grand Plaza is the oldest hotel in the city. It is family run. The children of the owners play in the lobby and had toys scattered all over the place. It was not cluttered or any danger. It made one feel like they were in a family home. I don’t really understand the numbering system, but Steff and I were on the fourth floor and our room number was 210.
     Our room was smaller than the one we had in Sorrento and our window opened on an inner court so had no view. We also had no refrigerator so Steff and I put our cheese on the window ledge to keep it cool.
     The public rooms of the hotel are very elegant with a lot of marble and high ceilings. There is a photo of Guiseppe Verdi in the lobby as this was the hotel where he stayed during the summers for over 20 years.
     After settling in, Steff did an exploratory walk around town to find the Internet café and to see if she could find some Pepsi. The Internet was just across Piazza de Populo or Plaza of the People, from the hotel, an easy 5-minute walk. On our walk, we saw Gucci, Cartier, and other posh shops. This surely is different from down to earth Sorrento. The stores were having a lot of big sales to get rid of last year’s stock and to prepare for a new tourist season.
     At 6:30 the hotel had a welcoming reception for us in the grand ballroom. The chandelier would take up my whole kitchen! They served us a drink that had Asti Spumante (Italian Champagne), vodka, peach juice and something else. It was

tasty. At 7 we were served dinner. The antipasto was pickles, Italian ham, and Tuscan unsalted bread. In Tuscany they seldom put salt in their bread because the meat is so salty. We then had fruit and cheese. We also had lasagna, pork roasted in a pastry shell, spinach and potato roasted with rosemary and olive oil. For dessert we were served panatone bread with chocolate sauce.
     We visited in the lobby for a while. Carla told us we should go outside to see the passegiatto. It is a ritual practiced by Italians on weekend afternoons. The man puts on his best suit, tie and hat. The woman puts on her best dress along with her finest jewelry and for Feb. her furs. The whole town turns out in the square to parade very slowly. Carla says it’s the Italian way of showing your neighbors how prosperous YOU are and how lucky THEY are to be able to gaze upon your wealth and good looks. I stepped outside for a while and I was surely impressed! There were hundreds of people strutting their stuff.
     While I was taking in the passegiatto, Steff was off on her own mission. It seems an Italian soccer team arrived for an overnight stay at the hotel. Carla made it her mission to get Steff as close to them as possible, like pretending to show her the swimming pool because they had to go through the room where the team was watching a video of one of their previous games. Steff did get her picture taken with them before they left the next day.
     Next week Our royal greeting by Montecatini

IN MEMORIAM
SHIRLEY CLUKEY
     DETROIT and BROWNVILLE - Shirley Archer Clukey went home to be with the Lord Aug. 10, 2003. She was the daughter of the late Sarah and Lester Archer. She was born in Van Buren, Oct. 15, 1925. She is survived by her husband, Cyril Clukey, of Detroit; daughter, Sheila, of California; two sisters, Regina Bowley of Orono, and Pauline Ellis, of Palmyra. Graveside service will be 2 p.m. Aug. 23, 2003, at Brownville Cemetery.

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     The Milo Free Public Library Laugh It Up @ Your Library Summer Reading Program held its final party on Friday, August 15, at 10:00 in the Milo Town Hall dining room. There were 53 children enrolled and they read 1156 books. Although no prizes are given for the most books read, Kendra Herbest, a 2nd grader, read 86 books. The child who listened to the most books was Telos Wallace, who had 152 books read to him.
     There were three Laugh It Up @ Your Library mascots and they were won by the following children.

Chuckles the Crocodile KENDRA HERBEST
Giggles the Monkey JONAH JOHNSON
Tee Hee the Yorkshire Terrier ASHLEY GOODINE

     Kyle Gero, our 13 year old volunteer, who worked with us last summer was back again this summer to help during the summer reading program. To show their appreciation the library staff presented him with the 5th book in the series, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.
     The judges for the poster contest were Merna Dunham, Allen Monroe and Gayle Shirley.
The winners for the poster contest were:-

PRESCHOOL DIVISION:- ANTHONY WEBB
GRADES K-2:- 1ST TRISTEN BECKETT
2ND JOSEPH JOSLIN
3RD AARON GOODINE
GRADES 3-6 1ST AUTUMN JOSLIN
2ND ASHLEY GOODINE
3RD PETER MORSE

     A special prize was donated by Jean Hamlin. A former summer reading program member Jean remembered what fun it was to win “free stuff” and generously donated her set of all 5 Harry Potter books to be given as a prize to a lucky child. The lucky winner was Branson Goodine.
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     Refreshments were served after the prizes were given out. Each child in the program received a reading certificate and 2 happy face balloons. Those who helped at the party and donated food were trustees Helen Carey, Joanne DeWitt, Melanie Hussey, Shirlene Ladd and substitute Tracy Morse. Volunteers Kyle Gero and Walter Macdougall also helped. A very special friend of the summer reading program for many years is Joyce Hogan who brings punch and serves in the kitchen during the party. She also helps during the 8 weeks of the program by coming to the library every Friday night for the drawing for the food prizes which are donated by the Milo House of Pizza, C & J Variety and the Milo Farmers Union. These local businesses lend their support to our program with their generous gifts.
     Each week members of the community came in to read for a story time on Wednesday afternoons. They were Kathy Dixon-Wallace, Tracy Morse, Nancy Scroggins, Jane Jones, Neil Hamlin, Phil Gerow, Karen Durant and Nancy Barden. We thank everyone who helped to make this year’s program such a success , and I especially thank my assistant , Pamela Flanagan, who kept the program going when I was often away due to vacation or medical procedures.

CHILDREN WHO SIGNED UP FOR THE PROGRAM WERE:
JERELL AREFEIN COLBY KOELSCH
EMILY ARMOUR MICKI LOVEJOY
CORA BAILEY TAYLOR LOVEJOY
COLIN BECKETT JILLIAN LUMBRA
TRISTEN BECKETT BREANNE MCKINLEY
KENDRA CHASE BEN MORRILL
EMILY COSTELLO BROOKE MORRILL
CAMILLE CRAMER PETER MORSE
CODY DUNHAM ALYSSA MURANO
ALLISON DURANT JULIUS ANTHONY MURANO
CAITLYN DURANT JUSTIN OTTMAN
KEVIN DUPLESSIS KELSEY OTTMAN
TOMMY FLAGG NICOLE PADILLA
AARON GOODINE ASHLEY RENNER
ASHLEY GOODINE BRYAN RUSSELL
BRANSON GOODINE RICHIE RUSSELL
RANDALL HATHORN JULIA SALINGER
KENDRA HERBEST BRIANNA STONE
NOAH HILL DEVON STROUT
KENDRA JENKINS EMILY STUBBS
LEXI JENKINS JOYCE STUBBS
DERRICK JOHNSON AUTUMN TYLER
JONAH JOHNSON KINEO WALLACE
TAYLOR JOHNSON TELOS WALLACE
AUTUMN JOSLIN ANTHONY WEBB
JOSEPH JOSLIN ALAN YANBUL
TIFFANY YOUNG

Library Summer Hours
Mon.- Weds. Fri.---2:00-8:00
Telephone 943-2612

     Lawrence and Carolyn (Heal) Stanchfield, 1948 and 1950 graduates of Milo High School, will be celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary on September 5, 2003. Those who wish may send notes of congratulations to:
Larry & Kay Stanchfield
c/o Dot Baker
PO Box 153
East Orland, Maine 04431

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM

     Have you ever wondered where people stored things before storage containers were invented. They've got them in every size and style now. Tons of them line whole walls of super stores. They must be cheap to manufacture because you can get such wonderful buys on them almost daily in one store or another. But....and now this is my burning question....the cost to build and maintain a complete wall in a super store must be terribly expensive. How can they possibly be making enough money on those storage containers to maintain it all? The building, the maintenance, the clerks’ wages, the taxes, the liability of putting staff up on high ladders to stack the things, must be astronomical.
     I've become a storage container queen. My husband would just call it another of my compulsive "things." I love storage containers and can look at one in a store and imagine exactly what I would put in it and where I'd store it. As a matter of fact, I look at storage containers in other people's possession and wonder where they got it, how much they paid for it, what I'd do with it if it were mine. I've got a little million food storage containers. I have shoe box sized containers and multiple containers with drawers. I have numerous totes for out of season clothing. The out of season clothing totes are stored at camp. Ah ha, you say. The woman has two complete houses that she can store her containers in! I know. Lucky, aren't I. For Christmas this year my kids gave me a huge container.....big and rugged.....and we've wracked our brains and can't for the life of us remember what's in it...but it's down cellar (we think) and one of these days we're going to go check.
     Upstairs in my house are a number of containers that are filled with pictures. I've got actual picture boxes, a big under-the-bed plastic covered box, and three totes in the spare closet in my room. All of these are filled with pictures. When am I ever going to get to do all the scrapbooking that I've promised myself that I will do? Maybe when I retire. Every once in a while I do open one of

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the boxes that is easily accessible and I go through the pictures in that box.
     The other day I came across the above picture in with some stuff that came from my mother and father's house. Dad recognized all of the boys in the picture. Left to right: with his head down and in a shadow is Reg Doble, Ward Shaw, then there is my Dad (Charles Horne), Edwin Christie, Albert Ellingson, Pee Wee Harris who is looking at Dick Doble who is sucking his stomach in to touch his backbone. They were all at Camp Roosevelt. I'm going to guess that it was the summer of 1929...but that's just a guess. Check out the knobby knees! Also, check out those bathing suits! I know that my Uncle Allan went to Camp Roosevelt that same year, so I'm betting that he took the picture since he's not in it.
     I laughed really hard at Dick's antics with his stomach and remembered another picture I had seen of him that was taken on the steps of the Primary Building. He was the only kid in the picture who had on a big Indian head dress. I think he must have been quite a clown. The Doble children and the Horne children grew up together. They were good family friends as well as neighbors. Dad and Dick's friendship went on beyond grade school and high school and into adulthood and then retirement. Dick's been gone a long time now, but Dad's memories of him are vivid and fun to hear about.
     As luck would have it my girlfriend Lorraine (Long) Smith sent me a little note today with some clippings that she had found in amongst her Grammie Buck's recipes. One of them was from a newspaper that must have been a published fairly locally. I will share what she sent:

OUR CHEF
By Richard "Dick" Doble
FILLED SUGAR COOKIES

1 1/2 cups sugar
3/4 cup shortening (melted)
3/4 cup milk
2 teaspoons cream tartar
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon lemon or vanilla flavoring

Filling

1 cup raisins
1/2 cup walnuts
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup cold water
2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons flour
     Chop raisins. Boil first five ingredients, then add flour mixed with cold water.
     Now, there wasn't a sign of a direction for the cookie, nor was there a sign of any flour listed in the ingredients for the actual cookie part. I'm guessing Dick figured that if you didn't have a clue how to be making a cookie....you wouldn't even attempt it anyway.
     I will say how I think it would be mixed. I'd mix the sugar and melted shortening. Then I'd probably start with 1 1/2 cups of flour sifted together with the cream tartar, soda and salt and alternate this with the milk in mixing. I'd add the tsp. of flavoring and if by any chance I thought the dough needed a little more flour then I'd add it by the rounded

tablespoonful until I had a soft dough. I looked at a few soft cookie recipes and they all called for 1 1/2 to 2 cups of flour to match the shortening and sugar. In any case the dough needs to be soft. Then I think I'd chill the dough while I was making the filling. It doesn't say how much cold water you need to mix with the flour to thicken the filling....but probably you'd need just enough water to make it semi-pastey. You would need to flour a board and roll out the cookies, cut them with a round cookie cutter and place on an ungreased cookie sheet. (If you're uncomfortable not greasing the pan....give it a shot of PAM spray. Plop on a dollop of the raisin filling and then cover with a like shaped cookie that you've rolled slightly thinner than the first cookie. I'm not sure about that part....but that's what I'd do. I'd bake it at 400 degrees for 7 or 8 minutes. As a matter of fact.....now that I think of it....I think I'd make and bake one as an experiment before I filled up the cookie sheet and for some reason over baked them.
     In any case I thought it was neat that I had found this picture....then Lorraine sent me the old clipping that had been printed with Dick's recipe on it. Just as an aside....Lorraine's grandmother had written in by the cookie ingredients the words: Flour to roll and one egg.
     Do you suppose she tried the recipe and liked it better with an egg in the cookie dough? Worth a try!!
     Oh, and by the way, on this same little newspaper there was this little snippet that I thought was interesting. The bold heading read RELIGIOUS CENSUS. The body of the article said: This Saturday afternoon 30 people of the Methodist church will meet for dinner and then will start out to call at each home in Milo and Derby to determine the religious preference of each family. The results of this census will be made available to every church and clergyman in the community.
     I couldn't believe my eyes when I read this. Lorraine commented on it, too, in her note to me. Can you imagine that project in this day and age. The dinner maybe...the census...I don't think so. I'd love to know just what year that little practice was tolerated in the Town of Milo.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
A picture is worth a thousand words.
(Postcard courtesy of Gary Harmon)

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ADOPT-A-CAT
     Three abandoned kitties need patient loving homes. Two of these three-month old males have been neutered. They are a longhaired black and white and a shorthaired gray tiger. The gray coon-like kitten needs to be neutered. However, assistance is available to help with the cost. For more information please call Julie at 943-5083.


I NEED A HOME!!!

THANK YOU
     Avis Spear would like to thank the Milo/Brownville Kiwanis Club for the wonderful senior barbecue hosted at Pleasant Park on August 13. Everyone enjoyed Don Harris’ grill skills!

THE SOUND OF QUIET
BY PRISCILLA ARBO CLIFFORD OSGOOD
There’s hurt in my heart for the whole human race
Who have never known quiet in their fast frenzied pace.
When I was a girl on our farm here in Main.
(Oh, Lord! How I’d love to be back there again!)
Up stairs in the east room I’d lay in my bed
In the calm, velvet darkness that o’er the house spread,
And I’d listen to quiet in that dear, old room,
The country night sounds that you hear in the gloom.
The sound of the whip-poor-will, sweet, sad and low,
All snug in the pine as he swung to and fro.
In spring there were ‘peepers’ to break the night’s still,
Their song was a sweet one, not piercing, not shrill.
Then the great snowy owls, with their big, yellow eyes
Sent their ages old question on up to the skies.
Off in the distance, the sad, lonely cry
Of the steam locomotive that swiftly passed by.
A little bit nearer, especially in spring,
The East Branch was flowing, its song it would sing,
To the east, by the ‘horseback’ is old ‘Beeme Pond’,
A small lake of which I ‘m especially fond.
I remember the evenings when shadows grew tall,
The lap of the water, the loon’s plaintive call,
The loveliest sound, in the quiet of night,
Was the ‘whoosh’ of the pines from the wind on its flight
Now the ache’s in my heart to hear them again,
The sounds of my childhood, it oft’ gives me pain.
So I thank God for memories of clean, country air,
For I live in the city and hear its loud blare.
And I shut out the city’s mad, brawling refrain,
And drift back in memory to that dear farm in Maine.

THE INFANTRYMAN
ANONYMOUS
          The average age of the Infantryman is 19 years.
He is a short haired, tight-muscled kid who, under normal circumstances is considered by society as half man, half boy. Not yet dry behind the ears, not old enough to buy beer, but old enough to die for his country.
     He never really cared much for work and he would rather wax his own car than wash his father’s; but he has never collected unemployment either.
     He’s a recent High School graduate; he was probably an average student, pursued some form of sport activities, drives a ten year old jalopy, and has a steady girlfriend that either broke up with him when he left, or swears to be waiting when he returns from half a world away.
     He listens to rock and roll or hip-hop or rap or jazz or swing and 155 mm Howitzers.
     He is 10 or 15 pounds lighter now than when he was at home because he is working or fighting from before dawn to well after dusk.
     He has trouble spelling, thus letter writing is a pain for him, but he can field strip a rifle in the dark.
He can recite to you the nomenclature of a machine gun or grenade launcher and use either one effectively if he must.
     He digs foxholes and latrines and can apply first aid like a professional.
     He can march until he is told to stop or stop until he is told to march.
     He obeys orders instantly and without hesitation, but he is not without spirit or individual dignity.
     He is self-sufficient. He has two sets of fatigues: he washes one and wears the other. He keeps his canteens full and his feet dry. He sometimes forgets to brush his teeth, but never to clean his rifle. He can cook his own meals, mend his own clothes, and fix his own hurts.
     If you’re thirsty, he’ll share his water with you; if you are hungry, his food. He’ll even split his ammunition with you in the midst of battle when you run low.
     He has learned to use his hands like weapons and weapons like they were his hands. He can save your life-or take it, because that is his job.
     He will often do twice the work of a civilian, draw half the pay and still find ironic humor in it all.
     He has seen more suffering and death than he should have in his short lifetime.
     He has stood atop mountains of dead bodies, and helped to create them.
     He has wept in public and in private, for friends who have fallen in combat and is unashamed.
     He feels every note of the National Anthem vibrate through his body while at rigid attention, while tempering the burning desire to ‘square-away’ those around him who haven’t bothered to stand, remove their hats, or even stop talking. In an odd twist, day in and day out, far from home, he defends their right to be disrespectful.
     Just as did his Father, Grandfather, and Great-grandfather, he is paying the price for our freedom.
Beardless or not, he is not a boy.
     He is the American Fighting Man that has kept this country free for over 200 years.
     He has asked nothing in return, except our friendship and understanding.
     Remember him, always, for he has earned our respect and admiration with his blood.

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BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather book.
AUGUST – 1966
August 19-Sunny-60° at 7 am and 78° at 6 pm.
August 20-Sunny & cool-50° at 6:50 am and 80° at 5 pm.
August 21-Sunny & cool AM-Cloudy PM-52° at 6:50 am.
August 22-Mostly sunny-50° at 7:30 am and 66° at 7 pm.
August 23-Rain, Misty & Foggy PM-54° at 7:30 am and 56° at 7:30 pm.
August 24-Mostly sunny-56° at 7:30 am and 60° at 7:30 pm.
August 25-Sunny AM-Cloudy PM-58° at 8 am.

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     My updates for the next couple of months will have to be quick ones as Katie and Eric are in the process of moving home, and I’m spending lots of fun time with her. As a matter of fact, she and I did a whole days worth of Animal Control calls on Saturday and the work is a lot easier and a lot more fun when she helps!
     One of the calls involved catching a stray pregnant cat on the Sleeper Road. Kirby had gone out in the morning and set a live trap . Katie and I were pleasantly surprised when we pulled up to the property and the cat was in the trap. Cats are sure a lot easier and quicker to catch than groundhogs!
     We transferred the kitty into a cat-carrier and brought her to our house. We let her out in Ben’s bedroom and she skidaddled under the bed. We tried our darndest to catch her, but 20 minutes and a maimed wrist later (mine), she was still eluding us. As of noon Sunday, she is still hiding, but has plenty of food, water and a place to stay warm and safe.
     Wild cats are so strong, quick, and such a sad sight. I don’t know if she can be tamed enough to adopt out or not and she is one of hundreds in our area. I wish people who refuse to spay or neuter their animals could see all the cats that are left to fend for themselves. I also wish they would consider the cost to the town and the state for tending to them. It’s very hard for me not to spend my time being bitter towards these irresponsible folks, but I know a lot of it is ignorance. I’m trying to be tolerant.
     On a lighter note, things on the farm are refreshingly calm and peaceful. MOST of the fowl are free ranging during the day and going into the coop at night to be safely locked up. The exceptions are three of the guineas and I have that problem well in hand , I hope.
     I knew the guinea hens were laying eggs, as they had laid their first few in the chicken’s nests in the coop. For three weeks or more though, I haven’t seen one of their eggs. Guineas are very wild acting birds, and it takes a lot of patience and work to teach them to act the way we want them to, that is, to go to the coop to roost each night. I did all of the cooping up and treat training that I could, but their instinct to brood and hatch their young is trying to take over.
     I had an idea where they had decided to nest, and Sunday morning I could hear them calling back to me when I yelled for them to come home and have a treat. I went to

search the field where I thought they were hiding. Radar the dog and Phil and Brad the kittens followed along to help. As I walked back and forth in the field, Radar and the kitties searched also. Our work paid off as Brad stumbled across the setting hens. Brad may not want to help me again though, because he learned that ?madder than a wet hen? could easily be replaced with ?madder than a setting Guinea hen !? The noises that came from the potential mama put me in the mind of a pre-historic Jurassic Park, although I know that no angry velocaraptor ever put more fear in roosting pterodactyl than that guinea put into Brad. He flew out of the field into the driveway with an enraged guinea hen pecking and grabbing at him.
     But thanks to Brads discovery, I now have over 50 guinea eggs incubating. I don’t actually know that they are fertile, as three guineas were setting on the eggs, and I’m not sure if the fourth is a male or a female. I put 30 or so eggs under one of my broody Buff Orpington hens and put the other 20 or so in my incubator. I want to discourage the girls from nesting in the field so I will continue to take their eggs until they give up and resume sleeping in their nice safe coop. “They” say it’s not nice to mess with mother nature, but “they” never met me……..Mother-worry wart.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

AUGUST 13 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy welcomed twenty members and guest Lt. Gov. Hal Sherman.
     Roy Bither led us in the Pledge of Allegiance and Paul Grindle led us in prayer.
     Edwin told us about a circle of ducks within sight of his camp in Bowerbank. A loon was also in sight but went out of view and came up in the middle of the family of ducks. They scattered every which way and one little duck seemed to walk

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on the water in his haste to get to the shore! Was it an accident that the loon came so near or was he just trying to intimidate his fellow swimmers?
     Veteran’s Memorial Park is the chosen name for the boat landing area.
     A $100 donation from the Orion Rebekah Lodge #16 for the Gazebo Project fund has been received and is greatly appreciated.
     Eleven happy and sad dollars were donated today for being back, leaving the coast for inland, an apology, being a member, daughter and family visit, Tyler, and a vacation to Conn. Thirty-two happy dollars went to purchase raffle tickets that will benefit PETS, Preventing Euthanasia Through Sterilization. This program has cut down the number of pets that have to be put down.
     Edwin was going to auction some of his black fly motels but forgot them. These lodgings are for the black flies to rest after a day of plaguing humans.
There were fourteen served at the senior barbeque last week at Milo Heights. Today’s barbeque will be at Pleasant Park. Key Club member Tabitha Olmstead has helped her Mom, Buffy, at each of the barbeques. Thank you Tabitha.
     The Three Rivers News has set a new record for sales with 338 issues sold last week! The trcmaine.org site could upgrade and stop pop-up ads with a few more donations.

     The Gazebo Project is beginning to receive money for memory plaques that are available for a donation of $25 or more.
     Board meeting report: Letters of support for the Gazebo Project are needed, Isabel’s Hope Endowment will be presented to the New England District, a movie and dinner is being discussed, the Zoot Suit Revue will be presented on September 27 at the Arts Center, a Coffeehouse will be held on October 25, Stephanie Gillis is starting up a children’s theater and Kiwanis has donated $500 as seed money, officer installation will be September 24 at the Legion Hall, and a fruit sale is in the works for December. This could be a joint project with the Key Club.
     Lt. Gov. Sherman requested items for the silent auction to be held by Gov. Ed Murphy.
     Our speaker next week will be Fran Moore, a physical therapist at Mayo Regional Hospital, and/or Jerry White, the Dover-Foxcroft YMCA director.

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