Three Rivers News, 2003-09-02
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 43
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

Milo Elementary News
     Milo Elementary welcomes some new staff members this year. When you come in to the school you will meet Mrs. Susan Keith, our new secretary. We have a new Guidance Counselor, Mrs. Susie Davis. Our new music teacher is no stranger to our community, Mr. Jack Eastman. We have several new
Educational Technicians, Mrs. Reta Haley in second grade, Mrs. Tina Johnston in grades four and five and Mrs. Pamela Stubbs in our special education program. We know that they will all be a great addition to our staff.
     We are very excited about our new music program this year. We will be having classroom music for the first time in several years. We are also planning a fifth grade band. I am sure that we will appreciate the music during our weekly assemblies.
     We are also beginning a new math program this year. I know that you will be hearing about this from your children. During our Open House you will get a chance to hear about it from the teachers. We will be sending information home to parents about the different topics we will be studying. Please look for your "homework" in your child's backpack.
     We will continue our weekly assemblies this year. We will be gathering as a school on Friday mornings at 8:30 in the gym. We take this time to celebrate the happenings of the week . We invite all parents and family members who are able to attend to join us. During the year, there will be some special assemblies where special people are honored. Notice of these
programs will be in the Kiwanis Newsletter and in notices your children bring home.
We are continuing to collect the General Mills Boxtops for education. last year the school earned over $400 by sending these labels/boxtops in. These are the pink labels that are found on many General Foods and Betty Crocker foods. The school also collects used ink cartridges for printers, these are turned in for cash as well.

Open House at Milo Elementary
     We would like to invite all families to our Open House next Thursday, September. The school will be open from 5:30-7:30 to welcome families to visit the classrooms. We hope to see many of you here. If you are unable to make the Open House, you are welcome to visit us at any time during the school day. We do ask all visitors to sign in at the office and get a visitor's pass. In our current times, we need to know who is in and out of our building at all times.

Tips for Parents from the Principal's Office
     We know that children learn everywhere, everyway. Since they spend more time at home than they do in school, we know that home time can also be important learning time. As a parent you can make sure your home creates an environment that promotes learning.
     Many of the things that are most effective in turning your home into a "learning center" don't cost any money. Here's a quiz to see whether your home is a learning center. Next week I'll include some tips on how parents can surround their children with learning.
  • Do you have a place to display your children's work?
  • Do you cook together as a family?
  • Do you eat together as a family at least three times a week?
  • Do the children help put the groceries away?
  • Do you play family games using math?
  • Do you limit the amount of television your children watch?
  • Do you have regular family reading time?
  • Do you encourage children to write letters?
  • Do you have regular routines for bedtime?
  • Does your child's room have at least one map in it?
  • Do your children have regular responsibilities around the house?
  • Do you try to combine learning with household activities?

     Remember this fact: From the time a child is born until she graduates from high school at age 18, more than 85% of his/her waking, learning hours are spent OUTSIDE the classroom-mainly at home. Home is truly the primary place a child learns.

CLASSES BEGIN AT BROWNVILLE ELEMENTARY


KATHY WITHAM AND FRIENDS.


READY TO LEARN!!!!

     School is back in full swing. Students at Brownville Elementary returned to find some construction changes. Here, Mrs. Witham is showing some students her new office and Miranda and Shelby are reviewing their keyboarding skills on the computer.
     It's great to be back!


POLARITY YOGA CLASSES
START THIS WEEK AT
RED EARTH
26 MAIN ST. MILO
Tuesdays 7-8pm
Sundays 6-7pm
CALL 943-2325
FOR MORE INFO.
USE REAR SIDE DOOR
FOR CLASS ENTRANCE


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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., SEPT. 2 SEALEG SALAD, CORN RELISH, CUKES, FRUIT COCKTAIL
WED., SEPT 3 HAMBURGER GREEN BEAN CASSEROLE, TOSSED SALAD, FROSTED CAKE
THUR., SEPT. 4 ROAST PORK, MASHED POTATO, PEAS, GELATIN
FRI., SEPT. 5 FISHBURGER DELUXE, ROSEMARY POTATOES, 3-BEAN SALAD, RASPBERRY YOGURT SQUARE
MON. SEPT. 8

BAKED CHICKEN BREAST, BAKED POTATO, SQUASH, BUTTERSCOTCH PUDDING

TUES., SEPT. 9

MAC AND CHEESE, GREEN BEANS, BASIL TOMATOES, GINGER COOKIE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 9 MILO GARDEN CLUB FIELD TRIP
to Treworgy Orchards, Levant. Bring a bag lunch (ice cream, drinks on sale). Car-pool from the Municipal Parking Lot at 11:30 a.m. In case of rain, meet at the Town Hall at 1 p.m.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Brownville is (a) 157 (b) 168 (c) 175 (d) 180 years old as a town.
2. The "hero of Lewiston" was (a) Dennis Larson (b) Danny Small (c) Alan Kirby (d) Ray Heath.
3. BHS burned in (a) 1930 (b) 1932 (c) 1935 (d) 1937.
4. Brownville's Road Commissioner is (a) Buster Grant (b) Larry Folsom (c) Sophie Wilson (d) Paul Grindle.
5. Brownville's population is (a) 1894 (b) 1567 (c) 1234 (d) 1259.
6. Our first town manager was (a) Everett Gerrish (b) Lyle Towne (c) Enrest Seavey (d) Dave Barrett.
7. The Herrick Hotel once was a (a) hospital (b) warehouse (c) school (d) garage.
8. Russell "Buddie" Ladd was postmaster for (a) 23 (b) 25 (c) 28 (d) 30 years
9. The largest train wreck in Maine's history was the (a) Sugar Wreck (b) Bowling Alley Wreck (c) Onawa Wreck (d) Wreck at Mileage 3.20.
10. (a) The Pleasant River Hotel (b) Dillon's Hall (c) the Star Market (d) the post office was at the end of Main Street in BJ.

Answer: 1-d 2-c 3-b 4-c 5-c 6-a 7-c 8-d 9-c 10a.

Bangkok Continued
BY BILL SAWTELL
     I lived in the brand new Prince Hotel-the top story had yet to be completed when we arrived. It was surrounded by a picked glass fence and guarded by friendly Thai police. One evening a mad Thai cab driver got through to the front desk waving a knife, causing considerable commotion.
     We were transported to work by bus six days a week. Instead of getting Saturdays off, I played left field for the Special Troops softball team coached by Major Don Kinkle, having one of the best batting averages in the league. Games were well chronicled by the two English language newspapers in the city, the Bangkok Post and the Bangkok World.
     In a game of undefeateds, Special Troops beat the Big Green and I was credited with a grand slam when the ball took a bad hop over the centerfielder's glove and went to the klong , a Thai river along the outfield at the International School Field.
     When I was transferred to Sattahip, Special Troops was still undefeated. In Sattahip I caught on the All Star team that won the national championship. Two lieutenants who had signed Major League contracts played on the All Star team., as had the pitcher of another Bankok club.
     I took a course in abnormal psychology from the Far East Division of the University of Maryland. There were many abnormal subjects (katoys and kamoys) in the city.
More to come

Thank You:
     I would like to thank everyone that said prayers, sent flowers, cards, and gifts in the recent passing of my beloved wife Jeannie. It has been overwhelming the amount of support that I have received from family and friends.
Thank you all.
Gordon Joslyn

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THE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20th meeting of the Piscataquis county council of the American legion in Brownville Jct. has been canceled due to a previous commitment by the post. The next regular scheduled meeting will be October 18 at the Joseph P. Chaison Post 41, Milo.


Class of 1948 to Meet
     The Milo High School Class of 1948 will hold its next bi-monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 9th at Freda & Everett Cook's Bread & Breakfast on High Street. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. with one of Freda's delicious breakfasts and the usual socializing and then some preliminary planning for our 56th reunion on July 3, 2003. All classmates are urged to attend.


SAFETY NOTICE
     I would like to ask people to remember that the paved area that surrounds and runs between Park Street UMC and the Baptist church is a driveway and parking lot. It is not a through street and we have children and adults that walk through to the post office or to the churches.
     There have been several instances where pedestrians and cars have had narrow misses and several times cars leaving or coming to the church have almost been hit by another car. We know that with the construction on Pleasant Street we are an easier route to the Post Office and places, but please enter and exit SLOWLY and with CARE so no one gets injured.
Thanks, Rev. Michele St. Cyr


My Milo Massage
     I have had several massages in my life, starting in the City of Falls Church, Va., near where I live. I used to be a reporter there, and recall when a massage therapist petitioned the City Council to give her a business license in the 1980s. She testified about the healing nature of massage, but some of the old timers did not hesitate to remind her that not so long ago, a massage parlour was a polite way of saying a brothel.
     But wisdom prevailed, as it usually does in Falls Church, which was founded by Maine natives more than 300 years ago, and Marlene the masseuse opened her business, went on to become the president of the American Massage Therapy Association, and got at least one new client. I found it necessary to go to her at least once a month because reporting gave me repeat motion syndrome from throwing open the car door at every town hall and courthouse in northern Virginia to pick up reports and filings.
     I am no longer a reporter, but I enjoy writing and hope to write fiction some day. If there is one thing I learned in the news business, it is that truth is stranger than fiction. But I digress from the purpose of this brief article, which is to describe the massage I got in Milo from Andrea Beaudoin, a licensed massage therapist and registered polarity practitioner. I am a summer person (well, not even that, a two-week-a-summer person). My husband, Paul, son, Ben, and I come up every year to stay with my Dad, David French, at his place on Schoodic Lake. You might know him. He went to Milo High School (class of 1956).
     Anyway, Ben and I were at True Value when I saw Andrea's sign on the sidewalk and decided to go in. She and her husband, also named Paul, have a lot of nice stuff for sale: arts, crafts, books, made-to-order lotions, and jewelry. I learned that Andrea does a craniosacral clinic one-day a week from 2-5 p.m. This _-hour session is only $5. It would be $30 in Washington, so, being one

to pinch a penny ‘til it screams, I was there the next day for a session, and was pleasantly surprised that I did not get pinched until I screamed, because I had no idea what to expect. I was ushered into a nice room in the back of the shop. Soft music was playing. I lay down on the table with a pillow under my knees and Andrea, who has a very gentle touch, began what I will call the laying on of hands. I believe this has been around since biblical times, when, if memory of my readings suffices, that is how they referred to what healers did back then, Christ, if I am not mistaken, being one of them. I tend to be very responsive to this type of work because both of my grandparents on my mother's side were chiropractors, which, as you probably know, has to do with the adjusting of bones and the muscles that support them for improved health. So I grew up getting what my grandmother called treatments. Most people would call it a neck rub.
     I learned that craniosacral therapy is used to detect imbalances in the craniosacral system (membranes and fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal chord), which can be the cause of sensory, motor or neurological dysfunction. The craniosacral area extends from the bones of the skull, face, and mouth, which make up the cranium, down to the sacrum, or tailbone area. Well, after a half-hour of this gentle laying on of hands, I found myself to be more balanced, and I also found myself to be signing up for a full-hour massage with Andrea the following week.
     For this I was led to a lavender painted room on the second floor of the building at 26 Main Street. Andrea has been there since November 2002, having moved from Westbrook, Maine. After filling out a short health form, I disrobed and lay down between clean-smelling sheets on a massage table, again with a pillow under my knees. Soft yoga chanting music was playing. It was from India but sounded kind of like Country and Western. I started out by laying on my back, and Andrea gave me such a nice scalp massage that the staff of Korner Kreations, which used to occupy the building she is in, would be proud. Then she got to work on my neck and limbs. Massage therapists have this way of respecting your privacy by uncovering one arm or leg at a time to work on them. According to Andrea's brochure, therapeutic massage is a relaxing form of bodywork that is used to relieve a specific body complaint or just to feel wonderful. Neuromuscular techniques are used to relieve tension, stress, knots, and pain at a very deep and healing level. This professional body work can help restore a body's natural ability to maintain health and vitality. To me, it is like a combing of the muscles, and leaves me feeling very relaxed and creative, which is good because I am usually anxious and blocked on account of working in the Nation's Capital on security-conscious Capitol Hill. When Andrea was done with my front side, I flipped over on my stomach, and placed my face in the face cradle, only to see the following words written on the massage table: "There is no substitute for the human touch." The cost of the massage was $50, but she often works out barter situations, she said.
     I don't know much about New Agey stuff like polarity work, which holds that disease begins in a person's energy field and later manifests in the body, but I do know that we have not advanced much as a species. We are still fighting wars, and, with all due respect to good county attorneys, we also have quite a proliferation of law school graduates. But I digress once again. Andrea seems to have the ability to balance a person's energy, comb their muscles, and add to their general well being. Living somewhat in the fast lane, I realize how lucky I am to come up here to Milo-Brownville, where year-rounders have the woods, lakes, mountains, springs, nature in general, and now Andrea, to work out their kinks. I'll be back next year for all of the above, and let's hope the war mongers and law schoolers do the same–but in their neck of the woods!
Yvonne French

     Editors Note: Thank you Yvonne for such a nice story. I can’t wait to hear from you again. Val

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TRC News Alert
     Three Rivers Community Alliance added a new category, Classifieds, to its Bulletin Board. Need a place for job postings, yard sales, or if you are looking for work? Visit the TRC Bulletin Board @ http://www.trcmaine.org/boards/ and see for yourself!

FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     What a shock last Friday when I went into my personal library mail and up came a sign announcing that my program had been attacked by the Blaster Worm virus! Being a very novice computer user, I quickly got out of the program without opening anything. Ironically I had just had a notice from Karl Beiser of the Maine State Library that the Blaster Worm had invaded the MSLN (Maine State Library Network). Pam, our assistant librarian, spent all the Monday library hours consulting with our computer coordinator and clearing up our two affected computers. I can’t really understand why any person very knowledgeable about computers would spend their time trying to vandalize other machines. Because that is what a worm is—simply vandalism. It doesn’t gain anything for the person who creates it, and it makes lots of time, trouble and expense for others. I suppose like all vandalism it gives a feeling of power. I had always heard of viruses but with antivirus protection on the computers, I had not worried about it. I guess I have learned to keep my eyes open.
     Pleasant Street is no longer torn up at the library end and getting to the library is now easy again. We were very busy as patrons could come in easily, and as they remembered we would not be open on Labor Day. Last spring Val gave the Kiwanis Kids all a tomato plant. She gave all her extras to the library staff. I had two tomatoes from my plants this week with lots more waiting to get ripe. I was pretty excited to get them, and they were delicious little orange tomatoes. How many of you Kiwanis Kids were able to harvest tomatoes too?
     We have had many books donated this last month, and I thank Ann Beland, Nelson and Minira Brown, Annie Chase, Ethelyn Doane , Barbara and Neil Hamlin, Jon Lawton and Tricia Stanhope for their contributions. Many are processed and ready to be circulated. Listed below are some of our newest donations.

Chesney, Marion SNOBBERY WITH VIOLENCE ( author of Hamish & Agatha)
Greene, Bob & Winfrey, Oprah MAKE THE CONNECTION
Greenlaw, Linda THE LOBSTER CHRONICLES
L’Amour, Louis BOWDRIE’S LAW
L’Amour, Louis NORTH TO THE RAILS
McCullough, David THE JOHNSTOWN FLOOD
Morris, Jim T HE OLDEST ROOKIE
Morris, Sylvia RAGE FOR FAME (Clare Booth Luce)
Nasar, Sylvia A BEAUTIFUL MIND
Some new books that we have received free from book companies or backordered are:-
Phillips, Michael ANGELS WATCHING OVER ME
( 1st in Savannah Sisters)
Riddle, Paxton THE EDUCATION OF RUBY LOONFOOT
Stasheff, Christopher MIND OUT OF TIME (Sci/fi)
Stevens, C.J. COLLECTED POEMS

Library Winter Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00
Telephone 943-2612

Skowhegan Motocross Park News
     Skowhegan Motocross Park had some racing going this past weekend. TREVOR LYFORD raced in the ATV class and had some trouble on the first turn...his tires got hooked up with another 4-wheeler’s.......but he was o.k. and took off again finishing 5th in the 1st moto and 3rd in the 2nd moto.....which was good enough for a 4th place overall trophy. He also raced in the 50cc 7-9 class finishing 6th overall.
     KYLE FOSS raced hard in the 85C class and he also raced in the 105 open class. Kyle finished in 2nd place in each moto in the 85c and brought home the 2nd place trophy....putting him to within 1 point of the 1st place leader for the end of the year trophies. JUSTIN MORRILL and MIKE BISHOP raced the 125 youth class. Mike finished in the midddle of the pack and raced just 1 moto. Justin raced both motos and finished in 8th place overall out of a whopping 30 bikes. DUSTIN BISHOP raced in the 125 Novice class and came away with a 2nd place trophy for the day.

A Historical Review - Part 1
They Fought in World War I
Old Soldiers Recall How It Was
Observer, by Edna Bradeen, (date unknown)
(SUBMITTED BY C.K. ELLISON, 2003)
     Milo -- The first complete division of the U.S. Army to fight in France in World War I was the 26th Division. Two Maine men were members of that contingent, the 26th Division -- specifically the 103rd Infantry Regiment, Company F. The outfit, Maine's only infantry unit, was formerly known as the 2nd Maine Regiment. But when it was necessary to expand the size of the troop from 60 to 250 men, the Army designated it as the 103rd. Company F originally was raised from the Piscataquis County, with many Milo men enlisting in it.
     Harry Ellis, 90, signed on in Company F on June 7, 1917. A Brownville resident at the time, Ellis joined the group, called Norton's Company, and was a first sergeant.
     Hazen Otis Hager, 81, also enlisted in Company F. He was 16 at the time. His 17th birthday was spent in the fields of France.
     From Dover, Ellis was sent by train to Augusta and stationed at Camp Keys. According to the company history, followed by Milo resident Stanley Howland, many of the men were dispersed throughout the state, guarding bridges.
     Eventually, the Maine men were joined by New Hampshire soldiers. When the rest of the company could be reassembled, soldiers were sent by train to New York. They traveled under the cover of darkness. Once in New York they boarded ship to be sent overseas.
     Ellis recalled that the soldiers were taken down the bay by tugboat to the troop carrier. They spent the day in the harbor and left around dusk. "The funny part is," Ellis said, "although we had been all over the boat during the day, we were put under cover when we left, all locked down below until we got out of sight."
     The troops landed in Liverpool, England, for a week and then were ferried to LeHavre, France and dispatched to Villouxel by train. "When we got to France," Ellis said, "there was very little food. We were fed twice a day, but the Americans hadn't gotten any food for us. We used to take a farm wagon and 10 or 12 men to haul it and go to Al Fol la Grande for supplies, such as they were."
     "In the afternoon, we would have a small potato, a little meat and a slice of bread. The morning meal was smaller, " he said, "We didn't drill, because we weren't being fed enough."
     Ellis said the company went in mid-winter to the front lines to train. The allied troops were on one side of a canal, the Germans on the other side. "It was here that Joseph Chaisson, for whom the Milo Post is named, was killed," Ellis said. "Joe and another sergeant had some small bombs they shot across the
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canal. Joe liked to do this. The Germans, though, returned the shots and one caught Joe in the throat." With the Germans threatening Paris in the spring, the 103rd was hurriedly sent as a reserve force for the 1st and 2nd Maine units. (Continued next week)

LETTER TO THE EDITOR:
Hi ..
     I've just come across your site for the first time, and I like it. While we are trying to do much the same thing with the Magic City Morning Star in the Millinocket, East Millinocket, Medway, and Woodville area, we don't yet have the same level of community participation. It looks very nice, and I can see that it would be quite helpful to those who live in your community, so I thought I'd let you know that.

Ken Anderson
Information, Magic City Morning Star

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Two years ago a little girl walked into my life with the most incredible eyes that I have ever seen. My own granddaughters had recently moved away and this child was a dead ringer for one of my own little darlings. My heart had a big empty spot that needed filling, and this little girl was the answer to my longing. The eyes were big and brown and I'm a sucker for brown eyes every time I see a great big set of them. I instantly fell in love with this child.....and she with me. It's hard to ignore a grown up who thinks you're just about the cat's meow and who lavishes you with love and affection on a daily basis. That was me.....she was my kid!!
     She tested the waters that first year of school. Once in a while she'd pull a prank in the kindergarten classroom and she'd have to sit in the hall for a few minutes to "think" about the better choice that she should have made. It was harder for me to see her sitting there than it was for her....I know that. I lovingly harped at her to behave herself...all the time holding the dear little thing on my lap so that she knew that no matter what....I still loved her and that wouldn't ever change. Imagine how fragile these little children are.
     My little doll face had had a pretty rough start in her, as yet, short little life. Removed from the home of her biological mother, she had luckily been placed into a loving foster home. Lucky little girl. A couple of years have passed now, and we've all worried more than a few times that the State would decide to make a new plan for her, wrenching her away from us. We couldn't imagine why, but stranger things have happened to little children in the State's care before.... unexplainable changes that twist the hearts of those who love them.
     All this time, the foster parents have slowly but surely been working towards adopting her and making her officially their very own. There have been ups and downs in this process, and times when we thought that the wheels couldn't possibly turn any slower, but finally we got the call this summer that the adoption was going to take place. They had invited me to the ceremony and it was with winged feet that my husband and I made the trip to Dover-Foxcroft to witness this happy occasion. I can barely tell this story without puddling up. This precious child now officially has a real family. She's got a Mom and Dad and a sister who all share the same last name. She's got Grammies and Grampies galore.

     Not all stories of little foster children end as happy as this story ends. It's unfathomable to me that there are abused or unwanted or neglected children in this world. We see them, read about them, and watch them on television all the time. God love their little hearts. They just want parents to love them. Even when they are trying the patience of their care givers, it's their way of testing for the unconditional love that they find so hard to accept. It's a special person who can give that kind of unconditional love to a child that is not their own. But, I can attest to the fact that it can be done. I've got a trail a mile long of kids that I've loved and been fortunate enough to help nurture. There must be lots of other people around like me. Makes you wonder why there are so many kids out there who are still searching for love.
     I would challenge you to open up your heart and expand it to include a little kid who could use some extra love. If you're feeling sorry for yourself because your children are all grown up and you don't have anyone to school shop for....why not find a little kid who could use some new school clothes. When the holidays arrive, think about sponsoring a child who might not have the kind of Christmas that your own kids enjoyed. The school or the Town Office could surely put you in touch with a needy child. If they can't....I can.
     Stay current on the laws that govern the Department of Human Services. If it seems as though they are making it harder and harder for loving parents to be matched up with needy children, then you must write to the Governor and your legislator and tell them how you feel about that. When you hear or read about some situation that is abhor able, keep in mind that some poor little innocent child was probably caught in the middle of the situation and that child was, no doubt, vulnerable and felt unwanted and unloved and quite possibly desperate. If you hear that a child has been uncontrollably naughty and has breached the boundaries of acceptable behavior, ask why this child is testing the discipline system. Ten to one there is a situation that has left this child wondering about his or her self-worth. Believing in your own lovability and self-worth shouldn't be something that a little kid has to worry about......ever.
     The President is worried about "no child being left behind." I'm worried about "no child feeling unloved." Wouldn't it be great if there was as much energy being put into each and every child being loved, as there is into teaching them their schoolwork. A child's schoolwork will come along when they aren't worried about who loves them. A parent who loves and nurtures and who is tuned into their child's needs will see that they aren't left behind.....the President shouldn't have to worry about that.
     I went to a lovely little party this past weekend. It was a pot-luck luncheon. This is the recipe for the delicious Dan's Zucchini Casserole that we all enjoyed.

1 lb. ground chuck
1 medium sized zucchini (or one small zucchini and one small summer squash)
1 small onion peeled and chopped
1 small green pepper chopped
1 can cream of Mushroom Soup
1 cup sour cream
1 package stovetop stuffing mix - any variety
1 stick of butter (melted)
1 8 oz. bag of shredded cheddar cheese
1 can of sliced water chestnuts (optional crunchy addition to the recipe)
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     Wash and cut the zucchini in bite sized chunks or slices (Dan seeds his, but that's optional).
     Either fry up the zucchini until tender or steam them until they are tender. Mix the softened zucchini with the chopped onion and green pepper. Add the Cream of Mushroom Soup, sour cream and the drained water chestnuts if you choose to use them and set this mixture aside. Mix the stuffing mix with the butter. This will make it crumbly. Fry out the ground chuck. In a greased 9X13 pan, sprinkle half of the stuffing mix. Then put your layer of meat, then the layer of creamed mixture, then the cup of shredded cheese on top of that and finally the second half of the stuffing mixture crumbled on top of it all. Bake at 375 degrees for 30 minutes or until heated through.

My Italy Trip Part 12
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Lucca
     Today’s optional excursion was to Lucca. It is in the Valley of the Mists like Montecatini. It is about 40 miles Northwest of Florence. Lucca was settled by the Ligurians, became a Roman town and later in 1369 became one of the most powerful city state republics of Northern Italy. It was then a dukedom before rejoining Tuscany in 1847. Today it has a population of around 400,000.
     We left for Lucca after walking to the bus parking area. It took less than a half-hour to make the trip. Though the city is very large, the old section we explored is inside a wall over fifty feet thick and thirty plus feet high. Most of the City States of Northern Italy were once walled cities. Today there are only remnants of walls around most of them. There are a couple of reasons why the walls of Lucca still stand. First, by the time the wall was finished, the wars between City States were about over, and second, when the city decided to break the wall for expansion, Elisa Baciocchi, a sister to Napoleon, had been given the city by Napoleon and decreed that the wall was to stay. Today the top of the wall is used for jogging.
     The bus dropped us off outside the wall because of the narrow streets. We were met by our guide, Ria who took us to the top of the wall for our first view of the old town. There were many square towers around the old city. Ria told us that families built these towers to show their wealth. A higher tower meant greater wealth. Today all the towers are the same height, because Florence conquered Lucca and to force submission, they decreed that all towers had to be the same height. Ria pointed out how one family got around the decree by planting a tree on top of theirs.
     From our vantage point we could see into the back yard of a beautiful villa owned by the Pfeiffer family. The yard was filled with statuary and fountains. Ria mentioned a recent Hollywood movie that used this villa, but I forgot to write it down.
     We descended the wall and walked to the Basilica of St. Frediano. It was built in the 6th century by Frediano, the Irish Bishop of Lucca and was dedicated to St. Vincenzo. The church was finished in 1104 and is one of 100 churches inside the walled city. The outside is very unimpressive. Marble from a nearby Roman Amphitheater was used in its construction. The marble columns didn’t match and the outside wall contained blocks of different colors of marble. Ria said it was an early example of

recycling. We probably would not have been taken to this church if it were not for Saint Zita whose remains are inside. The story goes that St. Zita was a poor girl who worked for a rich family. Each day when she left the house where she was employed, she was distressed by the number of starving people she saw. She started to hide bread under her dress to give the poor. One day she was caught by the rich man and he asked what she had under her dress. When she lifted her dress, hundreds of flowers came out. Later many years after she had died, her body was exhumed and no decomposition had occurred. For these two reasons she was considered a saint. Scientifically, the preservation of her body can be explained by the fact that she was buried in a peat bog where the tannins mummified her, but who knows.
     We walked to the old amphitheater. One wouldn’t recognize it today. People now live in apartments where the seats used to be. The inner portion is used as an outdoor market, tourist trap during the summer, and for the past few years has been the site of concerts. The town council is still trying to get the people who live there to stop hanging out their laundry for all to see.
     Our next stop was a small market where I bought some olive oil and a cappuccino. We stopped at the church of Saint Andrew. The church itself is small, but its façade is much larger for effect. Some of the windows in the façade are above the roof and are open to the sky on both sides.
     On our way to the Town Square we passed the birthplace of Puccini. Today there is a beautiful bronze statue of him with his characteristic cigarette. Puccini was not popular in Lucca during his lifetime and never visited after he became famous. The problem was that he was having an affair with a married woman and the citizens of Lucca didn’t like it. We had an included lunch at the Gli Ortid Via Elisa restaurant. We had Bruschetta, Italian ham, bacon, spelt soup, and chocolate pie. Spelt is an ancient variety of wheat and can be purchased in the US in health food stores.
     We took a scenic route back to Montecatini and came close to the town where Pinocchio was written. Pinocchio is the most widely read book in the world after the Bible and the Koran. We stopped in Montecatini to pick up anyone else who wanted to go to Montecatini Alto. The bus took us to the outskirts of town near to where the funicular station was. We walked to the café where Verdi used to have his cappuccino. Carla treated us to an expresso, cappuccino or ice cream. We explored some of the buildings before returning to the bus and the trip back to the hotel. Carla said we were the first group she had had that had enough energy to walk up the hill to the church.
     At 6:15 we had a lecture on the Italian Renaissance in Florence. The information we were given would require an article in itself. In Florence it went from 1401 to 1492 when the de Medici family ran out of money from fighting wars and the artists moved to Rome where the church could afford them.
     We ate at the hotel tonight. Steff is getting very friendly with Carla and Fernanda, the other group’s tour guide. She also is quite friendly with Liliana, the wife of the hotel owner. She ate with them today. I had cream of asparagus soup, veal with artichokes, wine, water, bread, and a baked apple for dessert.
Next week Firenze (Florence)

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50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
Friends and family are invited to attend a 50th Wedding Anniversary celebration in honor of Vaughn and Marie Bradstreet at the United Baptist Church in Milo on Sunday, September 7, 2003 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm.
Please, no gifts, cards if you wish.


MAKE A DATE TO DONATE!
PLEASE GIVE BLOOD!
PLEASE COME TO THE MILO AREA BLOOD DRIVE.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2003
2:00 – 7:00 P.M.
AT THE MILO TOWN HALL
SPONSORED BY THE
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS &
PISCATAQUIS LODGE #44 OF THE FREE MASONS
RANDOM DRAWINGS OF PRIZES FOR DONORS!


MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
SEPTEMBER 8 – 12
Monday-Cheese burger, school bun, rice pilaf, California blend veg., pears, and milk every day.
Tuesday-Italian sand., sliced cukes, chips, and brownies.
Wednesday-Shepherd’s pie, carrots, bread slice, and peaches.
Thursday-Teriyaki chicken, fries, salad, roll, and banana.
Friday-Breadsticks, sauce/cheese, stir fry veg. and fruit.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather book.
SEPTEMBER – 1966
September 2-Mostly Cloudy-50° at 6:30 am.
September 3-Sunny-48° at 7:30 am.
September 4-Foggy-40° at 7:30 am.

BROWNVILLE JCT. HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI EVENTS
September 13, 2003 – BONKO – 7 pm. Bring a snack for the snack table and BYO beverage, please.
September 20, 2003 – Baked bean supper – 4:30 to 6:30 pm. $5.00 for adults and $2.50 for children 12 and under.
Sponsored by the BJHS Alumni

LAKES
BY PRISCILLA ARBO CLIFFORD OSGOOD
There’s a glory in a sunset
On the far north lakes of Maine.
There’s longing in my heart now
To see them once again..
But I count them now in memory,
For I love them, one and all.
The big ones fill my heart with awe,
But the dearest ones are small.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
BY NANCY GRANT
The American Thread Company buildings during its early years.

(Postcard courtesy of Gary Harmon)

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

AUGUST 20 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy welcomed twenty-one members today plus our guests Katie Robertson, Lt. Gov. Harold Sherman, and Howard Kesseli.
     Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham helped us pray for the world leaders to maintain cool heads during these trying times.
     Don Harris read a very inspirational passage about freckles and wrinkles (where smiles have been). It seems a little girl was quite embarrassed about all of her freckles. Her grandmother told her they were beautiful and what could be prettier than freckles. The little girl looked at her grandmother and said, “WRINKLES”!
     Roy and Joan Bither will celebrate their wedding anniversary on August 28. Val is celebrating her birthday TODAY and Fred Trask will have his birthday cake on August 30!
     $23.50, thirteen from Frank, was donated today for a birthday, Chris’ liberal socks, the opening of school, small town living, walkie-talkies, “new” parents, and pets in heaven.
     Buffy dropped by on her way to work to give us the news about the senior barbeque held at Quarry Pines last week. She said that there were twelve guests served by five

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Kiwanians. Everyone thoroughly enjoys these get-togethers and look forward to next year. Thank you Buffy for all you do!
     Heidi Finson reminded us that Reading Is Fundamental is a continuing program for this year. And many years to come!
     Edwin will hand out a paper for the listing of projects that have been worked on during the past year. These are important for the end of the year wrap up.
     Ed also reminded us that the Officer Installation will be hosted on September 24 at the Legion Hall.
     Lt. Gov. Sherman informed the club that it has been chosen as a Distinguished Club for 2001-2002. During that year the club had at least a three percent net increase in membership. He presented Past President Todd Lyford a Distinguished President lapel button. As Past Secretary, Janet Richards will receive a Distinguished Secretary lapel button; and the club will receive a Distinguished Club banner patch and a certificate for US $50.00 for any use at Kiwanis International.
     Paul Grindle introduced Howard Kesseli, Kiwanis Past Lt. Gov. and our guest speaker for today. He told us about the Patch Program and gave us some background information about the Kiwanis Foundation.
     The Patch Program means that all 212 New England Kiwanis Clubs will have a speaker presenting information about the Kiwanis Foundation that was founded in 1953. This will insure that all clubs will be in sync and not have individual interpretations about the Foundation and how it works.
     Lt. Gov. Hal Sherman informed the club that it was chosen as a Distinguished Club for 2001-2002 for the number of new members recruited. He presented Past President Todd Lyford a Distinguished President pin. Janet Richards, Past Secretary, also received a Distinguished Secretary pin. The Lt. Governor presented the club the appropriate banner patch and a ruby single service patch for the club's achievement in renovating the Milo Town Hall Arts Center. This was the only ruby award given in Division 2 for 2001-2002.

     The New England Kiwanis Foundation is a charitable 501(C)3 established to enable individuals and other foundations to make tax-deductible donations. The Foundation manages funds for charitable purposes and is a separate corporation, rather than merely a committee of the New England District. All Kiwanians in good standing are automatically members of the Foundation. The Foundation Board of Directors is composed of all the Lt. Governors in the New England District plus directors elected in rotation at the annual meeting of the District. Any club member from the New England District may be a candidate for election to the Board. The Foundation has several dedicated endowments for specific charities, such as Make a Wish Foundation, and the sponsored youth programs within Kiwanis, along with others. The Foundation has an ongoing fund-raising campaign to raise $4,600,000 for children's programs. Some funds are specific to special needs, such as the fund for children of victims of the 911 attacks, which helps to pay for college expenses.
     The Boston Kiwanis Pediatric Trauma Institute is the signature program of the New England Foundation. KPTI was initiated by Henry Gerrish and Hap Gerrish of the Dover-Foxcroft Kiwanis Club, who felt that Kiwanis should provide a trauma center for children. Their idea, first presented to the Foundation Board of Directors in 1981, became a reality, and by 1989 was fully funded with a $3,000,000 endowment. The Kiwanis Red Jacket Program, which presents a red Kiwanis jacket to any Kiwanian who donates $1000 to the Foundation, provides the biggest financial support to the Foundation, which uses the money largely to support KPTI educational programs for doctors and other medical professionals, as well as for research and development of ideas to make children's lives safer.
     The speakers for September 3, 2003 will be Ginny Morrill, Sue Chaffee, and other members of the Wellness Team.
     Thank you for updating us about this much needed trauma center for children.

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