Three Rivers News, 2003-09-23
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2003
 VOLUME 2 NUMBER 46
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

TWINS BORN TO THE MORRILL FAMILY
     Twin daughters, Kiran and Lauren, were born on June 24, 2003 to Jamie and Holly (Brown) Morrill, of Coventry, R.I. Proud grandparents are Donna and Larry Morrill. Even prouder are the Great Grandparents, Helen and Donald Cobb. Maternal Grandparents are Annie and Wilford Brown of Enfield.

SENIORS TO MEET
     The Three Rivers Senior Citizens will meet September 26th. at the Milo Town Hall dining room with a Pot Luck Dinner at 12 o'clock noon. Our guest speaker is Carol Mower, who will be talking about Medicare Fraud. All area senior citizens are welcome.


You are cordially invited
To attend the 2nd Annual
BROWNVILLE vs. MILO
SOFTBALL GAME
Sponsored by Penquis Valley High School JMG
Sunday, September 28, 2003 at Davis Field in Brownville Junction starting at 1:00 PM.
A B-B-Q will be offered following the game for a donation of $3.00. There will also be 50/50 raffle with proceeds to benefit JMG and the Milo Fire Department. Proceeds from last year’s event raised almost $300 for Brownville’s Thermal Imaging Camera Fund.

3-FAMILY YARD SALE
AT ELAINE BLETHEN’S , 155 HOVEY ROAD
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26TH, 9AM-4PM
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27TH, 9AM-1PM
QUEEN-SIZED HEADBOARD, BOOK, CLOTHES, DISHES, TOOLS, ODDS AND ENDS


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
BAKED BEAN SUPPER
, sponsored by the BJHS Alumni 4:30 to 6:30pm Adults: $5 and children 12 and under $2.50. Baked beans, salads, hot dogs, rolls, coffee/tea desserts.

CALENDAR ORDERS BEING TAKEN
The Brownville PTO is taking orders for their annual Birthday Calendar.
If you have not been called or would like to order a calendar please call
Tricia Stanhope at 965-8122. Deadline for this is the end of September.
The next Brownville PTO meeting is
October 6, at 6:30
in the Library at the school.


PROPOSED ANIMAL SHELTER MEETING
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     There will be an informal gathering of folks interested in helping to create an animal shelter in Milo. The meeting will take place in the Milo Town Hall downstairs conference room, on Thursday, September 25th , at 6:30 PM.
     This meeting is for those of you who have a strong interest in planning and working to raise funds to establish and maintain a sanctuary for our area stray, abandoned, and abused pets.
     The shelter will serve Milo, Brownville, LaGrange, Lakeview, and all surrounding communities.
     Please let me know if you are planning to attend by calling me at 943-2324 or e-mailing me at val04463@verizon.net.
     A letter asking for suggestions and donations will be sent to area citizens and businesses, at a later date.


RABIES CLINIC
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2003
10:00 AM TO 11:00 AM
AT THE MILO TOWN HALL
SPONSORED BY THE TOWNS OF BROWNVILLE AND MILO AND FOXCROFT VETERINARY
RABIES-$6.00/DISTEMPER-$12.00

     Pet owners, mark your calendar and take advantage of our Fall Clinic.
     Cat owners, please take special note, as State of Maine Law now requires that ALL cats be vaccinated against rabies.
     In addition, please be aware that if you are no longer able to properly care for an animal, there are humane ways to deal with the problem. It is a Class D crime in Maine to abandon a pet, and anyone doing so will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Contact your Town Office for appropriate alternatives. Also, if your pet is lost or missing, or if you find an animal, please let the Town Office personnel know.
MILO TOWN OFFICE-943-2202
BROWNVILLE TOWN OFFICE-965-2561

Page 1

STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at www.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., SEPT. 23 BEEF PATTY, GRAVY, SCALLOPED POTATOES, BROCCOLI, APPLE CRISP
WED., SEPT. 24 CHICKEN ALA KING, MASHED POTATO, CARROTS, CORNBREAD, OATMEAL COOKIE
THUR., SEPT. 25 SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS, GREEN BEANS, FRUIT COCKTAIL
FRI., SEPT. 26 APPLE JUICE, FISH CHOWDER, TOSSED SALAD, BISCUITS, CHOCOLATE PUDDING
MON. SEPT. 29

MEATLOAF, MASHED POTATO, MIXED VEGGIES, PINEAPPLE CHUNKS

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:30PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:30 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Mr. Herrick's first name was (a) John (b) Eric (c) Cal (d) David
2. Sam Cohen' wife's name was (a) Alice (b) Dolly (c) Sarah (d) Maureen.
3. (a) Eleanor Rosebush (b) Greta Connors (c) Malcolm Buchanan (d) Carroll Conley taught at both BHS and BJHS.
4. The dam was built by the (a) Browns (b) Hollands (c) Smiths (d) Wilkinses.
5. (a) Bridge Construction (b) Hinman (c) Frank Rossi (d) Farrin Brothers straightened Buckley's Corner.
6. The Tannery School was near (a) Whetstone Brook (b) Knight's Landing (c) Briggs Block (d) Stickney Hill.
7. Marvel Harshaw was a (a) singer (b) preacher (c) teacher (d) postmaster.
8. Axel Carlson attended the (a) Methodist (b) Episcopal (c) Catholic (d) Congregational Church.
9. The Railroaders won their first tournament game at Bangor in (a) 1957 (b) 1959 (c) 1961 (d) 1968.
10. Bilodeau's Restaurant was part of (a) the Pleasant River Hotel (b) the YMCA (c) Briggs Block (d) Dillon' s Hall.

Answers: 1-c 2-b 3-b 4-a 5-d 6-a 7-d 8-b 9-a 10-d

MORITA’S SCHOOL OF DANCE
WILL BE OFFERING CLASSES IN TAP, BALLET, & JAZZ.
Friday afternoons, beginning October 3rd,
at the Milo Town Hall.
For more information, call Milo Rec at 943-7326.
Please register before October 2nd.

TOWN OF BROWNVILLE
MEETING OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN
Wednesday, September 24, 2003
Beginning at 6:30 PM at the Brownville Town Office
     All meetings of the Brownville Board of Selectmen are open for the public to attend. Those individuals requiring auxiliary aids in order to participate must contact the Town Office (965-2561) at least 48 hours before the scheduled start of the meeting.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
     Carolyn Sinclair would like to announce the birth of her new great-granddaughter, Sarah Babin, who was born August 1st in Raleigh, NC. Her parents are Michelle Demers and Bret Babin.

NOTICE TO MILO RESIDENTS
     It is time to remove all plastic flowers arrangements and their containers or holders from the Milo Evergreen Cemetery. They must be removed by October 15th.
Winter arrangements may remain all winter.

EXERCISE FOR SENIORS
     Carol Witham will be offering an exercise class for Senior Citizens, beginning September 22nd. The class is from 9am-10am, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The price is $3.00 per week and lasts for 6 weeks.
     She will also be offering a CardioBlast class, which gives an intense aerobic workout. This class lasts for 6 weeks and is held on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10am-11am. The cost is $3.00 per class. Call 943-7326 to sign up

Page 2

The Brownville Town Office will be CLOSED on the following dates,
so that the staff may attend training:
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9th
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18th
We Apologize For Any Inconvenience

Letter to the Editor:
Hey Val...
     Just a short note to say how impressed I am as to the wonderful work you are doing. I am also an animal lover, and I get so tired and disgusted with people that don't take care of their pets!! I have a dog and 3 cats here and would have more, but we just found out last year that David is allergic to cats!! Doesn't mean I am getting rid of mine, they are family.
     I hope that you are able to get the shelter up and running, you really need one up there. I listen to all the stories of my mother ( Cookie Farrar) live trapping cats, and taking them back and forth to the vets , trying to find good homes for them, and going around to all these places feeding strays and abandoned cats , climbing around in old barns and homes (luckily she hasn't gotten hurt doing some of these things) and paying for a lot of these things out of her own pocket. Mother always carries cat food with her all the time in case she sees a stray cat, ( that might be hungry or looks hungry) . We call her the Cat Lady of Brownville!! She and Julie are always going to rescue some stray cat somewhere, then make a run to the Dover vet to get it checked out, and shots and fixed. We not only need a shelter, we need a Vet that is closer. So Val keep up the great work and good luck in all. Just wanted to let you know that there are people out there that admire what you are doing!!
Sincerely,
Karen Bunker
Ps. I love up on the farm !! I look forward to reading it , I sat here one night and read all the back stories.. laughed and cried.

Editors note: I love getting notes like yours, Karen. Thanks so much for the lift…most days I need one!

FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Senator Paul Davis, Republican Leader
207-287-1505 or
207-876-4047
Latest DHS Problems call for Major Changes
     There appears to be a recurring theme in Augusta in recent months. It seems that hardly a month passes without a new revelation about some accounting or appropriation problem at Maine’s Department of Human Services (DHS). While some of the state’s financial problems over the past year or two are directly related to the economic downturn and a government’s penchant for spending more of your tax money than it should, many of our state’s recurring financial problems center around DHS. In fact, the fiscal mismanagement at DHS has reached epic proportions lately. The problems are so severe that the Governor hired an independent auditor, PricewaterhouseCoopers, a few months ago to examine the department’s finances and accounting practices.
     In the past 2 fiscal quarters, the state has been saddled with 2 substantial accounting gaffes at DHS. In May, it was discovered that $18.9 million was received from the federal

government and spent by DHS without being properly recorded. That amount grew to $32 million in misspent or undocumented funding. It was later determined by the independent auditor that the money was spent appropriately but was merely taken from the wrong accounts.
     Now, we have learned that there is another huge budget problem at DHS. A $37 million dollar problem, the start of which can be traced back to 1996! And, while some dismiss this $37 million hole as a minor problem given that the department takes in over a billion dollars a year from the federal government, I have to strenuously object. We have been told that the new budget problem at the department is not the result of any wrongdoing. How reassuring. Obviously, there are a whole host of organizational problems at DHS, and these problems need to be corrected immediately.
     To the Governor’s credit, the auditor has identified a number of outdated, faulty and ineffective accounting policies within the department. They have recommended a number of corrective measures and the Governor’s office has taken a keen interest in ensuring that things get rectified. The Governor has even dedicated some members from his own administration to help insure that things get corrected.
     However, the department still lacks a Commissioner, and the lack of leadership is apparent! It is not reasonable to expect the acting Commissioner to deal with the kind of sweeping changes that are called for. I am not optimistic that things will change institutionally until a new Commissioner is in place.
     The financial mismanagement at DHS can no longer be tolerated. This department is a huge segment of state government and deals with matters too vital to be handled in this way. Financially, the sloppy work by the department has already cost the state $3.2 million in Medicaid payments from the federal government lost because claims were not filed on time.
     The financial audit conducted by PreicewaterhouseCoopers is estimated to cost the state over $100,000 when all is said and done. While it is clear that this independent financial audit was long overdue, many people may not be aware that the Legislature formed its own auditing committee last session. The Office of Program Evaluation and Government Accountability (OPEGA) was formed to take a nonpartisan look at departmental functions to identify inefficiencies and issue recommendations to the Legislature regarding programmatic changes within departments. While OPEGA’s auditing role is not generally a financial one by nature, it will undoubtedly prove valuable when looking at the effectiveness of existing state programs and services. The Legislature has not traditionally done a very good job assessing whether or not specific programs are working well. DHS is one department that is in serious need of an examination by OPEGA.
     Aside from the financial management issues at DHS, many other concerns about the department’s operations also exist. We have all heard a horror story or two about the department’s child protective service unit - - the Logan Marr case immediately comes to mind - - and many other concerns come to my attention on a daily basis as constituents regularly call to complain about treatment they received from DHS bureaucrats regarding child support, elder care and MaineCare coverage. If the problems associated with DHS’s financial division are any indication, then every division within the department is in dire need of examination and scrutiny. An up close and personal look by OPEGA may be just the thing. I am sure that the new Commissioner - - when appointed - - will welcome the results of such scrutiny. There are many efficient and dedicated people working for DHS. They deserve a better working environment and a chance at a better reputation. And Maine people deserve a better use of their money.

Page 3

American Legion Post 41 News
On Saturday, September 27, at 12:00 Noon, the Legion will hold a Spaghetti Dinner to benefit a Widow of a Deceased Member.
Adults: $5.00, Children: $3.00
On October 18, 6:00 P.M. there will be a County Legion Meeting.


AREA SCHOOL NEWS

FROM BROWNVILLE:

     Mrs. Michelle Gnodde is the long-term art substitute this year while Mrs. Chapman is on maternity leave.
     Here she is working with the Kindergarten class in Brownville. We are very happy to have her with us.

FROM MILO:

     On Sept. 18 Mrs. Hussey's and Mrs. Tardiff's second grade class went to Fields Pond Audubon Center in Holden. The class has been studying pond life so the wetlands exploration was a wonderful activity. While at Fields Pond, students did an experiment to demonstrate how plants absorb moisture in the wetlands. They learned about how animals depend on the marshes and swamps for food and water. They also learned about different plant life in and around a wetlands habitat. The students had a wonderful time counting frogs in the marsh, hunting for tree frogs and salamanders and examining evidence of deer and moose in the marsh. After the explorations, the students enjoyed a picnic lunch on the grounds of the center.

MILO’S TERRIFIC KIDS
From the classroom of:
Mrs. Barden - Our Terrific Kid has a smiling face. He always is a helper and makes us feel good. The sweetest terrific kid is JUSTIN LARRY.

Mrs. Mills - Our Terrific Kid is a wonderful young lady who follows all the classroom and school rules. She helps others when they have questions. Her work is always neat and on time. She has a great smile that she shows us often and she has terrific corn on her farm!! We love to have HANNAH GUTHRIE in our class.
Mrs. Dunham - Our Terrific Kid is a dear, sweet girl. She comes in each day with a smile on her face, ready to work. She is kind and helpful to classmates and adults. She can be depended upon to run errands for the classroom. We love having Kendra HALL in our class.
Mrs. Gillis –
This boy's favorite subject is math,
As a BMXer he rides many a path,
Toward this boy you never feel wrath,
He reads "Sports Illustrated" when he takes a bath!
Congratulations, ALEX ZELKAN!
Mrs. Dell'olio- He helps the teacher and the kids. He is good at mechanics. His favorite food is shepherd’s pie. He thinks soccer is fantastic and he thinks his go-cart is the best. He has two sandpits near his house. Our Terrific Kid is ANTHONY MURANO!
Mrs. Hayes - This week our Terrific Kid is quite a girl. She is quite a reader, quite a writer, quite a math whiz, quite a helper and quite a friend. We are proud and happy to have SHANIA ROUSSEL in our class. You are quite a terrific kid Shania. We love you.
Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey - COLBY WYMAN- Colby has shown a lot of improvement in his penmanship already this year. He tries very hard and writes wonderful sentences for his stories. He is a great friend to his classmates. We are happy to have Colby in our class. CONNOR WEBB- Connor is a wonderful student. He is an excellent reader and a mental math whiz! He follows the 'I Care" rules and is a good friend. We are really proud of his good free time choices. We are glad to have Connor in our class.
Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Carey - Our first Terrific Kid has made a great transition to school. She comes into our class every morning with a big smile and a big hug. She is helpful to all her new friends and teachers and has a sweet little giggle that brightens our day. She has many special qualities that make her a terrific Terrific Kid and we're happy that MIRANDA POMERLEAU is part of our kindergarten family.
Our second Terrific Kid has lots of special qualities, too. He is happy, kind, eager to learn, helpful, and full of ENERGY!!! He has a smile that can light up a room and a heart just as big. We are so pleased that HUNTER LEWIS is also a part of our kindergarten family.
Mrs. Whitney - 5 Whitney's Terrific Kid for 9/19 is CHRISTINA BOWDEN. She is a very responsible student, who never has to be reminded to get her work done or pass it in. She helps the younger students in Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Carey and Mrs. Green's room in the mornings and still gets her morning work done before lunch time. What a good example for her fellow students. Great job Christina!!

THE KIWANIS KID’S KORNER LIBRARY PROGRAM WILL BEGIN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH.

Page 4

MEDICATIONS IN SCHOOL
BY SUE CHAFFEE
     There are some new guidelines for the administration of medications in the school this year. In the event that a student must take medication during school hours these guidelines must be strictly followed. Please refer to the information that went home in student packets when school opened.
     Just to summarize: Only medication that is medically necessary will be given at school. Any medication that can be scheduled at home should not be sent to school.
     A first dose of any medication must be given at home.
     There is always the potential risk of a serious allergic reaction when new medication is taken. Also, if your student is prescribed an antibiotic for infection, he/she should be on the medication for 24hrs before returning to school.
     All medication requires a doctor's order. The Maine State Board of Nursing does not allow medication to be given on order of a parent/guardian. This applies to over the counter medication (such as Tylenol) as well as prescription medication. A parent's written consent including specific directions for giving the medication is also required.
     Medication should be brought to school by the parent or guardian. It is never safe for students to carry medication with them on the bus.
     Medication must be in the original container and be current. Medication brought to school in an envelope or baggie will not be given.
     Only enough medication for the school week should be brought to school.
     At any time a parent/guardian may come to school to administer medication to their child.

WEIGHT WATCHERS AT WORK OPEN HOUSE
     There will be an Open House at Milo Elementary School at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday September 25th. A representative from Weight Watchers of Maine will meet with those interested in the program. This is open to MSAD #41 staff, students and community members. Great opportunity to hear about the new Flex Point System. Come ready to join! As soon as we have 15 paid participants our weekly meetings will begin. If you have any questions call Sue Chaffee or Chris Beres at 943-2122.

VARICELLA (CHICKENPOX) VACCINE
     This year the Varicella (chickenpox) vaccine was added to the Maine State Immunization Requirements for school age children. This fall all students in kindergarten and grade 1 were required to show proof of that the vaccine was given or provide a doctor's note stating that the child has had the disease.
     If your child is in kindergarten or grade 1 and you received notification by mail that he/she does not have proof of immunization or disease on record, you are not in compliance with Maine State Law and your child may be excluded from school.
     By start of the 2004 school year all children in grades K, 1, 2 and grade 6 will be required to have proof of immunization or history of disease verified by doctor. This gives you a head start so that you can take care of this in the upcoming school year. Each year a new grade level will be added until the year 2007 when all school age children will be vaccinated or have shown proof of disease.

MOTOCROSS NEWS
     Skowhegan Motocross Park hosted it's last race of the season on September 14th. There was a pretty big crowd on hand......and our local boys did a great job as usual. KYLE FOSS raced in 2 different classes, the 85B

and finishing 7th overall out of a group of 30 bikes. Kyle also raced a great race in the 85C class.....of which he reclaimed his 1st place spot in the overall points standings.....beating the top rider in both motos, putting him in the lead for the end of the year by a couple points. Also, in the 85C class.....it was drawn as the money class for that day and Kyle came home a little richer.....by getting 1st place for the day, in addition to a 1st place trophy he brought home $100.00. Trevor Lyford raced his best race yet with his dirtbike.....coming in 7th place overall out of 15 bikes... he did a fantastic job and even kept up with the top 6 riders and showed a great deal of improvement on it. Trevor also raced his ATV and ended up with a 3rd place trophy.... (it was a true photo finish with another ATV.....and Trevor almost took a second place for his efforts.)
     Justin Morrill got a great hole shot on his first moto and held on the entire race and finished in 5th place. I think Justin had a 6th place finish in the second moto. Kole Stevens also raced extremely well, especially in the 2nd moto....getting a great 4th place hole shot....but he had a little trouble in a turn and lost his position. They both did a great job.....against 28 other bikes. Dustin Bishop raced very well in the 250 Novice class getting 1st place in the first moto and 2nd place in the second moto.....but it was enough for him to capture the 1st place tropy out of 26 bikes.

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     We are lucky here at the Milo Free Public Library. Our patrons donate so many wonderful books to us. This week Donald Stanchfield was back. His persistence had paid off, and he brought in 5 more Nancy Drew books. He was delighted to bring us numbers 1-5. Not only does this fill in the beginning of the set but it also supplies us with a title we have not had before The mystery at Lilac Inn. He is working hard to find the missing sets to complete our Nancy Drew series as he did the Hardy Boys. The new books make our juvenile section look so cheerful, and the children are drawn to the new books.
     I have sent in an order for new adult books which should be here soon. Some of the books will not arrive until later as they are on back order, but here are a list of the titles I have ordered.

Baldacci, David SPLIT SECOND
Beaton, M.C. AGATHA RAISIN AND THE HAUNTED HOUSE
Bradley, Marion Zimmer THE FALL OF ATLANTIS
Brown, Sandra HELLO DARKNESS
Clancy, Tom THE TEETH OF THE TIGER
Clark, Carol Higgins POPPED
Clark, Mary Jane NOWHERE TO RUN
Cornwell, Bernard HERETIC
Cornwell, Patricia BLOW FLY
Dailey, Janet SHIFTING CALDER WIND
Dunn, Carola DIE LAUGHING
Evans, Richard Paul A PERFECT DAY
Fielding, Joy LOST
Fletcher, Jessica DESTINATION MURDER
Forsyth, Frederick AVENGER
George, Elizabeth A PLACE OF HIDING
Grisham, John BLEACHERS
Iles, Greg THE FOOTPRINTS OF GOD
Jance, J.A. EXIT WOUNDS
Johansen, Iris FATAL TIDE
Karon, Jan SHEPHERDS ABIDING
Kellerman, Faye SWEET DREAMS
Kushner, Harold NF THE LORD IS MY SHEPHERD
Lewis, Beverly THE BETRAYAL
Ludlum, Robert THE TRISTAN BETRAYAL
Martin, William HARVARD YARD
Maron, Margaret LAST LESSONS OF SUMMER
Morrison, Toni LOVE
Parker, Robert B. STONE COLD (Jesse Stone)
Pratchett, Terry MONSTROUS REGIMENT
Rendell, Ruth THE BABES IN THE WOOD (Chief Inspector Wexford)
Robards, Karen BEACHCOMBER
Roberts, Nora REMEMBER WHEN
Sparks, Nicholas THE WEDDING
Straub, Peter LOST BOY, LOST GIRL
Valentine, Katherine A GATHERING OF ANGELS
Woods, Stuart CAPITAL CRIMES

Library Winter Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00
Telephone 943-2331

Page 5

Historical Review - Part 1
Walking With Eyes to the Ground
Collecting Indian Artifacts Rewarding Hobby
By Tom Weber, BDN - 2/20/88
(SUBMITTED BY C.K. ELLISON, 2003)
     Medford -- On a high bank overlooking the Piscataquis River, Tim Russell pointed to a depression in the snowy ground where his neighbor's house used to be. Last spring, he said, the river filled with rain until it scaled the high bank, lifted the house from its foundation, and took it away. All that's left now is a black metal light post sticking up from the snow in the middle of nowhere.
     Yet the same flood that removed the signs of this modern dwelling also revealed evidence of ancient ones: fire-cracked rock and small stone tools laying exposed for the first time since they were dropped there thousands of years ago.
     For artifact collectors such as Russell, soil erosion of this magnitude can offer moments that go right off the scale. Russell, shy and reticent, has lived within sight and sound of the normally placid Piscataquis for all of his 23 years. With his father, a local guide, he has fished in the river, hunted near it, and walked its shores for miles.
     As a boy he would fill his pockets with interesting shaped rocks, hoping that they would turn out to be artifacts or fossils. Usually they turned out to be interestingly shaped rocks. But as long as there was a chance of stumbling across antiquity, perhaps even finding a stone ax like the one his grandfather had unearthed while digging potatoes nearby, Russell walked with his eyes to the ground.
     In the past few years, his ability to recognize man-made tools among odd bits of stone has resulted in a large and scientifically valuable collection of arrowheads, spear points, knives, chisels and pieces of pottery. Not only does he finally have an ax like his grandfather's, he has two. "Sometimes I just dream about what it might have looked like around here back thousands of years ago." Russell said as he absentlymindedly ran his index finger along an arrowhead's still-sharp edge. "No cars, no towns, just woods. I guess I just like going out and finding something old. I don't really know how to explain it."
     When he started, Russell would pole around in areas that he suspected had been campsites. He searched out high banks, and places where a clear stream might once have provided a rich feeding station for the salmon moving upriver. Where there were fish, there were Indians. Without training, he learned quickly that if a spot looked good to him then it probably also looked good to the hunters and gatherers of the past. He would lift the sod and sift through layers of earth beneath, prying out the flaked stones and rushing home to wash them off. (Continued next week)

NEW COMPUTER BUSINESS
     Pc Solutions, owned and operated by Bob Ade out of his home on 23 Prospect St. in Milo, is now open for business. Bob specializes in computer repairs, upgrades, the designing of custom computers, and home networks.
     Bob is an A+ and Networking+ Certified Professional with 3 years experience. Pc Solutions is open from 12pm to 6pm Monday – Friday. Please contact Bob at 943-2518 or e-mail him at bade_14@hotmail.com.
     Bob looks forward to taking care of all your computer needs.

My Italy Trip Part 15
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
Pisa
     The bus left for Pisa at 9. We had to park on the outskirts of the city again. This time we took a little tram similar to the ones at Disney World to reach the center of the city. The driver was an opera singer on the side and played his CD in case anyone wanted to buy one. I had been to Pisa before a few years ago. At that time the tower was being worked on and had a lot of lead weights attached to keep it from falling over.
     This time we were taken to the church and tower from the opposite direction. It was much more impressive. A wall kept us from viewing the sites until the proper vantagepoint to see the tower, cathedral and baptistery all at once. We met our guide, Urano. He explained that many people were named after planets in honor of Galileo who was born in Pisa.
     The tower has been stabilized and fifteen people at a time are allowed to go up and spend no longer than 20 minutes. The cost was 15 Euro. We went into the cathedral. The chandelier that Galileo used to develop the Law of the Pendulum is still swinging there. He developed his law at age 19.
     Urano explained that the cathedral was not completed until 1100 and it took around one hundred years to complete. He explained that the loft in the cathedral was for women so they could be closer to God. He also explained why cathedrals always have three doors and sections inside the main church. The women entered and sat on the left, the men on the right and the clergy through the larger center door.
     We were given a little time to shop for souvenirs and then the bus took us back by the same route through Lucca and Montecatini to Pistoia where we had a home-hosted lunch at Podere Villa Fredda. The place was like a bed and breakfast and often fed visitors. Our meal was toast with mushrooms, fried ravioli, bruschetta with tomato and basil, chicken liver pate on toast, wine made at the farm, gnocchi with cream and walnut sauce, and spinach filled crepes. For dessert we had a yellow pound cake and some almond biscotti that we were supposed to dip in a sweet wine.
     I was stuffed. I bought a bottle of olive oil pressed at the farm and started walking back to the bus that was about a mile down the road. The air was refreshing and I felt better walking off some of the food.
     I didn’t eat any dinner tonight because I was still stuffed from lunch. I went to bed early, but Steff went out on the town with Carla, our tour director, Fernanda the other group’s tour director, the two bus drivers, Liliana the wife of the hotel owner and an architect who was staying at the hotel. They went to La Cascina, a local nightclub. Steff said they spoke Italian most of the time but Carla translated for her. She got back to the room around 2AM.
     Friday, Feb 14th , was our last day in Montecatini. Carla had convinced Steff to go back to Florence with her on the train to see more of the sights I had seen on my previous trip. Eloise went back to Florence with a group to visit the Uffizzi Museum and learn more about the Renaissance. I was toured out and decided to stay in quiet Montecatini. I picked up some Valentine candy for Steff, had a couple slices of cold pizza for lunch and basically relaxed for the day.
     Steff returned around 4:15 and we started to pack for our trip to Rome tomorrow and our flight home.
     All week Steff was trying to organize a toga party (clothes on!) within our group. She wanted to surprise Carla at dinner on our last night in Montecatini. She had asked Liliana if she minded. Liliana wanted to know where she planned to get the sheets. Steff told her from the beds and Liliana said that was foolish and she would have 15 extra sheets delivered to our room for the occasion. At 6:30 people started to come by the room to get their sheets. They met in the public room on our floor. Some

Page 6

of the people were very creative and had even taken some laurel branches for their head. I was the lookout. Everyone was so loud, I thought that Carla would hear them when she descended the staircase. Fortunately she didn’t. She was in the hotel lobby as they descended the stairs chanting ‘Ave Carla’. I think she was really pleased that they went to all that effort for her. Steff read a poem written for her and signed by everyone in the group expressing our thanks for all the work she did to make this trip so memorable.
     For our last dinner in Montecatini we had ham and cheese in puff pastry, spaghetti, juice, crepes with ricotta cheese and spinach, chicken breast in artichoke sauce and ended with a cake soaked in a sweet liqueur topped with whipped cream.
     During dinner our friend Jeanne announced she had lost a gold ring she had purchased earlier in the day. We fanned out all over the hotel looking for it. She went back to her room to retrace her steps and found that it had slipped off while she was packing and was in her suitcase.
     Because things will be hectic tomorrow night in Rome, most of us stayed in the lounge to say our good-byes.
Next week: Rome and home

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     I read a wonderful book this summer. The title was Standing In The Rainbow by Fannie Flagg. Fannie is the red headed comedienne who wrote Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe. Standing in The Rainbow is written about a small close knit town. The story begins in the late 30's early 40's and continues with the same characters through to the present. What a delightful story. I literally laughed out loud every time I picked up the book. Some characters were more colorful than others, but they all played into the lives of the other. Their downtown area reminded me very much of how I remembered our downtown to be in my youth.....busy and bustling with business and activity.
     The main character of the book was a woman who did a radio show out of her living room every day....for most of the time frame of the story. Whether that was an actual depiction of something that really used to happen in those days I don't know...but I think I would have liked having that job. Not that I don't like the job I have, because I do, but I often think of the other jobs that I think I would love.
     For instance, (I think I may have mentioned this before but) I would love to have a little store downtown with a window storefront. I think the building that once housed the computer business would be an excellent place for my store. I would like to go on a buying trip.....probably several.....to find old used and/or antique furnishings. I'd like to display these pieces (either in their found condition or repaired and refinished condition) pleasingly complete with knick knacks, flower arrangements, pictures on the wall behind them and rugs on the floor in front of them. Each little scene of furnishings and adorable decorations could be bought in part or parcel. Even little fake windows could display sweet curtains that would be for sale. Finding cute little pieces of furniture and displaying it attractively is something I've always loved doing. I don't know who would shop at my little store, but if the prices were kept reasonable I think I'd get some customers.
     Another business that I think I'd love running would be a little restaurant on Main Street that served different salads and nice sandwiches with great chips or homemade fries and crisp pickles and great pies for dessert. The breakfast menu would be a few delicious choices of muffins or scones each day and hot cereals and

hot coffee or tea and juices. The furniture would all be vintage or retro and I'd use my collection of tablecloths and dishes that are the same....vintage and retro.
     Another dream job of mine would be to buy the farm up on Park Street and with the money that I get from winning the megabucks I'd completely do it over into a home in which I could take care of my elderly loved ones. What a beautiful setting it would be for them to live in that beautiful home. I'd hire lots of help to keep things nice and to cook and serve them delicious meals. Each room would be comfortable and beautifully decorated with their own collections and memories. Lonesome would not be a word in their vocabulary.....nor would boredom. Their options would be limitless, and with comfort and dignity they would live out their lives.
     Do I sound like a malcontent? Heaven forbid! If there is one thing I find hard to tolerate it's a malcontent. I'm just an incredible dreamer. I think the last time I talked about these dreams they also included a white collar business in the old Hillside Market building. Just a small company that would employ about 25 to 30 high quality workers.....with nice little families and lots of dreams of their own.
     In any case if you think you might like to read Standing In The Rainbow, it's available at the Milo Public Library and also at the Brownville Library. Perhaps you will read it and become a dreamer yourself. You'll get a good laugh out of it for sure.
     I can't believe that I still feel rotten.....and this is getting tiresome. I have heard more people say that they are suffering this year more than ever from allergies and whatever this thing is that has our heads completely filled up with yuck! I've taken antibiotics for a week and I've decided to take stock out in Kleenex Corporation. Every wastebasket in my house is brim full of the stuff. The antibiotics obviously weren't the answer to my problem, but I don't dare stop taking them in the event that they might kick in before day ten. Every morning I wake up and I can breathe. Hooray! Then I sit up and the faucet turns on. It runs then it stops.... then it runs....then it stops. It's unbelievable! I talked to my friend Lorraine Long Smith in Eliot, Maine tonight and she informs me that I've got at least another week of it to experience and survive. She and her husband have both had it for three weeks to a month.
     If I had a little restaurant down on Main Street I'd serve these!

Big Batch Bran Muffins

2 cups All-Bran
2 cups boiling water
1 cup, plus 3 tablespoons vegetable shortening
2 1/2 cups sugar
4 eggs
1 quart buttermilk
4 cups Bran-Buds
6 cups flour, sifted
5 teaspoons soda
2 teaspoons salt
     Pour boiling water over All-Bran and allow to set while mixing ingredients. Cream the shortening and sugar. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Blend in the quart of buttermilk. Add All-Bran and water mixture. Add the 4 cups of Bran-Buds. Sift the flour together with soda and salt. Add to the other mixture. Turn into a large container and cover tightly. Keep refrigerated for up to 6 weeks. You don't need to restir....just spoon right from the container into greased muffin tins when you want to bake some off. Bake at 400 degrees for 16 to 20 minutes or until top is firm.

Page 7

IN MEMORIAM
ARTHUR R. BERCE
     MILO - Arthur R. Berce, 65, husband of Deborah (Phillips) Berce, died Sept. 16, 2003, at Little Jo-Mary Pond. He was born Nov. 5, 1937, in Dover-Foxcroft, the son of Harold L. and Phyllis (Ames) Berce. Arthur was a retired Police Chief for the town of Brownville where he had served for 19 years and was also a Piscataquis county deputy sheriff. He was a member of the Piscataquis County Sheriff's Association. In addition to his mother, Phyllis Berce of Dover-Foxcroft, he is survived by his wife, Deborah, of Milo; one son, Eric Berce and wife, Mary Anne, of Dover-Foxcroft; four daughters, Laurie Pratt of Michigan, Linda Cvuprynski, Leslie Micalles, Leanne Fowler, all of Florida; one brother, Carlton and Wife, Liana, of Dover-Foxcroft, one stepdaughter, Lori Ellis and husband, Bob Gilbert, of Houston, Texas; two stepsons, Reginald Ellis of St. Albans, Randy Ellis of Texas; one sister-in-law, Rebecca Phillips of Saco; mother-in-law, Charlotte Phillips of St. Albans; 18 grandchildren including a special grandson, Gabe Pratt of Sangerville and two special granddaughters, Morgan Rae Berce of Glenburn, Anna Kate Rideout of Dover-Foxcroft, several nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins
Burial will be in the Dover Cemetery. Those who wish may make donations to the Piscataquis County Sheriff's Association, Scholarship Fund, 52 Court St., Dover-Foxcroft, ME 04426.

RUBY J. (LADD) THIBODEAU
     BROWNVILLE - Ruby J. (Ladd) Thibodeau, 85, wife of the late George H. Thibodeau, passed away on Sept. 18, 2003, at a Dover-Foxcroft nursing facility after a long period of declining health. She was born June 22, 1918, at Barnard, the daughter of the late Josephine and Harry Ladd. Ruby was a graduate of Brownville High School, Class of 1937, and of the Paine Hospital School of Nursing in Bangor, now known as St. Joseph Hospital. She was a member of the Brownville Community Church, the Milo Nurses Guild, the D.U.V. of Milo and of Echo Chapter No. 98, OES of Brownville. Nursing was her passion in life and she had assisted in the births of babies too numerous to count. Although she had had no children of her own, her "family" was her close 10 nephews and one niece. Ruby is survived by her twin brother, Russell Ladd and his wife, Ruth, of Brownville; her nephews, Bryce, Dayle, Darrell and Joel Rollins; Gary, Dwight, Steven and Brian Ladd; and one niece, Joanne (Ladd) Sokolowski. She was predeceased by two sisters, Hilda Shea and Julia Rollins; and two nephews, Wayne and Lyle Rollins. Graveside services were held Sept. 21, , at the Brownville Village Cemetery with the Rev. George Ganglfinger officiating. In lieu of flowers, those who wish may make memorial contributions to the Milo Nurses Guild, care of Beverly Hamlin, Treas., 351 Medford Road, Milo, ME 04463.

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION WEEK POSTPONED
     Due to an illness in the family, Our Maine Ideas customer appreciation week has been postponed until September 25 – 27. Our Maine Idea is located on the Milo Road in Sebec. Look for sales, music, and more during that Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 10 to 4. We look forward to seeing customers, old and new.
WRITING FOR FUN OR MONEY is an opportunity for you to work on that story or book you always wanted to write. The class is offered through MSAD #41 Adult Education and begins on Thursday, September 25 at 6 PM in the Penquis Valley School library. To register please call 943-5333 or stop in and visit the class before you register.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather book.
SEPTEMBER – 1974
23rd-Cloudy-42° at 6:30 am/67° at 12/38° at 10 pm.
24th-Sunny breezy-26° at 6:50 am/50° at 2 pm/30° at 9:30 pm.
25th-Sunny awhile Cloudy rain in evening-24° at 7 am/46° at 10 pm.
26th-Cloudy-46° at 6:40 am/46° at 10:30 pm.
27th-Fog Cloudy awhile sunny-36° at 6 am/63° at 2 pm/44° at 10 pm.
28th-Fog Cloudy rain in evening-46° at 7 am/36° at 12/60° at 12 pm.
29th-Rain-64° at 6:30 am.

LOCAL BIRTHS
     A son, Cameron David Smith, to Sarah Bartlett and Edmund Smith of Milo on September 16, 2003. Wt. 10 pounds 4 ounces.
     A son, Donte Luke Rackliff, to Danielle Farnham and Jason Rackliff of Milo, on August 30, 2003. Wt. 6 pounds 4 ounces

SURPRISE BIRTHDAY OPEN HOUSE FOR DORIS HARRIS
     Ina Jane and Phil Gerow of Milo are sponsoring a surprise open house in honor of Doris Harris, the former guidance secretary for Brownville Junction High School and Penquis Valley High School. The open house will be held on Friday, September 26, 2003, at Hilltop Manor, 462 Essex Street, Dover-Foxcroft, where she has been resident for some time. It will be held from 3 to 4 PM in the facility’s dining room with birthday cake and ice cream being served. It is hoped that many folks will be able to drop by and say hello to Doris and wish her a happy 88th birthday.
     In the event you can’t attend, we’d love to have a shower of cards for her special occasion. Her address is Doris Harris, Hilltop Manor, Dover-Foxcroft, ME 04426. The telephone number there is 564-3049 in the event you wish to call her.
     Let’s make this a day to remember. Doris played a great part in many of our lives, serving as organist for the Brownville Junction United Methodist Church for many years and was very active in church work. She also was very active with students at both Brownville Jct. and Penquis Valley High Schools.
     Gifts are not required, but in the event you wish to take a little something, remember, Doris just loved to eat. So candy, fruit, etc, would be wonderful for her.
Page 8

John and Elizabeth Reinsborough, neighbors of Doris for many years before moving to Readfield, are going to help keep her occupied until 3 PM when she will be brought into the dining room to be surprised. If you folks have any questions, feel free to contact Ina Jane and Phil Gerow at 943-2046.

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     I hardly know where to begin, there are so many animals to write about. We (Julie and I) have been busy adopting out kitties, and I have been busier trapping and picking them up. So the tally for this week was 8 getting new homes, and 7 coming to my home. Slow progress, but progress non-the less.
     A week ago I seized a sweet shepherd collie mix, and thought we had a home lined up for her. The folks who were going to adopt her decided on another stray, so dear little ?Purple? is still in need of a home. She’s a darling smallish shepherd-looking dog, but at the present she is in heat, so she is VERY unruly. She is particularly restless at our house, and Katie and I realized it’s because I have four male dogs!! Despite the fact they are all neutered, they still really excite Purple. Consequently, Purple spends most of her time at the camp Katie and Eric are renting. Katie’s only dog is Haley, a spayed female, so no extra hormonal action goes on between her and Purple.
     Out of 50 guinea eggs I had incubated, ONE hatched! I waited a few days to see if the unhatched eggs were just late, then gave up. I even broke them all and all I found were yolks. I take that to mean that my poor guinea that died two weeks ago was my only male, and that the lone hatchling is his only offspring.
     I had forgotten how teeny and cute the guinea keets are. A full-grown guinea has a face only a mother could love, yet the tiny babies are as cute as can be. As I watched him for a few days, living by himself in his brooder, I started feeling sorry for him, worrying that he was lonely. He would “cheep” loudly when I entered the room, (with 15 cats in the house, the keet has a room to himself !), and seemed to like my company, so I began trying to think of something to help with his loneliness. Then an idea came to me and I gave my dear friend Patty Estes a call. I asked if it was possible she had any chicks of any type that had just hatched., and she said ” yes. ”. It seems she had decided to hatch one more batch of Jumbo Quail despite the lateness of the season, and they were 2 days old. Yay ! My keet was only 4 days old. She didn’t hesitate to say “Sure, come on down, “ so we agreed on a time.
     I arrived at Patty and Al’s with a warmed insulated box in hand, and Patty and I headed for their huge barn. Patty and Al own the old Ricker Dairy Farm, on the River Road, and they raise hunting dogs and game birds, such as pheasant, chukkars, and quail. Their farm is nationally known and is recognized as one of the finest of its type.
     When I entered Patty’s chick nursery area I was amazed and delighted. There were hundreds, maybe thousands, of half-grown quail! They were in a large heated room, and it was so clean and warm I wanted to stay. Patty told me the quail in there were 6 weeks old. We left, and entered into the brooding area, where the just hatched chicks go. What a room! There were hundreds of teeny brown-striped chicks. If I didn’t know better, I would have thought they were keets.
     A giant gas heater kept the whole room at 95-degrees, and the floor was covered with a layer of sweet -smelling wood chips. I think I had a glimpse of what my heaven will be! She scooped 4 of them up and I placed them in my carrier. I thanked her and told her any time she need a “bird-sitter” I was available and headed home.
     I had done research on quail chicks, and knew I could raise them the same as the keet, so I popped them in the brooder and was amazed to see that my keet was three times the size of the quail! But knowing there is power in numbers, I watched to see that everything would be O.K. At first my “monster” keet was very leery of the babies, but didn’t seem at all aggressive, so I left them to get to know each other. When I checked back a few hours later, they were all snuggled up together on my keet’s stuffed animal, and looked as if they were family. Of course, my keet towered over the rest of them, but no one seemed to notice. Don’t you love it when a plan comes together!?
     Here is a picture of my newest additions. Yes, that is a giant stuffed drop of blood! Katie got it when she donated blood last week. When your children are all grown up, stuffed animals are scarce, so thanks to the Red Cross, my babies have a surrogate mother. Gives a whole new meaning to the old adage ?Blood is thicker than water?!

     Keetzilla telling 3 of his quail brothers to be careful as brother number four says, “ Mama, what big eyes you have”.

     FOUND ON THE MAIN ROAD IN BROWNVILLE, ACROSS FROM THE AIRPORT, A CALICO CAT. SHE IS VERY FRIENDLY, AND NEEDS TO FIND HER MAMA OR DADDY!!! CALL 943-2324 IF YOU THINK SHE MAY BE YOURS.

Page 9

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at Angie’s Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Janet Richards or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

SEPTEMBER 3 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Edwin Treworgy greeted twenty-four members and guests Hannah Knowlton and Key Club members Kate Hamlin, Krystle Parkman, Dani Graves, and Ashley McMahon.
     Roy led the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb spoke a prayer for guidance and peace. Paul Grindle read an inspirational message that asked the question, “When does night turn into day?” A Rabbi was quizzing some of his students and received various answers. He told them he thought the answer was, “When you look into any one’s face and see your brother or sister; it will be dark until then”.
     A newsletter from the Dover-Foxcroft Kiwanis Club was circulated.
     Birthday greetings go out to Sheri Conley on the 22nd and to Trish Hayes and Todd Lyford on the 23rd.
     Seventeen happy and sad dollars were donated for Ed’s last regular meeting as president, Toby moved out (happy and sad), thanks from the Key Club, a great year, a safe trip, and having Happy Birthday sung when it’s not your birthday!
     The Three Rivers News circulation is down a bit but still doing great.
     The Key Club is gearing up for another busy year with officer elections slated for September 18. A few of the members are planning to help out at the Piscataquis Heritage Days in Dover-Foxcroft on September 27 and 28.
     Evergreen will entertain at the Coffeehouse on October 25 from 7 to 9 pm. The cost is $8 per person. Door prizes will be awarded. Refreshments will be available as well as raffle tickets for a quilt to benefit the Gazebo Project.
     The Kid’s Korner library program will begin the weekly Wednesday events on September 24.

     Kathy Witham introduced our guest speaker for today, Hannah Knowlton. She is the daughter of Mrs. Julie Knowlton, a second grade teacher at the Brownville Elementary School. Hannah is a junior at Foxcroft Academy and is active in the Big Brothers/Big Sisters program. She also writes a monthly column for her church newsletter and is a member of the swim team.
     When Hannah was five years old she was diagnosed with Wilm’s Tumor, a kidney cancer that is only found in children. Through her affiliation with the Pediatric Oncology Department of the E.M.M.C. she had quite an experience in August. She had the chance to travel to New Mexico and stay at The Hole in the Wall, a camp sponsored by Don Imus. Children from New Jersey were the first to be invited to the ranch but now they come from all over.
     Hannah’s first impression upon landing was the predominance of the color brown and the lack of any trees taller than 12 feet. Upon arriving at the ranch she and the ten other young people got to pick out jeans, boots, shirts, and anything else needed for their stay.
     She told us that they got up at 5:30 each morning, fed the horses and other animals, had breakfast, did the chores, went horse-back riding, had lunch then went swimming. They had an opportunity to watch calf roping in an indoor arena. The horses had to be warmed up inside before going out on the trails. The sight of a coyote on one such trip made quite an impression on her. There were crafts and a pool table in the barn and Hannah learned to play poker! The food was interesting, especially the casserole containing tofu.
     One of the horses, PJ, gave a bit of trouble when they were supposed to herd the cattle. It seems that PJ wanted to join the cattle in play. Hannah worked with Chicken Jack, one of the ranch-hands, to clean out the pens, move grain and bales of hay, and clean out a culvert. The last chore involved thorny weeds so it wasn’t one of Hannah’s fondest memories.
     The worse day of the trip was the day to leave, as Hannah hated saying goodbye to everyone. The only good thing about that day was coming home and flying into a thunderstorm, as it was getting dark, cool!
     Thank you Hannah, for the upbeat description of your trip!
     Next week will be Kiwanis’ officer installation at the Legion Hall.

Page 10

Print Issues: Copyright © 2001 - 2012 Three Rivers Kiwanis Club
Website: Copyright © 2002 - 2012 Three Rivers Community Alliance