Three Rivers News, 2003-12-23
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2003
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 7
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

PEACE AND LOVE TO ALL DURING THIS HOLIDAY SEASON
6th ANNUAL CHRISTMAS DINNER
To be held at the Milo Town Hall
December 25, 2003.
Dinner served at noon.
The dinner is open to all community members who would like to attend.
Delivery available to shut-ins.
Contact Trish Hayes at 943-2902 for more information or to request delivery

GRANTS AVAILABLE
BY EBEN DEWITT
     The towns of Milo, Brownville, and Orneville have received a $300,000.00 housing improvement grant from the State of Maine. Grants are available to income-eligible homeowners needing assistance with home improvements. The types of improvements eligible under this program include roofing, replacement windows, doors, insulation, steps, electrical, heating systems and other necessary items to improve the safety and energy efficiency of the home. The application process is very easy and confidential. There is a short application form to complete and you must provide verification of income and ownership. Applications are available at the Brownville or Milo Town offices or by calling the Community Development Office at 1-800-648-8335. The income limits for eligibility are based on the size of the family, for example: 1 person-$22,000.00; 2 people-$25,900.00; 3 people- $29,150.00; 4 people-$32,400.00. The deadline for applications is February 1, 2004.

BENEFIT DEMONSTRATION WORKSHOP
SPONSORED BY P.E.T.S.
     P.E.T.S. a local organization devoted to reducing overpopulation and abandonment of companion animals is sponsoring a demonstration workshop on the Tellington TTouch. Cheryl Lord of Charleston, a guild-certified Tellington TTouch Practioner, will show us how this special touch or massage is done. She brings to her practice a lifetime of experience living and working with animals, along with an extensive background with horses. Cheryl spent much of her adult life as a professional zookeeper in some of the countries top zoos. Her career has included working with a wide variety of exotic animals, bird trainer and performer for raptor and exotic bird shows, working with Busch Gardens Animal Training Center, wildlife rehabilitation and veterinary assistant. It is this extensive and varied background with animals that has attracted Cheryl to Tellington Touch since it is beneficial to any animal.
     The TTouch consists of gentle, connected, circular touches and lifting and stroking movements on the skin. These touches alter behavior, improve well-being, and influences the relationship between animals and their humans and is easy to learn. This demonstration workshop will take place on Saturday, December 27 Thompson Free Library, Dover-Foxcroft, 10a.m. to noon. $10 donation with all monies being donated to P.E.T.S. For more information call Cheryl Lord at 285- 7329 or Mary Shapleigh at 564 –8092.

SANTA SIGHTINGS!

     On Thursday, Dec 18th, at the Cook School in LaGrange, Mrs. Carter's 2nd/3rd-grade class waits their turn to tell about different Christmas traditions from different countries. There was a huge crowd gathered to watch the Christmas programs put on by all the classes.

     Brownville Elementary held its annual Holiday Program on Friday. Each class in grades K-5 did a short presentation in front of a packed gym.
The day concluded with a visit by "Santa" arranged by the PTO. The staff and students wish everyone a very Merry Christmas.

TOWN OF MILO NOTICE
FOR THE UPCOMING HOLIDAY SEASON THE TOWN OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED:
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 24TH AT NOON
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25TH AND
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26TH
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 31ST AT 3:00
THURSDAY, JANUARY 1ST
THE TOWN OF MILO EMPLOYEES
WOULD LIKE TO WISH EVERYONE
A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR!

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME MENU

TUES., DEC. 23 BAKED HADDOCK, NEWBURG SAUCE, RED POTATO, PEAS, FRUIT COCKTAIL
WED., DEC. 24 HOMEMADE BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, COLE SLAW, GINGERBREAD
THUR., DEC. 25 MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!!
FRI., DEC. 26 HAPPY DAY AFTER CHRISTMAS!!!
MON. DEC. 29 SPAGHETTI CASSEROLE, GREEN BEANS, SLICED PEACHES
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


On Wednesday, December 24, the Brownville Community Church Candlelight service
will be held at 6:00 p.m.

THURSDAY CURBSIDE PICK UP!!
IN OBSERVANCE OF THE CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR HOLIDAYS, CURBSIDE PICK UP WILL BE AS FOLLOWS:
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2003 CURBSIDE PICK UP WILL BE ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2003 AND THURSDAY, JANUARY 1, 2004 CURBSIDE PICK UP WILL BE ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2003.

THE TOWNS OF MILO AND BROWNVILLE WILL BE ACCEPTING CHRISTMAS TREES TO RECYCLE. PLEASE DROP TREES AT THE JSI PARKING LOT IN THE ROPED OFF AREA ON THE MAINE SAVINGS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION SIDE OF THE PARKING LOT. THE TREES CAN BE DROPPED OFF ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 2ND OR SATURDAY, JANUARY 3RD UNTIL 12:00 P.M. TO MAKE REMOVAL MORE EFFICIENT WE ASK THAT EVERYONE PLACE THE TREES BUTT END OUT. MANY THANKS TO JSI STORE FIXTURES, INC. FOR THEIR ASSISTANCE.

     This picture was taken by George Dean on Sunday, Dec. 14th, after our second snowstorm of the season. Can anyone figure out where it was taken? Hint: It’s in Milo.

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Roland Stubbs was a (a) dentist (b) mechanic (c) bus driver (d) mail man.
2. After the block fire, the telephone office was moved to (a) the village school (b) Mcginness's Store (c) the Methodist Church building (d) Mutty's Garage.
3. Carlene Perry was Axel Carlson's (a) daughter (b) niece (c) granddaughter (d) sister.
4. Axel was a(n) (a) Episcopalian (b) Methodist (c) Catholic (d) Congregationalist.
5. Brownville's population is in the (a) 1100s (b) 1200s (c) 1300s (d) 1500s.
6. Mrs. Nelson taught (a) phys ed. (b) English (c) French (d) home economics.
7. The BHS stage was on the (a) west (b) east (c) north (d) south side of the gym.
8. Silent movies were shown at (a) Dillon's Hall (b) the YMCA (c) the Prairie Pavilion (d) the Herrick Hotel.
9. Mr. Herrick's first name was (a) Cal (b) Gil (c) Carl (d) Ed.
10. Bernard Jones was killed in (a) the Civil War (b) the Spanish-American War (c) WWI (d) WWII.
Answers: 1-c 2-d 3-b 4-a 5-b 6-d 7-a 8-a 9-a 10-c

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I AM A MARINE WIFE
BY PAT EGAN
SUBMITTED BY M/SGT. PHILLIP FLAGG, RETIRED US MARINE CORP
     I am a Marine wife.
     I share my husband's pride in the Marine Corps.
My husband has conquered the most challenging military training program the United States has to offer.
     The Eagle, Globe and Anchor give testimony to his title: "Leader of Men--United States Marine."
     He has taken his place among history's Marines who have made the free world feel safer just hearing the words, "The Marines have landed, and the situation is well in hand."
     I am proud that in an age that scorns fighting men, he chooses to be ready to defend his country.
     Although I can never fully understand his devotion to this fighting fraternity, I realize that these closed corners of his heart and mind are no threat to our marriage.
     That without this dedication to the word "Marine" and all it stands for--honor, courage, patriotism, and devotion to duty-he would not be the man he is. I try to be familiar with the job so I can appreciate his abilities.
     I wait when long hours or tours of duty separate us, knowing our reunion will revitalize our marriage. I pray for his success in his career and for his safe returns. I hope that he fulfills his potential and that I will never be a deterrent.
     I share a common bond with those wives who waited during Belleau Wood, Guadal-canal, Tarawa, Iwo Jima, Inchon, Khe Sanh, Beirut, Grenada...knowing one day I may be the one waiting.
     I choose to let the possibility of loss increase the intensity of the moment, to live fully, to love completely.
     My husband has earned his right to be called "Marine." He has been tested and not found lacking. May I be found as worthy of the title, "Marine Wife."

CALENDAR RAFFLE
     The Brownville Jct American Legion Auxiliary is sponsoring a Christmas Calendar Raffle for the month of December. The calendars are sold to the public and a name is drawn every day for the entire month. Each person has 31 chances to win. If they win one day, their name is put back in the pot and can be drawn again. The raffle pays $10.00 a day for week days and $20.00 for Saturday and Sunday. Whoever has their name drawn Christmas day will win $100.00. The following is a list of all those who have won up to December 18: Donna M. Jones, Deanna Bellatty, Miranda Patton, Marjorie Damon, Jared Weston, Mark Andrade, Peggy Witham, Linda Coburn, Marie McSwine, Raymonde Theriault, Peggy Witham, Donna M. Jones, Gene Burnham, Debra McAndrews, Barbara Reed, Cindy Wood, Fran Jay, and Ron Bolduc.
     We'd like to thank all those who participated in this raffle. It will enable us to continue with our community projects.

HELP OUR TROOPS
BY LINDA HOWARD
     If you have frequent flier miles and want to help our troops coming home, American Airline is allowing people to donate their miles to "fund" for them so they don't have to pay, like some of them are.
     What a great gift from the heart.....Go to http://www.aa.com/content/urls/heromiles.jhtml for more information

OPEN HOUSE FOR WEIGHT WATCHERS AT WORK
     There will be an open house for WW at Work on January 13th at 3:00 p.m. at Milo Elementary School. Judy Ann King from WW of Maine will present the program and answer any questions about how the program works. We have had some great success with the At Work program in the past and the New Year is often a great time to begin working on making healthier choices.
     If you are interested in finding out more about Weight Watchers and how it can work for you, plan to attend this information session on January 13th. If you have any questions you may call Sue Chaffee at 943-7346 ext. 208. Leave a voicemail message and I will return your call.

Greetings:
     Christmas greetings from Japan to the staff and friends of the Three Rivers News. Our family was recently privileged to visit Beijing, China where we got to walk the Great Wall and see the Forbidden City and Summer Palace. We were surprised to learn that there was a KFC on the Wall (so much for preserving one's culture) and that the local Mc. Donald’s delivered. We did not indulge though with great Chinese food all around.
     Milo has lost another one of its treasures in the person of Roy Monroe (December 15). The Monroes have been like family to me since childhood. Roy loved people, all kinds of people. He possessed one of the keenest minds Maine has ever produced, yet he was always willing to converse with people on their level.
     Roy was also one reason we are serving in the mission field in Japan. He opened up the scriptures to me in a most dynamic way some 33 years ago. Life has been a spiritual odyssey ever since. Visiting Milo has changed forever, but I am thankful for the family and loved ones we still have there. Roy's wife, Dot, is at the Hibbard Nursing Home and we are planning to see her this coming summer when we return for my MHS 40th reunion. Roy often spoke of going home to the kingdom, and "in a little while" his friends in the faith will join him.
Tom for the Pooles
Ikoma, Japan

Book Review
BY BILL SAWTELL
Living History
by Hillary Rodham Clinton (2003)
     Living History is a must read for anyone interested in recent American history. Hillary Clinton well chronicles her 56 years with anecdotes and a legal perspective when necessary. Senator Clinton offers a viable defense of accusations from the far right resulting in costly investigations and litigation. Here her degree in law from Yale comes into play.
     Although unforgiving of her husband's actions in the Monica Lewinsky case, she prays against impeachment.
     Hillary blames herself for the Democratic losses of the 1994 elections, which she attributed to her health care crusade and she begins a more symbolic period in her role as First Lady, visiting many countries all over the world, as far away as Mongolia. In fact, the book is a fine travelogue of her voyages and those of her husband and daughter Chelsea..
     Her interactions with other First Ladies and heads of state are interesting, particularly those with Jackie Kennedy.
     With a busy schedule and much travel, Hillary manages to fill her role as mother, seeing Chelsea complete her studies at Stanford on the West Coast.

Milo Free Public Library News
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     Winter has arrived in this area with two big snowstorms even though it is not winter yet on the calendar. When spring officially arrives on March 21 (or whenever) we will probably have snow on the ground and could even get another big snowstorm or two. Here in Maine we get extra winter time. Aren’t we lucky!
     We had our final Kiwanis Kids Korner on December 10. Don and Frank walked the children down from school, but this time it was hazardous duty as there was snow on the ground-lots of it. Don and Frank were the targets of many, many snowballs. The snow was soft and it was all in good fun. The “Kids” tumbled in with laughing, rosy faces and amid chaos peeled off boots, ski pants and
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mittens. The theme of the Christmas party was “cookies”. All kinds of cookies to eat and cookies to decorate to take home to share with families. The “Kids” had a wonderful time decorating with different kinds of frostings , lots and lots of sprinkles and gold and silver dragees-the little BB-like decorations. Pam and I were so surprised when two older Kiwanis Kids came upstairs with a tray of decorated cookies for each of us. One little fellow with a pleased grin asked if we had noticed the cookie tower on one tray. When we asked if he had made it, he answered “Yes”, and confided that it had been very hard to pile the cookies up using frosting for sticking.
     Val, Dottie and Katie along with two mothers helped the children with their cookies and also worked hard on the very messy clean-up afterwards. Those little gold and silver dragee BB’s really rolled everywhere. This was the final Kiwanis Kids Korner of the year. Val plans to wait until April before resuming the program. We at the library will miss the children and the adult helpers. The programs made our Wednesday afternoons exciting and fun and kept us in touch with the youngsters . We hope that many of them will be coming back to the library this winter to continue the joy of reading.
     We have had gift books donated to us this week. On Wednesday Donald Stanchfield brought in 5 more Nancy Drew books. These were numbered 31-35. They include two new titles that we did not have before-The Hidden Window Mystery and The Haunted Showboat. We are very pleased that Don has continued to bring in new Nancy Drew books to update our collection. He has just a few left to find and our collection will be complete with all new copies.
     Thank you, Don. That same evening Neil Hamlin brought us a gift book too. He brought in The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio by Terry Ryan. This is the true story of Evelyn Ryan who raised 10 children by writing jingles and winning contests in the 50’s and 60’s.

Please note the Library will be closed
DECEMBER 24 And DECEMBER 26
In observance of the Christmas holiday.
We will also be closed DECEMBER 31

Library Winter Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00
Telephone 943-2612

THE LIBRARY STAFF WISH ALL OF YOU A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND
A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR

METHODIST CHURCH NEWS
BY CAROLYN SINCLAIR
     I want to thank everyone who supports the food cupboard. We have served many families throughout the year and without the support and generosity of the community many in our area would have suffered. This year has been really busy and I expect to have more calls throughout the winter. I also want to thank
everyone who made our Christmas Fair so successful on Dec. sixth. I missed sending out a message last week as I was caring for my great-grand-daughter, Sarah, who was visiting from NC. I remember now why we should have our children when we are young. Sarah and her brother Ashton, are a delight but I was glad when Mom picked them up.
     There will be a candle light service at Park Street UMC at 11PM on Dec.24. Merry Christmas!!

AREA SCHOOL NEWS
     Milo Elementary held a holiday assembly on Friday morning. Music was shared by many of the classes. Danielle Newman played Silent Night on the glockenspiel, Sadie Zambrano, Lindsay Brown and Erika Worthing played Jolly Old St. Nick on the clarinet. The kindergarten children sang Jingle Bells. They accompanied themselves on the bells. First graders, accompanied by Mr. Eastman, sang Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. Second graders entertained the group with The Magic Toy. Fourth graders sang a kwanzaa song, "Imani" and explained about the holiday. Fifth graders sang "Feliz Navidad" accompanied by Mrs. Whitney on the drums. Our assembly ended with the staff wishing all of our school family peace and joyous holiday season with the singing of "Let There be Peace on Earth."
     The task of educating children on the last day before Christmas Break is often a struggle. As a school, we are always trying to make the very best use of the 175 days allotted to us each school year and hate to see time slip away from us. This year, the teachers have reviewed our curriculum and the state Learning Results and have chosen to develop some fun learning centers around some of the holiday customs around the world.
     The children spent the day in mixed age groups and moved around the school to learn about different customs. If you spend time with some of our students, take a moment during the break to ask about some of the things we learned about today.
     First grade staff members taught children about the Chinese New Year. Children explored music through drums, they learned about the national emblem of China, the dragon which symbolizes good fortune. They made a mask with the red color of happiness on it.
     The Special Education staff told the children of customs in Germany. Christmas there begins on December 6 when the children put their shoes outside their doors for St. Nicholas to fill with treats. The kids also leave a list of gifts they would like to have delivered to them on Christmas Eve by the Christkindl (Christ Child). Advent calendars, Advent wreaths, the hanging of stockings and Christmas trees are also traditions that originated in Germany. The students made an ornament for a Christmas tree - which was filled with treats as it might have been in Germany.
     Mrs. Whitney's room and the reading portable were filled with the wonder of Hanukkah. The children were told the story When the Hanukkah Candle Met the Christmas Star. They learned of the miracle of the oil in the lamp and the shining brightness of the star of hope which announced the birth of a special child of hope. Perhaps the most important lesson the children learned today was that even though these symbols of the holidays represent different things they can still complement each other and peacefully live together. The children played a dreidel game and colored Hanukkah papers.
     The fourth grades explored the traditions of Kwanzaa, including the 7 guiding principles, symbols, and music. Kwanzaa is a holiday established in 1966 to honor the African American culture. Kwanzaa is celebrated for 7 days from December 26 to January 1st. Ask your child what Imani meansin the Swahili language. Students made Kwanzaa candle gifts and sang Kwanzaa songs.
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     Mrs. Mills and Mrs. Dunham explored the country of Mexico and it's traditions. They discussed with students the fact that children started their celebration on December 16 when the "posada" began. The celebration lasted for 9 nights. Children received their main presents on January 6.
     They left their shoes outside filled with straw for the camels of the Three Wise Men who came to visit the Christ child. The Wise Men then filled the shoes with toys. We also talked about the Poinsettia, which originated in Mexico.
     Mrs. Walker/ Mrs. Carey - read the story The Wild Christmas Reindeer by Jan Brett, and taught about the wild reindeer that live in the Ukraine and the Arctic, and discussed the Tundra. The children made a reindeer using their hands cut out of paper as antlers.
In Mrs. Hussey and Mrs.Tardiff's second grade classroom children learned about Christmas in Holland. We found Holland on the world map and listened to carols sung in Dutch while we worked. Santa is called Saint Nicholas or SinterClaus in Holland. He arrives in their country by ship and then travels by horse from town to town. Children leave their wooden shoes by the fireplace or door. They are filled with carrots and straw for his horse. St. Nicholas leaves them treats and a shiny coin. The children made St. Nicholas day cards out of oaktag and attached a shiny penny and candy cane. They listened to a story at the end of our center.

Cook School News
     Our Holiday Program was a wonderful success. The Gym was packed with a standing room only crowd. The afternoon began with a welcome by Mrs. Bradbury and "The Pledge of Allegiance." The K-1 class took the stage first. They began by singing, "Must Be Santa." They held adorable handmade Santas as they sang. The kindergarten students presented, "The Gingerbread Man." The first grade students explained, "How the Seasons Came to Be." The 2-3 class taught us about Christmas customs and music from around the world. We learned about traditions in Mexico, Indonesia, Germany, Sweden, France, England, Italy and the United States.
     The 4-5 class adapted the popular children's book, The Polar Express into a play. The message about the magic of Christmas was well received. Students in grades K-5 concluded their program by singing, "Walking in a Winter Wonderland, "One Little Candle" and "Up on a Housetop." Thank you Mrs. Harmony for accompanying us. The students asked their parents to join them in sharing a holiday snack. Thanks to all who donated goodies to our snack table. Thanks to the PTO for all their help.
     On Friday morning, the children in grades K-5 made Gingerbread Houses. This has become an annual tradition. The older help the younger and creativity is at an all time high. The students took their houses home at the end of the day. At our final assembly of 2003, SHYLA HARRISON, BILLY PARKER and TRAVIS ADAMS were recognized as Terrific Kids. Ms. Ivy said that Shyla read with great expression during the program. Shyla is always friendly. Mrs. Carter praised Billy for doing a good job concentrating the week before vacation. He did a great job saying his lines in the play even though it's not his favorite thing to do. Miss K. loved the pink bathrobe that Travis wore in

the play. He was a role model in learning his lines and reciting them loudly and clearly. Travis has made a real effort to keep track of his homework assignments. Congratulations to all our Terrific Kids.
     Bus Students of the Week were Bryan Russell, Shalene Cody and Billy Parker. Thank you for riding safely. Trevor Lyford presented a Terrific Teacher award to Mrs. Carter. He recognized her for thinking up their Holiday play "All by herself." Jessica and Rachael gave an award to Mrs. Rhoda for being there whenever kids need help. Rose and Heather appreciate Mrs. Andrews because she helps others and is always polite. The students and staff have been collecting donations of canned goods for the LaGrange Fire Department. With the children's help, 21 Christmas boxes will be delivered. All students who donated had their name placed in a drawing. The winners were Rachael Wood and Tyler Tibbets. They were very pleased to receive a gift pack which included markers, colored pencils and crayons. Happy New Year to all.

     The PVHS Key Club would like to thank the many people who helped stand the Community Christmas tree up again after the many recent windstorms. Thanks to David and Debbie Walker, the Milo Fire Department, Frank Cochrane, the Milo Public Works crew and a special thanks to Abe Willinski for building us a great tree stand that should withstand even the harshest wind and weather. It truly is a community Christmas tree this year! Merry Christmas to everyone!

A Historical Review
Rescue - Nothing Else Will Do
Observer ? ... 8/17/78
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2003)
     Milo - A large red van parked outside Milo Fire Dept. headquarters is the latest word in Piscataquis County lifesaving equipment. Inside is gear which enables emergency technicians to extricate victims from crushed automobiles, move a person down the face of a cliff, or lift tons of fallen timber to reach an injured worker. "It won't be needed often," says Rescue Unit Chief Mike Nutbrown, "but when it's needed, nothing else will do."
     The van is a piece of surplus state property acquired by Milo Fire Sept., painted, and manned by men trained in various skills required to carry out difficult rescues.
     Nutbrown, who is certified emergency medical technician (EMT), still is building his rescue unit staff. It's not an easy job. More that 100 hours of training is required to qualify -- hours spent studying for the EMT certificate plus learning how to master such equipment as cutting torches, climbing gear, rigging, and underwater breathing apparatus.
     Five people are scheduled to enter scuba diving training this autumn, Nutbrown reports. Ultimately, the rescue squad will be composed of 12 men -- four men from the fire department, four from the Milo Ambulance Service, and four assigned to the rescue unit. Nutbrown's plan is to have sufficient versatility among the crew to provide any skill required at anytime of the day or night.
     The big red van contains enough equipment to demand many skills. Its lockers are filled with jacks, torches, first aid equipment, stretchers, crowbars, shovels, rope, even a portable generator. The unit also can serve as a communications center. It would cost more that $40,000 to replace the vehicle and its equipment.

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     At present, the rescue unit responds to highway accidents involving personal injury. The unit is to provide assistance to ambulance crews in the event a difficult rescue situation is encountered. Formerly, area garages were asked to lend their town vehicles and other heavy equipment to the rescue task.
     Nutbrown explained that mutual aid agreements with fire departments in the area permit the rescue unit to be used wherever it is needed. He said the unit will respond to calls from police, fire or medical authorities.

IN MEMORIAM
ROY H. MONROE
     MILO - Roy H. Monroe, 90, husband of Dorothy (Towne) Monroe, and long time resident of Milo, died Dec. 15, 2003, at a Dover-Foxcroft nursing home. He was born Jan 16, 1913, in Milo, the only son of Guy and Elsie (McKenney) Monroe. Educated in the Milo school system and at the University of Maine, he taught science at Milo High School during the 1930's. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and was for several years a self-employed printer. He was employed by the State of Maine and Piscataquis County as a director of civil defense, and supervised the design, construction, and operation of the county's first coordinated emergency response center in the late 1950's and 1960's. In his later years he was a realtor and a consultant performing title and property research services. Mr. Monroe attended United Baptist Churches. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy, of Milo; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Memorial services will be announced at a later date. Arrangements are in the care of the Lary Funeral Home.

MARION N. BROMILEY
     MILO - Marion N. Bromiley, 80, wife of the late Charles E. Bromiley, died Dec. 15, 2003, at a Dover-Foxcroft hospital. She was born April 3, 1923, in Milo, the daughter of Norman H. and Edith M. (Cookson) Richards. She had been employed as a cook in East Longmeadow, Mass. schools. Marion was president of the Water Street Coffee Club. She was predeceased by a son, David Horne. She is survived by three stepsons, Gene T. and his wife, Sandra Bromiley, of Milton, N.H., Irvin W. and his wife, Gail Bromiley, of Lindenwold, N.J., Charles E. and his wife, Catherine Bromiley, of Kresson, N.J.; two stepdaughters, Nancy and her husband, Gary Bramwell, of Conifer, Colo., Mary C. and her husband, George Iorio, of Gainesville, Ga.; many grandchildren, including a special grandson, Shawn Bromiley; several nieces and nephews. Graveside funeral services in the family lot in Evergreen Cemetery will be announced by the Lary Funeral Home in the spring.

ONE OF MILO’S HEROES
     SPC Luke A. Hussey safely returned to his U.S. base at Fort Hood, Texas on Dec. 8th, after serving for 8 months in Iraq. He was promoted from PFC to SPC while he was there. He is a petroleum supply specialist with the 4th 1D. His duties, while in Iraq, included fuel missions, night guard duty, transporting the unit’s Staff Sargent, and being a volunteer gunner on a humvee.
     One of his many accomplishments was taking part in the finding and capture of a large cache of weapons and the capture of 26 Iraqis.
Luke’s proud parents are Kim and Debbie Hussey of Milo. Also very proud of him are his brother Nathaniel and his sister Jennifer. His family is anxiously awaiting his return to his home town of Milo for Christmas.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Many years ago I taught Sunday School at the Park Street United Methodist Church. My children were little and I knew that I would need to commit to being there every Sunday myself, if they were going to be regular participants themselves. I have that kind of personality....I easily get complacent unless I have made a commitment to someone else.
     Church participation is an easy thing to get complacent about. When you have to get up every day of the week and get dressed up to go to work, it's easier to stay in your pajamas on Sunday morning. These days I watch Dr. Robert Schuller on the Lifetime Channel on cable t.v. on Sunday morning. His Hour of Power at the Crystal Cathedral in California is magnificent; and his guests, the music, and the message is always inspiring. What a brilliant man he is. I'm looking forward to his annual Christmas program this year.
     But back to teaching Sunday School. Every Christmas we'd put together a Sunday School program and the children would learn Bible verses and songs to present to parents and friends who would come to the annual event. Phil Gerow was Superintendent of the Sunday School in those days, and the children's Christmas program was beautifully done and much anticipated by all of the parishioners. The church was gaily decorated the night of the program by not only the wreaths that had been hung at the annual Hanging of the Greens program, but also by a beautiful tree that sat just behind the little set of pews in the vestry. The children always made the ornaments for the tree as well as a paper chain garland. It was quite festive. The ceramic nativity scene was set up and often times the placing of the figures was worked into the program.
     I'll never forget the year that the children portrayed the nativity themselves...dressed in costume they came forward a few at a time and situated themselves all around the alter. My daughter was the angel. She was perched on a stool kind of in the back of the scene. His angel costume was beautiful, but her little arms were supposed to be outstretched as she assumed the pose of an angel high in the night sky watching over the nativity. All of a sudden the little arms began to droop......then I saw her little hand come to cover her mouth as she began to take a deep yawn. Many in the audience took note of her predicament, and the "behind the hands" laughter could be heard. I'm sure that many of them were as relieved as I was when the scene finished and she was able to get down off of the stool and give those precious little arms a rest.
     I taught the children in the preschool. The preschoolers were just learning the stories of the Bible. Their lessons were very basic. I used a flannel board to teach most of the Bible stories including the birth of Christ. I had sent away in a catalog for both the flannel board and all the little pieces that made up each of the most famous stories of the Bible. We'd go over the Christmas story time and time again in the weeks that proceeded the program. Then the night of the program, I'd sit up there on the little rise behind the rail with the children gathered around. I'd begin by asking a few pertinent questions...and the story would just sort of unfold, the children adding their "take" on how it must have been. We'd place all the pieces of flannel one-by-one on the easel covered with flannel. The children always added things to the story that they had seen on the television network's Christmas specials, like the animals talking and the special donkey that carried Mary. The scene was almost magical....each year the same....yet different.
     I have a story from my Sunday School teaching days that I've always thought would make a good story for Reader's Digest. I have never written it down before, but will attempt to here. This took place in or about 1977. My husband and I had recently attended a weekend retreat called Marriage Encounter. It was a wonderful experience that we shared with many couples from Milo and some of the surrounding towns. We made many lifelong friends from our Marriage Encounter experience. One of the things we learned to do at Marriage Encounter was to invite Christ into our homes. In prayer we would ask Him to join us....as our children were saying their prayers, if we had a catastrophe, at mealtime,

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almost anytime that we felt the need to have Him with us. It took great focus and belief to do this activity, but we found it very fulfilling more than once.....which is another story for another time.
     This one particular Sunday morning I decided to try the activity with my Sunday School class. You must remember now that these children were four and five years old.
     We sat at our little low classroom table with folded hands. I explained that I was going to invite Jesus to come into the classroom with us.....and that if they believed and prayed hard enough, that it would happen. To a child, I was taken seriously. The reverence that filled that classroom is something that I have rarely experienced....before or after that day. Little heads bowed in prayer joined me in the invitation......and Jesus came to us. As sure as I am sitting at this computer right this very moment....Jesus was in that classroom, filling our hearts with His presence. We were filled with the Holy Spirit.
     After the moment had past....while we were still warm with the glow of His visit, the children looked up at me with a look of awe on their little faces. One little girl said, "I saw Him....He was in a white robe." But the thing that was said that indicated how powerful and incredulous the experience was to one little boy: "Could you get Batman, Batmite and Robin?" Surely if I could get the mightiest person of all to join us....I could get Batman!!
     I quickly busied the children doing a coloring activity while I ran up and down the Sunday School hallway knocking on other classroom doors, gathering the teachers outside their classrooms into the hallway to tell this story. The miracle of having Christ in my classroom was kind of overshadowed by the kid asking for the other super heroes, but I truly believe that this story proves the long suspected suspicion that Jesus has a sense of humor.
     I pray that each of you dear readers will be blessed this Christmas with the nearness of friends and family. My holiday message to you is that you find yourself in a place where you are able to give and receive love...for it is the greatest gift of all.
     Speaking of giving and receiving love....we are blessed at Brownville Elementary School to have a staff member with an incredible Mom. Donna Nason's mother Mrs. Marjorie Damon makes an incredible birthday cake for many of the staff members of our school when individual birthdays roll around. I hope that I am not taking liberties in divulging the up-to-now secret recipe that she uses.

Mayonnaise Cake - by Marjorie Damon
2 cups flour
1 cup water
1 cup sugar
1 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 cup cocoa
1 teaspoon vanilla

     Beat all together. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes. Makes a 9X13 inch cake. Then frost with this incredible frosting. The cake must be kept refrigerated with this frosting on it.

Crisco Frosting - also by Marjorie Damon
1 cup of Crisco
1 cup of sugar
2 whole eggs
1/4 tsp. salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 cup water

     Beat all together on high speed for about 5 minutes, until stiff. Marjorie adds a little food coloring to a small amount and pipes birthday wishes and our name to the top of the cake. It's very special to be remembered by this thoughtful woman with her wonderful cake. We seldom have enough left to refrigerate....but if you do have some left, it's best kept cold.

The Washington Post – November 2003
Arthur Owen, Teacher, Dies
     Arthur E. “Murph” Owen, 96, a retired Navy captain and a Fairfax teacher, died Nov. 16 of complications from a fall at his home in Falls Church.
     Capt. Owen was born in Milo, Maine, and graduated in 1930 from the U.S. Naval Academy.
     During World War 11, he served on the USS Texas, which provided support for the invasions of Morocco and Sicily. He later was damage control officer on the USS Tennessee and participated in the Battle of Surigao Strait, during which the Tennessee was hit by a Japanese kamikaze plane.
     During his career, Capt. Owen commanded the USS Aldebaran and the USS Vulcan. He served on the staff of the Commander Atlantic Reserve Fleet, at the Bureau of Ships and on the joint staff of the U.S. European Command. He completed his career as an instructor at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, retiring in 1960.
     Capt. Owen moved to Arlington County in 1954, and after retiring from the Navy, he taught seventh-grade and eighth-grade math for eight years at Longfellow and Thoreau schools in Fairfax. He and his wife moved to Goodwin House West in Falls Church in 1994.
     A son, Arthur E. Owen Jr. died in 1998.
     Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Madeleine G. Owen, of Falls Church; two children, M. Kayleen Hadd of McLean and Dr. Robert G. Owen of Port Orange, Fla.; 10 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren.
     Services were held at Murphy’s Falls Church Funeral Home, 1102 W. Broad St. on November 21. Inurnment will be on December 22 at 9 a.m. at Arlington National Cemetery. Contributions may be made to a charity of your choice.

BACK ALONG CHRISTMAS DAY WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.
1966-Snow all day-20° at 7 am and 32° at 3:30 pm.
1967-Snow evening –10° at 6:30 am and 18° at 4:30 pm.
1968-Windy&cold –6° at 7 am and 0° at 4 pm.
1969-Sunny-10° at 7 am and 20° at 4 pm.
1970-Sunny-19° at 6 am and 14° at 6 pm.
1971-Sunny&windy-6° at 6 pm.
1972-Sunny AM Cloudy PM-22° at 4 pm.
1973-Sunny am Cloudy pm snow in evening-24° at 4 pm.
1974-Snow flurries-24° at 12 and 10° at 10 pm.
1975-Cloudy cold snow evening-26° at 9 am and 0° at 9:30.

Mayo Regional Hospital Births
     A son, Maxwell Anthony Osgood, to Kristy and Bryan Osgood of Milo on December 14, 2003. Wt. 8 pounds 3 ounces.

THANK YOU!
     A special thank you to my family and friends from MSAD #41 and Three Rivers Kiwanis for the help and support you’ve shown before, during, and after my surgery. Your thoughtfulness is greatly appreciated. The beautiful flowers have brightened my days!
Sincerely, Nancy Grant
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THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

DECEMBER 17, 2003 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Joe Zamboni welcomed fifteen members today, our guests from the Dover-Foxcroft Kiwanis Club: Bob Moore, Joe Guyotte, Owen Pratt, Bob Darling, and Hoyt Fairbrother, and Rev. Ernie Madden.
     Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance, Herb Dunham led us in prayer, and Chris Beres read an inspirational message.
     Newsletters from the Dover-Foxcroft and Orono/Old Town Kiwanis Clubs were circulated.
     Happy birthday wishes go to Ryan O’Connor on the 27th. Joe and Chris Beres celebrate their anniversary on the 30th.
     Twelve happy and sad dollars were donated today for PAT’s game, son home from Iraq, successful hip surgery, wonderful game, Secret Santa shopping, Murrel’s birthday, Red Sox concerns, new position available, can’t find help for now, and losing a loved one.
     Trish Hayes reported on the Key Club activities: food sales for the Dec. 22nd game, blood drive today, still collecting ‘Coats for Kids”, and caroling on the 21st with the high school chorus and Kiwanis members.
     Cheryl Hamlin told us that the fruit sale realized a $1400.00 profit!
Murrel and Janet said the Secret Santa distribution has been completed. Lots of gifts were donated to make Christmas merrier for fifty families.
     The Gazebo Project is on track and looking good.
     Don’t forget the Christmas Dinner on December 25 in the Town Hall dining room from noon to 2 pm. Volunteers are needed to help prepare vegetables on Wednesday from 12 to 4 pm. Pies are still needed as 75 to 125 guests are expected at the dinner.
     We will not hold our regular meeting next week, December 24, but we will meet on December 31 at the regular time of 6:30 am at The Restaurant.
     Our special guest speaker today was Rev. Ernie Madden, pastor of the United Baptist Church. He spoke to us today about The Purpose of the Christmas Story.
     There were fourteen generations from Abraham to David, fourteen generations from David until the people were taken to Babylon, and fourteen generations from that time until Christ was born. An angel of the Lord came to Joseph in a dream and told him not to be afraid to marry Mary as she will have a son and you will name him Jesus and he will save his people from their sins. When Jesus was born in Bethlehem three wise men came from the east to worship him. They had followed a star that went before them until it stopped where baby Jesus was. They presented him with gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.
     Joseph was again visited by an angel of the Lord who told him that King Herod wanted to do harm to the baby Jesus. Joseph took the baby to Egypt and stayed there with Mary until Herod died. They were afraid to stay in Israel so they traveled to the area of Galilee and lived in the town of Nazareth.

     Thank you for celebrating this most special birthday with us.
     As Rev. Madden is quite fond of monkeys, he was presented with a large white one for his office!
     My special thanks to Dottie Brown for a great job of being the active secretary today!

UP ON THE FARM(and down at the shelter)
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     As I sit and write this, the sun is shining, it is 5-degrees, and the goats are standing on the deck casually chompping away on an empty cardboard carton. Nothing bothers a goat as long as it has a bag of garbage to rummage through.

     I promised you a “tour” of the P.A.W.S. Animal Shelter, and as you can see from the pictures you are about to have it.
     The first shot is off the building at 39 Clinton Street, taken from the corner of Cove and Clinton Streets. We love the snug little location and the huge lot out back. The cute little sun-porch on the front is always unlocked and every day we arrive to a pile of items dropped off to help us . Christmas comes everyday, either in the form of supplies or new residents for the shelter.

     As you walk in the front door, the first thing you notice is how bright and warm the shelter is. And of course the “house cats”. Many of our longtime strays have their run of the house, and they are always a wonderful host or hostess as we enter. Two of the girls are Maria and Sabrina, who are very friendly black, young females. They have both been spayed and even though they appreciate their temporary home at the shelter, they would LOVE a permanent home with a responsible family. They are both kid and dog friendly, and basically just want to sit on someone’s lap, get petted, and give love.

     This is a picture of Sabrina, one of those two. She is in the kitchen, which is to your right as you enter. Behind her is the board we use to record the names of all of the guests at the shelter.

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     Our board is decorated for Christmas, thanks to the kindness of Roxanne Freese, who donated the stockings and a box of treats. We are going to open the stockings and the treats and just let all of the cats go for it; on Christmas Eve. Santa comes early to good cats and kittens!

     Another “regular” at the shelter is Lady, the dear collie/shepherd mix that was abandoned on Pleasant Street in Milo. Although she lives with Kirby and me, she is a frequent visitor to the shelter,. She is looking for a home, and loves people and all other animals.
     Also on the first floor is the “maternity room”. In there is Mama and her 6 kittens. As you can see, she is so comfortable and happy. Behind her is some of the many boxes of kitty litter we have been given. We use them to keep the little ones from wandering between and behind the washer and dryer, as this room also serves as a bathroom and laundry room. Mama doesn’t care what the room used to be, it is now her nursery and no cat has ever been more appreciative of warmth and a steady supply of food. She is also appreciative of the help Julie and I give her, especially when we supplement the babies with some kitten formula. She knows we love her children as much as she does and trusts us completely.

     Moving on, we go upstairs to a big open bedroom with a double bed, where the house cats spend a lot of their time, both on and under the bed. Rusty, Sabrina, Roxy and Maria are apt to be lying on the bed and give a sleepy nod in our direction. Andy, the gray bobtail who was severely injured when he was hit by a car in front of The Restaurant in October, will likely be under the bed. He is still a little mad at humans, both the one who hit him, and the one who abandoned him. We hold him and love him and tell him what a sweet fellow he is. He was neutered last week, so he is probably a bit made at us for that whole deal, but he’ll get over it. (We hope !)

     Also upstairs is the quarantine room, where we house the newcomers to make sure they are healthy and to observe them. Presently a beautiful white mom, named Ms. Kitty, and her two adorable girls, Oreo and Marshmallow occupy that room. Both youngsters are about 4 months old and gorgeous. Oreo has black and white markings like a milk cow, and Marshmallow is pure white. Both are friendly and need a home. They can be adopted separately, but together would be an extra nice thing.

     Julie and I would like to mention a wonderful adoption that took place last Sunday. Buffy and Muffy, the two buff colored boys, were adopted by the Vachon family on Swett Hill. We can’t tell you how wonderful it is to have such loving, caring people from our own town take in our area strays. Thank you Amy!

     The room at the river side end of the top floor is where we keep the cats and kittens who need work on their social skills. Shown in the next picture is Ghost and Wendy, two of the kittens trapped under Maria Landry’s porch in Junction last summer. Their mother is Maria, one of the black house cats, and they still run to her and rub and purr when she drops in to visit them. Wendy was spayed last week, and Ghost and his “brother” Casper are going to be neutered soon. They are getting friendlier every day, and could go to a “special” home.

     This photo shows Mia and Casper in front of their door. The wonderful little cat couches and chairs were gifts from the Milo Elementary kids.

     As you can see, the kitties live quite comfortably in their temporary home. The black fellow closest to us is Max. He is one of the litter abandoned at Maria Landry’s. Also in the room is a bed and a walk-in closet. More than likely, Shyla and Hazel are in there. Hazel is the gray tiger dropped off at The Field Of Dreams greenhouse last Summer. Hazel’s two kittens, Cutie-Pie and Sweetie-Pie, were adopted earlier this month. Hazel and Shyla have “issues” with humans, and we pet and hold them when we can, but they would like to be left to themselves. Both were spayed last week, and it was quite a scene at Foxcroft Vets. We took seven cats in all and most of the cat carriers had huge written warnings saying ” Caution !!! We Bite” . Thank goodness the folks at Foxcroft have seen and done it all when it comes to cats. Everything went smoothly, and all of the patients have recovered from their ordeal. Now we can focus on trying to show the poor abused animals that some people are good, and that they can learn to tolerate and trust us. I’m not naïve enough to believe they will ever like us, but miracles do happen.
     So that is most of the layout of our shelter. As new developments happen, I will keep you informed.
     A few more thank-yous are in order for this week. Cheryl and Steve Hamlin have been wonderful friends of our furry friends. They have given lots of food, and Cheryl has made the most wonderful bunch of kitty playthings. Their daughter Michelle is also a great supporter.
     Another great friend is Marty O’Conner. I don’t know if he even realizes we know….but he has removed snow for us, and what a help that is!
     Pete Snow , who works with Kirby at the M.M.A., gave a very generous monetary donation, as did a wonderful couple from Pennsylvania, Bruce and Joni Seth. I was so elated by their gesture and by the kind words Joni wrote. Thank you !!
     So here are some holiday wishes for you, from the Robertson flock.
     We hope family, love and peace surround you.
     We hope you find time to relax…

We wish you coziness and warmth…..

We wish for you, the peace and confidence that comes from being mature and well loved .

And we hope your holiday hair-style comes out better than Ziggy’s did!!

PEACE AND LOVE TO ALL…
AND
PLEASE BE PART OF THE SOLUTION AND MAKE OUR BIGGEST CHRISTMAS WISH COME TRUE.
HAVE YOUR PET SPAYED OR NEUTERED.

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