Three Rivers News, 2003-12-30
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2003
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 8
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

HAVE A WONDERFUL NEW YEAR!

SANTA AND HIS REIN-GOAT WERE SIGHTED ON SARGENT HILL DRIVE.
     This is reported to be the only known photo of the elusive old chap and his trusty pal “Jack” the rein-goat.

Thank you!
     Thank you to everyone who donated money, baked goods or time to help make the 6th Annual Christmas Dinner a success. We served 79 meals including 21 deliveries to shut-ins. We couldn’t have done it without the support of family, good friends and local merchants. The support shown for the dinner guests and for Everett and Freda was truly in the spirit of the season.
     Freda asked me to let everyone know that Brian is doing well and is working hard in physical therapy with hopes of making a full recovery. (Brian was injured in a fall from the roof of the new home he is building and injured his elbows, wrist and ankle.)
~Trish Hayes


NOTICE FOR THE TOWNS OF BROWNVILLE AND MILO
THE TOWNS OF MILO AND BROWNVILLE WILL BE ACCEPTING CHRISTMAS TREES TO RECYCLE. PLEASE DROP TREES AT THE JSI PARKING LOT IN THE ROPED OFF AREA ON THE MAINE SAVINGS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION SIDE OF THE PARKING LOT. THE TREES CAN BE DROPPED OFF ON FRIDAY JANUARY 2ND OR SATURDAY, JANUARY 3RD UNTIL 12:00 P.M. TO MAKE REMOVAL MORE EFFICIENT WE ASK THAT EVERYONE PLACE THE TREES BUTT END OUT. MANY THANKS TO JSI STORE FIXTURES, INC. FOR THEIR ASSISTANCE



TOWN OF MILO NOTICE
THURSDAY CURBSIDE PICK UP!!
IN OBSERVANCE OF THE NEW YEAR HOLIDAY CURBSIDE PICK UP WILL BE AS FOLLOWS:
THURSDAY, JANUARY 1, 2004 CURBSIDE PICK UP WILL BE ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2003.


PUBLIC HEARING
Milo, Brownville, Orneville
A Public Hearing will be held on January 8, 2004 at 6:00pm at the Milo Town Office to discuss the 2003 Community Development Housing Program. This $300,000 program provides grant funds to improve substandard housing for income eligible residents in the three towns. Interested residents are encouraged to attend.

In Loving Memory Of
JUSTIN ELI GERRISH
Dec. 31, 1977 - June 10, 1992 Forever in our hearts
STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings
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MEALS FOR ME MENU

TUES., DEC. 30 BEEF STROGANOFF, NOODLES, CORN, TOSSED SALAD, BUTTERSCOTCH PUDDING
WED., DEC. 31
ROAST PORK, GRAVY, BAKED POTATO, BROCCOLI, LEMON MERINGUE PIE
THUR., JAN. 1 HAPPY NEW YEAR!
ALL SITES CLOSED
FRI., JAN. 2 BAKED HADDOCK, RED POTATOES, PEAS, PINEAPPLE CRISP
MON. JAN. 5 MEATLOAF, GRAVY, MASHED POTATO, SQUASH, MOLASSES COOKIE
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!

Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. Don Vachon was Josee Vachon's (a) father (b) uncle (c) grandfather (d) brother.
2. In the Onawa Wreck, the passenger train was coming (a) north (b) east (c) west (d) south.
3. (a) Bert Dillon (b) Sam Cohen (c) Jim McGrath (d) Dr. Hayes had the first car in Brownville Junction.
4. Jim Hay was a (a) supply clerk (b) mechanic (c) preacher (d) teacher.
5 Carlene Perry was a champion (a) bowler (b) skater (c) runner (d) speller.
6. Brownville's highest population was near (a) 1400 (b) 1600 c) 1800 (d) 2000.
7. Pauline Thomas was Brownville's first woman (a) policeman (b) librarian (c) fireman (d) selectman.
8. The Bangor and Aroostook service into KI was discontinued in (a) 1920 (b) 1922 (c) 1923 (d) 1927.
9. The Bangor and Aroostook freight shed was used for (a) basketball (b) table tennis (c) Methodist Church (d) Boy Scouts.
10. Henderson's first name was (a) Evan (b) Alan (c) Eder (c) Elwin.
Answers: 1-b 2-c 3-a 4-c 5-d 6-d 7-c 8-b 9-a 10-c

TRC ALLIANCE CORNER
www.trcmaine.org
TRC Meeting Dec. 23, 2003

     The meeting began at 4:00 p.m. at the Town Hall. Present were: Seth, Izzy, Kitty, Melissa and Priscilla.
Reports
     The director (Seth) reported the site hits were down again this month but that is to be expected at this time of the year. We are still getting over 1,200 hits a week with the top two searches being Winter Pictures and Wintery Pictures. Third was the Piscataquis Observer and it was noted that we have the most articles from that newspaper of any site on the Net.
     Site Changes include a new Highlights Section for local news highlights and information. And also the menu has been updated, removing the word local making it more streamlined. All agreed that both sections are much nicer and that Seth has done a great job.
     The secretary (Priscilla) had nothing new to report.
The treasurer (Izzy) reported there is a little over $100 dollars in the account.
     News & Development Coordinator (Izzy) reported she has been able to talk to Murrel Harris about the sports program and also the Fishing Derby.
     Directory Coordinator (Melissa) reported she is in the process of contacting the snowmobile clubs for information for our planned Snowmobile page. She will report later with the results.
     The Historian (Kitty) reported she will now be able to travel further for information on the Ebeemee Community Project. She brought the group up to date on the information she has now and what sort of research she is planning.
     The Registry of Deeds Project is also still being worked on and a report will be forthcoming.
Old Business
     The Holiday Lighting Contest was discussed and Melissa will be notifying the winners. It was discussed that because of the low response to the contest that maybe next year we would pass on having one. A decision is to be made later on.
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     Kitty is working on doing a TRC Alliance Corner for the paper. The minutes of our meetings will also be used one week in this spot.
Sports Schedules
     The High School Sports Schedule seems to be working well. A recent addition to the sports schedule is the Pee Wee Basketball schedule.
Free Advertisements
     So far the Piscataquis Observer is the only paper that has given us space about TRC(AND OF COURSE THE Three Rivers News!) and that was a very small entry on the lighting contest. Priscilla will be checking on getting into the Milo Farmers Union flyer. Other options are needed as well.
New Business
     Murrel reported to Izzy that the poster for the Fishing Derby is being worked on and should be available soon. We need all the information and especially when this event will occur. A discussion of whether the prize drawings would be line on line this year and a final decision will be made later.
     We plan a Schoodic Lake Ice Out contest but will need someone living at the lake to help us with this project. We discussed when this should be started and the question was asked if anyone knew when the ice usually goes out.
TRC Alliance Bylaws
     These are still being worked on and some sections need a lot of work. This will be an ongoing project.
     We wished each other a Merry Christmas and adjourned the meeting at 5:00 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by
Priscilla Bass, Secretary

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM

     We had a wonderful Christmas with our darling grandchildren. Above are Hayley, Josh, Morgan and Brianne. Little stepping stones to my heart. They are sitting in front of our ceramic village....posing to make their old Nannie happy. Believe me when I tell you they were sick to death of the sight of a camera by the time I got done taking pictures.
     One of fun things that we did this year was to go to the University of Maine last Saturday night to see the group Manhattan Transfer at the Maine Center for the Arts. WOW!!! They were wonderful! I don't know if any of you read the review in the B.D.N., but the girl who wrote it couldn't say enough good about them...and I reiterate. What a great show! It's so festive doing a special Christmas show...last year we went to see Anne Murray. My ultimate Christmas dream show, as you all know, is to go to NYC to Radio City Music Hall to see the Rockettes Christmas Show.

     Since Everett and Freda Cook had to be away taking care of their son who was seriously injured in an accident, we had to make plans to have our Christmas Eve breakfast with our good friends at a different venue. I called Sylvia Black on the chance that she might be able to accommodate our huge group and she graciously obliged. We had a scrumptious meal at the Down Home Bed and Breakfast and even had our tree right there in her beautiful dining room.
     As I write this, the Christmas dinner dishes are just drying in the dishwasher. There isn't a single present put away. We've just about finished with our celebrations....but we still have one more to enjoy. Lori and John and the baby will be here for the weekend and we'll get to spend the remnants of Christmas with them. Mostly the picking up and putting away of things.
     This week we were saddened by the passing of my beloved cousin Richard Cianchette. He had been sick for some time and passed away two days before Christmas. We will make the trip to Pittsfield for his memorial service very early tomorrow morning. I've put together sandwich mixings, sweet breads and some other snacks to take over to my cousins who spent their Christmas sadly mourning their loss and worried about their mother....my aunt. We have been a very lucky family in that there were 26 first cousins all together. One little girl cousin died many years ago when she was just one year old, but the 25 remaining cousins have all lived through to middle age and several are well beyond that. Genetically we know that we are predisposed to high blood pressure, type two diabetes, and kidney disease, but because we know this about ourselves, we are quite careful. Of the 25 of us who grew up together, Richard is the first (at age 50) to pass away. God love his heart, he always did live just a step or two outside of the box.
     I've been so busy with Christmas with trying to keep up with my usual traditions, that I've barely had time to think about New Years Eve. What with all of the school functions and then trying to fit in dinners and special occasions with family and friends it seemed like it was a million years away. Now, it's coming right up in less than a week. YIKES!! I must come up with a plan.
     Over the years we've done many different things on New Year's Eve. We generally try to keep our celebrating in town....but we've planned things out of town before....only to have the plans dashed because of horrific weather. So, it just doesn't make any sense to try to do something out of town. I think our favorite celebrations have been those that we have spent with friends doing progressive dinners. We would start with appetizers at one house...move on to the next house for soup and salad....then on to the next house for the main meal....and then on to the next house for dessert and ringing in the New Year. It took all evening to get all of these things accomplished and everyone got to show off their beautiful table settings with their finest china. We'd have a different kind of wine at each place....and finish the evening off with a big pot of coffee with dessert. Well...actually we'd end the evening with a glass of champagne and a toast and a kiss. That was always the fun part.
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     Many years ago my dear Aunt Vi sent me this recipe for Cheese Cake that she loved to make at Christmas time. There was a sweet little Santa Claus sticker on the paper and her handwritten recipe was in red ink. I cherish those recipes that I have from my aunts in their own hand writing. It follows:

Cheese Cake
Make a graham cracker crust by using 32 graham crackers mixed with 1/4 cup sugar and 1 1/4 sticks melted butter (she used oleo). Mix together and press into a pie plate. Reserve 1/2 cup crumbs for the top.

For the filling:
In the first bowl dissolve 1 pkg. lemon jello (small) in
1 cup boiling water
Cool but do not jell.

In another bowl put one 8 oz. pkg. of cream cheese
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla
Cream the above.

     In the 3rd bowl: Whip 1 tall can evaporated milk that is very cold.
     Put the filling in the crust....scatter the reserved crumbs over the top and refrigerate overnight. After serving keep refrigerated, as well.
     Aunt Vi shared in a short paragraph at the bottom of the page that she often used a few more graham crackers to be sure she had enough....and also she put the canned milk in the freezer for a short time before whipping. She stressed that the pie did not taste like canned milk at all...it is really delicious!

A Historical Review
Dr. Rodriguez Honored
Town Crier, Oct. 6, 1988
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2003)
     Milo Doctor Araminta Rodriguez was honored with an Open House at the Milo Town Hall on Sunday. Dr. Rodriguez closed her medical practice on September 30th after 42 years as a physician.
     Dr. Rodriguez and her late husband Dr. Garcia-Rey came to this country from Cuba with their young family of three boys in the 1960's because of the conditions there. They had to pass their medical examinations in English (a great achievement) and then served their internship at the Eastern Maine General Hospital in Bangor. They came to Milo and opened their general medical practice in July of 1963. Dr. Garcia passed away in 1983 but Dr. Rodriguez continued their practice, being the only doctor in town until Dr. Hockmuth came to Milo three years later.
     More than 200 friends, neighbors and officials turned out to help her start her new life as a private citizen. Town Manager Jayne Farrin was on hand to present the guest of honor with a framed resolution on behalf of Milo residents to show the gratitude for her 25 years of dedicated service to this area.
     State Senator Charles Pray and Representative Robert Hussey, Jr. were present and presented Dr. Rodriguez with a proclamation on behalf of the State legislature honoring her service to medicine in Maine.
     Two of the doctor's sons, Robert who is an accountant in Boca Raton, Florida and Felix Manual who is an educator now living in Milo, were present for the occasion. Another son, Jorge who is a publisher in New York City, was unable to attend. He sent a letter which was read by Christina Howard. He also sent a gift of a pair of earrings with five gold petals, "representing the five members of the family" surrounding a diamond center "representing the family unity."

     The program included remarks by Dr. Linus Stitham of Dover-Foxcroft and by Malcolm Buchanan who was principal at the high school attended by the doctor's sons.
     The choir of the Park Street United Methodist Church under the direction of Merna Dunham, sang "Reach Out and Touch" to represent the many lives that have been touched by the care of Dr. Rodriguez. The Rev. Joseph Beardsley of the same church opened the proceedings with an invocation. Janet Calvert closed the program by singing "My Task" to commemorate the many years Dr. Rodriguez has performed the task which she set for herself when she became a doctor. Mrs. Calvert was accompanied by Pauline Sherburne.
     A surprise visitor, who came to celebrate with Dr. Rodriguez, was her niece, Arlene Amargos of Miami. Dr. Rodriguez delivered her and her twin sister 20 years ago. Dr. Rodriguez was quite overcome by the outpouring of affection for her and her only remarks at the close of the program were "I love you all", a fact that has been obvious through her loving care these many years.

River Cruise Part 11
BY VIRGIL VALENTE
     After lunch, I went on deck to write in my journal and to watch the scenery. The top deck was still closed due to low bridges. In fact for one bridge the captain had to lower the wheelhouse and collapse the walls. He steered the ship by having his body protrude through the roof of the wheelhouse. When we came to a bridge everyone had to lay on the deck or go down stairs. Later in the afternoon we played cards in the lounge waiting for dinner. The menu was crab thermador, spicy cream of chicken soup, fish fillet baked in a parmesan bread crust, served with lemon parsley butter, turned potatoes and vegetables or veal Zurichoise, sautéed veal strips in creamy white wine sauce with mushrooms served with potato rosti and vegetables. We had a ginger parfait with plum stew for dessert. After dinner we had the crew show. Most of the costumes used were sewn by the captain. He made a captain’s uniform and using his arms for legs formed a puppet that danced. Another was a pantomime with a guy trying to get the attention of a girl by flexing his muscles. He gave up after a while. Then the girl got up. She was supposedly blind. There were many other skits and a good time was had by all. After the show there was dancing in the lounge.
     Sat. June 16th. Another early breakfast this morning because we had to be on the buses by 7:45 for our tour of Nuremberg. Emperor Heinrich III founded the city in the 11th century. From the 11th to the 16th century nearly all the emperors lived in the castle here and held their imperial meetings in this city. It was considered the unofficial capital of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nations. It remained a free city until it was annexed by the Kingdom of Bavaria.
     It was raining this morning so we all took our umbrellas. Our first stop was where Hitler held his rallies. It is neglected now and there are many young trees growing up between the stone steps. Across a small lake we could see a replica of the Coliseum of Rome built by Hitler. It is one and a half times the size of the one in Rome.
     We left the park of Hitler and were driven to the courthouse where the famous trials at the end of WWII were held. The war crime trials were held from November 20, 1945 to
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October 1, 1946. Nuremberg was selected for a number of reasons. First the Palace of Justice was spacious. It had 22,000 square meters of space with about 530 offices and about 80 courtrooms. The war damage was minimal and there was a large undestroyed prison as part of the complex. The Russians wanted the trials held in Berlin but agreed to compromise with the first of the trials held in Nuremberg and others would be held in Berlin. Because of the cold war, none were ever held in Berlin. Twenty-four Nazi leaders were indicted and tried as war criminals here. It was eerie to sit in the courtroom where all this history took place. Some of the criminals were imprisoned and others were sentenced to death. Hermann Goering was sentenced to death, but on the night before his execution, he took potassium cyanide from an unknown source and killed himself. The unknown source is believed to be an American officer. We had a short lecture in the courtroom and then boarded the bus again.
     We were taken up a hill to the castle where we could poke around. It was a great spot to take pictures of the city. Some people decided to walk down the hill to the center of town where the bus would pick us up. Others rode the bus down. Our group decided to take the bus because we would have more time to look around before we had to reboard the bus.
     Louise told us to try the small sausage Nuremberg is famous for. It is called rostbratwurste. Georgia and I went into a bier garden and had some. They looked a little smaller than our breakfast sausage and were mild very tasty.
     In the main square is a beautiful fountain. Around the fountain is metal latticework. In the latticework is a gold ring. Tradition has it that the maker of the ring was a young man. He was in love with a girl and the girl’s father said he wasn’t good enough for his daughter. He made the gold ring and then left town. The father was so impressed with the ring; he consented to let his daughter marry. Unfortunately no one could find the young man. To this day it is said that if you make a wish while rubbing the ring three times the wish will come true. We shopped around the square for a while and picked up some of the city’s famous gingerbread called Lebkkchen. I also got a vanilla ice cream.
     We boarded the bus at 12 for our trip to Roth where the ship was picking us up.
Next week: The Main-Danube Canal

IN MEMORIAM
SHAWN E. SCRIBNER
     WILLIAMSBURG TOWNSHIP Shawn E. Scribner, 41, died peacefully Dec. 25, 2003, at his residence. He was born June 22, 1962, in Augusta, a son of Henry E. and Rose Marie (Mason) Scribner. Shawn grew up in Norwich, Conn., and returned to Maine in 1989. Through the continuing education program he received his diploma from Old Town High School and attended University College, Bangor, graduating with a bachelor's degree in social services. He established the multi-cultural unit at University College. Shawn was a friend of Bill W. and was very active in the local AA groups. More importantly, Shawn was a friend to all and was always willing to help those in need. He is survived by his parents of Indian Island; his wife, Lori (Morgan) Scribner of Williamsburg; two daughters, Syndi Lee Scribner-Drinkwater and her husband, Tim, of Medford, and Sandie Lynn Scribner of Williamsburg; a grandson, Dylan James Drinkwater; two brothers, Randy Scribner of Florida, and Todd Ketchum of Indian island; two sisters, Debbie Francis of Indian Island, and Dawn Coley of Connecticut; close friends, Jim Sprouse of Winterport, and Carroll Robinson of Bangor; many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. He was predeceased by nephew, Joshua Scribner. A celebration of Shawn's life will be conducted 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, 2004, at the Old Town United Methodist Church, Stillwater Ave., Old Town. Cremation arrangements by Birmingham Funeral Home, 438 Main St., Old Town, ME 04468. www.dignitymemorial.com

NELLIE WEBB
     In Loving Memory Of Our Beloved Mother Aug. 19, 1917 - Dec. 24, 2002 So many memories you left behind. Your love for us was one of a king. On this Christmas eve we want you to know you are with us always, wherever we go. We know you are there to sing and yodel with the angels tonight. Your loving

family, Ronald and Kathy Betty Anne Nena and Seiford Connie and Gene Lorraine and Ronnie Eunice

KATHLEEN E. (MARTIN) BUZZA
     BROWNVILLE JUNCTION and PRESQUE ISLE - Kathleen E. (Martin) Buzza, 82, passed away, Dec. 20, 2003, at a Presque Isle healthcare facility. She was born Oct 21, 1921, in Brownville Junction, the eldest child of Sterling V. and Edith M. (Sawler) Martin. She graduated from Brownville Junction High School, Class of 1940. In October of that year she married Gordon W.H. Buzza, who predeceased her in 2001. She worked in woolen mills to help her husband through college to obtain his ministerial degree. She helped with many church activities in all the churches he served. She was best known for her many talents with various crafts and the churches benefited from these talents at their bazaars. She later worked at Ricker College and took in boarders to help put her own children through college. She retired with her husband back in their home town of Brownville Junction, where she was active with Brownville Junction Alumni Association, United Methodist Church and her craft group. She was a 50 year member of the Order of the Eastern Star, a member of Brownville Junction United Methodist Church. She is survived by one son and daughter-in-law, Gordon W.H. Buzza Jr. and Charlene of Presque Isle; one daughter and son-in-law, Cynthia M. and Charles Kennedy Jr. of Erie, Pa.; six grandchildren, William and Melissa Buzza of Auburn, Jennifer Kennedy of Pittsburgh, Pa., Aaron and Jennifer Buzza of Mapleton, Angela and Aaron Collins of Erie, Pa., Christopher and Sarah Kennedy of Georgia, and Linette and Darshan Murphy of Orland, Fla.; six great-grandchildren, Patrick and Reid Buzza, Madelyn Buzza, Aaron Collins, Sapphira and Gavin Murphy; two brothers, John Martin, Thomas and Sandy Martin; three sisters, Gertie Weston, Lucy and Loren Strout, Ada and Harry Cunliff; one brother-in-law and wife, Eric and Ditty Buzza; several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by two sisters and two brothers. Funeral services were held at Grant Memorial United Methodist Church in Presque Isle on Sunday, Dec. 21. Memorial services and burial will be held in the spring in Brownville Junction. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Brownville Junction United Methodist Church, Brownville Junction, ME 04415 or the American Diabetes Foundation Always and Forever Memorial and Honor Program, ATT: ADA Web, P.O. Box 2680, North Canton, OH 44720. Arrangements in the care of the Duncan-Graves Funeral Home, Presque Isle, and the Lary Funeral Home, Milo.

NORMA JEAN WRIGHT
     MILO - Norma Jean (Ogden) Wright, 69, died Dec. 21, 2003, at the home of her sister from complications with pneumonia. She was born June 25, 1934, in Medford, the daughter of John Price and Alice (Lovejoy) Ogden. Norma was a member of the Milo Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. She spent many hours each month sharing with others her love for Jehovah God and the Bible. Norma graduated in 1953 from Milo High School. Norma lived a very full life. She enjoyed the coast of Maine, walking in the woods, feeding the birds outside her bedroom window, and spending time with her children and grandchildren. Norma spent much of her life caring for others. Norma is survived by her husband, Russell Wright of Milo; her children, Leslie and wife, Helene, of Norwood, Mass., Eugene and his wife, Cynthia, of Milo, Beverly Wright of Milo, Virginia Chessa and her boyfriend, William Brown, of Milo, Lydia and her husband, Timothy Richards, of Milo, Debra Murphy of Milo, Ralph and his wife, Joan, of Sangerville, Melissa and her husband, Christopher Roy, of Bradford, and Donald of Bangor; grandchildren, Jessie Chessa of Stonington, Christopher Chessa and fianc&Mac226;e, Heidi Robinson of Milo, Jennifer and her husband, Shawn Thibeau of Augusta, Alicia and her husband, Raymond Ferris, of Milo, Megan and Regina Wright of Milo, Antwan Wright of Milo, Jazmine and Jarod Roy of Bradford; great-granddaughter, Caitlin Hodgkins of Stonington; special friends, John, Dillon, Jessica and Andy; two sisters, Gertrude and her husband, Conrad Demers of Milo, Gladys Wright of Milo; six brothers, Philip and his wife, Peggy, of North Carolina, John Kent of Bangor, Arthur and his wife, Terry, of Dover-Foxcroft, Robert Elbridge of Illinois, Benjamin and his wife, Tami, of Derby, Larry of

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Milo; several nieces, nephews, and cousins, including a special niece, Emily Mills of Milo. She was predeceased by, her parents; a brother, Linwood, and a nephew, Timothy. A memorial service was be held at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's in Milo, Friday, Dec. 26, 2003, with Fr. Mayo officiating. Arrangements by Pine State Cremation Service.

JOSE VIEIRA
     BROWNVILLE JCT. - Jose Vieira, 75, husband of the late Luella (Taylor) Vieira, died December 20, 2003, at his residence. He was bom September 30, 1928, in Lowell, MA, the son of Carlos and Jacqueline (Texeria) Vieira. He had been employed as a truck driver for many years, and was an active member of the Milo Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. He is survived by a stepson. Jerry Connelly of Jefferson, and a sister, Mary Ferreira of Chelmsford, MA.

HISTORICALLY SPEAKING
By Nancy Grant
     High school seniors are nearing crunch time, passing their final exams with a high enough grade to earn the credits needed for graduation. This is not a new experience as high school students have been facing this same dilemma for years. In the past many people had to drop out of school after only a few years of formal education because they had to work to supplement the family income or to join the service. It was probably tougher for these folks to gain employment since they ‘only had an 8th grade education’. Were they so poorly educated that they had to take off their shoes to ‘cipher 8 + 6?
     Not according to the 1895, 8th grade final exam in Salina, Kansas. This test consisted of forty-eight questions in five areas of study. Students had six hours to complete the exam.
Here is a sampling:

GRAMMAR:
Name the parts of speech and define those that have no modification.
Define case; Illustrate each case.
Write a composition of about 150 words and show therein that you understand the practical use of the rules of grammar.

ARITHMETIC:
A wagon box is 2 ft. deep, 10 ft. long, and 3 ft. wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?
If a load of wheat weighs 3,942 lbs., what is it worth at 50 cts/bushel, deducting 1,050 lbs. for tare?
Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.
What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $20 per meter?
U.S. HISTORY:
Give the epochs into which U.S. History is divided.
Show the territorial growth of the United States.
ORTHOGRAPHY:
What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, linguals.
Give four substitutes for the caret ‘u’.
Mark diacritically and divide into syllables the following, and name the sign that indicates the sound: card, ball, mercy, sir, odd, cell, rise, blood, fare, last.
GEOGRAPHY:
Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba, Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fernandez, Aspinwall, and Orinoco.
Name and locate the principal trade centers of the U.S.
Name all the republics of Europe and give the capital of each.
     My thanks to Jack Damon, a former Derby boy who now works for the U.S. Justice Department in Washington, D.C., for sending this interesting and challenging exam to me.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.
December 30, 1967 – January 5, 1968
30th-Sunny-2° at 7:30 am and 12° at 4:30 pm.
31st-Cloudy L snow PM-18° at 11 am and 18° at 4:30 pm.
1st-Windy&cold-24° at 7 am and 0° at 4 pm.
2nd-Sunny&cold-22° below at 7 am and 0° at 4 pm.
3rd-Snow&cold-0° at 7 am and 8° at 4:30 pm.
4th-Sunny Light snow PM-6° at 7:30 am and 16° at 4:30 pm.
5th-Cold&windy-6° at 7:20 am and 4° at 4:30 pm.

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