Three Rivers News, 2004-02-24
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 16
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

Schoodic Lake Ice Fishing Derby Results
MASONS TO SPONSOR CHILD PROTECTION PROGRAM
     Parents of Milo Elementary students are reminded that the CHIP child identification program will be done on Wednesday, February 25th at the school. Students will need parent’s permission for this. The program will involve students being fingerprinted and video taped for identification purposes only. All prints and videos are sent home with the students.
     A grim reminder of the importance of this information comes to us on the news on a regular basis. Thousands of children disappear in the United States every week. Police departments and investigators support parent’s having this information available to them. While a photograph and fingerprints certainly help in locating children, a videotape records speech and mannerisms that provide more unique information in searches for children. All parents are urged to take advantage of this opportunity. A permission slip can be obtained at the school if you need one.
     The program is sponsored by the local Masonic Lodges. Volunteers for the lodges in the area will conduct the program at the school. No copies of prints or videos are kept by the school or the lodge. The permission slip, only, is kept by the lodge. Please call the school if you have further questions

OPEN HOUSE AT QUARRY PINES
     The Brownville Housing Corporation is holding an Open House at The Quarry Pines apartments on February 24th, from 5 PM to 7 PM. There will be an apartment available to tour and refreshments served. There will be people there to answer any questions about qualifying for an apartment.

Shrove Tuesday Celebration
     On February 24th, at 5:30pm, at the Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church, a Pancake Supper will be held. There is no cost for the supper, just bring a box of pancake mix. Left over mixes will be donated to the food cupboard. This is a time of preparation for lent. Come have fun with an old English custom of eating pancakes to use up the eggs and fat, which were not in the diet during Lent. After supper there will be a fun program for young and old alike. We welcome anyone who would like to come and be part of an old custom.

EAST SANGERVILLE GRANGE TO PRESENT PLAY
     The Center Theatre proudly presents the 2004 performance of Eve Ensler's, The Vagina Monologues on Saturday, February 28th, 2004 at the East Sangerville Grange. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.; the performance begins at 7pm. Please note that this play may not be suitable for young children. Tickets are on sale at Mr. Paperback in Dover-Foxcroft. For more information contact Jayne Lello 564-0136 or Lynn Winters 564-7259.

Grand Ole Milo Opry Needs Singers!

     Voices are still needed for the Three Rivers Kiwanis Variety Show chorus. Step out of the box and onto the bandstand. Join the fun with the group of singers that are gathering to make this the best variety show yet!
     We will be meeting at 6:30 each Tuesday evening from now through March in Stephanie Gillis' classroom at Milo Elementary. Rehearsals last about an hour. The commitment includes Friday and Saturday evenings April 2nd and 3rd at the Milo Town Hall where we will present Grand Ole Milo Opry.
     If you can't come every week to rehearsals.... that’s o'kay, too. The music is easy and we'd love to have you as often as you can come. Stephanie's classroom is in the main building of Milo Elementary. Enter on the end of the building where the portable classrooms are...and her classroom is the first on the left. See you there!

Eastern Maine Quarterfinals
BY BILL SAWTELL
Schenck, 63, Penquis 54
     Bangor, February 17-The 11th seeded Wolverines coached by Steve LeVasseur upset the third seeded Patriots here. It's hard to beat a good team three times in a season. And this was no exception.
     An Aaron Waite three pointer put the winners up 34-31 at the outset of the second half and they led throughout the remainder of the contest, with the Penquis boys unable to generate any momentum.
Keys to the Win:
     1. The work of center Mark Hannington in the middle and his 21 points
     2. The work of his sub, Andy VanEss, when he got into foul trouble and VanNess's 10 points
     3. Schenck's ability to exploit the Penquis man-to-man
     4. 11 points each from Aaron Waite and Brian Graham
     Jordan Allen paced the Patriots with 21; while Justin scored 11 and Devin Perkins 10.
Schenck 12 31 50 63
Penquis 14 31 46 54
Officials: Plourde; Webb; Gallant

METHODIST NEWS
     Ash Wednesday services will be held at Park Street United Methodist Church on Wed. Feb. 25th, at 7:00 PM. Our Monday morning group at Park Street will be starting a Lenten study. Everybody is welcome to come. Looking ahead: Ad. Council meets Mon., March 1st at 7:00PM, at Park Street. Women's breakfast is at The Restaurant on March 4, at 8:00AM.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, Angie’s, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, JD's Emporium, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME MENU

TUES., FEB. 24 AMERICAN CHOP SUEY, CAULIFLOWER, APPLESAUCE GELATIN SQUARE
WED., FEB. 25 BAKED OMELET W/CHEESE SAUCE, BAKED POTATO PEAS, FRUIT COCKTAIL
THUR., FEB. 26 BEEF STEW, CRACKERS, CALICO SLAW, BISCUIT CRANAPPLE CRISP
FRI., FEB. 27 FISH STICKS, MASHED POTATO CREAM STYLE CORN, MOLASSES COOKIE
MON. MAR. 1 PEPPER STEAK, MASHED POTATO, HARVARD BEETS, CAKE
ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


Brownville Basketball Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL
Choose the best answer.
1. The best outside shooter of the Browns was (a) Jack (b) Sid (c) David (d) Shirley.
2. (a) Larry Morrill (b) Scott Kirby (c) Jim Rosebush (d) Steve Knox was the best dribbling point guard.
3. The scoreboard was on the (a) south (b) southeast (c) northwest (d) east side of the gym.
4. The BJHS girls won a tournament at Fairfield in (a) 1936 (b) 1939 (c) 1945 (d) 1951
5. BJHS played its last game in the Penquis League in (a) 1957 ((b) 1959 (c) 1960 (d) 1962.
6. (a) Raymond Heath (b) Alan Kirby (c) Wayne Kirby (d) Bryan Artes did not play his senior year.
7. The only senior on the state championship team was (a) Alan Kirby (b) Mike Cail (c) Dennis Larson (d) Billy Perry
8. The BHS gym was built in the (a) teens (b) twenties (c) thirties (d) forties.
9. (a) Chet Hubbard (b) Pete Webb (c) Wayne Champeon (d) Don Nesbitt scored the most points against the Railroaders in one game.
10. When Carroll Conley first came here, he favored a (a) 1-2-2 (b) 1-3-1 (c) 2-3 (d) man-to-man defense.

Answers: 1-c 2-a 3-c 4-b 5-c 6-d 7-d 8-c 9-a 10-b

     Cheryl Lord, Tellington Touch Practitioner, demonstrates for Gretchen Ziemer and her dog Astrum during the "T Touch for Dogs Workshop" at the Thompson Free Library in Dover-Foxcroft, one of the many techniques used to calm and relax your pet. TTouch offers positive solutions to common behavioral and health-related problems, as well as increasing understanding and communication with your companion animals.

Bill Sawtell's latest publication,
Old Lagrange
is hot off the presses. Filled with information and wonderful old photos, the book can be purchased from Bill or at outlets throughout the area.
To order this or any of his books, contact Bill at:

Bill Sawtell
P.O.Box 272
Brownville, ME 04414
rtell@kynd.net
965-3971
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THREE DAYS AT THE HEMLOCK STREAM CAMP
Part 2
BY CARL HAMLIN
     The sun was up and swinging south as Dad took out his compass and checked the road and sun. Leaving the road, we crossed a little swamp and were soon on the edge of a nice hardwood ridge. It was quite open. I looked around carefully to see what grew there for trees. There were maples, birch, and ash, and scattered around there were some oaks. Deer love acorns. Dad said, “I always jump deer around this ridge.” It looked good to me, too. We started slowly along the ridge, me on the low side and Dad on the upper. There were lots of signs: scrapes, droppings, and spots where acorns were plentiful. I saw Dad stop, look around, and sit down. I followed suit. The sun was fully up now and felt warm as I took my gloves off. The little Remington nestled across my legs. I’d shot two deer with it and knew what it could do. I took no long or running shots, for it wasn’t high-powered. But at 50 to 100 feet or so I could put a bullet where it would do the most good.
     Suddenly I heard a loud snort. Looking back over my shoulder, I saw a nice deer “high-tailing it” toward the low ground. My heart did a flip-flop as I grabbed my rifle. I didn’t shoot, but brought the rifle up to see if I could get a bead on it, but I was too slow and the deer was too fast. Dad came down and we found that the deer had sneaked up behind me without a sound. The first jump he made after smelling me was only forty feet from my tree. I hadn’t heard a sound. Dad said, “ Guess we better head back to camp for lunch.” It was just noon when we got there. After unloading the guns and hanging them on the rack, we sat down on the porch facing the brook. I was thirsty and walked to the spring for a drink. The spring of sweet, cold water was about three feet across and two feet deep. It never went dry and was the reason the camp was built there.
     I sauntered back to camp and had hardly got seated when we heard a shot close to the brook. Dad said, “They must have got a shot at one.” We waited, then we saw Harland come out of the bushes, laughing so hard he couldn’t talk. Finally he said they had gotten to the log which crossed the brook and he had just walked across when he turned to see if Fred was coming. Fred was quite old by then, short and a little stooped. He carried a long octagon barrel .30-.30 Winchester. He always said he shot his deer with a ball, not a bullet. He was a great guy. When Harland looked, he saw Fred halfway across the log and a big blue heron flying along the brook. Fred turned halfway around and fired at the bird, losing his balance and falling backward into the brook. His hat came off and floated away, but he had hung onto his gun. About the time Harland finished telling us, Fred came into sight. Was he ever mad! The air was blue! Water was running out of his pants and he was covered with mud. We got to laughing along with Harland, which didn’t help Fred’s disposition. The blue heron flew off, but after the cussin” Fred gave it, I doubt if it made it through the winter!
     After cooking up a good lunch of ham, potatoes, and peas, we all lay down for a nap. Fred built a fire in the ram-down and was busy drying his clothes. He smoked a pipe, and the smell of it mixed with the many other smells of the camp and the warmth of the stove soon put me to sleep.
     Dad shook me about 2 p.m. and said he was going out to the ridge and stay until dark and wanted to know if I wanted to go with him. I hit the deck, pulled on my boots, and by 2:30 we were sitting on the ridge again. It was a little overcast, but not too cold. I scraped up some dry leaves to sit on and soon was comfortable with my back to the oak tree. A big red squirrel came down a tree a few feet from me. I sat still, hardly blinking an eye. Something jumped him and he ran right across my feet. He grabbed an acorn and took off, and I didn’t see him again. Squirrels are no help to hunters. We sat and watched the ridge until we both were tired of sitting. I stood up and Dad came down and we headed out.
     We were almost to the road when Dad stopped and slowly raised his rifle and fired. He said, “I think I got him!” He headed toward the deer and another one exploded almost in front of

us. It was a small one, so we didn’t shoot. I looked ahead, hunting for the deer, but could see nothing. It had run after Dad fired, but with its flag down. After circling a few times, I saw it in a cradle knoll. I put my gun on it and yelled to Dad that I had found him. “Boy, that is a pretty six-point buck, Dad!” I said. We dressed it out and put the heart and liver on a crotched stick. We put a rope on his antlers and tied it to two-foot sticks we cut. Together we moved right along.. As we neared the camp, I gave the boys a big “Yah hoo!” After they had admired the deer, we hung it on the game pole. We had scored the first day! Supper was already on the stove and it smelled good and tasted better. Fred and Harland had jumped a couple, but hadn’t seen them. After playing a few hands of cards, we all hit the bunks and slept the deep sleep of happy hunters. We might do as well or better tomorrow, but that would be another day and another story.

IN MEMORIAM
BRUCE A. BRADEEN
     BROWNVILLE — Bruce A. Bradeen, 82, formerly of Brownville, died Friday, January 23, 2004, after a brief stay at the Rumford Hospital following several months of care at the Victorian Villa in Canton. He was pre-deceased by his wife, Elodia Breau, who died in 1995.
     Bom in Brownville, Mr. Bradeen was the son of Lester and Edna (Fredin) Bradeen. He spent many years in Rumford, where he was employed as a log buyer at the Oxford Paper Company. He retired to Brownville in the early 1980s, where he lived in the Merrill Homestead in Williamsburg until returning to Rumford in 1998.
     Mr. Bradeen served in the U.S. Army in World War II as a member of the famed 10th Mountain Division and was awarded a Bronze Star; He was a member of the Robert Shand Post #1641 VFW. A large and powerful man with a gentle soul, Mr. Bradeen's greatest love was humanity and animals, especially dogs. He would be most thankful for donations in his memory to McKennelis Animal Shelter, 88 Hall Hill Road, Rumford, ME 04276.
     Mr. Bradeen is survived by cousins Jane Whitney and her husband, Richard Hero, of Brooklin and Sheila Fredin of Brighton, MA; his good and longtime friend Eleanor Welch of Wilton; and his very special caregiver, Angelina Casey of Rumford.
     Funeral services were held on Sunday, Feb. 1, at the Meader & Son Funeral Home, Rumford, with the Rev. Robert Peters officiating. Interment in the Spring will be in the Farrington Morton Cemetery, Mexico, ME.

LAWRENCE E. RICKER
     MILO - Lawrence E. Ricker, 77, husband of Myrna (Angove) Ricker, died Feb. 16, 2004, at his residence. He was born July 16, 1926, in Milo, the son of Robert E. and Gladys (Flanders) Ricker. A graduate of Milo High School, he served with the U.S. Army during World War II. Lawrence was a farmer and a self-employed master electrician. He was a member of Piscataquis Lodge No. 44 AF & AM, and Rabboni Chapter No. 62. He was an avid gardener, and his pride and joy were his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife and best friend of 53 years, Myrna; his children, who thought of their Dad as their best friend, Robert Ricker and his wife, Lynn, of Milo, Pamela London and her husband, William, of Milo; a brother, Edward Ricker of Milo and Florida; a sister, Ella Thomas and her husband, James, of Bangor; his mother-in-law, Yvonne Angove of Milo; three sisters-in-law, Patricia Ricker of Milo, Gloria and her husband, James Whalen, of Framingham, Mass., Dorothy and her husband, James Ireland, of Madison; three grandchildren, David Ricker, Hilary London and Alex London. He was predeceased by a brother, Carl Ricker; and a sister-in-law, Violet (Allen) Ricker.. Spring interment will be in the family lot in Evergreen Cemetery. Those who wish may make memorial contributions to The Performing Arts Center, care of the Town of Milo, P.O. Box 218, Milo, ME 04463.

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CALLING ALL COOKS:
THE TIME IS DRAWING NEAR TO SUBMIT YOUR RECIPES TO THE P.A.W.S. COOKBOOK. DEMAND FOR THIS COLLECTION OF RECIPES, HINTS AND ANECDOTES HAS BEEN UNBELIEVABLE, AND WE HAVE SOME WONDERFUL AND UNIQUE RECIPES COLLECTED, AS WELL AS A LOT OF COMMUNITY FAVORITES.

CLICK HERE TO ENTER RECIPES

WE WOULD LOVE TO TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO THANK EVERYONE WHO HAS HELPED US WITH THIS ENDEAVOR. WE HOPE TO RAISE ALMOST HALF OF THE MONEY NEEDED TO BUY OUR SHELTER’S BUILDING FROM THIS FUNDRAISER. THE COOKBOOKS WILL BE READY BY MAY, SO WILL MAKE WONDERFUL MOTHER’S DAY OR FATHER’S DAY GIFTS.

Milo Free Public Library News
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL
     On February 12, 2004 the Milo Free Public Library lost a wonderful friend when Helen Carey died. Helen was a library trustee for many years and the head trustee for the last few years. While I have been director , Helen has been very supportive of every change that would benefit the library patrons and did not hesitate to pitch right in when there was work to be done. Several years ago, she and her husband , Herbie, gave many hours to the library by cleaning and painting the basement reference room. They worked hard and made it a much brighter, cleaner room. More recently Helen helped greatly when we moved the non-fiction stacks down into the reference room in order to make room for a new children’s area upstairs. Whenever I had problems or good news, I always ran the situation by Helen first to get her ideas and help, or to have her share my enthusiasm for our fortunate circumstances. Helen continues to help our library even now as her family designated the Milo Free Public Library as the beneficiary for memorial gifts in her name. Thanks to very generous friends, relatives and former students , we have received many gifts in her name. Helen, we thank you for all the help you have given to this town library in so many ways.
     Along with the many tax forms I have mentioned before, we have added Estimated Tax for Individuals . We also have the necessary vouchers to be used with the 2004 estimated tax payment.
     We have had several shipments of backordered books arrive. The following is a list.
Barr, Nevada HIGH COUNTRY
Beaton, M.C. DEATH OF A POISON PEN
Bragg, Rick I AM A SOLDIER TOO : the Jessica Lynch story
Hess, Joan MULETRAIN TO MAGGODY
Martel, Yann THE LIFE OF PI
Phillips, Susan Elizabeth AIN’T SHE SWEET
Rice, Luanne DANCE WITH ME

Library Winter Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00

Attention: Class of 1984
I'm looking for friends from PVHS class of 1984. There are a few of us interested in having a reunion sometime this summer & we need help locating our classmates. Please email me if you are an old classmate & are interested in getting together. Thanks!

Tami (McKusick) Goodine

Traditions of a Milo-ite
BY KATHY WITHAM
     Another mincemeat weekend come and gone. Gaiety and frivolity prevailed. You would think that if we have so much fun together that we would do it more often. We get together just enough. A lot like sisters, my cousins and I like things just the way they are. We're close enough to be Johnny-on-the-spot if needed....and far enough away to look forward with anticipation to our few weekends together a year. Our husbands enjoy each other's company, but their interests are so varied that they'd probably tire of each other if we were stuck in each other's lives all the time.
     Friday night we all met at the Scootic Inn on Main Street in Millinocket. The place was jammed packed. My cousin Joan loves it that way. She lived in Millinocket most of her life, and has now been transplanted to a little town in New Hampshire called Contoocook...near Concord. As a matter of fact she just got a new job at the State House in Concord that she finds exciting and challenging. When she comes to Millinocket to visit, a trip to the "Scootic" always gives her a chance to meet for a few minutes with many old friends. We always see Joanie Clark there, and sometimes even a relative or two besides us four cousins.

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     I had the garlic mussels for an appetizer…dipped in drawn butter, they are wonderful. I decided on a bacon-cheeseburger and fries to complete the artery clogging experience.
     After we got home, I served a special Valentine Torte that I had put together for our dessert. Have you seen the single layer cakes at the Farmer's Union in both yellow and chocolate? They cost a dollar a piece, and they are wonderfully versatile in dessert ideas. I bought a yellow and a chocolate and split each in two....through the middle....making four layers. I spread seedless raspberry jam between the layers, piling them yellow, chocolate, yellow chocolate. Then I made the white frosting that I had in the paper a few weeks ago (shortening, butter, white sugar, egg, vanilla, beaten hard and fast for 5 minutes) and spread that on the cake. I decorated the cake with adorable little chocolate covered cherry mice that Joie McGuinness made. The dessert was Valentine appropriate, and looked like I'd fussed for hours with it.
     Saturday morning we had grapefruit halves and a fat slice of Blueberry Gingerbread that was made in a loaf pan and sliced. The bread was served with a choice of either butter or cream cheese...I chose the cream cheese. Then the mincemeat making began. Using a bowl for a measuring cup is a different experience. Many bowls of ground venison to many more bowls of apples, suet, butter, two kinds of raisins, currents, cherries, juices of lemons and oranges, vinegar, molasses, spices...it was quite a procedure. We made two 12-quart cookers plum full! What a process!!! I'm proud to say, it's out of this world delicious. We let it cook all evening and then all through the night. We couldn't wait to wake up in the middle of the night to smell the wonderful comforting aroma.
     Our hosts prepared a sumptuous dinner...pictured above. Gail's table was a Valentine in itself. The place settings were gorgeous....like from the pages of a magazine. Each lady's place was set with a fresh rose flower arrangement tucked into the specially folded napkins. Each gent’s place was set with a small heart shaped box of chocolates. The centerpiece, flanked by both white and cranberry candles in crystal candlesticks, was a large crystal clear bowl which held floating rose shaped candles, fresh rose buds and rose petals. We ate Italian that night enjoying the ambiance, the wine and the company.
     What and where we eat is always an important part of the decision making when we get together. Next, would be the theme for the weekend. I can't remember when we've ever spent a weekend together that we didn't enjoy the planning as much as we enjoyed the actual weekend. We love anticipation and detail. When we e-mail each other...which is usually two or three times a week...there must be details in each message. If you think that perhaps that sounds like we live vicariously through each other....then you might be correct.
     There is seldom a time when we are all bored and uninteresting at the same time. One or the other of us is busy and excited about something all the time. I enjoy my cousins and they enjoy me. We share a rich and colorful heritage, and we come from a long line of love.

     Here is the wonderful Blueberry Gingerbread that we enjoyed for breakfast. Read the ingredient list carefully as it calls for a cup of hot tea...which is an unexpected ingredient.

1 cup sugar
1/2 tsp. each of cloves, cinnamon, ginger
1 heaping tsp. baking soda
2 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup molasses
2 eggs
1/2 cup cooking oil
1 cup hot tea
1 cup blueberries (frozen or fresh)
     Mix dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients. Add the tea last. Fold in the blueberries. Pour into a greased and floured bread pan.
     Bake at 350 degrees until done (50-60 minutes.) Joan says she kept checking it near the end of the cooking time.

News from:
‘THE RESTAURANT’
943-7432
We will be celebrating our 1-year ANNIVERSARY
MARCH 8th-14th
There will be daily specials, prize drawings
and giveaways.
• Monday, March 8th - FREE Coffee with any meal
• Tuesday, March 9th - Buy one meal get 1 half price (equal or lesser value)
• Wednesday, March 10th - All you can eat pasta night
• Thursday, March 11th - Kids eat for $1.00 (off the children’s menu)
• Friday, March 12th - FREE soda with any meal
• Saturday, March 13th - Fine dining (reservation only)
• Prime Rib in the front dining room (after 5pm)
• Sunday, March 14 – Hot fudge sundae $1.00
Please stop by to celebrate with us and join in the fun!!

A Historical Review
Rivers and Dams in Maine - Part 5
Dams and Power - Phyllis Austin, Maine Times
Sept. 16, 1977
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2004)
     While all the hullabaloo is going on about Dickey-Lincoln, another environmental tempest is building over proposed new dams on the Kennebec and Penobscot rivers. Before the struggles are over, Mainers should be well versed on the issues surrounding the development of hydroelectric power.
     Those who oppose turning whitewater into lakes contend that hydro projects can never produce enough electrical power to justify "destroying" rivers. They point out that hydroelectric generation is usually used for peak power demands. The water is stored in the lake behind the dam, and then, at times of greatest electrical demand, is released through turbines.
     But power companies and the pulp and paper companies -- the largest hydro developers in Maine -- see things differently. They, like environmentalists, can appreciate the beauty of unencumbered rivers and feel the excitement of shooting down a rapid in a canoe or kayak. Rivers, however, can't be ignored as a renewable energy resource, they contend.

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     It has become national and state policy to find alternatives to fossil fuels. And utilities, such as Central Maine Power (CMP), and pulp and paper companies, such as Great Northern Paper (GNP) are counting on hydro to take up the oil slack. CMP has plans for a larger dam on the Kennebec, and Great Northern is hoping to build one on the West Branch of the Penobscot River. Both dams would come on line in the 1980's, when the companies anticipate additional peaking power needs. There has been considerable publicity surrounding Great Northern's plans for the Penobscot because the West Branch is under consideration as a National Wild and Scenic River. (If so designated, it would stop construction of any more dams.) Since CMP's Kennebec project is scheduled for 1987, there has been less focus on it.
     The two dam plans, however, are uppermost in the mind of Wayne Hockmeyer of Rockwood, who owns Northern Whitewater Expeditions, Inc. He takes people in large rafts down the Kennebec and down the West Branch of the Penobscot. Hockmeyer has formed the Society to Protect the Kennebec anf the Penobscot rivers and hopes to organize opposition equal to that attacking the Dickey-Lincoln hydro project which would dam the free-flowing St. John River.
     Obviously, Hockmeyer has a financial interest in keeping the Kennebac and Penobscot as they are. Wiping out more of the rivers' whitewater would put his raft expedition out of business. But he also wants to preserve what he says are "the most beautiful and unusual" whitewater sections in Maine.
     The whitewater part of the West Branch that would be destroyed by the proposed Great Northern dam is from Ripogenus Dam to Nesowadnahunk Falls. It is described in the Appalachian Mountain Club Canoeing Guide as "the most scenic stretch of the West Branch trip." Places that would be flooded are Ripogenus Gorge, Little Eddy, Big Eddy, the Big heater, the Horserace and Ambe-jackmockamus Falls, Hockmeyer said. About 200 acres of Baxter State Park also would be flooded if the dam itself were placed at Nesowadnahunk Falls. The section of the Kennebec to be inundated is a "wild gorge of remarkable size and beauty, there being no ther gorges of comparable magnitude in New England," the guide said. Hockmeyer said the Kennebec Gorge is about 12 miles long and almost continuous whitewater. "The upper five miles are so heavy that only expert kayakers could conceivably make its passage," he said. "The lower seven miles are extremely heavy canoe water. It's almost total wilderness and almost inaccessible except by foot... awesome to those who have traveled the gorge." "How could this be traded off for peaking power?" Hockmeyer asks.(continued next week)

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.
FEBRUARY AND MARCH – 1979
24th-Snow at night Cloudy misty PM- 36° at
12 (noon)
25th-Sunny-34° at 2 pm.
26th-Snow windy rain in evening-20° at 12.
27th-Snow at night misty snow in evening
-32° at 12.
28th-Sunny-40° at 12.
1ST-Cloudy-35° at 12.

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON
     As I type this, a chorus of dogs barking pierces the quiet. Katie and Eric have gone to Burlington, Vermont to visit with Ben, who lives with Shawn Gray and Ryan Smart. It is “Mardi Gras” there, and the whole city celebrates, much in the fashion of New Orleans. Kirby and I have two extra houseguests, Katie’s dog Haley and the dog she is fostering for the animal shelter, Diamond. Both dogs are a mix of Pit Bull and something and are VERY lovable.
     My car needs some work done on it, so I have a loaner car from the Saturn dealer. As I left with the loaner car, the service manager said” We didn’t get a chance to vacuum it, and the last person who used it must have let their dog in it because the back seat has short hairs all over it.” “No problem” I said. I thought of his words last night as I loaded Bandit, Haley, and Diamond into the back seat. I have a blanket in there, but I’m thinking that service manager will understand why I was unconcerned with a few dog hairs.
     Last evening, I was at the library picking up some books for my grandmother, and I mentioned to Pam and Judy that I had to hurry, as I had a car full of Pit Bulls. Pam said it sounded like a good plot for one of the “On-Star” commercials where they play back live phone calls from folks who use the computerized help system. She imagined it going something like:
     “Yes Ma’am, this is On-Star, can I help you?”
     “Yes you can. I just realized I’ve got a car full of Pit Bulls.”
     “Do you need me to dispatch an Animal Control Officer?”
     “No thanks, but could you direct me to the closest vacuum cleaner?”
     Maybe it’s one of those situations where you had to be there to get the humor, but Pam and I thought it was hysterical. I usually get a good laugh whenever I go to the library. Judy and Pam are always cheery, witty, and helpful, although we aren’t always quiet. I love the Milo Public Library and I always feel safe and “homey” when I’m there. I can remember walking from there as a child, and trying to keep from reading my newly checked-out treasures as I made my way to the top of Stoddard Hill. Although there was never a campaign warning us it was not safe to read and walk, I knew it wasn’t the smartest thing to do, especially while crossing two bridges and a set of railroad tracks.
     I will forever be indebted to Judy and Pam for all the help they give me when I’m there. My wonderful grandmother, Betty Stanchfield, who turned 90 last November, is an avid reader and for the last few years, I have had the pleasure of going to the library to select 6 or 7 books for her week’s reading. Pam and Judy are always pointing me in the direction of books they think she’ll enjoy, or books they know I haven’t taken to her. Because of them, I rarely pick out a dud, and Grammie is one of the most well read people in town.
     Things are going so nicely at the PAWS animal shelter. We have a very dedicated group of volunteers helping out. Julie and I rarely have to do any cleaning, thanks to Stacy Slagle, Kayla Bailey, Dawn Patten, Rebecca Perry and her friend Sam. Stacy is particularly appreciated, as she goes in 2 mornings during the week and does the day’s feeding, cleaning, and most importantly LOVING for the animals. We are looking for someone to do those tasks on the weekends and I have no doubts we will find someone.

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Also helping tremendously is Hannah and Sam Cote-Rothlauf. Hannah is only 4, but she is so bright and so gentle and we love her! Sam is so wonderful to bring her and to help us with loving our babies!
     I have been spending most of my free time formatting and compiling recipes for the PAWS cookbook. We have some wonderful recipes from our area’s best cooks, as well as some quips, quotes, tips and anecdotes. The cookbook will be a wonderful scrapbook of our community and of the people in it who love to cook and love to eat!! Be sure to send in your cookbook submission. We still need 150 recipes to complete our goal, and I am sure you will be happy with the finished product. I will offer one little bit of advice: Be sure to read any recipe with Ellen DeWitt’s name on it, all the way through. I wouldn’t want you to have the whole meal blow up in your face!
     It’s Sunday morning and we received 3-4 inches of fresh powdery snow last night. The ducks know that snow is just frozen water and treat it as such. They roll and fluff themselves in it and clean up nicely. The only drawback is that the chickens dislike the snow, so I have to spread hay on the snow for them to walk on. This creates a great chance to rake some of the used hay out from the floor in the stall. I was extra generous with hay this winter as I felt it would help make Jack more comfy when he had his cast on. I would lay a nice soft layer in the goat stall every night, and not wanting to make the ducks, chickens, and guineas feel slighted, I would give them a fresh layer also. Now, the floors of each section of the barn have over 2 feet of built up packed hay, and I have to bend over when I’m in there.

     Now, on to a totally unrelated subject. I had a fun experience last week that I would love to share with you, in case you qualify for some free stuff! We have a Visa credit card, courtesy of Maine Savings. For years I have noticed the points that amassed at the bottom of the statement, and occasionally I would glance at the flyer that came with the statement showing the gifts that were available if you redeemed your points. Last week I decided I needed a new vacuum cleaner, so I checked out the website I was directed to on the statement. I entered what I wanted into the search space, and lo and behold, I had enough points for a new vacuum with points to spare! I ordered a toaster-oven and the vacuum and was surprised that I didn’t have to pay for shipping. The toaster and vacuum were delivered and I am so happy with my brand new Eureka and as you can see, Chloe is pretty thrilled with the new toaster oven. So if you have been ignoring the points at the end of your Visa statement, give them a closer look. Free stuff is so fun.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

FEBRUARY 18, 2004 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Joe Zamboni said hello to fifteen members and special guest Ben Darling, the grandson of Ed and Ethelyn Treworgy.
     Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance and Paul Grindle asked for guidance in his prayer.
     Steve Hamlin read an inspirational passage on how people judge one another. Abe Lincoln was not known as a handsome man partly because some individuals told him so. He was known for his great accomplishments and humbleness. Man looks on the outside; the Lord looks at the heart.
     The Dover-Foxcroft newsletter was circulated.
     Happy birthday to Erica Lyford on the 21st and anniversary wishes go to Herb and Merna Dunham on the 20th!
     Happy dollars were donated for educational dollar bills, looking forward to spring, 56 years together, and being in Milo. The sad dollars were for the PVHS boy’s basketball team and fans and the Yankees having to buy pennants to the tune of $190,000,000!!!
     Joe Zamboni told us that a third grant is being written for the gazebo project.
     The JSI/Katahdin Country Club charity golf club is tentatively set for August 6, 2004.
     Fred Bishop, chairman of the Kiwanis Growth Committee, has requested a representative from the Three Rivers Kiwanis Club speak at the Kiwanis District Convention in MA on March 6. He said that the Milo/Brownville club is one of the top three clubs in the New England district with the greatest membership growth during the past ten years. Todd Lyford graciously volunteered to attend and explain our ‘secret’ for almost doubling the membership in less than ten years.
     February 25-business meeting, March 3-Kevin Black will update us about Milo’s new water intake plant, March 4-Board of Directors meeting, March 10-business meeting, and on March 17-Felix and Jan Blinn will tell us about their recent trip to Japan.
     Ethelyn Treworgy, speaker chairperson for February, informed us that our guest speaker for today could not attend. Being a resourceful lady as well as a former teacher, Ethelyn had a backup plan. She passed around pieces of paper and asked members and Ben to write something about his or herself. After hearing clues we were supposed to guess the person described. It wasn’t a surprise that Herb Dunham outguessed the others! Ethelyn awarded him a wooden toy handcrafted by her husband Edwin. It was a fun way to discover more about each other! Can you guess who was a tumbler in college or has a pilot’s license or thinks of Barney as a hero or had an .857 batting average or…… Thank you, Ethelyn.

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