Three Rivers News, 2004-05-04
TUESDAY, MAY 4, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 26
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

CONGRATULATIONS MICHAEL upon your graduation from the University of Maine at Orono.  Your whole family is very proud of you!!!


Mike Weston is the son of Charlie and Lynn (Zwicker) Weston of Brownville Jct.

MILO FARMER’S UNION IS P.A.W.S. BEST FRIEND!

TO WRAP UP THEIR WEEKLONG ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION, ON SATURDAY, MAY 22, BETWEEN 9 AM AND 2 PM, AT THE M.F.U. PARKING LOT, YOU CAN HAVE A DOG AND HELP THE DOGS! (AND CATS)

IN CONJUNCTION WITH JORDAN’S®’, COUNTRY KITCHEN®, FRITO LAY®’, AND BEST YET®, THE MILO FARMER’S UNION IS SERVING LUNCH AND HALF OF ALL PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT THE P.A.W.S. BUILDING FUND.

FOR $1.50 YOU WILL GET A RICE’S HOT DOG SERVED ON A COUNTRY KITCHEN ROLL (WHICH YOU CAN SMOTHER WITH BEST YET CONDIMENTS), A BAG OF FRITO LAY CHIPS, AND A CAN OF BEST YET SODA.  SEVENTY-FIVE CENTS FROM EACH SALE WILL GO TO P.A.W.S..  THERE WILL ALSO BE ANNIVERSARY CAKE.

      The Milo Farmer’s Union is one of the biggest supporters of our local animal shelter and this is a great opportunity to show your support.  Stop in, have lunch, pick up some groceries and CELEBRATE!!


The Milo Garden Club will meet at the Town Hall on May 11 at 1 p.m. Program to be "In House" workshop for the State Convention.  If you have any question call Joanne DeWitt  at 943-2486

PAWS will be holding a book fair downstairs at the same time.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME MENU

TUES., MAY 4

MEATBALLS WITH GRAVY, BUTTERED NOODLES, PEAS, TAPIOCA PUDDING

WED., MAY 5

SLICED TURKEY DELUXE SANDWICH, PASTA SALAD, PICKLED BEETS, ORANGE GELATIN WHIP

THUR., MAY 6

HOMEMADE BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, POTATO SALAD, BISCUIT, CAKE WITH FROSTING

FRI., MAY 7

CHEESEBURGER PIE, GREEN BEANS, TOSSED SALAD, WHEAT ROLL, SLICED PEARS

MON. MAY 10

PORK PATTY W/SUPREME SAUCE,
ROSEMARY POTATOES, MIXED VEGETABLES, VANILLA PUDDING

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS. WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM. PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488.


BINGO! BINGO! BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!

SPRING HAS SPRUNG!


This sweet baby was born in Atkinson at the farm of Mike and Stacia Russell.  The first photo shows Anthem and mom, Sarah, moments after birth, and in the second photo Anthem is 1 day old. 

They grow up so fast!! 

 

The Restaurant Plans Prom

The Restaurant, on Park Street in Milo,  will be hosting fine dining the night of the prom - May 15th.

We will offer two seatings, one at 4:45 PM and the other at 6:00 PM. The price is only $15.00 per person and will include a photo of your memorable night. You can pick up menus at The Restaurant or call for details. 943-7432. This night is by reservation ONLY!


THREE RIVERS REDEMPTION AND FEED HAS

 A HUGE SUPPLY OF FLOWERS AND THE GREENHOUSE IS OPEN!!! MIKE WILL BE OPEN ON SUNDAYS UNTIL MEMORIAL DAY  FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE AND, AS ALWAYS, IS OPEN EVERY OTHER DAY OF THE WEEK.


Brownville Trivia
By Bill Sawtell

Choose the best answer.

1. (a) Larry (b) Gary (c) Galen (d) Ronnie Larson ran two Boston Marathons.

2. First baseman (a) Steve Knox (b) Bill Vale (c) Art Stanhope (d) Dennis Larson wore a bandanna.

3. Jimmy Hay and John Ray were (a) Fuller Brush salesmen (b) attorneys (c) preachers 9(d)YMCA secretaries.

4. Brownville was incorporated in (a) 1800 (b) 1820 (c) 1824 (d) 1835.

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5. Arthur "Lefty" Strout played minor league baseball in (a) New York (b) New Jersey (c) New Hampshire (d) Nova Scotia.

6. The Grange Hall cost (a) $500 (b) $1000 (c) $1200 (d) $1500.

7. The Grange Hall was built in (a) 1895 (b) 1899 (c) 1905 (d) 1921.

8. A popular silent movie shown there was (a) Roy Rogers (b) The Ranger (c) Kit Carson (d) Hoot Gibson.

9. Don Vachon was a popular (a) conductor (b) brakeman (c) engineer (d) fireman..

10. Josephine Stubbs was a great teacher and a(n) (a) artist (b) swimmer (c) poetess (d) singer.

Answers: 1-b 2-a 3-d 4-c 5-d 6-d 7-a 8-d 9-a 10-c

JUMPING JEHOSAFAT …JUDY DID IT!

     I don’t know any details..but I received this picture from Judy Morrison..proof positive that she jumped from an airplane to raise over $2000.00 for the Children’s Miracle Network!  What a feat!!

SERVICEMAN’S ADDRESS

     Timmy  would love to receive mail from home! His address is:
          P.V.2 Drinkwater, Timothy
          HHG 17th AVN    BDF
          Unit # 15270
          APO AP 96205

“P.E.T.S. Community Project”
     P.E.T.S. (Prevent Euthansia Through Sterilization) is devoted to ending the suffering of our companion animals because of overpopulation and abandonment. We have taken on the monumental task of spaying and neutering 54 cats in an area of severe poverty in Piscataquis County. Two issues are present in this poverty stricken area: overpopulation and abandonment of cats. 36 of these cats are females; the remaining 18 are males. Our reduced cost for spaying/ neutering and shots for 54 animals is $3285.00. Each animal needs to have rabies and distemper inoculations for a total of $30.00 per cat. Our goal is to reduce the overpopulation and abandonment by sterilizing these 54 cats and placing the abandoned cats in foster care or with the Penquis Animal Welfare Sanctuary. The volunteers at P.E.T.S. need your help. If you would like to sponsor the neutering of a male cat at the reduced cost of $22.50 or the spaying of a female cat at the reduced cost of $35.00 please send your donation to P.E.T.S., Box 912, Guilford, ME 04443. We are a 501 ( c) (3)

all volunteer organization so your kind donation is tax deductible. For any additional information please call Sue Slate at 379-2809, Phyllis Dyer at 564-8072 or Julie Gallagher at 934-5083.

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
By Carolyn Sinclair

     It will be a busy week for the UMC. On Monday, May 3rd, at 7:00PM the administrative council meets at Park Street UMC. On Tuesday, May 4th, at 7:00PM anyone interested in helping with Vacation Bible School is invited to meet with Hope Dyer at Park Street UMC.  On Thursday, May 6, at 8:00 AM, the women will meet for breakfast at The Restaurant.   All women are invited to join us for a time of fellowship, good food and good fun.
     Child care is now available at the Sunday Morning services at Park Street United Methodist Church..

Elm Street Construction Project
Submitted by Jane Jones
     The Milo Board of Selectmen will be holding a briefing and discussions on this summer’s upcoming Water/Sewer District construction project at the next Board meeting to be held in the Milo Town Hall on Tuesday, May 4th, beginning at 6:30 PM.   The Project entails significant construction along Elm Street from the intersection of Main Street to the MDOT Garage, as well as several other areas in Town during this Summer.   The purpose of the meeting is to present as many details as possible regarding the Project, answer any questions that residents may have and to outline the course of action that the Board intends to take regarding additional road reconstruction that will be needed in the Summer of 2005. 
     The members of the Board of Selectmen and the Water/Sewer District Board of Trustees are sensitive to the fact that these activities will be very disruptive of traffic and will cause considerable inconvenience to residents.   The Project is, however, both necessary and worthwhile and will bring substantial upgrades to the infrastructure of our community when it is completed.   All interested citizens are cordially invited to attend the meeting.

Milo Gazebo Project
     Fund raising efforts for the Kiwanis Gazebo in the Park Project are currently in full swing.   The Gazebo Committee, chaired by Joe Zamboni, met Wednesday evening, April 28th to review the status of the Project and to map out the next phase.   The current timeline calls for the Gazebo to be constructed by July 4th.  
     To date, the Committee has raised $7,300 for the Project.   Individuals interested in contributing may send their donation to The Gazebo Fund, c/o Milo Town Office, P.O. Box 218, Milo, ME 04463.   Your donation of $25.00 or more will be recognized if you wish, on a plaque(s) at the Gazebo or you may make your $25.00 contribution in honor of another or in memory of a loved one.   The next Committee meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, May 5th at 6:00 PM at the Milo Town Office.

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Area Happenings

Monday, May 10
Sebec Village Cemetery Association meeting, at 7:00 p.m. in the fellowship hall at of the Sebec Village Community Church. Owners of lots are urged to attend.

Saturday, May 15
Hooked on Fishing, sponsored by the Piscataquis County Sheriff's Office and Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. Pre-registration is at 7:00 a.m., derby starts at 8:00 a.m. Youth up to age 12 invited to compete. Trophies awarded. Snow's Pond (near the Piscataquis Valley Snowmobile Clubhouse) off the Greeley's Landing Road, Dover-Foxcroft.

Thursday, May 20
The Widow's Group will meet at 11:30 at the Sunrise Restaurant in St. Albans. Information : call 965-9511 or 564-7724


Town of Milo - Help Wanted
Cemetery Worker

The Town of Milo has an immediate opening at the Evergreen Cemetery for a full-time seasonal laborer.   This position is for 40 hours per week, pays $6.75 per hour and involves substantial physical labor.   Applications are available from the Milo Town Office, 6 Pleasant Street and must be returned no later than 5:00 PM on Friday, May 7, 2004.

 Milo Town Office
P.O. Box 218
Milo, ME   04463
(207) 943-2202


“Pizza and a Movie”
     On April, 24, 2004, as part of their Children and Youth program, the Brownville Jct American Legion Auxiliary hosted a "Pizza and a Movie" afternoon for area children. The Auxiliary members made the pizza and had a great time doing it. The children ate all the pizza they could and then watched the Disney movie "Haunted Mansion." They had popcorn and drinks while watching the movie on the Legions big screen tv. We had a great time with the kids and they all enjoyed the afternoon.

     The pictures are of some of the children who attended. You will notice that the boys and girls did not sit together, but each had a separate table.

AREA SCHOOL NEWS

     Next week is “Teacher Appreciation Week”.  The following piece expresses well the pride and appreciation we have for our area teachers, and everyone who makes a difference in the life of a child.

 "Where are the heroes of today?" a radio talk show host thundered. He blames society's shortcomings on public education. Too many people are looking for heroes in all the wrong places. Movie stars and rock musicians, athletes and models,  aren't heroes, they're celebrities.

Heroes abound in public schools, a fact that doesn't make the news. There is no precedent for the level of violence, drugs, broken homes, child abuse, and crime in today's America. Public education didn't create  these problems but deals with them every day.

You want heroes? Consider Dave Sanders, the schoolteacher shot to death while trying to shield his students from two youth on a bombing and shooting rampage at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado.  Sanders gave his life, along with 12 students, but other less heralded
heroes survived the Colorado blood bath.

You want heroes? Jane Smith, a Fayetteville, NC, teacher, was moved by the plight of one of her students, a boy dying for want of a kidney transplant. So this pretty white woman told the family of this handsome 14-year old black boy that she would give him one of her kidneys. And she did. When they subsequently appeared together hugging on the Today Show, even tough little Katie Couric was near tears.

You want heroes? Doris Dillon dreamed all her life of being a teacher. She not only made it, she was one of those wondrous teachers who could bring the best out
of every single child. One of her fellow teachers in San Jose, Calif., said, "she could teach a rock to read." Suddenly she was stricken with Lou Gehrig's Disease, which is always fatal, usually within five years. She asked to stay on the job--and did. When her voice was affected she communicated by computer. Did she go home? She is running two elementary school libraries. When the disease was diagnosed, she
wrote the staff and all the families that she had one last lesson to teach -that dying is part of living. Her colleagues named her Teacher of the Year.

You want heroes? Bob House, a teacher in Gay, Georgia, tried out for Who Wants to be a Millionaire. After he won the million dollars, a network film crew wanted to follow up to see how it had impacted his life. New cars? Big new house? Instead, they found both Bob House and his wife still teaching. They explained that it was what they  had always wanted to do with their lives and that would not change. The community
was both stunned and gratified.

You want heroes? Last year the average public school teacher spent $468 of their own money for student necessities--workbooks, pencils—supplies kids had to have but could not afford. That's a lot of money from the pockets of the most poorly paid teachers in the industrialized world.

Public schools don't teach values?!!! The critics are dead wrong!. Public education provides more Sunday school teachers than any other profession. The average teacher works more hours in nine months than the average
40-hour employee does in a year.

You want heroes? For millions of kids, the hug they get from a teacher is the only hug they will get that day because the nation is living through the worst parenting in history. Many have never been taken to church or synagogue
in their lives.

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     A Michigan principal moved me to tears with the story of her attempt to rescue a badly abused little boy who doted on a stuffed animal on her desk--one that said, "I love you!" He said he'd never been told that at home. This is a constant in today's society--two million unwanted, unloved, abused children in the public schools, the only institution that takes them all in.

You want heroes? Visit any special education class and watch the miracle of personal interaction, a job so difficult that fellow teachers are awed by the dedication they witness.  There is a sentence from an unnamed source, which says, "We have been so anxious to give our children what we didn't have that we have neglected  to give them what we did have."

What is it that our kids really need? What do they really want? Math, science, history and social studies are important, but children need love, confidence, encourage-ment, someone to talk to, someone to listen, standards to live by. Teachers provide upright examples, the faith and assurance of responsible people. Kids need to be accountable to caring parents who send well-disciplined children to school. These human values are essential in a democracy.

NEWS FROM MILO ELEMENTARY

Flat Stanley Is A Traveling Man
     The second grade class at Milo Elementary has been very excited. Our class read Flat Stanley, a book about a boy who gets flattened during the night by a bulletin board. He gets mailed, in an envelope, to visit family in California. We decided to send Flat Stanley around to different places.
     He traveled to Iceland with Mrs. Tardiff's daughter, Joline. She took pictures of him on the KC135 refueling plane, at a hot water spa, in a fishing village, and by a volcanic rock outcropping.
     Stanley also went to Hawaii to visit a friend of a classmates' mother. He enjoyed a day on Alamoana Beach in Oahu. Stanley took a trip to Boston with Mrs. Walker to see the University of Maine hockey team play at the Frozen Four. He had his picture taken with Bananas the Bear. He also went to the Prudential Center and Quincy Market.
     Stanley has gone to Finland, San Diego, and Ottawa. We are waiting to hear from him on those journeys. We have sent him to our pen pals in Calais, too. His future trips will be to Florida, Alaska, Pennsylvania, and the Caribbean.
     The children are using their mapping skills to keep track of Stanley's trips. They enjoy showing where Stanley has been on the map and sharing our display of Stanley pictures with friends and other teachers.

MILO’S TERRIFIC KIDS
From the classroom of:

Mrs. Barden - Our Terrific Kid is another repeater. He is a boy who loves to read. He loves animals and is learning how to play the guitar. Our Terrific Kid is DONATO CEDRONE.

Mrs. Mills - Our Terrific Kid is truly a perfect gentleman. He tries his hardest at all he does. His reading skills are improving. His math skills are coming quicker. His handwriting is looking good. I really enjoy having EMERY TARNOCZY in my class. We ALL do. Great job Emery.

Mrs. Dunham - Our Terrific Kid really exhibits those traits we all look for. She is kind to all, puts extra effort into her schoolwork and she is prompt with everything she does. She is a risk - taker, willing to try anything new, no matter how difficult the task is. We enjoy seeing her pretty smile every morning. Congratulations to HALEY KNOWLES!

Mrs. Gillis –
Mrs. Dolley says progress he's showing,
This week his effort has really been glowing,
We like it when he comes on the scene,
Please give it up for WILLIAM DEAN!

Mrs.Dell'olio - Our Terrific Kid is quite an athlete, always riding his bike or playing ball. He really enjoys riding his dirtbike! He comes in every morning with a smile on his face, ready to work. He is helpful to his friends and teachers, and especially loves to share his stories. We enjoy having KLAY STEVENS in our class.

Mrs. Hayes- We welcome a terrific new student to our classroom. She is excited about her new friends and very happy with her new books and browsing box. This young lady enters our school with a good attitude and has shown us that she gets her work done neatly and on time. Please welcome BROOKE DAYS to our school community.

Mrs. Tardiff and Mrs. Hussey - HEATHER PEARL- This girl is working hard to improve her penmanship and fluency in reading. We are very proud of her math story problems. She is writing and solving great problems for us. Congratulations Heather!
COLTON LARRABEE- Colton is a math whiz, astounding us with two step problems. He is a great reader and storywriter. His free time is spent reading books. Colton is a wonderful friend and classmate. Congratulations Colton!!

Mrs. Walker and Mrs. Carey - It's really nice to be able to honor two kindergarten friends this week that have grown into such responsible and respectful students. The first Terrific Kid is a little girl who loves her journal writing and likes to read, read, read.. She may be tiny – but she's terrific in our room. We love our days with CAITLYN GERRISH. Our second Terrific Kid is our rhyming champion. He's one of the best when it comes to making guesses for the Rhyming Bag. We are proud of
his reading and his writing - and the fact that he is so helpful to his friends, We love our days with NOAH ALLEN.

Mrs. Whitney - Our Terrific Kid is DARLENE DEROCHERS. She is always polite, does what is asked of her and tries her best on every task. Mrs.Whitney would like to clone her so everyone would have such a student or maybe two! Great job Darlene!!

COOK SCHOOL NEWS


Mrs. Carter's class singing, "Elbow Room."

Grades 2 and 3 sang "Elbow Room" to open our April 30th assembly. Mr. Walker welcomed the students and our guests. "This is My Country” was sung after the Pledge Of Allegiance.

     Terrific Kid awards were presented to RACHAEL BAKER, TAYLOR SEVERANCE and JUSTIN OTTMANN. Ms. Ivy said that Rachael is trying very hard to write more thoughts. She has been writing neatly in her Journal and organizing her math work. Taylor's Terrific personality makes Mrs. Carter smile. Taylor is very involved in everything that goes on in the classroom. She has learned when to share and when not to share! Taylor keeps an outstanding Reading Log.

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     Miss K. complimented Justin for being a role model for the last 6 years. He does his best every day in all academic areas. Justin has a wonderful sense of humor. His kindness touches many people in our school family.
     Bus Kid of the Week Certificates were awarded to Shalene Cody, Codie Donlon and Lillis Noke.
     Lillis Noke, Rose Theriualt and Heather Michaud surprised us with some homemade Terrific Teacher awards. Mrs. Davis was thanked for her great sense of humor and for helping anyone who has a problem. Mrs. Lavigne was honored because does her best to pick out wonderful books. Mr. Eastman is Terrific because he lets us try out instruments. We like the sounds. Mr. Eastman gives nice compliments.
     Move and Improve prizewinners were Lillis Noke, Rachael Baker, Billy Parker, Rebecca Pierce and Mrs. Robinson.
     Most Improved Student Awards (sponsored by the Portland Sea Dogs) were received by Josh Gray, Billy Parker, Michelle Baker, Trevor Lyford, Taylor Severance, Rebecca Pierce, Justin Ottmann, Mackenzie Morel, Morgan Drake and Jacob Turner.
     We celebrated Mrs. Andrews', Levi Engstrom's (11) and Shalene Cody's (8) Birthdays. Congratulations to all of our Terrific Kids and Teachers.


Morgan Drake and Rachael Wood carving sculptures in Mrs. Gnodde's Art Class.


Justin Moulton Artist at Work.

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Letter to the Editor:
     I noticed your announcement in today's (4/27) paper about saving Box Tops for education. I've been doing that for years with no one to give them to. Since I live in Georgia (we've corresponded before; you printed one of my newspaper columns), I can't "drop them off at the Farmer's Union or a TRN display box, but I would love to mail them to someone. Tell me who -- or is that "whom?" -- and I'll ship them out pronto. I have loads of them.
          Barbara Seaborn
          Augusta, GA
          seabara@aol.com

Editors Note: Thank you soooo much!  Its so wonderful to see we have friends all over the country.

The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy
Continued  - Part  VI

     Outside, and usually attached to the woodshed, were the privies – “his” and “hers”, separated only by a partition, with a tiny aperture, as likely as not knifed through it.  They weren’t marked “his” and “hers”. Of course, for those were times long before such courteous niceties.  Pupils knew, however, from the very first day, which one to here toward, when the call came and they cleared with the teacher their need “to leave the room”.
     The privies had no modern toilet to flush, nor any washbowl to swing toward for a cleansing of the hands afterward.  There was no sink at the schoolhouse either, nor any water except what was drunk from, perhaps emptied back, and re-drunk from the water-pail.  Any further contamination of that, for washing purposes, would have been one straw too many!
     It might be noted here that toilets, like desks, were carved with more fevor than art.  Some imperfectly imagined sex carvings were essayed, as might be expected.  There was, as I recall at my school (quite a distance from Milo), few graffiti of an obscene nature.  Not that pupils minds weren’t a fertile seed-bed for vulgarity.  What kept the school grounds relatively free of four-letter words was a recollection of the leather strap that lay, coiled up, in a drawer of the teacher’s desk.  Teacher was invariably a realist.  She knew, almost from the first day school opened, in which pupils minds dirty words lay nearest the surface, struggling to get out.  And in the district school, there was no reading of rights to the accused, nor any trial by jury
     Schoolroom lighting rarely resorted to, was symbolically represented by three oil lamps on each side wall.  They were set into brackets high enough to be out of reach of mischievous pupil hands, as casual breakables.  For an occasional evening program, they might be lighted.  The six lamps together gave probably no more light than a 40-watt bulb would give today.
     Almost at the end of the district school era, in 1923, Superintendent Foster L. Higgins spoke of the poor lighting in the rural schools – “lighted from both sides; giving a cross light, which is the worst kind for study.”  What the improvement-minded superintendent didn’t know was that this cross-lighting was rarely bothersome because the lamps were rarely lighted.

     There was a little variety in lighting, from school to school, but none of it was up to helping a pupil do his sums on a dark day.  One school, Stanchfield Ridge, I think, had hanging-lamps.  Another had only one lamp (most likely the Hobbstown school), and that on the teacher’s desk.
     Maurice Richardson told me that in his school, on dark days, pupils were permitted to approach the window with their book, when they read, during recitation.

Milo Free Public Library News
By Judith Macdougall

     Well, I am writing this Friday morning, the last day of April, and I can hardly believe the weather. I just looked at the temperature on the north side of the house-73 degrees. Later in the afternoon it went to 84! What a shock!.. My favorite temperature is in the 60’s. Why can’t the heat gradually rise every week getting us use to it instead of shooting from 32 to 84? We sail through the 60’s never stopping both in the spring and in the fall. To me a few weeks in the 60’s would be spring-a fine temperature for working outside.
     The Kiwanis Kids Korner began again in full force after a vacation hiatus. Val brought in two visitors, her ducklings, Hocky and Puck. No one could believe that Hocky had hatched just two weeks ago and Puck was even younger. Val explained that ducklings grow much faster than chicks. Unfortunately Dottie Brown was sick and could not be with us on Wednesday. I think this was the first day Dottie has ever missed. Don stayed at home to take care of her so we were missing two valuable players. Frank Cochrane along with Joseph Zamboni and his Newfoundland dog, Max, walked the 32 “Kids” down from school. It was a beautiful day for a walk. Fortunately for Val and Frank, Key Club member, Dawn Patten, and Rainbow Girl, Jamie Perkins, were on hand to help out with refreshments and the craft, which consisted of old fashioned picture frames to which the children were adding a bead decoration. Val took a picture of each “Kid” to put in the frames next week. Dawn and Jamie also went outside to do traffic duty as Don , wearing his Cat-in the- Hat hat was not available. They were busy girls and a big help to the Kiwanis Kids. Refreshments for the group were Val’s homemade cookies with oatmeal and peanut butter ( a healthy snack) and M & Ms for color. The children wolfed these down with milk or apple juice as they listened to the story of Little Flower by Gloria Rand. Little Flower is a pot-bellied pig whose owner, Miss Pearl, taught her to play dead. Little Flower used her trick to bring help when her owner was injured.
     We have received three adult gift books this week. Dr. Susan Love’s Breast Book and A Breast Cancer Journey will be great additions to our medical section. Dr. Susan Love’s book is described as a bible for women with breast cancer. Glancing at it briefly, I noticed that almost everything one could want to know about breast health care, breast feeding, breast cancer, procedures, reconstruction and life after breast cancer was written up in great detail, perhaps helping a person to make difficult decisions in a time of great stress. The second book gives information on treatment options and their potential side effects, complementary and alternative methods and also gives practical tips on managing the emotions , reactions and side effects of breast cancer and its treatment. We are glad to have these two books for valuable information on this prevalent disease. These books were brought to us by a representative of the Maine Breast and Cervical Health Program –The Penobscot Coalition. The

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third book we received was Babies with Down Syndrome . This book frankly and very positively discusses the Down Syndrome baby, how to care for him/her and how to help him/her reach their full potential. The book discusses the daily care of your baby and how to help your baby to become part of your family. The book includes lots of suggestions from other parents of Down Syndrome children too. This book was sent to us by the Southern Maine Down Syndrome Family Network. Again we are so pleased to be able to add it to our collection.
     We also received a large box of donated children’s books from Lori Brown. Included in the collection was a nice set of tiny Beatrix Potter books, a neat little nature set with such titles as Little Lizard, Baby Penguin, Tiny Tiger and Prairie Dog. There were also 16 paperback Goosebumps books which will be very popular with our young patrons who want scary books but not too scary. I’m sure our youngest patrons are going to enjoy these books and the others in the box. Thank you, Lori Brown.

Library Winter Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Saturday 2:00-4:00
Telephone 943-2612

A Historical Review
Rivers and Dams in Maine - Part 14
Tour of Lower Penobscot Unveils History of Dams, Powerhouses
Bangor Daily News -- David Platt - October 23, 1984
(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2004)

     By the 1880s, the lower Penobscot was turning out power for a variety of paper mills, sawmills and other industries -- Water flowing down the Penobscot River has been used to make energy for almost two centuries. A water-powered sawmill existed at the site of the Veazie Dam, in fact, before 1800.
     By the 1880s, the eight miles between the Bangor Dam and Milford had become "a working section of the river," according to Fred Ayer of Bangor Hydro Electric Company. At the time the lower Penobscot was turning out power for a variety of paper mills, sawmills and other industries. Dams on the river also directed water into powerhouses and controlled levels for logdriving. Complex agreements apportioned rights to the water in the river.
     Ayer conducted a guided tour of the lower Penobscot dams and powerhouses Sunday afternoon under the auspices of the state office of Energy Resources. The river's history, he explained, accounts for the fact that a number of the facilities there don't make maximum use of their sites.
     Veazie -- New England's oldest hydroelectric station -- was converted to its present purpose in 1886. Before then -- but subsequent to the 1880 sawmill -- it had power a pulp mill. One of Bangor Hydro's corporate predecessors, Public Works Co., bought the power station and converted it for utility purposes. A remnant of the old pulp mill remains in the form of the larger of the two buildings at Veazie -- known as the "A" unit -- which once housed mill machinery. Its cavernous interior dwarfs the 15 generating units installed along one side. Bangor Hydro added the adjacent "B" unit, with two turbines, several years after acquiring the Veazie Dam.
     Now the utility wants to expand Veazie again by adding a third powerhouse across the river. The expansion would nearly double the site's capacity. It would be built at the same time as Bangor Hydro's proposed Basin Mills project upstream.
     The history of the hydroelectric sites at Orono is similar to Veazie. Virtually all of them were built originally for purposes other than hydroelectric generation. The dam at Stillwater, for example, which snakes its way across the Stillwater River to Marsh Island above Orono, was built in 1902 by Orono Pulp and Paper Co. Bangor Hydro added a new powerhouse 30 years later, after buying the dam from the paper company. The powerhouse has a capacity of 1.9 megawatts.(continued next week)

THE SNOW GOOSE HUNT
     Summer was over, the kids were back in school, and fall was just around the corner.  There was a tingle in the October air, making cool nights and warm days.  And most of all, the feel of hunting season was in the air.
     Paul Foulkes had asked if I would like to go snow goose hunting on the St. Lawrence River.  I had been once before, so knew what a great experience it was.  October is the time of year when the snow geese who have nested in the  Baffin Islands in Canada migrate south.  I was told that unless they were driven down by a storm, they would fly the 750 miles to the St. Lawrence non-stop.
     The snow goose is a beautiful bird.  The young are gray;  the mature birds are pure white with a six-inch  black wing tip and weigh from eight to ten pounds.  They nest on an eight-mile stretch of the river and feed on a type of foot-tall grass that grows there.  The Canadian government watches their numbers closely, for they don’t want them to over-feed their grounds.  For that reason the government encourages hunters to harvest them in the fall.
     I asked Althea if she would like to go on the hunt.  She said she would.  We  borrowed  two twelve-gauge shotguns from Gary Robinson and Harry Carey, as our light bird guns weren’t adequate for such big birds.
     The first morning we drove to Jackman, where we registered our guns and then headed for the city of Mon-Ami, about thirty miles down the St. Lawrence from Quebec City.  At night we could see the lights on the bridge where we picked up the ferry which took us to the Isle Aux Grus.
     This part of the river is tide water.  When the tide is out, the geese feed on grass growing on the shores of the islands.  The Laurentian Mountains can be seen across the river.  When a “raft” of six to eight thousand geese take off, they fill the sky until you can’t see the mountains.
     Because it is against the law to shoot the geese while they are in the water, unless they are wounded,  the shooting is all “wing or pass” shooting.  On a good day they fly high above shooting range.
     We took our cars across to the island, although there was only a one-mile stretch of tarred road on the island, and strangely enough, there were power poles in the center of the road the whole way.
     On the north end of the island there was an old motel.  I remember that the doorways were low, but the room was clean and comfortable.  A short walk from the motel there was a big ocean-going decommissioned tugboat pulled up on shore.  The upper glassed-in deck was the dining room.  We spent the evenings in the lower deck bar room, where the guides and guests gathered to talk about the days’ hunt and study the blackboard, which held the names of the guides, the guests they were to guide and the place they were going.
     A boat had to be used to get to some of the neighboring islands,  a few of which  were connected to the big island when the tide was out.  It was hard walking as the mud was sticky and would pull your boots off if they weren’t tied on tight.  The islands had sunken boxes of blinds about five feet deep with a board seat.  One blind was about big enough for two people.  To one side the guide had a smaller one.  These all filled with water when the tide came in and had to be bailed out by the guide.

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     The first morning we were up at 5:00, had breakfast, and were at the blinds  by 8:00 o’clock.  The guide secured his boat, got his five-gallon pail for bailing, a bale of hay for the seat, his shotgun, and a roll of 25 sheets of heavy white paper.  He tucked two corners of the paper  into the mud and twisted one up for the neck and head for decoys.  He spread the hay on the seat, and we were ready for business.
     We were completely covered with rubber hip boots, a rubber coat, and light rubber gloves.  The mud was everywhere.  In front of our blind there was a raft of three or four thousand geese just out of shooting range.  As the tide went out, they started flying, and the guide called them with his mouth.
     The first day was beautiful.  Althea wanted me to shoot first so she could see how it was done.  The geese were flying high and I was anxious, so I ended up shooting a box and a half of shells without cutting a feather.  Afterward the guide told me not to shoot until I could see their feet, when they would be within range.
     We went back to the same blind the second day.  Althea was to do the shooting that day.  The guide called in a dozen or so, but they were all too high.  He cupped his hands and called in three that were just the right height.  She stood up, aimed, and fired and the lead goose dropped.  Her second shot got another and the rest flew off.  The guide’s mouth dropped open and he yelled, “Wow! Dat woman she can shoot!”  He got out of the blind, ran out and got the geese.  He had a big grin on when he got back.  When we got back to the motel, he had to hose the mud off us before we could go into the motel.  That evening he took the geese into the bar to show the others.
     We had one more day of hunting.  That day we had a new guide who met us in his pickup and after driving around the power poles got us to the other end of the island.  The blind we had was on a slope and was full of water.  The guide started bailing it out, throwing it out on the uphill side above the blind with the expected consequences.  I said to Althea, “Did you ever see anything like that?”  Somehow he finally got the water out and the decoys set up.  We had good shooting that day.  Althea got another white bird, and I got a young gray bird. 
     We were heading home that afternoon, and after cleaning up we walked to the open upper deck on the  tugboat.  We sat watching the flocks of geese coming in.  A big flock would break up into smaller flocks and they would form their own V.  Their white wings glistened in the sun.  It was like watching a ballet of birds set to music, beautiful to see.  We took the 2:00 P.M. ferry back to Mon-Ami and headed home.  It had been a great trip that would give us a lot of good memories.
     After we got home I made up a little song for the birds.  It went like this:

The snow goose flies and the wind blows free.
The snow goose flies and the wind blows free.
The hunter waits so patiently
For the snow goose flies today.

     The children are all grown up now, but they still remember the snow goose song!

                    The Old Whittler


Shane & Cliff

The Turkey Hunt
     Lady Luck was with these two fellows as they ventured out for their first ever turkey hunt. Saturday, May 1, was Youth Day for the turkey-hunting season. Shane Smith, 12, of Fairfield Center, was chosen to have a permit to hunt this spring, and he and his father, Cliff Smith, set out to learn all they could about the process. They bought or borrowed camouflage clothing, turkey decoys, turkey calls, and even watched several videos on turkey hunting.
     At 5:30 that morning, Shane and Cliff walked out back of their house to some cornfields, and set up their decoys. They saw several turkeys out there, and picked a spot near the edge of the woods to sit and call them in.
     They sat for an hour, calling and waiting, and at 7:10, three jakes (young males) walked in. Shane picked the bird he wanted, and fired. Just like that, Shane's season was over. Shane says that what scared him the most about the whole experience was when his father jumped up and screamed with excitement when he saw the turkey laying on the ground!
     Shane and Cliff would like to thank Butch Green and Jim Brawn for their assistance and guidance in making this first experience a successful one.
     Shane is the son of Cliff and Becky (Foss) Smith, both formerly of Milo, and the grandson of Gerald and Rachel Smith and Larry and Gini Foss, and the great-grandson of Phil and Gini Barden. Shane is in the sixth grade at Benton Elementary.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham
     As we creep closer to our favorite season of the year....tourist season....I found this list on the internet and thought of all of you readers. So, for those of you in Maine you can laugh. For those of you who are no longer in Maine, you can reminisce. For those of you who are only lucky enough to know someone from Maine - maybe this will help you better understand us.

You know you're in Maine when:
     Your idea of a traffic jam is more than one car waiting to pass a tractor on the highway.
     Vacation means going to camp for the weekend and a major family vacation is two weeks at camp.
     You measure distance in hours.
     You know several people that have hit deer more than once. (or have had deer run into them more than once).

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     And, now you also run the risk of hitting a flock of wild turkey on most outings.
     You often switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day and back again.
     Giving up your flannel sheets for the summer is a major decision and is always risky.
     You literally have 4 different wardrobes....one for each season, with few crossovers.
     You drive pretty fast even during a blizzard, without flinching.
     You see people wearing hunting clothes at social events.
     You install security lights on your house and garage, yet leave both unlocked.
     Venison is an uppity word for deer meat.
     You always carry jumper cables in your car and if your girlfriend doesn't know how to use them, your 10-year-old does.
     There are 7 empty cars - engines running - in the parking lot of the local grocery store at any given time.
     You design your kid's Halloween costumes to fit over their snowsuits.
     Driving is better in winter because all the potholes are filled with snow.
     You know all four seasons: feelin' like winter, winter, mud, and road construction.
     There's no such thing as running into the store for a minute....there are too many people in there to visit with to make a "quick trip."
     Your favorite department store is Reny's.
     You define June by the length of time the black flies are around. And evening activities in any summer month are limited to what you can do in the daylight....because in the evening you must keep the lights off to avoid the mingees.
     All weather tires come standard on all cars.
     You can identify a Massachusetts accent. "You're frum Massachusetts ain't cha?" You can always recognize someone from Massachusetts because they drive too fast.
     If you missed their driving, but you got to talk to them....you could tell they were from Massachusetts because they exaggerate just about everything.
     You can actually pronounce Piscataquis, Passadumkeag and Mattawamkeag. You know where Mooselookmeguntic is AND you can pronounce that, too.
     You go out for "all you can eat" fish fry every Friday, and stay home for beans and hot dogs every Saturday.
     You drink soda and refer to your dad as "Pop".
     Brown mustard is definitely gourmet.
     If you're lucky, at least once a year your kitchen doubles as a meat processing plant.
     You've gone through way more snow blowers than you have lawn mowers.
     You think the start of deer season is a national holiday, and you put as much effort into a moose hunt as you would an African safari.
     Whether or not the kids go out for recess is determined by the thermometer rather than what's falling out of the sky. If it's above the donut it's usually a "go."

     It won't be long now.....the rhubarb will be up. Here's my favorite recipe for Rhubarb Bread.

2-1/4 cups all purpose flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. nutmeg
1/2 tsp. allspice
3 eggs
1 cup vegetable oil
1-3/4  cup packed brown sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
2-1/2 cups rhubarb (diced)
3/4 cup chopped nuts

     Combine flours, baking soda and powder and spices in a bowl and set aside.
     Beat eggs, oil, sugar and vanilla in a large bowl with an electric mixer at high speed until smooth and fluffy. Stir in the dry ingredients - just until moistened. Stir in the rhubarb and walnuts. Spoon batter into two greased and floured bread pans. Bake 350° for 50 minutes for fresh rhubarb or 65 minutes for frozen rhubarb.

IN MEMORIAM

ALICE HEATHER CROZIER
     BOWERBANK - Alice Heather Crozier, 71, died April 24, 2004, in Lexington, Mass., after a four-and-a-half year battle with cancer. Born and raised in Boston, Mass., Heather graduated from Barnard College and later was awarded a Ph.D. in Biochemistry by the University of London, England. Her professional career was in medical research and she set up research labs in eastern United States, the United Kingdom and Canada. Following the death of her husband, Eric, Heather moved to Bowerbank, where she had lived for the past 20 years. As a librarian, she helped establish and teach computer library skills at Foxcroft Academy in Dover-Foxcroft. She also served as secretary to the Town of Bowerbank for several years and organized a pictorial history of Bowerbank at the town library. Heather leaves her son, Robert; her brother, Edwin
Wyman; several nieces and nephews; as well as great-nieces and great-nephews. A memorial service will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, May 8, 2004, at the Sebec Village Community Christian Church. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent in her name to the Head and Neck Oncology Program, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St., Boston, MA 02115.

     This loving fellow was found on the back Brownville road, near Felix Blinn’s.  If know who he is, call Julie Gallagher at 943-5083.


BURKE’S YARD SALE
HOVEY ROAD
MAY 6-7-8

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HELLO,
     My name is Jillian Lumbra.  Some of you know my Mom Andrea, my Dad Steve or my brother Matt.  Mom got a letter from Wide Horizons for Children (WHFC), which is the adoption agency I was adopted through.  WHFC works with Holt Children’s Services in South Korea.  Holt provides foster care for children waiting to be adopted.  They have many other programs.
     One program is the Holt Ilsan program.  Ilsan is located near Seoul (where I was born).  This program provides a resident home for 300 specially challenges kids.  The children are given loving care and excellent medical attention.  They live in small group homes and as they get older, they participate in the Korea Special Olympics and sheltered workshops where they make crafts to sell.  Most of these children will not be adopted.
     The Holt Ilsan program is in desperate need of a new bus with a hydraulic lift for residents in wheelchairs.  Mom and I want to help them by raising money to send them.
     We would like to do this through a bottle drive and donations.  You could help us by:

a.      Bringing your bottles to the Lumbra’s mill or our house (6 Alton Street).
b.      Leave your address and we will pick up the bottles.
c.      Make a donation (checks can be made out to WHFC, earmarked Holt Bus Fund).

Thank you for helping the children at Holt Ilsan!

Jillian Lumbra

MSAD #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU
MAY 2004

3-Chicken burger, rice, peas, fruit, and milk every day.

4-Macaroni & cheese, baked ham, Cole slaw, cinnamon roll, and fruit.

5-Spaghetti/meat sauce, garden salad, dinner roll, and birthday cake.

6-Deli turkey sand. macaroni salad, carrot stix, and pineapple.

7-Juice, egg muffin, hash brown, and applesauce.

10-Bacon cheeseburger, mashed potato, Calif. Blend veg., and peaches.

11-Dagwood sand. lettuce/tomato, smiles, and apple crisp.

12-Shepards pie, hot carrots, dinner roll, and fruit.

13-Chicken fajita, salad, rice pilaf, and choc. pudding.

14-Italian sand. fries, vegetable, and icy juicy.

17-NO SCHOOL-TEACHER IN-SERVICE DAY.

18-NO SCHOOL-TEACHER IN-SERVICE DAY.

19-Quidadilla pizza, rice pilaf, salad, and fruit.

20-Chicken parmesan, spaghetti, broccoli, dinner roll, and fruit.

21-Juice, chop suey, cuke slices, dinner roll, and ginger bread.

24-Chicken nuggets, oven fries, mixed veg., dinner roll, and fruit.

25-Super sand., hash brown, Calif. Blend veg., and Jell-O/topping.

26-Taco, rice, lettuce/tomato, and pineapple.

27-Turkey & gravy, mashed potato, corn, dinner roll, stuffing, and cookie.

28-FREE FOR SENIORS-Pizza, mac. Salad, salad greens, and fruit.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.

MAY 1987
4-Sunny L wind-46° at 12.
5-Cloudy am Rain after 11 o’clock-40° at 12.
6-Rain-42° at 12.
7-P sunny windy pm-54° at 12.
8-P sunny am windy some clouds pm-56° at 12.
9-P sunny-56° at 12.
10-Sunny windy Mother’s Day-64° at 1 pm.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

APRIL 28, 2004 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY
     President Joe Zamboni said hello to twenty-three members and guest Erika Lyford.
     Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance.  Edwin Treworgy said a prayer for people who are ill and for the families of the military personnel serving during this difficult time.  He remembered the families who have lost loved ones.
     Correspondence: Orono/Old Town newsletter and a thank you from Merna Dunham, District #1 of the Maine Federation of Women’s Clubs, for the $100 donation to the high school arts contest.
     Happy birthdays wishes to Kathy Witham on May 2 and Judith Stevens on May 4.
     Twenty-four happy dollars were donated today for Ed’s return!, memories, Red Sox sweep over the Yankees, direct deposit for social security form being in?, having the BEST nurse in the world, Kiwanis help, Paul’s Mom being better, Houlton comedy show, and more dollars donated for the Yankees than the Red Sox.  One very sad dollar for a Mom’s passing.
     Trish Hayes reported that the Key Club is wrapping up their raffle for Dreams for Maine Kids.  They have sold 700 tickets and hope to sell another 100 by this weekend.  Great job!!
     Joe Z. said that Robert Skoglund, “The Humble Farmer” is eager to put on a show during the summer.  This will be taken up at the board meeting next week.
     Kathy Witham proudly announced that Brownville Elementary has again been chosen as a RIF award winner.
     Steve Hamlin told us about a concession wagon for sale in Bangor.  Joe and Jeff will take a look at it to determine if it would be beneficial to upgrade and if the price is right.
     There will be lots of jobs to do in readying for the annual auction in June.  Joe Z. and Todd Lyford are the co-chairs, Chris Beres and Nancy G. will draft a letter to be sent to businesses and coordinate business contacts, Nancy will collect donations, Herbie Dunham (943-2353), Eben D. (943-2486), and Fred Trask (943-7746) will be the contacts for items to be picked up, Ethelyn T. will handle advertising, Frank Cochrane will handle the 50/50 tickets, Fred T. is in charge of tents, Murrel H. and Janet R. are in charge of the yard sale, and Sandra Gray, Heidi Finson, Cheryl Hamlin, Janet R., Lois T., and Nancy G. have volunteered to keep track of bidding at the auction.  We still need people to help with picking up items, set up, clean up, moving items during the auction, and food preparation and sales or anything that hasn’t been mentioned!  Chris Almy introduced our speaker, Jere White, the director of the YMCA in Dover-Foxcroft.  He said that there are many programs available at the Y but feels the most important one is headed by physical therapist Fran Moore.
     Fran told us that health insurance programs were implemented almost 100 years ago and have been ever changing since.  Social security programs came in after the crash of 1929.  Consolidation of regional services occurred in our area 25 years ago with the closing of the Dexter and Milo hospitals.  This forces small towns like ours to lose their identity.  Healthcare malls compete with hospitals in larger cities.

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     Seventy percent of Mayo Regional Hospital’s patients are Medicare and Medicaid funded.  Providing healthcare for all Maine people is a challenge.  Fran feels that it should start at the local level.  Changes are made nationally for the masses, not the individual.  With a rise in obesity in children, fibrmyalgia, adult onset diabetes (Type 2), etc., he stresses prevention and wellness.  Instead of waiting until an illness occurs people should try to stay well by maintaining a healthy lifestyle with diet and exercise.
     Fran has had great success with his Physically Challenging Club at the YMCA for the past 15 years.  The club provides exercise for people with chronic disabilities, stroke and cancer patients, and mentally challenged individuals.
     For additional information about this and many other programs please contact the Piscataquis Regional YMCA, 48 Park Street, Dover-Foxcroft, ME, 04426, call 207-564-7111 or e-mail at prymca@midmaine.com.
     Thank you Jere and Fran.

AN EVENING WITH
TRAVIS COWING
(Comedian extrodinairre!!)

DATE: SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2004
TIME: 6:30 PM-10:00 PM
PLACE: THE MILO TOWN HALL AUDITORIUM

COST: $10.00 ADVANCE, $12.00 AT THE DOOR
ALL DESIGNATED DRIVER’S ADMITTED
FOR half-PRICE!!!

THERE WILL BE AN ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET, STARTING AT 6:30 PM

FOLLOWED BY A 45-MINUTE P.G.-RATED COMEDY SET BY TRAVIS STARTING AT 7:30 PM.

AT 8:15, THERE WILL BE A 30-MINUTE INTERMISSION AND AT 8:45, TRAVIS WILL PERFORM A 45-MINUTE SET OF R-RATED COMEDY.

B.Y.O.B IN MODERATE AMOUNTS.
PEOPLE DEEMED INTOXICATED WILL BE ASKED TO LEAVE.
DRIVERS WILL BE PROVIDED IF NEEDED, AT AN ADDITIONAL COST.

Tickets available by calling 943-2324 or e-mail Kirby Robertson at val04463@verizon.net,

at The Head Shop on Elm Street in Milo,
from Murrel Harris.
or from Susie Ricker at 943-2692.

ALL PROFITS WILL GO TOWARDS THE PAWS BUILDING FUND.

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