Three Rivers News, 2004-07-05
MONDAY, JULY 5, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 35
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

The Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church Thrift Shop has been an important part of the area for several years. Here Nancy Belvin, Dawn Priestman, Lois Hyde, Beverly Jamison and Thelma Farrar prepare to open for another day. Regular hours are every Wednesday and the first Saturday of the month from 10-1. The Thrift Shop will be closed July 14th and the 21st for a summer break.

Shelby Weston shows off her great form......Shelby plays second base and outfield for the Red Sox. More pictures on page 5.

LITTLE LEAGUE SCHEDULE

If you are looking for a night of exciting baseball......don't turn on the t.v.; come to Brownville Jct. and watch a Little League Baseball game. Play offs start July 6th at 6:00 p.m, and run through July 15th.

Game 1 July 6th Braves vs. Red Sox
Game 2 July 6th Mets vs. A's
Game 3 July 7th winner of game 1 vs. Cubs
Game 4 July 8th
Game 5 July 8th
Game 6 July 12th
Game 7 July 13th
Game 8 July 14th
Game 9 July 15th    (if necessary )

Ellen DeWitt and Milo the Hunk getting settled in Fred Worcester's 1970 GTO. The Milo hunk has recently moved to town and is residing with Ed and Ellen DeWitt. Ellen said that residents will be seeing Milo at many community events in the coming months. She also said that he is a great houseguest. Not only is he handsome but he is quiet, doesn't eat much and does whatever you tell him to do! He does have a bad habit of bidding too high at auctions, as shown recently at the Kiwanis Auction. You can sometimes catch Milo in front to DeWitt’s Real Estate office on Park Street, always dressed to the nines!!

CRIUZE-IN RECAP
BY SUSAN WORCESTER

Antiques! Classics! Customs! Streetrods! Tuners! Cars! Trucks! A limo! And even a tractor!! Vehicles that were for sale and vehicles that couldn't be bought. Vehicles that are all original, vehicles that are in restoration, and vehicles that have been fully restored were all on hand for spectators to peruse. For the fifteenth year people from as far away as New Gloucester, Cherryfield, and Presque Isle drove to Milo to attend the Penquis Cruizers' 15th Annual Cruize-In which was held at the JSI Store Fixtures plant. Over 400 people attended the event. The weather was just right for car buffs young and old to admire the variety of vehicles on display. Ron and Carol Gray of Orrington and Ray Young of Cherryfield drove their 1923 T-buckets, some of the oldest vehicles participating, to the show and Jeremiah Brown of Brownville arrived in his 2000 Ford Focus.The Focus was one of the newest vehicles there. Curtis Chase was on hand with his restored truck collection.

There was a Rap Contest held at the event. This is an opportunity for car owners to get a decibel reading as to how loud their cars are. A decibel meter is held a certain distance from the tail pipe of each vehicle and a reading is taken. There were eleven participants in the contest this year. The first place trophy was awarded to Kim Sherburne of Milford, second place went to Tom Dyson of Ripley, and third place was given to Lory Langley from Hermon. Sherburne's vehicle was a 1965 Cobra and Dyson drove a 1967 Camaro. Langley's third place reading was from his 1939 Ford.

The trophy for the "Favorite Cruizer" was awarded to Danny Dow of Sebec for his 1963 Chevy Impala 409. John and Diane Kirby of New Gloucester were given the "Longest Distance" trophy. They traveled to the Cruize-In with the 1955 Ford Fairlane they just purchased last year. The "Hard Luck Story" award was given to Richard and June Smith of Mattawamkeag who had a flat tire and lost a wheel on their 1924 Model T. A trophy is given to the "Best Appearing Club". This is the car club which has the most members participating in the Cruize-In. This year the award went to the Dusters Antique Auto Club. There were sixteen members of that group who attended the event in Milo. A number of members of the

Page 1

Page 2

Lakeshore Cruisers of the Greenville area and Central Maine Street Rods also participated. Many people who own and enjoy showing their cars and trucks do not have any club affiliation.

There were several raffles held at the Cruize-In. Dick Gillen of Blaine won more than $200 in the 50/50 raffle. A diecast streetrod was won by Dillon Conley of Milo. A 24"x36" LED "Roadside Diner" poster was won by Ronald Clukey of Ripley. Several Smokey the Bear puppets and baseballs were awarded to five children who participated in the Kids' Raffle.The winners were Vinnie Monahan, Nick Gaillard, Chris Kirby, Issac Brown, and Taylor Lyford.

Jim Hoar of the Maine HO Slot Racing Association was on hand with a race track set up for kids young and old to try their hand at slot car racing during the day.

There was an auction of new and used car related items as well as donations from members and local businesses. The Cruizers would like to thank the following businesses for donating items or gift certificates to the auction this year: The Red Earth, Milo Farmers' Union, The Restaurant, Pat's Pizza - Orono, Graves' Service Station, C & J Variety, Milo Exxon, Ellen DeWitt Real Estate, S & L Auto Parts, J & S Furniture, 3 Rivers Feed and Redemption, Salley's Auto Repair, Lakeview Realty, Grant's Used Cars, the World of Flags, Field of Dreams, Harmon's Texaco, and Rowe Ford - Westbrook.

Susan Worcester, one of the organizers for the event, said "Thanks to the support of club members and local businesses and assistance from the Three Rivers Kiwanis Food Wagon this was one of the most profitable Cruize-Ins the Penquis Cruizers have held. The original goal of the Cruizers was to bring cars to Milo and we have managed to do that for fifteen years now. The weather has cooperated and people have driven many miles to attend the event again and again."

Four restored vehicles owned by Curtis Chase and family were on display at the Milo Cruize-In.

John and Diane Kirby's 1955 Ford Fairlane and the "Longest Distance" trophy from the Penquis Cruizers' Cruize-In.

STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

Community Calendar

Saturday July 17 P.E.T.S. benefit “BLOW OUT YARD SALE.  All items $1.00 or less. Great buys to be had,  such as bikes, china, glassware, small appliances, clothing, stuffed animals.  Lots of misc. items.  All items must go as we have no storage space. To be held at Dover-Foxcroft Fire Station 8am to 2pm.

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., JULY 6

SHEPHERD’S PIE, BROCCOLI, SLICED PEARS

WED., JULY 7

VEAL SCALOPPINI, RED POTATO, CARROTS, FRUIT COCKTAIL

THUR., JULY 8

HOMEMADE SPINACH BISQUE, CHICKEN SALAD ON WHOLE WHEAT, BASIL TOMATOES, PINEAPPLE CRISP

FRI., JULY 9

MEATLOAF, GRAVY, MASHED POTATO, CORN. SLICED PEACHES

MON. JULY 12

CHEESEBURGER DELUXE, POTATO SALAD, GERMAN CUKES, BANANA PUDDING

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS.  WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM.
PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. 


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15 PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!

Page 2

Page 3


Deanna Sherburne, Ron and Jane Ames

MILO POSTMASTER RETIRES

On Friday, July 2, 2004 current and retired employees of the Milo Post Office gathered to present retiring Postmaster Ron Robinson with farewell gifts.  Mr. Robinson began his postal career in Dover-Foxcroft as a part-time city carrier in 1974.  He progressed to full-time city carrier and then a window clerk.

He became Postmaster of  Milo in 1986.  The biggest changes he has seen at the post office have been the use of computers and automation.

He plans on spending more time at his camp.  Next fall  he will continue to support his son Lincoln’s athletic career at the University of Maine at Farmington.

Ms. Susan Lyford will be “officer in charge” at the Milo Post Office until a new Postmaster is appointed.

Help Local Family Bring Son Home from Russia.

John and Jamie Gorecki are selling a unique cookbook to raise the needed funds for the adoption of a 2 or 3 year old child from Russia.

The cookbook contains recipes from 19 families from all over the United Stated that are in the adoption process. The families have never met, but came together through a Yahoo! E-group to support each other in their adoption fundraising process.

“We feel strongly about adopting.” Jamie said. She adds that “Adoption is an expense that we would rather not go into debt for,so we are hoping the sales of this cookbook will contribute greatly to our adoption fund.”

Over 500 recipes, including Appetizers, Breads, Desserts, International Dishes, Main Dishes, Soups and Salads, Vegetables and Side Dishes and a "Just for Kids" section, are included in the cookbook. Icons help cooks find recipes that are heart healthy, freezer friendly, quick and easy, or kid friendly.

A special bonus to the book are sections on cooking and cleaning tips, stories about the families participating, and information about adoption.

The Gorecki's son’s favorite recipe from the book is the "Edible Fish Tank," submitted by Marcia Lisboa. "It's easy to make and kids love it!" Simply make a blue or green gelatin in a large bowl following the package instructions. Let thicken for about an hour in the refrigerator. Insert gummy fish and pineapple fish shapes into the gelatin “sea". When it is time to serve, spread whipped topping over it to create the illusion of the water surf.

The cookbook is available for $20 and can be purchased by emailing Jamie at RUAGORECKI2@MIDMAINE.COM or calling 296-2035.

There are many orphans in Russia that are in need of forever families. For more information about International adoption, contact MAPS, the agency that the Gorecki's are using, at 941-9500.

4th quarter honor roll from Penquis Valley Schools

Seniors: High Honors: Shannon Gerrish, Amanda Kahl, Rebecca Madden. Honors: Justin Allen, Shawn Burke, Heather Dolley, Melissa Gledhill, Desiree Hogan, Jennifer Hussey, William Koelsch, Melissa Miller, Krystle Morrill, Cameron Wellman
Juniors: High Honors: Erin Beasley, Elizabeth Comeau, Elyse Kahl Honors: Derek Brewer, Ashley Case, Christina

Day, Drew Hamlin, Katherine Hamlin, Lisa Koelsch, Jessica LaMunyon, Hilary London, Maria Mills, Krystle Parkman, Devin Perkins, Crystal Sanborn
Sophomores: High Honors: Christina Gerrish Honors: Adam Ballash, Mary Belvin, Tyler Herbst, Matthew Ludden, Kylie Palmer, Jodi Walker, Alex Zwicker
Freshmen: High Honors: Kristin Burch, Jessica Metros
Honors: Amber Benoit, Chris Bessey, Krystle Leavitt
8th Grade: High Honors: Noah Bissell, Nycole Carey, Jessica Kahl, Ryan Madden Honors: Tyler Case, Michael Dilley, Nathan Durant, Haley Flanders,
Jennifer Goodine, Lucas Knapp, Cheryl Roesing
7th Grade: Honors: Ryan Bailey, Logan Greenlaw, Joseph Leland, Paige McGuinness, Emily Mills, Stephen Morse, Kelsey Ottmann


Penquis Valley High School  Class of 1999
5th Year Reunion/Social SeaDog Restaurant
26 Front Street, Bangor (on the waterfront)
August 7, 2004 6pm
RSVP or questions? Please call 207-279-0179 or
Email penquis99@hotmail.com All are welcome!
Hope to see you there!


A Historical Review - Part 1
The Quarries (portion of a Brownville History)
by Susan Merrill Lewis (date unknown)
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2004)

When William Dodd became the proprietor of Williamsburg, he engaged Moses Greenleaf (then of Bangor) to act as his agent for settling the township. Mr. Greenleaf, with his brother Eben who was a surveyor, became deeply interested in the wild land and resources, not only of the town and county, but of the entire state. In 1820 he published a book of statistics (revised the following year under the title of "Survey of Maine") which he sold with his maps of Maine. During his research work for this project, he discovered the vein of slate underlying Range 8. On pages 116-118 of his book he refers to the slate as several varieties: argillite, siliceous and mica, and says the specifically, "On the Piscataquis the argillite is in general regularity stratified and in a number of instances has been found capable of being spilt into roof slate of a superior quality. An instance of this kind exists in a large quantity at Williamsburg, where tables have been obtained from 6 to 10 feet in length, of the best quality, suitable for roof or writing slate."

This book of Mr. Greenleaf's was widely read in our own country and even became know abroad. And when Robert Evans and Owen Morris came from Wales (about the year 1840) landing at Philadelphia, they heard by some means of this vast deposit of unutilized slate. As soon as they could make ready, they packed up and started for Maine. On reaching the Kennebec River they traveled in the direction of Moosehead Lake where they took a trail for Williamsburg. In Barnard they found signs of slate and made openings, comparing the slate with that of the Pen Rhyn quarries of Wales, samples of which they had brought with them. Owen Morris became interested on lone of the quarries at Barnard and remained there, but Robert Evans worked eastward until he located the site of the Crocker Quarry and of a small quarry in the Stickney pasture. Tradition has it that Evans died shortly after, while on his way to Bangor, and that Morris returned to Wales for more funds and never came back.

By whatever means, news of the slate deposit traveled across to Wales, and a little company of Welsh men came to Brownville with the purpose of operating a quarry. The leader of this enterprise was William Hughes who opened both the Crocker and the Merrill quarries. William Hughes was a man of dignified presence and of pleasing but forceful personality. Associated with him in the work of the slate fields were Robert Roberts, David Griffith and Mesach Jones; his brothers-in-law, Williams D. Williams and brother Benjamin Williams; and Evan Hughes.

In 1843 he opened the Crocker Quarry. The property was at that time in the hands of Phinias Morrill, who transferred it two years later to Samuel Crocker, Isaac Putnam, Joseph Sims and

Page 3

Page 4

William Hughes. In 1847 the other three transferred the several parts to Samuel Crocker who owned and successfully operated the quarry under supervision of William Sparrow. William Sparrow and family lived in the slate house near the quarry and from them it has always been called the "Sparrow House."

In 1855 Mr. Crocker sold the entire plant to the Bangor & Piscataquis Slate Company who continued to operate it until about 1876 when it closed on account of unsettled business conditions. For many years William Williams was foreman of this quarry, but in 1865 a strike having occurred on a question of wages, he left and Joseph David took his place.

In 1871 the property was mortgaged to the Bangor Savings Bank, and seven years later the mortgage was foreclosed. In 1879 the mortgage was assigned to Judson Briggs who transferred it the following year to Joseph Story of Boston, who, two years later, took a partner, Sidney A. Wilbur, also of Boston.

In 1876 to 1890 the quarry stood idle; the Story and Wilbur sold to Norcross Bros. Of Worcester who operated one year under supervision of John Tripp of Abbot, then under Edward E. Williams of Brownville, and lastly under William Howse of Worcester, closing finally about 1912.

When in successful operation it produced about 12,000 squares of slate annually and employed 50 to 60 men. The first roofing slate taken from the quarry was used to slate the Hamblet barn.

In 1846 William Hughes and his associates opened the Merrill Quarry. The land comprising this quarry property is recorded as a 50-acre piece and a 6-acre piece, both owned by John Willard. William Williams and Benjamin Williams bought the 6-acre piece. The following year David Tillson and Asa Wilbur (the controlling slate importer of Boston) together bought the 50-acre piece. In 1848 Wilbur acquired Tillson's half-interest and made over one-fourth portion to William Hughes. William Hughes also bought the 6-acre piece of the Williams's and transferred his holding to Adams H. Merrill. The following year (1849) Mr. Merrill acquired title to the balance of the property. He also bought the Greenleaf homestead of Benjamin Williams, who, with his associates, had occupied it while they worked the quarry.

Soon after this William Hughes and Benjamin Williams removed to Fairhaven, Vermont. Also David Griffith, Evan Hughes and Robert Roberts, having become interested in the old strike, went to California with other young men of the locality. Mesach Jones, however, became foremen of the Merrill Quarry and remained so during the major part of its history.

Memories of a Brownville Junction Railroader
1963-1964
By Bill Sawtell

Gone were most of the starters of the Eastern Maine runners-up of the previous year: Larry Morrill, Billy Davis, Gary Larson, and Peter Meulendyke-big shoes to fill. In came Rodney Ross at the point, Allan Butterfield at right wing, Walter Farrar at high post, and David Brown at the other wing, with Lockhart at the low post running the baseline.

Bill Sawtell returned to play after two years to spell Farrar and Lockhart, much the same as Gerald Kirby came off the bench for Ross, Butterfield, and Brown. Other subs were Wayne Kirby, Bryan Artes, Walt Rendzia, and Art Stanhope.

The Railroaders continued to dominate the Central Maine League then consisting of East Corinth, Higgins, Hartland, and Corinna, as well as ourselves. Hartland's Chet "the Jet" Hubbard was an outstanding player and gave us fits at times. But Rodney Ross was able to shut him down.

A new opponent came on the scene that year and for that year only: Sumner, beating us 62-38 down there-perhaps the worst beating a Carroll Conley team ever received while he was at BJHS.

We avenged the lost in a wild one at home 73-63. Sumner was never scheduled again.

Our only other loss came on our Aroostook trip at Washburn when Tom Lockhart was out by injury. Bill Sawtell scored 16 points in his place but the boys from Cinder City went down to defeat, only to bomb Ricker 90-21 the next night. When we came to the YMCA on Sunday after returning in private cars from the trip, there were questions to be answered about our loss. Our fans weren't used to that.

We went into the tourney ranked fourth and defeated Lubec in the opener in a hard fought affair. But perhaps more important, was the loss of forward Allan Butterfield via a knee injury.

Yet we went on to bomb top ranked Mount Desert 85-51 in the semis setting the stage for the finals against big Gene Ellis (6''6') and his Searsport Vikings, who beat us 54-43.

I remember members of the 1959 championship team coming into the locker room at the Auditorium to encourage us before the game. But we were just not equal to the task. We lost the second of three straight Eastern Maine championship games..

More memories: I got a great thrill when I scored off Jack Brown at noontime on the outside basket and when I blocked a Dennis Larson shot while practicing with the 1967 state champs while I was teaching in Milo...The late Skippy Graham was a most passionate fan of the Railroaders...Those from away who played in the old BJHS gym never forgot the experience...Former Greenville coach said he put coal miners' hats on his boys to practice coming to the Junction court...I'll never forget seeing an East Corinth jayvee hit the beam on the east end on a foul shot.

The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy
Continued Part XV

Oh yes, and the ghost.

Year after year, the town treasurer’s books have carried a balance, a paper balance of $1320.13.  This account is inked in yearly on a neatly designed page under the heading of “Trustees of Ministerial and School Funds”

At one time that balance must have represented real money.  Where did it come from?  Where did it go to?  I am sure that custodians of the funds didn’t appropriate it to their own use.  I am not so sure that it didn’t go into the town treasury with all its other funds, to be applied against exigencies in some stringent time.  The ghost on its annual visitation offers no explanation.  And the town treasurer neatly inks in the balance from year to year, simply because it was there last year and nothing has happened since to warrant a revision of the account.

Milo’s public lands have long since been sold.  Ministers are paid now enough to live on – which they weren’t in the old days.  And we support our schools today at an annual figure which all the dues from grass and timber on the public lands, in the old days, couldn’t have equaled.  So that empty balance of $1320.13 solemnly entered on the treasurer’s books, year after year, probably need not keep our town’s corporate conscience tossing nights, unable to sleep!

All the same though, just out of curiosity, it would be intriguing to know just where that money did come from and what became of it.

I did mention the clerk’s book of the Trustees of Ministerial and School Funds, which is in the town office, along with the town clerk’s records back to 1823.  This clerk’s book is merely an account of annual elections held by the Board of Trustees from 1848 to 1875.

The first entry, in 1848, reads as follows:  “I hereby certify that seven days at least, prior to the 10th day of June, A.D., 1848, I called a meeting of the selectmen, town clerk, and town treasurer, of the town of Milo, constituting the trustees of the Ministerial and School Funds, in the town of Milo, to meet at my office in Milo on the 10th day of June, at 1 of the clock in the afternoon, and gave the selectmen, town clerk and treasurer, personal notice thereof.”

Such punctilio in respect to the rules of calling meetings could not but give confidence as to the meticulous execution of the provisions of dedication made when the public lands were set aside for the support of the ministry and of the schools.

The books last entry is a simple announcement of the election of officers of the Board of Trustees of Ministerial and School Funds, October 15, 1875.  The board’s officers were listed as M.L. Durgin, President; W.E. Gould, treasurer; and R. A. Monroe, clerk.

We return now again to the chronological events in the town’s school history.  Two items of importance appear in 1838:

1. Milo ceased to be a part of Penobscot County.  It became affiliated instead with Piscataquis County;

2. The town added District 7 (Tollbridge) to its roster of school districts.

The list of school agents now had one additional name.  This was the new complete list:  First District, Charles Ricker   ; 2nd, Phineas Tolman; 3rd, Henry Wilkins; 4th, John Shurborn (whose name was flagrantly misspelled through the years); 5th, P.P. Fowler; 6th, Levi Johnson; and 7th, Charles Foster.

Page 4

Page 5

The town raised $200 that year for the support of schools.

The year of 1838 was apparently a financially depressed time.  One indication of this was a vote to allow six per cent discount on taxes paid within thirty days of billing.  Another indication was a vote to instruct the several school agents “to agree” with the several instructors in the schools to wait for their pay “until the month of March next; and that the selectmen draw orders for instructors payable in March.”  (Since this was already March, and the instructions were to wait until NEXT March, it seemed, on the face of it, that the teachers’ pay was to be held up for a full year)!

At the next regular town meeting, April 8, 1839, the restlessness in district school lines, mention earlier, showed up in two articles in the town warrant.

In the first of these voters passed over the application “to see if the town will set off John Shurborn and William Sturtevant from District 4 to District 6.”

Voters approved the second article “to set off George Stanchfield from District 5 to District 2.”

In 1840 nothing of moment disturbed the serenity of school operation.  The town again raised $200 for the support of education.

A year later, however, the old restlessness was again tugging at the district lines.

At this meeting a committee, new in the records, made its appearance.  This was “The Committee on School Districts.”  Whether it was ad hoc or a permanent committee we have no way of knowing.  The time however was certainly ripe for some authoritative group to recommend carefully considered changes to district lines.

Stable district lines, alas, were still a long way off.

Voters, however, accepted the recommendation of this new committee.  The article read:  “That lots 100-101, belonging to District 2, with the occupiers of the same, be set off from District 2, and the same be annexed to District 6; and that lot 102, owned by William Newcomb, and lot No. 3 (103?), by William Sturtevant, and No. 104 – which belong to District 4, be set off from District 4, and the same be annexed to District 6.”

At this same meeting, a new district (No 8) was voted and then promptly exorcised to await reinstatement for more that a decade.

MORE LITTLE LEAGUE ACTION

That's Stephanie Vachon on first base for the Red Sox. Richie Russell  is the first baseman for the Braves, checking on his outfield players. Stephanie went on to score a run.....so in case her father missed her being on base......here she is! Great job Stephanie !

Shelby Jay gets ready to hit one over the fence.. Cody Howe is the catcher for the Braves.

Milo Free Public Library News
By Judith Macdougall

What a busy and exciting week at the Milo Free Public Library! This week, the second week of the summer reading program, the giveaways were cowboy hats and bandannas donated by our very generous Three Rivers Kiwanis Club. There were certainly lots of surprised and very happy little cowpokes selecting their cow-children (to be politically correct) hats ( two colors to choose from-red or blue both with sheriff stars) and also trying to make a choice among six colors of bandannas pegged out on a clothesline in the children’s area. Thank you very much, Kiwanians. I hope you see cowpokes around town dressed in your gifts .

Our mascot, Traveler, has garnered lots of comments too. All the children want to win him, but some children even more so than others. I have set Curious George on Traveler’s saddle for a more cozy look, but Curious George is a library mascot and will stay with us even after August 13. One little four year old checked the color of her hat, and then announced that a “ little girl with a red hat was going to win the horse”. She then elaborated more fully on what little girl she was talking about when she said, “I don’t want the monkey. Someone else can win the monkey, but I’m going to win the horse”. We wish they all could. Like the old nursery rhyme—“If wishes were horses” our wishes would be to be able to present every child with a horse mascot. Someone will win, and it could be any one of our summer reading program members.

Several weeks ago the library was given a large check by Ms. Esperanza Crackel to be used to purchase books in Helen Carey’s name. I chose to select books for the summer reading program as Helen , having been a teacher and a library trustee, strongly supported the program. I was able to purchase 47 books. They seemed like such an impressive collection that I piled them on the desk and took a picture of them. I sent the picture to Ms. Crackel to thank her again for her generous gift. This week I received a large box of books with some beanie babies in it too. Ms. Crackel had been to an estate sale and had purchased all their primary books-grades K-4th grade. She would be sending them to us in various shipments until we had received all 250 books! What a generous gift. Just the packing and shipping would be time-consuming and expensive. How lucky we are to have this benefactor who lives in Salinas, California think of our little library and want to contribute to our summer reading program.

Library Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Telephone 943-2612

 

IN MEMORIAM

GEORGIA D. ROYAL
MILO- Georgia D. Royal, 60, loving wife of Roland F. Royal for more than 43 years, died at her home June 23, 2004. She was born Oct. 11, 1943, in Brownville, the daughter of Arthur and Etta (Doane) Grant Sr. She was a loving wife, mother and grandmother. She enjoyed spending time at the ocean and especially enjoyed viewing and collecting lighthouse items. She is survived by her family who will have her forever in their hearts and are counting the days until they can be with her again. She is survived by her husband, Roland of Milo; three daughters, Robin and her husband, Jeffrey Fowle, of Mercer, Deborah and Richard Flagg

Page 5

Page 6

of Milo, Ann and her husband, Jeff Witham, of Brownville; five brothers, Arthur Jr. and his wife, Violet, Eugene and his wife, Rose, Terry and his wife, Marge, Stanley and his wife, Donna, Gary and his wife, Robbie; one sister, Jeannine Hayes and her friend, John Lohr; four grandsons, Brandon, Adam, Dylan, and Jeff Jr.; several nieces nephews and cousins; and sister-in-laws, Claire, and Virginia Grant and a very special sister-in-law, Helen (Grant) Henderson. She will be deeply missed by a special friend, Alta Noble. She was predeceased by four brothers, Keith, Martin, Buddy, and Edward.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Heart Association or the American Diabetes Association.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham

What does a day look, feel, and sound like when four old friends get together. That was one day last week for me and three of my old girlfriends....old being the operative word. My goodness how we laughed and how we yakked. We shopped, ate out in a Chinese Restaurant, sat in rocking chairs in their rented cottage on the ocean and generally enjoyed a leisurely day of visiting. We always share our ills and woes, too. If you can't share that stuff with your best friends.....who can you share it with? We all lament the aging process....that's always one of our big topics of conversation. We've managed to stay in-touch over all of these years (52 or 53 to be exact) and enjoy catching up on husbands, parents, kids, grand kids, jobs, illnesses, etc.

I left Milo at 6:30 a.m. for Boothbay Harbor. Arriving at 9:00 a.m. I found them all still in their nightclothes just drinking their first cups of coffee. The lazy bums. They certainly didn't think that I'd be arriving that early. The first thing we did was exchange birthday gifts. Joan had gotten me a little stuffed bear all dressed up in Red Hat Society clothing. It was the cutest thing I'd ever seen. Jane got me a sweet Red Hat pin....that I immediately pinned on my new Red Hat Society tee shirt that my boss had gotten me on her trip to Bar Harbor a week or two ago. Lorraine's gift was an adorable white animated teddy bear that was dressed in a beautiful purple velvet hat with netting and a big purple flower pinned to it. When you pressed the bear's paw and the mouth began to move and a song about love and friendship came out of the bear's mouth. She had bought one for each of us and we just loved them. I had taken the same gift for all of my friends....and even got one for myself...a box of note cards....Dick and Jane pictures on the fronts of the cards. We all loved our gifts and remember fondly Florence Decker teaching us to read those stories about Dick, Jane, and Sally, and Spot and Puff when we were in Kindergarten.

The trip to Boothbay gave me a chance to go to the Spruce Point Inn where my son's wedding is going to be in a couple of weeks. What a luxurious place!! My, my, my!

I was impressed. I wasn't sure just how to get there, so this gave me a chance to get my bearings and now I can make a little map to give to friends and relatives who will be attending the wedding from Milo. The girls took me to the hotel that we will be staying in, and I was able to confirm our reservations. That made me feel better.

Since the wedding is on a Friday night we will have the rest of the weekend to play on the coast. Our intention is to go out on my cousin's sailboat. The details of that day will no doubt be a topic for a future column. Let's hope it goes well. I've been known to spend more time throwing up over the rail of a boat out on the ocean than enjoying the scenery.

When did weddings get so complicated? Remember the good old days when couples from Milo got married at one or the other of the local churches and their receptions were at the Derby Community Hall? Jean Hanson made and

decorated many a beautiful wedding cake. Bob Jones, Eben DeWitt, Cecil Miller and Fern Cunningham played the standards for everyone to dance to. The Dorcus Guild from the Baptist Church catered. Bud Daggett made the punch....and you could either punch it up a notch or two...or not.

Everyone's wedding was pretty much a carbon copy of the next one, but nobody cared. I don't recall ever thinking that mine had to be better than any of my friends. Nor did it occur to me that it had to be unique. If I remember correctly, you pretty much wanted it to be just like everyone else’s wedding. In this day and age my wedding would cost considerably more than it did in 1970, but what the bride's parents pay for a wedding these days is out of reason.

I can't imagine why a bride would want to pay $10,000 (or more) for a wedding. Heck you could make a down payment on a house for that kind of money. One of the reasons that my son's wedding is on Friday night instead of Saturday was because of the difference in price between the two nights. Thousands of dollars were saved. That blows my mind! Whatever the cost, it's going to be a beautiful, beautiful wedding in a gorgeous setting and I'm going to have a blast!

It's great being mother-of-the-groom! My husband and I are responsible for the rehearsal luncheon. That in itself is a bit of an expense...but nothing compared to the wedding. It's going to be served in the dining room of the Inn at noontime the same day of the wedding. I'm having Frank's Bakery in Bangor make and decorate adorable wedding cookies. On each cookie will be the name of a member of the wedding party. The cookie will serve not only as a place card, but it will also be my table decoration and dessert. Pretty clever of me, don't you think? It was one of those brilliant ideas that I get...and then can't rest until I've made all the arrangements.

The clock is ticking down on the festivities. My nerves are getting frazzled. It's like that joke that you may have seen with a cartoon figure with her hair all totally frizzled out straight. She's got this horrid look on her face and the caption says, "I've got one nerve left and you're getting on it!" That's exactly how I feel. I guess I need to do some meditating.  That ought to work, right?

I guess I should try to spend some more time with my old girlfriends. They always make me feel great.

I made my famous Orange Salad yesterday. My family loves it. It's low fat and no sugar (or little sugar) so it's pretty good for you. I don't have it written down...only in my head, so bear with me.

1 container of cottage cheese (I used the low fat kind)
1 sugar free orange Jello
1 20 oz. pineapple tidbits - drained
1 can mandarin oranges - drained and rinsed (if you are afraid of sugar)
1 cup of Cool Whip (any type you want)
1 cup of mini-marshmallows (or less..or none at all if you don't want them)
1 handful of coconut

In a large bowl mix the cottage cheese and the Jell-O until it's well blended. Drain the fruit and add to the mixture. Stir in the cool whip, marshmallows and coconut. Spoon into a pretty serving dish and I put a few cherries on it to dress it up. It's really yummy!

Page 6

Page 7

Jeeter and Mike Harris are very HAPPY : This 9 month old pup has finally learned to swim. "Good Boy" were the secret words that not only convinced Jeeter to take up swimming but also "fetching" sticks from the Sebec River: Congratulations to both trainer and trainee! Jeter is the grand-dog of Murrel and Laurel Harris.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

REGULAR MEETING
     The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas. All are welcome to visit with us. If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application. We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would b

JUNE 30, 2004 MEETING MINUTES
SUBMITTED BY NANCY GRANT, SECRETARY

President Joe Zamboni organized a trip up the river for the 5th Wednesday of June.  Eight members and guests Charlie Stevens, Barb Hamlin, Kirby Robertson, Bob and Tanya Ellison, and Randy Walker made the leisurely 2 1⁄2-hour trip to the ‘rips’ during the evening.  We had the pleasure of watching a family of ducks sun themselves on a large log and spotted two loons a little farther up the river.  During the return trip we were treated to the sunset behind us and the almost full moon ahead of us.  Many thanks to Captain Ellison for his expert navigation and his expertise as a tour guide.   

Jeff Gahagan reported that the annual Kiwanis auction brought in approximately $8500 (before expenses).  This total includes money raised from the yard sale, auction, and food sales.  More details soon.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.

JULY 1968
6-Fair-64° at 7:10 am. and 88° at 3:30 pm.
7-Sunny am Fair pm-64° at 7:50 am.
8-Sunny-74° at 7 am and 70° at 9 pm.
9-Sunny windy Thundershowers after supper-98° at 3:30 pm.
10-Rain Clearing PM-74° at 7 am.
11-Sunny-66° at 6 am and 70° at 8:30 pm.

12-Sunny-90° at 4 pm.

WEBER GAS GRILL RAFFLE
MODEL SILVER B-36,000 BTU’’S VALUE-$495.00

TO BENEFIT THE  P.A.W.S. BUILDING FUND

1 TICKET-$1.00, 6 TICKETS-$5.00

Penquis Animal Welfare Sanctuary WOULD LIKE TO thank the MILO FARMER’S UNION FOR THEIR GENEROUS DONATION OF THE GRILL!!!!

DRAWING TO BE HELD FRIDAY, AUGUST 13TH AT 6:00 PM AT THE MILO FARMER’S UNION

TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE MILO FARMER’S UNION COURTESY BOOTH, WHERE YOU CAN ALSO PURCHASE YOUR COPY OF THE P.A.W.S.COOKBOOK, “COOKING WITH P.A.W.S”

Page 7

Page 8

WHAT'S NEW ON TRC

The newest addition to our site is the Alumni Section (www.trcmaine.org/alumni/).  This section is devoted to the three local alumni associations from Milo High School, Brownville Jct. High School, and Penquis Valley High School.  We will post any and all information that the associations want.  Currently, only the MHS page has information on.  If you are involved in any of the organizations and would like to give us some info, please contact us at info@trcmaine.org, or Izzy Warren at 943-7367.

This summer we are also offering an Online Farmers Market (trcmaine.org/community/farmers). We are looking for prices, directions, and contact info for anyone who sells home-grown produce.  This service is free of charge, and we hope to better promote the local farmers!  Please contact us if you would like your prices and items listed.

WE NEED YOUR HELP!

If you know any information about the Boston Post Gold-Headed Canes, or who the current holders are for the towns in our area, please contact us!  We are looking to create a new Landmark Feature!

K Y N U E N S U M M E R Q S
X Q F N Y D B U E X B G Y E
J H U Q J N M E M J J N G K
U J K Q P T G W M E T I H A
L E U F O S Y D W R J N T L
Y L J P D U Q E E J J N R R
Z K P A G G G E H K X A U D
U N U B G U T U S S Z T O E
F V T D O A X E M L C I F V
I N D E P E N D E N C E Y A
D K E U B H I K I N G V H T
F B S W I M M I N G R F M K
M Z Q G Y S U N C B E A C H
Y C E G H C A K T J C C Y N

INDEPENDENCE   SWIMMING  TANNING   AUGUST    HIKING    FOURTH    SUMMER     BEACH     LAKES     JUNE JULY SUN

Page 8

Print Issues: Copyright © 2001 - 2012 Three Rivers Kiwanis Club
Website: Copyright © 2002 - 2012 Three Rivers Community Alliance