Three Rivers News, 2004-07-26
MONDAY, JULY 26, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 38
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

THE WEBCAM IS UP AND RUNNING!!!!

THANKS TO THE TRASK INSURANCE AGENCY, YOU CAN GO TO http://www.trcmaine.org/webcam/  AND SEE WHAT IS GOING ON ALL THE WAY UP MAIN STREET IN MILO.  THE VIEW SHOWS HARMON’S TEXACO ON THE RIGHT.  THE LEFT OF THE VIEW STARTS WITH RED EARTH CAFÉ, THEN THE MILO FLOWER SHOP AND MILO TRUE VALUE.  THE VIEW DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA IS THE PARKING ACCESS TO TRASK INSURANCE AND SMALL TOWN VIDEO STORE.  OUT OF THE PICTURE AT THE FRONT RIGHT IS THE SWIFT RIVER HYDRO PLANT. BE SURE TO CHECK IT OUT !!!!


PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR OUR ANIMAL SHELTER AND GO TO THE MILO FARMERS UNION TO PURCHASE YOUR RAFFLE TICKETS FOR THE WEBER GRILL!

WEBER GAS GRILL RAFFLE TO BENEFIT P.A.W.S.

MODEL SILVER B-36,000 BTU’’S VALUE-$495.00

TO BENEFIT THE  P.A.W.S. BUILDING FUND

1 TICKET-$1.00, 6 TICKETS-$5.00

Penquis Animal Welfare Sanctuary would like to thank the Milo Farmer’s Union for their generous donation of the grill!!!!

The drawing will be held Friday, August 13th at 6:00 PM at the Milo Farmer’s Union.

Tickets are available at the Milo Farmer’s Union courtesy booth, where you can also purchase your copy of the P.A.W.S. cookbook, “Cooking With P.A.W.S”.

THE DRAWING IS GETTING CLOSE!! SHOW YOUR SUPPORT AND BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW!!


Penquis Valley High School
Class of 1999

5th Year Reunion/Social
at the SeaDog Restaurant, 
26 Front Street, Bangor (on the waterfront)
August 7, 2004 6pm
RSVP or questions? Please call 207-279-0179 or
email penquis99@hotmail.com
All are welcome! Hope to see you there!

The Milo Garden Club Summer Fair

will be held at PVHS on August 5,  from 11-2. Crafts, vegetables, perennials, plants, a "nearly new" table and food will be on sale. A luncheon, by donation, will also be available. Auction, raffle and door prizes are sponsored by the Milo Garden Club. Something for everyone to enjoy!!

Joanne DeWitt, contact person, 943-2486


 

HAPPY 1ST BIRTHDAY CHRISTOPHER

LOVE FROM MOMMY, DADDY, GRAMMY AND GRAMPY TREADWELL, AND NANA ALEACIA

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., JULY 27 SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS, PEAS, BREAD STICK, PEACHES
WED., JULY 28 BAKED FISH , MASHED POTATO, BEETS, PUMPKIN CHOC. CHIP COOKIE
THUR., JULY 29 BAKED STUFFED VEAL W/ROSEMARY SAUCE, MASHED SWEET POTATO, MIXED VEGGIES, FRUIT MUFFIN, GRAPENUT CUSTARD
FRI., JULY 30 SALISBURY STEAK, RED POTATOES, FRESH CARROTS, PEARS

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS.  WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM.
PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. 


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15 PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


RAFFLE RESULTS

The Brownville Recreation Committee held a Little League raffle drawing on Wednesday, July 14th. The winners were: 1st prize - $50 gift certificate to Moosehead Furniture to Theresa Lovejoy of Brownville Jct., 2nd prize - $20 gift certificate to C & J Variety to Alexis Larson of Milo, and 3rd prize - $20 gift certificate to Three Rivers Redemption to Maynard Emery of Brownville Jct. Congratulations winners.

Thank you to the businesses who donated the prizes and a BIG thank you to everyone who purchased tickets.

P.E.T.S. SPRING/SUMMER RAFFLE A HUGE SUCCESS

The P.E.T.S. (a local reduced cost spay/neuter organization) volunteers worked mostly outside through blazing sunny and misty damp days to sell raffle tickets from Bangor to Newport to Guilford. With the additional assistance from friends of P.E.T.S. and community support the organization raised well over $800 from ticket sales and donations. Two great prizes were donated – the “Weekend Getaway” from The Birches in Rockwood and a “Dinner for Two” from The Guilford Bed and Breakfast. The winner of the “…Getaway” is Val Coleman of Bangor and Denise Noll of Penobscot won the “Dinner for Two”. All of the monies raised go to assist individuals and families with the spaying and neutering of their companion animals and to continue work on “Our Community Project”. At the outset of the “….. Project” we targeted 54 animals to be spayed/neutered. There are 41 remaining. We are making progress.

                Our fund raising continues with a Summer/Fall Raffle. We have a beautiful full size handmade quilt by Cookie Farrar of Brownville Jct and machine quilted by Vicki Brackett of Quilting Mania. P.E.T.S. will be at Homecoming, August 7, Bowerbank Days, August 14 and Piscataquis Fair, August 28th with raffle tickets for this exquisite quilt.

                Anyone who would like to sponsor the neutering of a male cat, $22.50 or the spaying of a female cat, $35.00 or just make a donation in any amount may send checks to: P.E.T.S., P.O. Box 912, Guilford, Me. 04443. All donations are greatly appreciated and help to reduce the number of animals taken to shelters, most of which are euthanized or dumped in the woods or by the side of the road.

Baseball Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL

Choose the best answer.

1. Mickey Mantle came from (a) California (b) Texas (c) Michigan (d) Oklahoma

2. Ted Williams came from (a) Texas (b) California (c) North Dakota (d) Wyoming.

3, A baseball has (a) 84 (b) 100 (c) 108 (d) 176 stitches.

4. Jackie Jensen played in the (a) Cotton Bowl (b) NBA (c) Rose Bowl (d) Sugar Bowl.

5. He was afraid of (a) snakes (b) fish (c) subways (d) flying.

6. Gene Conley and Pumpsie Green took off for (a) France (b) Brazil (c) Iraq (d) Japan.

7. Carlton Willey last played for (a) the Braves (b) the Mets (c) the Red Sox (d) Lamoine.

8. Bill "Moose" Skowron was the Purdue (a) pitcher (b) quarterback (c) wide receiver (d) punter.

9. The youngest professional player was (a) Joe Nuxhall (b) Al Kaline (c) Frank Robinson (d) Ty Cobb.

10. Goats were once put in the (a) Detroit stadium (b) Los Angeles stadium (c) Kansas City stadium (d) Philadelphia stadium.

Answers: 1-d 2-b 3-c 4-c 5-d 6-c 7-d 8-d 9-a 10-c

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Memories of a Brownville Junction Railroader
1965-1966
BY BILL SAWTELL

Gone was the great center Tom Lockhart, Walt Rendzia, David Brown, Gerald Kirby, and Art Stanhope. New starters were Wayne Kirby, Bryan Artes, Cary Butterfield, Scott Kirby, and the great Denny Larson.

Led by Wayne Kirby, this team put a lot of points on the board. Wayne set a school record by scoring 46 against East Corinth. A tremendous athlete, Wayne could do it all. He could shoot and leap out of the building.

Dennis Larson was like a deer, another great athlete, with great body control, shooting the hook from either side.

The floor general, Scott Kirby was the best leaper of all. Bryan Artes was a great shot from the left wing and a steady player. Cary Butterfield was a fine leader of the younger teammates and grabbed boards, holding his own down low and in the pivot. He and Wayne Kirby were the only seniors in the starting five.

A promising Danny Sickler and George Harmon were on the bench. George went on to star at Foxcroft Academy and at Ricker College.

The Cinder City Boys defeated Searsport in the opening round at Bangor behind Wayne Kirby's 32 points, a BJHS tourney record, before bowing to Sumner in the semis. Danny Sickler gave a good account of himself off the bench that night, a sight of things to come.

Dennis Larson was much a self-made player, working long hours on his own, a la Wally Russell in later years. He had a great attitude and was very coachable. He evolved in a class , the Class of 1968 (the last class to graduate at BJHS), composed of several goal oriented athletes: Alan Kirby (valedictorian), Scott Kirby, Ray Heath, Butch Boobar, etc. These boys had intelligence and good chemistry and a certain esprit de corps, which would bring glory to their town the next year.

Bryan Artes, the current principal of PVHS in Howland, often played basketball in the Sawtell barn,  one of a few barns where many of the great Railroaders played.

A Book Review
SEABISCUIT An American Legend
By Laura Hillenbrand
399pp  New York 2001

If the movie is better, I'd like to see it. Bambi and Old Yeller have to take distant second and third places to this animal. The vicissitudes of the horse, the trainers, the jockeys, and the owners are so emotionally portrayed and the blow by blow descriptions and accounts of the races so heart throbbing that the reader's attention is maintained throughout.

Seabiscuit was a better-known figure in his day than even FDR, Hitler, or Mussolini. Having read the masterpiece, it's easy to understand why. Thoroughbred horseracing was a spiritual and financial uplifting force during the Great Depression., ands Hillenbrand explains why.

The protagonist's near wins and smashing victories alike were cause for tears to flow from this reader's eyes. The unique cast of characters made for entertaining reading as well.

Howland All Stars Win Brownville Rec Tourney 
BY BILL SAWTELL

Brownville Jct., July 24-Dean Bellatty and his ground's crew got up at 5:30 to get the field in playing condition after the downpour of the night before to host a four team Little League tournament here, with the top team in Old Town, and all star team from Howland, and two all star teams from the Brownville Rec League.

In the seventh and deciding game of the day, Adam Callender of the Howland All Stars gave his team the championship with a bases clearing drive to deep right center to defeat the Brownville I Team 2-1, after the Brownville Oners had taken the lead 1-0 in the top of the fourth.

Brownville I got good pitching from Kyle Larson and Derek Hibbs and good hitting by Hibbs throughout the well attended tournament played under clear skies.

Third Baseman Chad Badger was named MVP for Brownville I and Ian Champeon for Brownville II.

Tom Wallace threw the honorary first pitch, and Holly Witham did an excellent rendition of Our National Anthem.

As well as being named MVP of the Brownville II team, Ian Champeon won the home run hitting contest held between games.

The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy
Continued Part XVIII

The restlessness, mentioned earlier in regard to school district lines persisted for years.  In the special town meeting (of which there were many in those early years) of July 15, 1871, voters passed over an article to see if the town would annex District 3 (Hobbstown) to District 8 (Drake) and on what conditions.  Hobbstown was always a small school.

Again, in 1881, the restlessness manifested itself in a vote by the town “to set off Ira Weymouth and the real estate occupied by him from School District 2 (near the old Brockway Dairy Farm on the Medford Road), and annex same to District 4 (Stanchfield Ridge).

The Weymouth farm, Roy Monroe told me, was located where Gary Robinson today has his stable of race horses and practice race track, on the hill on the Lakeview Road, just before the entrance into the Ramsdell Road.  After Weymouth’s time, this was known as the Tolman Farm.  The forested summit of the hill, surrounded by the race track is still crossed by stones that were once neatly laid up on stone walls when the land was cultivated.

In 1882, voters passed over a significant article “to see if the town will establish a school district in part of District 9 (Billington Road and River Road) south of Bangor & Piscataquis Railroad and annex the remainder of District 9 to District 1 (Sargent Hill).

What was apparently intended by this defeated proposal was to centralize this new proposed District 9 nearer to Milo Junction (Derby) which had been growing up as the railroad flourished and to leave the few scholars near the corner of Billington and River Roads to go up to the Sargent Hill School.  This plan to centralize a school at Milo Junction, however, was destined to wait another quarter century before it was realized.  By that time Derby had grown quite a bit and the zeal for , and importance of, separate district were in process of being forgotten.

Returning again for a bit to the reversal of town policy in regard to permitting the withdrawal of school money:

On March 11, 1861, the town voted “to let Joseph Hamlin draw his proportion of school money from District 9 and expend it in some other place”.  It might well have been that the petitioners had already explained to the voters what they proposed to do with the money but officially there were no strings attached to approval of the proposal.

Again in 1870, it was voted “to allow Henry W. Hobbs to draw his proportion of school money and expend it in some other place.”

A year later by a similar, apparently unanimous vote, the town permitted Samuel W. Frost to draw his proportion of school money from District 5 and expend it in District 8.

The last noted record of this strange , individual latitude accorded with regard to school money, as expressed in the town records, was in 1882 when the town voted “to allow J. W. Buker to

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draw his proportional share of school money and expend it in a school at his home.”

Thereafter, either district lines were becoming more stable or the voters were becoming more firm in regard to their concept of the block use of school money, or citizens were philosophically resigned to the proposition of leaving the schools as they were.

Good education, apparently, is not a byproduct of modern buildings, flush toilets, drinking fountains, heated buses or plenteous free textbooks.  The pupils of long ago had none of these.  Schoolhouses were cold, discipline was firm, if not downright stern, pupils paid for their own textbooks and they got to school, as Edith While told me, “the best way they could”.

School districts possessed a great deal of self-rule, were coddled very little and were admonished not to expect too much in the way of assistance from the town.

A case in point was the disposition of the old tollhouse at the equally old tollbridge on lower Elm St. right where the present bridge is.

Payment of tolls to pass over the bridge had long been a bone of contention at town meetings.  Every year there was an article in the warrant proposing to allow residents to pass over the bridge freely.  After being voted down many times, the proposal got enough votes to win, leaving payment for the bridge for someone else to think about.

It also left the tollhouse as quite surplus property.

Now evidently the schoolhouse in District 7, right by the bridge, was pretty badly in need of repairs, a fact that had already been mentioned.  Residents of the district, therefore, began to cast lustful eyes on the tollhouse, which wouldn’t do anyone any good just standing there.  It could well be used as a schoolhouse, maybe a free one.  So, in 1873, the district asked for it as a gift from the town.

But the town, on its ungenerous part, voted at the next town meeting, to sell the tollhouse to District 7 for $25.  This was a lot of money at that time, but evidently the offer was gratefully accepted, for no further mention was made in the records of inadequate school housing in District 7.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
by Kathy Witham

The fairy tale wedding is behind us, and what a day it was!!!   Mr. Schmoopy finally has a Mrs. Schmoopy.  Those two are so much in love that it made me weep...more than once throughout the whole day of the wedding. 

The day started out dismal and foggy.  My hubby and I had checked into the Holiday Inn in Bath...the reason we were so far away from the wedding will be explained later in the story...on Thursday evening.  We had traveled through rain most of the way to Bath, and the car looked like we had just come off the camp road.  I was ashamed of it.  Finding no car wash on Friday morning, that we could see from Route One that is,  we went directly to The Spruce Point Inn in Boothbay Harbor and hid our car out in the back.  I felt like the Clampetts arriving in that filthy car...but it couldn’t be helped. 

We unloaded the flowers and the beautiful cookies that we had brought from home for the rehearsal luncheon, and turned our back on the old bomb and never looked back.  The weather had decided to turn sunny...and it remained the best day of the summer that we’ve experienced so far.  We lucked out!!!  The luncheon was elegant.  Eighteen guests joined the bride and groom in a tasty luncheon in a pretty little private dining room right in the Inn.  The groom’s cake, that had been generously made by one of the bride’s neighbors, was served for dessert .  I am going to get the recipe for that cake and share it, as it was beyond a doubt the tastiest cake I have ever eaten.  It was a rich chocolate with some kind of raspberry layer and then another cream layer and the whole thing was frosted in a hard shell type chocolate frosting.  The top was decorated like a tuxedo....very appropriate...just adorable.

As we were rehearsing we noticed our good friends the Mulherins, the groom’s God parents)   had arrived and were checking in.  We were anxious to get a good long visit in with them as we hadn’t seen them for about two years.  They had been lucky enough to book the Admiral’s Quarters, and the suite lived up to it’s name.  What a lovely room...or rooms as the case was.  We brought our dress-up clothes up to that room to change into, and then spent the rest of the afternoon reminiscing with our dear old friends.  Isn’t it amazing how old friends can just pick up where they left off without skipping a beat!

A quick change of clothing and we were ready to roll at 6:00 for the wedding.  I was totally overwhelmed by the number of guests who attended and shared this happy occasion with all of us.  Two families blended into one now....forever bonded by those kinds of strings that forever connect friends and families and former strangers.

Much laughter and many tears cemented that union.  I’ve never seen a happier bride or groom.  They are so blessed. 

The evening proceeded just like most evening weddings do, with picture taking, receiving lines, dances, refreshments, toasts, cake cutting, garter and bouquet tossing, and all the things you would expect .  The unexpected at this reception was the thoroughly enjoyable slide show that the bride and groom had put together for all the guests to see.  Flashed upon the wall in both black and white and color was the story of our life....put to music...my husband and I as a bride and groom, our children, our grandchildren, my beloved parents, our family friends.   The bride’s family got their share of photo’s, too, of course.  Then there were the wonderful photos of the bride and groom and the progression of their courtship.   It was amazing, and my favorite part of the festivities.

It was a grand occasion , in a beautiful setting, and it couldn’t have happened to a better couple.  We couldn’t be happier for them.  They’ve got lots to look forward to, and we wish them God speed.

The day after the wedding found us joining the cousins and our beloved Lori and John on a beautiful sailboat out in the briny deep!  YIKES!!  Staying up until the wee hours, I’d had little sleep to begin such an adventure.  My first order of business after arriving at Robinhood Marina in Georgetown (hence the decision to stay in Bath), was to have a nice little nap in the vee-berth of the boat.  Lulled by the rhythm of the waves, I slept peacefully.  The raucous laughter of the ship mates was drowned out by the humming of the motor as we headed out towards the sea.  We did enjoy the tour of the coast, and we learned lots about tacking and swells and Bonine....needed for the queasy stomachs that ensued.  I had a wonderful time...but me thinks that land lubber would better describe this sailor.

Home again-home again-jiggedy jig....glad to be back with all of my memories of a long awaited wedding.  The best news for me, though, was my cousin’s daughter, Michelle,  will be married next May in Ogunquit...how nice is that gonna be?  Stay tuned!

Joan made a wonderful Fruit and Pasta Salad  for our shipboard dinner.

1 and 1/2 cups uncooked small shell pasta

11 oz. can mandarin oranges, drained

8 oz. can of pineapple tidbits, drained

1 cup halved grapes (green or red)

1 - 6 oz. container of lemon yogurt

1 Tbsp. sugar

1 cup halved strawberries

Mix All ingredients except the strawberries.  Chill for 1 to 2 hours to blend flavors.  Just before serving add the strawberries.

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Free Public Library News
By Judith Macdougall

We have received new adult books which I am going to list in this column. I think the most looked for book is the latest Stephanie Plum by Janet Evanovich, Ten Big Ones. We now have it. We have also had lots of inquiries for the newest Marcia Willett. She had written several our patrons had enjoyed , and they were eagerly awaiting more. The Children’s Hour is her latest and we have it. Now for the rest.

Brown, Dan                   ANGELS AND DEMONS
Brown, Dan                   DIGITAL FORTRESS
Caldwell, Ian                   THE RULE OF FOUR
Chamberlain, Diane                HER MOTHER’S SHADOW
Chesney, Marion                                     HASTY DEATH
Chevalier, Tracie             GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING
Chevalier, Tracie                                     VIRGIN BLUE (paperback)
Coulter, Catherine                                     BLOWOUT
Dalton, Sharron NF                                     OUR OVERWEIGHT CHILDREN
Donnelly, Jennifer                                     A NORTHERN LIGHT
Harpaz,Beth                                     FINDING ANNIE FARRELL
Hannah, Kristen                                     THE THINGS WE DO FOR LOVE
Hatcher, Robin                                     LEGACY LANE (Christian)
Haruf, Kent                                     EVENTIDE
Hosseini, Khaled                                     THE KITE RUNNER
King, Stephen                                     SONG OF SUSANNAH (Dark Tower VI)
Koontz, Dean                                     THE TAKING
Lowell, Elizabeth                                     THE COLOR OF DEATH
Macomber, Debbie                                     THE SHOP ON BLOSSOM STREET
Meier, Leslie                                     STAR SPANGLED MURDER
O”Dell, Tawni                                     COAL RUN
Reichs, Kathy                                     BARE BONES
Reichs, Kathy                                     FATAL VOYAGE
Reichs, Kathy                                     MONDAY MOURNING
Scottoline, Lisa                                     KILLER SMILE
Spindler, Erica                                     SEE JANE DIE
Truss, Lynne NF                         EATS, SHOOTS AND LEAVES

I’m sorry I haven’t had a column in the last two issues of the paper, but as Val noted last week I was on vacation. I did send her two columns, only one of which she received. She took the blame feeling she may have lost the second column that was a list of books (included in this issue somewhere I think), but I don’t think she ever received it. A mistake on my part, I’m sure.

We were down south in VA and NC visiting our sons, Arthur and Malcolm and families. For those of you who know them, they are all fine. Walter and I had another little adventure in the wilds (probably an exaggeration) of NC for those of you who remember the family canoe trip of last summer. This time Walter and I were alone. We had dined with friends in Linville and were on the way back to our motel in Boone at 10:45 p.m. About half way there, 15 minutes out of Linville, we were stopped in a line of cars as we watched police, ambulances and emergency vehicles go by in the other lane. Some cars turned back, but we did not know the area so we waited-a good hour. Finally an official came along and said the roads would be blocked for several more hours. He suggested an alternate route to Boone and gave us quick, efficient directions. Unfortunately he forgot to mention that there would be up to 20 miles between his check points! We turned back and took the road to Banner Elk confidently, but we suddenly found ourselves going down a mountain that we didn’t know we were on. Switchback after switchback, we couldn’t believe we were on the right road. However, every once in awhile we would spot several cars coming up the other way so we were assured . It was kind of unnerving to be traveling unknown NC mountain roads at midnight, but it was an adventure! And we had a lot to be thankful for---it was not raining, we had plenty of gas, Malcolm’s jeep took tight mountain turns well and we were not in the accident. We got back safely to our motel at 1:15 a.m. We were grateful to be “home” !

Meanwhile back at Reading Ranch, Pam and Nancy kept the library going and wonderful community readers came in as scheduled to handle the Story Time. On June 30 Debbie Knapp read and provided milk and cookies to her little group. On July 7 Melanie Hussey read, on July 14 Jane Jones conducted the Story Time, On July 21 Neil Hamlin read to a large group. Neil had bought two

juvenile books to read in his turn and then presented the books to the library. They were The Waterfall’s Gift and The Camping Spree of Mr. Magee. Thank you, Neil. Our thanks to all of you busy people, teachers, a lawyer and our town manager, for taking time from your day to show the children how important reading is and to show them how much pleasure you feel reading can give to them. We also thank parents and grandparents who bring the children to Story Time as it takes two---a reader and listeners to make a successful Story Time. We thank all of you.

Library Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Telephone 943-2612 

A Historical Review
District School House,
from the journal of Ida Louise Snow Perkins, Castine Normal School, 1877.
[My grandmother was then a resident of Medford Center, Maine.]
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2004)

Foreword: "Your home is your refuge. Surround yourself with what you love, whether it's family, pets, keepsakes, music, plants, or hobbies. Our family is busy compiling our family history along with photographs. The following is a part of that collection."

School House -- Entry across the front, 1 for boys and 1 for girls. Entry also have partition across by door to prevent snow & rain on wardrobe. On heating -- one large stove in front room in the coldest corner. One funnel passing inside half way across the back. Wood box holding days supply. Stove to have a zinc or tin partition to prevent extreme heat or radiation burning of clothes. Also to secure circulation of air. Cold air box to open under the stove during school time, closed when pupils are out, tend until the room is warm in the morning. Chimney to have two flues, for impure air one at the bottom always open, at top to occasionally allow impure air to pass off and surplus heat. For further ventilation use boards, narrow, to feed in on sides where wind blows.

Necessary apparatus for school room. Blackboard, erasers and chalk. Books, globe, map of U.S., thermometer, clock. Other maps if possible.

One of the subjects recommended -- Language can be taught at all times and in all places. 100,000 words were used by Shakespeare. Children speak what they hear... the necessity of hearing good language. The good of objects lessons it gives them ideas, thought, language. Compositions commence at an early age.

Motto: "Never write upon a subject until you have read yourself full of that subject."

METHODIST CHURCH NEWS
BY CAROLYN SINCLAIR

Our Strawberry Festival was a huge success and I want to thank all that made it happen. A big thank you to everyone, from those who picked and prepared the berries to those who washed the dishes and the final clean up.

We had a great crowd show up and really appreciate the support from our community.

Again thank you to all who made it so successful.

Vacation Bible School will take place from 9 AM to
Noon each day from starting August 16th-20th. All children in
the community are invited to attend.

CARD OF THANKS

The family of GEORGIA ROYAL would like to express their sincere thanks to everyone who offered their love, support, prayers, food, flowers, cards or stopped by during the loss of our loved one. Georgia was our best friend and a friend to all. She touched a lot of lives and was loved by all who knew her. A very

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special thank you to all our friends and neighbors on Clinton St. for your love and support. And we also thank you for the generous donation that was made. We sincerely appreciate all that you have done.

IN MEMORIAM

WINNIFRED J. BISSELL BIDDEFORD - Winnifred J. Bissell, 69, of York Manor, died on Tuesday, July 20, 2004, at Southern Maine Medical Center, following a brief illness. She was born August 18, 1934, in Brownville, the daughter of John and Mary Ann Mitchell Ellis and was educated in Brownville Jct. schools. She attended Beals Business College in Bangor. On April 11, 1948, she married Gordon A. Bissell in Brownville. He died on March 28, 2000. Surviving are six sons, Edward Bissell of Rochester, N.H., Paul Bissell of Sanford, Scott Bissell of Shapleigh, Richard Bissell of Springvale, Norman Bissell of Sanford, and Gordon R. Bissell of Springvale; three sisters, Betty Cassidy of El Paso, Texas, Janette Elsmore of Bangor, Blodwen Treworgy of Brewer; 12 grandchildren; one great-granddaughter; one great-grandson; and several nieces and nephews. There will be no calling hours or funeral services. Burial will be in Gordon Cemetery in Searsport.

MILO NATIVES BICYCLING ACROSS AMERICA
Submitted by Phil Gerow

Russell Carey, social studies instructor at Penquis Valley High School in Milo, and his son Ian, a junior at the same school, are spending their summer on an “America By Bicycle” program from Oregon to Maine.  The 50-day trip takes them through the upper states of the United States and into Canada.

On June 18 Russell’s wife Vikki drove with them to Manchester, New Hampshire.  Russell and Ian flew to Portland, Oregon then drove to Astoria, Oregon where they met with 30 or so individuals also participating in the trip.  While there they dipped their bicycles in the Pacific Ocean.  They began their 50-day trip across the country on June 20.

Ian Carey holds the bicycles in the Pacific Ocean before the start of their trip to the East Coast.

The Carey’s found out about the program through the internet.  Vikki said is was something Russell has always wanted

to do.  He and their daughter Alyson had done some bicycling in earlier years but going cross-country was his dream.

Russell Carey stands with the bicycles with the Pacific Ocean in the background.

The group starts their day by having breakfast together and getting their cycling hints for the day.  They meet up again at their motel in the next stop to have supper and get ready for the following day.

Russell said there are many people who enter and leave the tour at different spots, depending on the amount of time they wish to spend on their bikes.  He said they travel approximately 75 to 80 miles per day.  They are given a 40-page rider kit, which contains all the information needed.  It includes recommended items for the trip.

In the brochure, they are told that the fantasy of crossing the country on a bicycle and reality of doing it are two completely different things.  But they can be sure of one thing; it will be something they’ll remember for the rest of their lives.  “It’s not all fun and games and some days can be real work.  Don’t think the whole ride will be in sunshine on tree-lined roads with no traffic and birds singing as you pedal along, letting your mind wander.”

They were told that the weather is an unknown variable and can have a profound effect on any day.  Typically, we have a few days of rain, but you should expect to ride in all kinds of weather conditions, most of which, if you were home, you might not ride in.  You should also expect to ride in places you might not normally go, like highways and busy city streets.  These situations will expand your comfort zone and make you a better rider.  It’s all part of the total package of riding cross-country.

We’re not telling you this to discourage you from taking this challenge, but you should be prepared by knowing what to expect.  Thousands of riders, with almost all ability levels, have crossed the nation in these conditions every year without a problem.  So there’s no reason, if you’re fit and have the right attitude, you can’t enjoy the experience of a lifetime.

Ian and Russell are shown at the Continental Divide in Wyoming.

Their schedule began in Astoria on June 21.  They traveled 69 miles to St. Helena.  As of this writing they should be in Wisconsin Dells.  The following is a list of their latter schedule with miles traveled.

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Day 36-Ludington, Michigan
Day 37-Mount Pleasant, 115
Day 38-Birch Run, 75
Day 39-Port Huron, 89
Day 40-London, Ontario, Canada, 76
Day 41-Brantford, 64
Day 42-Niagara Falls, New York, 72
Day 43-Niagara Falls, day off for rest and relaxation
Day 44-Henrietta, New York, 80
Day 45-Syracuse, 83
Day 46-Little Falls, 85
Day 48-Brattleboro, Vermont, 81
Day 49-Manchester, New Hampshire, 85
Day 50-Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 60
Day 51-Kittery, Maine

After reaching Portsmouth, the bikers will dip their bicycles in the Atlantic Ocean.  Then it’s ‘head for home’ time where Vikki will pick them up in Kittery.

In those 51 days of bicycling, they will have traveled 3,622 miles through some of the most beautiful country in the world.  Russell and Ian have kept in constant contact with Vikki and have sent some fabulous pictures.  Hopefully, on their return, they will be willing to do some public speaking and picture shows.  We look forward to it.

We are planning a ‘Shower of Cards” for Russell and Ian when they reach Syracuse, New York.  Their address is:

Russell and Ian Carey
C/o America By Bicycle
Holiday Inn
100 Farrell Road
Syracuse, NY  132209

Please send your cards and letters as soon as possible.

Let’s give them some really great notes of appreciation for what they are doing and for putting Milo on the map!

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.

JULY – AUGUST 1980
27-Rain-65° at 1 pm.
28-Fog Cloudy-84° at 2 pm.
29-Cloudy showers after 4 pm-82° at 12.
30-Cloudy awhile sunny-85° at 3 pm.
31-M windy-78° at 12.
1-Sunny-82° at 12.
2-Fog cloudy, sunny then clouding up-90° at 3 pm.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS

CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to eat breakfast, enjoy fellowship, hear speakers on various interesting topics, and to share ideas.  All are welcome to visit with us.  If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application.  We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them.

JULY 21, 2004 MEETING MINUTES

President Joe Zamboni greeted sixteen members this morning.

Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance and Joe requested thoughts for those in need.

Fred and Lois Trask will celebrate their wedding anniversary on July 26.

Four happy dollars were donated for raising money through the Humble Farmer show and coming to breakfast.

Val Robertson reported that The Three Rivers News is fine and dandy!

Joe told us that the utility pole is ready to be set in at the gazebo site.

It was reported that the Humble Farmer show entertained a small group.

The club has been approached to sponsor a snowmobile drag race on grass, possibly in October.

The Dover-Foxcroft Kiwanis Club expressed interest in renting the large tent used at the annual auction.  It was recommended that they contact Susan Worcester as the tent is used in conjunction with the Penquis Cruizers.

A senior barbeque is planned for July 28 at Quarry Pines beginning at 4:30 pm.

The Installation of Kiwanis Officers for 2004-2005 will take place on Friday, September 24, 2004 at the Milo Town Hall.  The social hour is 5-6 with supper served at 6 pm.

Sandra Gray introduced our guest speaker, Andrea Beaudoin. 

Andrea has been a member of the local community for two years.  She holds a license in massage therapy and is the proprietor of the Red Earth Café. 

Andrea told us that the mind, body, and spirit are all connected.  What affects one also affects the other two.  She uses polarity therapy, which enhances energy in the body, to relieve aches, pains, and tension.  Cranio-sacral therapy is used for the spine and body.  Andrea works with individuals to discover what their body is trying to communicate.  She has helped many people gain relief from migraine headaches through her therapy techniques.  If there are underlying factors such as allergies, more time and therapy may be needed for relief.

She has studied anatomy and physiology and believes that tight muscles may keep the body out of alignment.  Andrea said that she has a gentler way of massage than chiropractors.

Her therapy business is building and at this time she is booked a week or so in advance.  She did inform us that she has separate phone numbers for her therapy and café.  To schedule a massage session you can call her at 943-5666.  The fee for 1-1⁄2 hours of massage therapy is only $50.

Thank you Andrea.  It’s good to know that relief is only a phone call away.

MID-MAINE TAE KWON DO

Web page: downtownme.com/midmainetkd

Owned and operated by Bill and Karen Goodman.  Both are certified 2nd Degree Black Belts offering traditional lessons in MOO Duk Kwon Do, street smart self defense instruction, sparring techniques, and much more.  Family discounts and private instructions are available, offering lessons for adolescents, teens, and adults.  There is a “Tiny Tiger” program for children ages kindergarten through 2nd grade.  They are continually accepting new students.  Located on the 2nd floor of the Milo Town Hall.

E-mail us at: Midmainetkd@yahoo.com
Bill & Karen Goodman
(207) 943-3073.

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WHAT'S NEW ON TRC

The newest addition to our site is the Alumni Section (www.trcmaine.org/alumni/).  This section is devoted to the three local alumni associations from Milo High School, Brownville Jct. High School, and Penquis Valley High School.  We will post any and all information that the associations want.  Currently, only the MHS page has information on.  If you are involved in any of the organizations and would like to give us some info, please contact us at info@trcmaine.org, or Izzy Warren at 943-7367.

This summer we are also offering an Online Farmers Market (trcmaine.org/community/farmers). We are looking for prices, directions, and contact info for anyone who sells home-grown produce.  This service is free of charge, and we hope to better promote the local farmers!  Please contact us if you would like your prices and items listed.

TRC COMMUNITY CALENDAR


WORD SEARCH

If you have word ideas for the word search, please send them to us!  Either use our email, or just get them to Val.


WE NEED YOUR HELP!

If you know any information about the Boston Post Gold-Headed Canes, or who the current holders are for the towns in our area, please contact us!  We are looking to create a new Landmark Feature!

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Website: Copyright © 2002 - 2012 Three Rivers Community Alliance