Three Rivers News, 2004-08-02
MONDAY, AUGUST 2, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 39
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

THE WEBCAM IS UP AND RUNNING!!!!

THANKS TO THE TRASK INSURANCE AGENCY, YOU CAN GO TO http://www.trcmaine.org/webcam/  AND SEE WHAT IS GOING ON ALL THE WAY UP MAIN STREET IN MILO.


Penquis Women’s Alumni Softball Tournament
@ Davis Field in Brownville Jct.
SATURDAY-AUGUST 14th (rain date Aug. 15th)
Looking for Alumni players and current High School stars!
$10.00 per player Teams will be picked accordingly.....double elimination games.  Other contests to be played as well. Deadline to sign up: Aug. 10th.  Sign up to be on a team with any of the following people:
Jean Larson: 943-7760, Arielle Sickler: 965-8500, cell:631-9335,e-mail: arielle2003@yahoo.com, Marilyn Lyford: 943-2342, e-mail: trucking@midmaine.com,Erin Weston 947-1999 ,email: eweston@midmaine.com


Penquis Valley High School Class of 1999

5th Year Reunion/Social  at the SeaDog Restaurant,  26 Front Street, Bangor (on the waterfront) .August 7, 2004 6pm  RSVP or questions? Please call 207-279-0179 or

email penquis99@hotmail.com

All are welcome! Hope to see you there!


WEBER GAS GRILL RAFFLE
TO BENEFIT THE  P.A.W.S. BUILDING FUND
1 TICKET-$1.00, 6 TICKETS-$5.00

Penquis Animal Welfare Sanctuary would like to thank the Milo Farmer’s Union for their generous donation of the grill!!!!

The drawing will be held Friday, August 13th at 6:00 PM at the Milo Farmer’s Union.

Tickets are available at the Milo Farmer’s Union courtesy booth, where you can also purchase your copy of the P.A.W.S. cookbook, “Cooking With P.A.W.S”.

THE DRAWING IS GETTING CLOSE!! SHOW YOUR SUPPORT AND BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW!! EVERY PENNY OF THE RAFFLE MONEY GOES TO THE SHELTER BUILDING FUND SO THIS IS A PERFECT WAY TO DONATE TO P.A.W.S. AND HAVE A CHANCE TO WIN AN AWESOME GRILL!!!

PLEASE BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!!!!

OLD AMERICAN THREADS
ANNIVERSARY SALE

AUG. 3RD TO AUG. 7TH .
10 % OFF BOOKS, FABRIC, ANTIQUES, AND COLLECTIBLES.
HOURS: TUES.-FRI., 10AM-4PM.
SAT.- 9AM-12 NOON


CORRECTION:Please note the correct zip code to send a card to Russell and Ian Carey

Their address is:

Russell and Ian Carey
C/o America By Bicycle
Holiday Inn
100 Farrell Road
Syracuse, NY  13209

Please send your cards and letters as soon as possible. Let’s give them some really great notes of appreciation for what they are doing and for putting Milo on the map!


BROWNVILLE REC’S CHAMPS

The Howland Recreational Departments Team won the tournament held in Brownville the weekend of July 23rd and 24th. Anthony Batchelder (bottom photo)was chosen as their MVP,  getting on base all 8 times up to bat and only allowing one run when he pitched.

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., AUG. 3 BAKED HAM, BAKED POTATO, CARROTS, PEARS
WED., AUG. 4 BROCCOLI QUICHE, BEETS, TOSSED SALAD, FRUIT WHIP
THUR., AUG. 5 SLICED TURKEY, POTATO SALAD, 3-BEAN SALAD, CRANBERRY SAUCE, PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE
FRI., AUG. 6 HOMEMADE BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, COLE SLAW, BROWN BREAD, BROWNIES
MON. AUG. 9 COLD PLATE W/ HAM SALAD SANDWICH, BEET AND ONION SALAD, CALICO SLAW, STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS.  WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM.
PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. 


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15 PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


August 14, 2004: American Legion Post #92 in Brownville Jct. will hold their annual yard sale on Saturday, Aug 14 from 9 AM to 1 PM at the Legion Hall at 75 Railroad Ave (formerly Main Street).

 Rain or Shine.

Proceeds will benefit the Post's Scholarship Fund.

 

Tom Wallace throwing the honorary first pitch at the Brownville Rec Little League Tournament last Week.

BROWNVILLE REC. ALL-STAR TEAM

My Apologies

In last week's coverage of the Brownville Little League Tournament I mistakenly identified the singer of Our National Anthem as Holly Washburn Witham when it should have been Holly Beaulieu, who has graciously given us a stirring rendition before a number of games this season. My apologies to Holly Beaulieu and the readers.
Bill Sawtell

Memories of A Brownville Junction Railroader
1966-1967 State Champs!!!!

The only senior on this team was the manager, Billy Perry. Denny Larson, Lewis Boobar, Alan Kirby, Danny Sickler, and Scott Kirby were the starters-all juniors. Sophomore Tim Buchanan was Number Six man. Whatever happened to Gene Brown in the mix I can't remember. Ray Heath and Mike Cail were on the bench.

Larson was one of the greatest players in BJHS history and proved it throughout the season. and the tournament and the state championship game when he scored 27 points.

Scott Kirby was the floor general and was the best leaper in the practices when players made scratches on the balcony wall with chalk with weights on their hips. He was known as "Mr. Cool," and earned his reputation in the Sumner game the next year in Bangor by calmly sinking two free throws in overtime ( or to send the game into overtime).

Alan Kirby was class valedictorian and had vacuum cleaner hands on defense and could hit the 20 footer from the right wing to keep defenses honest. He replaced senior Bryan Artes in the starting lineup, who opted not to play that year to concentrate on his grades for college acceptance.

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Lewis Boobar was a workhorse down low and set a school rebounding record. He went on in life to obtain a Ph.D., before passing away a few years ago.

Danny Sickler was another of those great shooters from the left wing, like Bryan Artes and Gary Larson.

Tim Buchanan was an up and coming fine jump shooter, who could have started for almost any other school. He went on to start the next season and at Penquis.

It had been a tradition in the spring at BJHS to have intramurals with six teams, having the starters of the varsity as captains of five teams and the faculty as another team. But when this particular junior class was in the eighth grade, Mr. Conley chose to take the time to work with them in the gym after school instead of holding intramurals.

And it paid dividends.

The 1966-1967 team lost only one regular season game (to Higgins 48-47) and a Christmas Tournament game in North Anson (to Madison 66-64 on a last-second shot), going on to win the Eastern Maine Tournament and beat Old Orchard in the state finals in Lewiston.

In that game Dennis Larson scored 27. But Railroader fans will most remember the two free throws by Alan Kirby in the waning seconds that gave the boys from Cinder City the win 56-55 and the celebrating that followed-one of the happiest days in this writers life- a day we had waited for eight years since the Railroaders lost in that same Lewiston Armory in 1959 to Freeport with sick Bill Bellatty and those three straight losses in the Eastern Maine finals in the mid-1960s.

(My old friend Tony Hamlin brought the glory back to the area 33 years later at Penquis.)

Lake View Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL

Choose the best answer.

1. (a) Dr. Carde (b) Dr. Bundy (c) Dr. Johnson (d) Dr. Larrabee was the first doctor at Lake View.

2.`(a) Charlie Chessa was an expert (a) blacksmith (b) cook (c) scaler (d) fireman.

3. Lake View had the most modern (a) mill (b) store (c) hospital (d) school in the county.

4. 29, 36, and 41 were (a) boardinghouse room numbers (b) passenger train numbers (c) woods camp numbers (d) phone numbers.

5. (a) F.W. Hamlin (b) E.M. Hamlin (c)Neil Hamlin (d) Ash Hamlin located Lake View.

6. (a) F.W. Hamlin (b) E.M. Hamlin (c) Ash Hamlin (d) Omar Hamlin ran the boardinghouse.

7. F.W. Hamlin (b) E.M. Hamlin (c) Omar Hamlin (d) Ash Hamlin ran the mill store.

8. F.W. Hamlin (b) E.M. Hamlin (c) Omar Hamlin (d) Ash Hamlin announced the mill's closing in 1925.

9. The telephone line repairman was (a) FW. Hamlin (b) Harry Hamlin (c) Omar Hamlin (d) Ash Hamlin.

10. Fred Canney managed the (a) tennis court (b) railroad station (b) silent movies (d) boardinghouse kitchen.

Answers to Lake View Trivia:
1-b 2a 3-d 4-c 5-a 6-c 7-c 8-b 9-b 10-b

ANNUAL QUILT SHOW

The Monday Morning Quilters will be having their 6th Annual Quilt Show on August 14th from 9am-3pm. at the Brownville Junction United Methodist on the corner of Front Street and Railroad Ave  in the Junction. (The first white church on the right after passing under the railroad tracks.) We welcome any quilts that anyone would like to enter in our show. You may contact Nora Roberts at 965-7371 if you have any questions or to make

arrangements for drop off. You may contact the Quilters any Monday at the church between 9am and 3pm. Stop in or call the church number, 965-1951. We will also be at the church on August 14th between from 9:00am until 1pm if you would like to just drop off then. Have your name, address, name of quilt, and a little history about your quilt.

Bring It On!  MSAD 41 Wellness Team
By Lynn Gerrish, Team Member

Calm waters, relaxing atmosphere, ducks swimming by, healthy food, and electrifying enthusiasm – this was the setting for the MSAD 41 Wellness Team Retreat held at Marie Hayes’ summer home on Schoodic Lake July 27.  The Wellness Team met to brainstorm and discuss wellness activities to promote throughout the upcoming school year and to share exciting information with members who did not attend the Maine Schoolsite Health Promotion Conference offered by the Department of Education.

Ten team members attended the conference from June 27 – July 1 at Sugarloaf USA.  This year’s theme “Wellness! Bring It On!” focused on personal wellness branching out to each of the five components of wellness – Physical, Mental, Spiritual, Emotional and Social.  We spent much time attending workshops, round table presentations, experiencing wellness time and listening to tremendous keynote speakers.

To highlight a few of the presentations, Sunday night Richard E. Collins, M.D., an accomplished cardiologist and author of The Cooking Cardiologist, discussed the latest trends and fads in controlling weight and reviewed the real reason for our weight gain.  While Dr. Collins spoke, he created delicious foods for us to taste; for example, flourless chocolate torte with raspberry sauce and guiltless potato chips.  And these were so good!  His stories were funny and enlightening and they made us laugh and take a look at ourselves and our eating habits.  Dr. Collins motto:  “Do not give up what you like to eat, just change your recipes.  Cook well, live long!”

Monday morning the team attended a session called Morale Building, Stress Management and Team Building by Norm Bossio, a former teacher, principal and school superintendent.  Norm explored and discussed the unique stressors, frustrations, and opportunities facing all school employees.   The prerequisite for this session was a sense of humor.  Laughter filled the room as Norm shared personal stories and left us with this powerful message “If you don’t love what you’re doing, get out.”

Monday evening, Gary Crocker, The Power Of Humor, delivered in the Downeast tradition, presented information about the power of humor as a part of the educational process “at all levels.”  Gary kept over 300 people laughing throughout his presentation and showed us that humor is definitely an important part of our health, both physical and mental.  (The team is looking at getting Gary to speak here.  His website is www.garycrocker.com)

Wednesday’s presenter, Anne Audain a New Zealand native, qualified for six Olympic Games, set a world record in the 5000m, and won Gold and Silver medals in the Commonwealth Games.  Anne spoke of her life experiences as her best credentials – adopted at birth, undergoing surgery on her deformed feet at the age of 13, becoming an elementary school teacher, then focusing on running.  She kept us enthralled and humored as she took us through her life, hardships, ups and downs, and now her retirement.  Anne founded the Idaho Women’s Fitness Celebration which includes thousands of participants each year.  She is the author of her biography Uncommon Heart.  Anne’s message to us, “Life is a journey not a destination.”

Thursday’s keynote speaker was David Roth, an award-winning singer, songwriter and speaker.  We joined David on a roller-coaster ride of song, story, spontaneity, and interactivity ranging from holistic to hilarious, poignant to improbable.  His work celebrated and examined ordinary people doing extraordinary things, effective communication, personal development, life challenges, inclusiveness, compassion, humor, diversity, transforming obstacles into allies, inspiration and cooperation on many levels.  His warning to us:  Stress reduction may occur and community may be built!

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Some facts about our wellness time:  Chris Beres, Milo Elementary Principal, presented in a workshop “Administrators’ Panel – Speaking Out for Wellness”; we received a certificate of attendance for five years; our team entered the Poker Fun Run/Walk and won first place; and we performed “Hey good looking, what ya got cooking” in the talent show.  Two team members won door prizes.

Each speaker used humor in his/her presentation and truly sent the message that humor in work, school and everyday life is important to our wellbeing. 

The Maine Department of Education did a wonderful job organizing this valuable conference to schoolsites and the MSAD 41 Wellness Team is appreciative of having the opportunity to attend this each year and bring home a wealth of information to share with the community.

Members attending the summer retreat came away rejuvenated and anxious to get health and wellness rolling this school year.  Plans are underway for “Pedometer Days” the first Friday of each month, with mileage being logged and a celebration when we get to our destination. Our team will host the regional meeting November 1. The annual Holiday Celebration will be held on December 4 and Move and Improve will be on our agenda too.  A kayaking trip up the Sebec River in Milo is scheduled before school starts and other activities are being planned for the school year. 

Keep humor in your life and bring on wellness!

 

MSAD 41 Wellness Team Members attending the XIX Maine Schoolsite Health Promotion Conference are: Back:  Stephanie Gillis, Chris Beres, Sue Chaffee, Linda O’Connor and Eddie Oakes Front:  Lynn Gerrish, Teri Morrill, Amber Gahagan, Marie Hayes and CeCe Harmon


~photo by Lynn Gerrish

MSAD 41 Team Members relax while kayaking at Schoodic Lake after their wellness retreat -Marie Hayes (in back), Teri Morrill, Ginny Morrill, CeCe Harmon, Linda O’Connor and Edie Miles

6th Annual Quilt Show
presented by the
Monday Morning Quilters
Saturday, August 14, 2004 from 9am-3pm
At the Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church, corner of Railroad Ave. and Front Street.
$1.00 donations accepted. Along with your donation, you will have a chance of winning one of our door prizes.
On Sale in the Church Dining Room: Quilts and quilt projects by the Quilters
Doughnuts and coffee from 9am-11pm
Lunch from 11am-1pm - Assorted Sandwiches,
Assorted pies, coffee, tea, or punch.

IN MEMORIAM

WENDELL T. JAY

MILO - Wendell T. Jay, 63, husband of Diane (Burgoyne) Jay, died July 27, 2004, at a Bangor hospital. He was born Oct. 28, 1940, in Houlton, the son of Harold G. and Phyllis (Foster) Jay. Wendell was a quiet, kind, generous, do-it-yourself man. He was a hard laborer all of his life and did much to help his family and friends. In addition to doing all his own electrical, plumbing, carpentry and mechanical work, he was often called upon for his skill with an arc welder. He was employed by Kroemer Farms in Milo from 1959 to 1967. Wendell left Kroemer Farms to work at Dexter Shoe Co., where he was employed until his retirement. Wendell is survived by his loving and caring wife, Diane of Milo; his father, Harold of Milo; three sons, Kenneth and his wife, Cynthia, of Milo, Stephen and his companion, Vicki, of Milo and Lewiston, Daniel and his wife, Teresa, of Milo; four brothers, Richard and his wife, Eileen, Terry and his wife, Karen, Eugene, Kevin and his companion, Laurie, all of Milo; a sister, Diane Perkins of Milo; five grandchildren, Sam, Josh, Mary, Tony, and Katrina; two twin great-grandchildren, Sabastian and Jerico; and many nieces and nephew who will miss their Uncle Wendell. He was predeceased by two brothers, Glenwood and Dennis. Burial will be in
Evergreen Cemetery.

MERLE K. SHOREY

DOVER-FOXCROFT - Merle K. Shorey, 79, husband of Lorraine (Kimball) Shorey, died July 25, 2004, at Maine Veterans Home, Bangor, after a long illness. He was born July 1, 1925, in Howland, the son of Ralph and Ella (Lyman) Shorey. Merle had served his country in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He had been employed at Varnum Farms, and later retired from Moosehead Manufacturing. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine of Dover-Foxcroft; three sons, Merle L. and his wife, Margaret, of Dover-Foxcroft, James E. Sr. of Sebec, Ronald L. of Parkman; two daughters, Gerri-Lee Drake and her husband, Frank, of Island Falls, Sally Badger and her husband, George, of Milo; a son-in-law, Edward Richards; 24 grandchildren; 27 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-granddaughter. He was predeceased by two sons, Kenneth and Robert; and a daughter, Lorraine Richards. Burial will follow in the family lot in Lee Cemetery.

MARGARET L. LAW

BROWNVILLE JCT. - Margaret L. Law died July 28, 2004 in Dover-Foxcroft. A private interment will be held. Those who wish may make donations in her memory to Paws Animal Shelter, P.O. Box 81, Milo, ME 04463. Arrangements are in the care of the Lary Funeral Home.

Editor’s note: Mrs. Law was one of the greatest animal lovers I have ever known.  I will miss delivering her meal to her and talking about all our pets.  Because of the money being sent in her memory, our area’s strays will have a safe and loving home for many, many years to come.  We all thank her.  Valerie

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STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL RECAP

The Strawberry Festival at the Methodist Church in Milo went off without a hitch.  Here is a picture of Nat Harris in the kitchen at the Methodist Church the afternoon of the Strawberry supper…. just-a-stirring the potato salad. At 87 that’s quite a feat! Nobody could quite put a date on the first Strawberry Festival but Nat’s made the potato salad for all of them (16 or 17 was the best guess!).

Karen Horne Clark was in to Boothbay celebrating her 60+ birthday and came across this Brownville Jct Railroader's numberplate . It was enclosed under glass along with a variety of CPRR pamphlets and schedules.  Although she didn’t ride the train she really enjoyed all the railroad items at the museum. Can anyone put a date when this Brownville Junction. memorabilia was made and used?

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham

Well, by now many of you have heard the saga of me losing my computer, but if you didn't, here it is:

I was sitting here at my computer last Tuesday when I could hear thunder rumbling off in the distance. I was working on the Comprehensive Plan....and had gotten three more segments just about wrapped up. I was so happy with all I'd written...things were really coming together. I decided not to push my luck and so "saved" my work and completely shut my system down. I rarely shut completely down....but thought I would in lieu of the pending thunderstorm.

I went out in the kitchen and fixed Dad a little lunch and brought it in for him to eat in the livingroom on his TV tray. The storm quickly accelerated, and in just minutes was right on top of us. Now, you need to know that my father has always scoffed at fear-of-thunder-storms. We were never allowed to screech at a loud clap of thunder. Don't get me wrong. Dad didn't ever laugh in the face of storms, he believed in taking the necessary precautions of going to a safe place and then sitting down and keeping your mouth shut. So, I was taken aback when the fateful strike came, and my father's eyes bugged out and he said, "that was a close one!" I knew it was a strike to worry about.

The lights flickered off, but came right back on again. I began to hear this little clicking or ticking kind of sound. It was coming from my den. I got up and glanced in. Everything seemed to be fine. The fan was sweeping the room back and forth...papers were rustling...the little red light was on the power strip where the computer was plugged in...the printer/scanner was on. (I'd forgotten to turn that off). I determined that the little noice I heard was the fan blowing some little thing that was pinned up on my bulletin board...or possibly it was my Coke calendar being rustled about by the little breeze. In any case, I dismissed the sound as being inconsequential.

Then the livingroom, diningroom and my office filled with the most toxic odor that I had smelled in a long time. The smell did seem to be centered in the office right near my desk. I burst into action! The first call went to my husband at work..."come home right now I smell something burning!!!!" Further, "Do you think I should call the Fire Department?" He assured me that when-in-doubt the safe thing to do is call. He thought they'd send someone to check it out. In the meantime, he'd fly home as quickly as he could get there.
And he did. My hero.

I called 911 and they did, indeed, send someone out. Actually, it was about twelve someones...all in turnout gear and with no fewer than three fire trucks. By this time Dad and I had made our way out to the porch....just to be on the safe side. My daughter and her children had also arrived, so we were all sitting in a line on the porch furniture. The man-in-charge determined by a quick scan with a thermal imaging camera that there was no fire in the walls and that undoubtedly it was something electronic that had burned up. Uh-oh! I hardly dared to come in the house and touch the "on" button of my computer...but, alas, I had to. My worst fears were realized.

Oh yes, my hero had arrived and was running through the house only to find that I hadn't made the beds. I know it...I couldn't believe it myself. I always make the beds as soon as we get up. But....not that day. I had gotten up early...long before Dad...and so rather than disturb the sleeping Grampy, snuck downstairs to get started on my Comprehensive Plan project. One thing had led to another, and I had never gotten back upstairs to make the beds. I would have eventually! I just hadn't done it yet. So here's the hero, quickly making the beds in case the firemen had to come upstairs and witness that chore undone.

Now, unbeknownst to me, my friend Cheryl Hamlin right down the street had been witness to a huge bolt of lightening hitting a power line. She, too, had placed a call to 911 because she didn't know if the workmen who have lined Elm Street all this summer were all safe. The activity had come to a complete stand still out there and it worried her....with good reason. She could hear the sirens coming pell mell towards the scene of the explosive lightening strike, and then they just stopped. What could possibly be the holdup? Shamefacedly, I must say that I was the hold up.

Thankfully, all's well that ends well. The workmen were all safe. My house was safe. The firemen were all geared up and ready for about anything at that point...and they went off to another call as
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soon as they cleared my crisis of the incredibly hot smelling rooms. A few days after the incident I was in the grocery store retelling the story to a neighbor who had heard that I'd lost my computer. Right behind me in line was a man I'd never seen before. He asked if I was the woman who lived on Elm Street who had had her computer zapped by lightening. I allowed as how I was that woman, and he said, "Well, in one of those strikes on Elm Street lines were struck just above me and they dropped right down on my truck!" Wow! "Whatcha do?" "Well, I put my truck in gear and drove off leaving the lines behind." There you go!!! I don't know if that is the proper protocol for wires on your vehicle, but it worked for him. He was there at the Farmer's Union telling me about it in person.

The bad news is that my computer is tee-totally-defuncticated. The good news is that my hard-drive was retrievable, and my son hopes that all of my columns (that he's got hanging out there in cyberspace somewhere) were not lost. Of course, I have all of them in hard copy, but to lose all of that work would really bum me out. Actually, this will give me a good chance to clean up my desktop and save what is really important. So, all is not lost.

Did I tell you about going to the Methodist Church on the day of the Alumni Reunion for breakfast put on by the Trask family? It was a tremendous feast, and sister Gayle had prepared a French Toast Bake for the occasion. I had asked her for the recipe, and she recently forwarded it to me. You are going to love it!!!

Holiday Morning French Toast

1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup melted butter
3 teaspoons cinnamon (divided)
3 tart apples (thinly sliced)
1/2 cup dried cranberries (called Craisins) or raisins
1 loaf Italian bread (cut into 1" slices)
6 large eggs
1 1/2 cups milk
1 Tablespoon vanilla

Combine brown sugar, melted butter and 1 tsp. of the cinnamon in a 13"X9" pan. Add the apples and craisins or raisins and toss to coat. Spread the apple mixture evenly over the bottom of the baking pan. Arrange the slices of bread on top of the apple mixture. Mix the eggs, milk and vanilla and the remaining cinnamon until well blended. Pour this mixture over the bread soaking the bread completely. Cover and refrigerate for 4 (but up to) 24 hours. Bake covered with aluminum foil in a preheated 375 degree oven for 40 minutes. Uncover and bake 5 minutes longer. Let stand for 5 minutes before cutting and serving. This was absolutely delicious!

I would also like to clear up some confusion with the directions for the Pasta Fruit Salad that appeared in last week's column. You need to cook the cup and 1/2 of pasta, drain, and rinse it with cold water. This instruction was inadvertently left out. Sorry about that! I will eat a number of things raw....pasta isn't one of them. Hopefully, most people who read the column and cook the recipes know that.

Vacation Bible School will be
held at Park Street UMC from 9:00AM to Noon from
August 16th through August 20th.
All children are welcome.

The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy
Continued, Part XX

The High School

First mention of higher learning in Milo showed up in the town meeting of 1874 when the town voted $100 “to support a free high school.”  There was a similar vote two years later.  In 1897 the amount was increased to $145.  In 1880 it was back to $100.

That year (1880) the possibility of a state contribution was weighed and the amount voted was “on condition that the legislature appropriated a like amount.”

Evidently this request fell on friendly ears for in 1883, the free high school received the sum of $214 for its operation.  (In those early years the word “free” always preceded “high school.”)

Of the $214 expended the town had raised $100; the state had contributed another $100 and three tuition payments of $3 each had added another $9.  That left the high school account in the red by $5 in 1883.

An article in the High School Breeze of 1903 gives credit to the state for making the first move to open its treasury to foster higher education.  The article entitled “Glances Backward,” and signed “Alumnus” states:

“When the state legislature made its offer of aid to towns wishing to establish Free High Schools (capitals mine), Milo was prompt to take advantage of it and Milo High School had its birth.”

And this, of course, accounts for the meticulous use of “free”  whenever the title “high school” was used.

An obscure passage in this same 1903 Breeze article seems to indicate that a rudimentary attempt at higher learning had been made even earlier that the records show.

“Two schools in this (primary) building, “it said, “were spoken of as the “small” school and the “big” school –the latter being the embryo of our high school.

What was taught in the “big” school and the time of its origin, the article leaves vague.

It is clear, both from this article and from an account in the Breeze of 1908, that the high school did, in fact, have its earliest home in the primary building.  The 1908 Breeze article entitled “Recollections of a Milo boy,” and signed by Fred K. Owen, then living in Portland, noted at the beginning of the account that “The present primary school…used to be primary school, high school and all the rest.”  What he meant by “all the rest” isn’t clear but as for the first home of the high school, this corroborates the “Alumnus” statement of five years earlier.

Development of the high school in its earliest years is puzzling to say the least, from conflicting statements about it.

Records of town meeting show, in 1887, payment of $5 to Dirigo Lodge (I.O.O.F) “for schoolroom for the free high school.”

The 1903 Breeze article says:  “After a time—(that is, after the 1870”s) private schools were introduced.  The town schools were held in summer and winter, and the Private High Schools (capitals mine) in between.  Tuition was charged for attendance during the session of high school…”

“The village schools were now beginning to be considered of some consequence.  Another school was added, and Intermediate, and the ground floor of The Old IOOF Hall was used for this purpose.  This building, it goes on, parenthetically, “will be recognized as the tenement near the present primary building.

“So, then,” the article continues, “pupils attended the “small” school, “Hall” school, “big” school, and “high” school if they chose.”

Considering that the town records show an expenditure of $16, in 1885, for housing for the high school  in the Odd Fellows Hall and continued expenditures for rent there in succeeding years until the new grammar school building was erected in 1892-93, the Breeze story leaves many questions to be answered.

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Was the intermediate school it mentions in essence the high school?  Were the private high school sessions competitive with the “free high school”?  How did the “big” school, “hall” school and the “high” school differ?  Was the subject matter presented all at the same level that pupils could attend the one or the other “if they chose?”  And when did the private high schools vanish and the free high school come into its own as the sole institution of higher learning in Milo?

A Historical Review - Part 1

Residents of Sebec Lake Concerned over Dam Bangor Daily News, Diana Bowley, 6/6/1981
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2004)

Dover-Foxcroft -- The battle has begun to save Sebec Lake, Richard Hartley of Sebec told about 75 concerned residents Monday.

Hartley, a year-round resident of Sebec Lake, is acting spokesman for the Sebec Lake Association. The informational meeting had been called by the organization to inform residents of recent developments regarding a proposed hydro-electric generating facility to be located at the dam in Sebec Village.

The association is worried about the economic impact the project would have on the Dover-Foxcroft area. The 6,000-acre lake is 13 miles long and supports more than 500 privately owned camps used during the summer and a few year-round residents. Peakes Kenney Park, which has more than 50 campsites, is on the shorefront. Hartley said he was first aware of interest in developing the Sebec dam through an advertisement in a weekly newspaper announcing John Cotton of Sebec had applied for a primary permit to do a feasibility study on the dam for the generation of hydro power.

The dam is owned by Bangor Hydro-Electric Co. Hartley said camp owners and officials at the company have had a mutual agreement on the water level and have had a good relationship. Neither Cotton nor a representative from Bangor Hydro attended the meeting.

In their petition to intervene, Hartley and another resident, Burton Packard of Willimantic, cited concerns over the possibility of the applicant altering the presently maintained water level of 322.9 feet.

Packard -- who was out of town and could not make the meeting -- and Hartley contend it is important that the lake water be maintained at 322.8 feet, since a higher level inundates useful shore frontage and facilities and water level below 322.8 feet mark makes certain shorefront facilities useless and inoperative. They claim low water would make certain areas of the lake dangerous for navigation.
In his notice of application, Cotton said he does not propose any change to the existing lake management procedures. But Hartley said Cotton had told residents he would like the level of the lake raised a foot to increase productivity.

The meeting with Cotton was called because residents were troubled because the hydro-power plant would be a rather large one, Hartley says, adding the group was concerned over conflicting statements by Cotton. Hartley said the higher the head, the more efficient the turbine is. He said Packard -- who is probably the largest landowner on Sebec Lake -- is adamant about height water and remarked, "Sebec Lake will be in a constant flood stage."(Continued next week)

Card of Thanks

We would like to thank all the very kind people that sent prayers, cards, food and money to us while Jared was in the hospital. All the churches for their prayers, Walter & Nancy Cook, Helen Woodruff, Bingo Friends, The Craft Club, Gene, JD`s Emporium and Victor & Teresa Pierce for taking care of Cocoa.

Thank you all for your many acts of kindness. God Bless You All---

Jared & Ann Weston

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.

AUGUST – 1983
2-fog showers sunny awhile late pm-77° at 12.
3-Sunny breezy-80° at 12.
4-Sunny breezy-86° at 12.
5-Sunny breezy-82° at 12.
6-fog cloudy L T shower pm-81° at 12.
7-Sunny breeze-77° at 12.
8-M sunny T shower windy 5 pm and by times all nite-82° at 12.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS
 
CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to enjoy fellowship, share ideas, conduct Club business, and host many interesting speakers.  All are welcome to visit with us.  If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application.  We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them with us.

JULY 28 MEETING MINUTES

President Joe Zamboni said hello to fifteen members and guest Anne Hathorn.

Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance and Paul Grindle asked for help in helping others.

The Orono/Old Town newsletter was shared.

Amanda Walker celebrates her birthday on the 31st and Steve & Cheryl Hamlin will observe their wedding anniversary on August 5th.

Nine happy and sad dollars were donated for the gazebo taking shape, attending a Red Sox game, visiting with a special friend in Rhode Island, son Ryan finally home in Maine, and A-Rod causing trouble!

Joe told us that the gravel is in and compacted at the gazebo site.  The forms for the cement have been built and the utility pole has been set in.

The next Town Hall Arts Center event is the Zoot Suit Review in September and a Coffeehouse in October.

Milo Heights is the location of the senior barbeque on August 4.  A paper was circulated today to sign up for items to make and/or bring to the barbeque.

Joe reminded everyone that club dues are due.

The Board of Directors meeting will be on Thursday, August 5.

Sandra Gray introduced her cousin Anne Hathorn, our speaker this morning.  Anne is the owner of the Old American Threads Shop on Park Street in Milo.

Anne told us that the idea of opening this kind of shop began a while ago.  She needed a certain spool of thread and had to travel to Bangor to find what she was looking for.  Anne told herself that there had to be a better way.  So a few months later she open her own local shop.  It was a way to enjoy a few of her favorite things, quilt supplies, collectables, and antiques.

She has made a quilt for the Key Club for the “Dreams for ME Kids”.   Anne has also helped the Brownville fifth grade students with their quilt projects.  Another interest of hers is the PAWS project.

Even though she has only been in business for a while many quilters from other areas are frequenting the Old American Threads Shop.  Quilting is a true art form enjoyed by those who make the quilts and the recipients of a beautiful hand made item.

Anne’s hours at the Shop are: Tuesday – Friday from 10 am to 4 pm and Saturday from 9 am to 12.

Ann, it’s obvious that you like what you are doing and we appreciate you taking the time to share your interest with us.

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WHAT'S NEW ON TRC

The newest addition to our site is the Alumni Section (www.trcmaine.org/alumni/).  This section is devoted to the three local alumni associations from Milo High School, Brownville Jct. High School, and Penquis Valley High School.  We will post any and all information that the associations want.  Currently, only the MHS page has information on.  If you are involved in any of the organizations and would like to give us some info, please contact us at info@trcmaine.org, or Izzy Warren at 943-7367.

This summer we are also offering an Online Farmers Market (trcmaine.org/community/farmers). We are looking for prices, directions, and contact info for anyone who sells home-grown produce.  This service is free of charge, and we hope to better promote the local farmers!  Please contact us if you would like your prices and items listed.

WORD SEARCH

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WE NEED YOUR HELP!

If you know any information about the Boston Post Gold-Headed Canes, or who the current holders are for the towns in our area, please contact us!  We are looking to create a new Landmark Feature!

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