Three Rivers News, 2004-08-09
MONDAY, AUGUST 9, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 40
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

There will be no paper for 8/16 as the Printer is broken.

JSI CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT RAISES THOUSANDS FOR KIWANIS


Mark Awalt, co-owner of JSI, presents Nancy Grant with a check.

The first annual JSI Charity Golf tournament, held at Katahdin Country Club in Milo, raised over $4000 for the Milo/Brownville Three Rivers Kiwanis. JSI is Milo’s largest private employer and manufactures high-end wood and steel displays for the supermarket industry. Brothers Mark Awalt, Terry Awalt, Barry Awalt and stepfather Clayton Johndro own the company.

Golfers from all over New England converged on Milo to participate in the well-organized event.  Area Kiwanians assisted Rick Gerrish, who owns the golf course.  Frank Cochran served as chauffeur and gofer, Fred Trask provided the tents and tables, and Steve Hamlin, JSI employee and Kiwanian, supervised the volunteers.  A B-B-Q luncheon was served at the conclusion of the tournament, and many of the items for the cook-out were donated by the Milo Farmer’s Union.

The winning teams took home trophies and gift certificates.  A kayak and set of John Daly golf clubs were awarded for the shots that were closest to the pins on holes two and five. 

Many sponsors contributed cash and prizes and the list includes:

TRASK INSURANCE
PATRIOT TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS
AMERICAN STEEL & ALUMINUM
BUTLER BROTHERS
BERG SPORTSWEAR
N. H. BRAGG & SON
MCCUE CORP.
RUDMAN & WINCHELL, LLC
BANGOR MILLWORK/WHOLESALE LAMINATES
MSC INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY
BANKNORTH, N.A.
PERFORMANCE PRODUCT PAINTING INC.
SPONGEX CORPORATION
HOLT & BUGBEE
ATLANTIC PLYWOOD
ADVANTAGE GASES & TOOLS
A. E. ROBINSON
DUNLAP
MILO TRUE VALUE
MILO FARMERS UNION

A special thanks to all the volunteers: Nancy Grant & Emma O’Conner, Frank Cochran, Don Harris, Michelle Hamlin, Cheryl Hamlin , Kathy Witham , Val Robertson , Katie Robertson , Tabatha Omstead, and D. J. Omstead.  Three Rivers Kiwanis is awed by the amount of money raised and at being chosen as the benefactor of the proceeds from the charity event.  JSI is an important industry in our area and is a good friend to its people.  More pictures on page 2.


On Saturday, August 14, 2004, the  American Legion Post #92 in Brownville Jct. will hold their annual yard sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Legion Hall at 75 Railroad Ave (formerly Main Street). Rain or Shine. Proceeds will benefit the Post's Scholarship Fund.


Vacation Bible School will be
held at Park Street UMC from 9:00AM to Noon from August 16th through August 20th.

All children are welcome. 


Penquis Women’s Alumni Softball Tournament @ Davis Field In B’ville Jct. SATURDAY-AUGUST 14th (Rain Date Aug. 15th) Looking For Alumni Players And Current High School Stars! $10.00 Per Player (Proceeds Benefit High School Softball Team)

Teams will be picked accordingly and the format is double elimination. Other contests to be played as well. Deadline to sign up: Aug. 10th  Sign up to be on a team with any of the following people:

Jean Larson: 943-7760 Arielle Sickler:965-8500 , cell:631-9335, e-mail: arielle2003@yahoo.com Marilyn Lyford: 943-2342 e-mail: trucking@midmaine.com


There is a group of local citizens interested in starting an annual celebration for Milo. We are brainstorming for ideas and suggestions and would like the communitie’s input. Please contact Murrel Harris at 943-7326 with event suggestions or to volunteer your services.


B-B-Q CHICKEN SUPPER

AUGUST 14TH 4:30 PM-7PM

$5.00 PER PERSON

AT THE PISCATAQUIS VALLEY FAIRGROUNDS

TO BENEFIT THE BARN.

CHICKEN, BAKED BEANS, SALADS, GARLIC BREAD AND ASSORTED DESSERTS

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., AUG. 3 BAKED HAM, BAKED POTATO, CARROTS, PEARS
WED., AUG. 4 BROCCOLI QUICHE, BEETS, TOSSED SALAD, FRUIT WHIP
THUR., AUG. 5 SLICED TURKEY, POTATO SALAD, 3-BEAN SALAD, CRANBERRY SAUCE, PEANUT BUTTER COOKIE
FRI., AUG. 6 HOMEMADE BAKED BEANS, HOT DOGS, COLE SLAW, BROWN BREAD, BROWNIES
MON. AUG. 9 COLD PLATE W/ HAM SALAD SANDWICH, BEET AND ONION SALAD, CALICO SLAW, STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS.  WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM.
PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. 


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15 PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


Hamlin Family Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL

Please associate the word or words on the left with the choices that follow.

1. Perry Mason (a) Ash (b) Tony (c) E.M. (d) Neil.
2. Boardinghouse (a) Oscar (b) Ash (c) Peter (d) Tony
3. Store (a) F.W. (b) E.M. (c) Omar (d) Oscar
4. Bank (a) Mike (B) Cedric (c) E.M. (d) Oscar
5. Golf (a) Mike (b) Oscar (c) E.M. (d) Omar
6. Closing (a) F.W. (b) E.M. (d) Peter (d) Cedric
7. High Scoring (a) Ash (b) Oscar (c) Tony (d) Peter.
8.Locator (a) E.M. (b) Tony (c) F.W. (d) Cedric
9. Red Auerbach (a) E.M. (b) Tony (c) Mike (d) Omar.
10. Stories (a) Omar (b) Peter (c) Carl (d) E.M.

Answers: 1-d 2-b 3-c 4--d 5-a 6-b 7-d 8-c 9-b 10-c

Memories of a Brownville Junction Railroader

1967-1968

As I was serving our country during this season, my memories aren't quite as good as they could be.

There were two significant changes in the starting lineup that season, possibly breaking up a winning combination. Gene Brown played center in place of Lewis Boobar, and Tim Buchanan played the right wing on the 1-3-1 in place of Alan Kirby.. Both Boobar and Kirby played integral parts in the Railroader's drive to an undefeated season, however. Almost every game was won by a lopsided score. . So, according to Denny Larson, it didn't make any difference who started.

Brown and Buchanan were underclassmen and the fact they were going to be available to Mr. Conley the following year at Penquis may have been a consideration. Boobar was sick at one point. He had set the rebounding record at BJHS the year before. And Alan Kirby was a defensive genius who had been the hero at Lewiston in the state championship game.

The boys from Cinder City struggled to make it back to the Eastern Maine finale, where they lost to Searsport in the school's final game 60-54. My mother sent me the clippings when I was 13,000 miles away-shocked.

The BJHS Railroaders went to the Eastern Maine finals six times in the period 1959-1968 and won twice, and those who had seen them in action had seen great basketball and great basketball players: Jack Brown, Bill Ballast, Dennis Larson, and Wayne Kirby, to name but a few. Whenever I was asked if I had ever played on any of those great teams, I was always proud to respond in the affirmative. The BJHS Railroaders were a source of great pride and gave our community along the tracks a sense of identity. Tony Hamlin has worked hard in recent years to bring back some of this to the area.

Next Week: Miscellaneous Memories of Basketball and Baseball of a Brownville Junction Railroader.

MORE TOURNEY PICTURES

The winner of the John Daly Golf Clubs

The winning team.

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The second place team, that’s Carroll Witham second from the right .

A HOME RUN FOR BROWNVILLE REC.

Brownville Recreation Director Dean Bellatty and a crew of volunteers are already preparing for next year. Under the direction of "Uncle Buck" the crew began to construct new dugouts at the second Little League field. Special thanks also go to Bishop Concrete for supplying the foundations. Area children have been very lucky to have such great volunteers working to improve the facilities. Fencing was installed this summer and now several sponsor signs are hanging in center field.

Thanks go to Milo Exxon, JSI, Lyford Trucking, Sebec Fencing, Subway, Bishop Concrete, Earl Gerrish and Sons, Cat Traxs, Moosehead Motor Sports, and Patriot Transport for their support. Any others who would like to have a sponsor sign should contact Dean Bellatty.

The Davis Field complex now has two little league fields and a basketball court. Lights for evening play were recently installed. Another work in progress is a new Snack Shack for next year. It's been a busy site as the Rec. Dept. has also sponsored a Little League Tournament and two adult softball tournaments. Next weekend there will also be a Penquis Women's Alumni Softball tournament. Anyone who would like to play should contact Jean Larson, Marilyn Lyford or Erin Weston. It's been a very busy summer.

ROSS ROLFE’S BEAUTIFICATION PROJECT

Upon entering Brownville Jct. residents drive by a lovely park area which has been totally maintained for several years by Ross Rolfe. This picture only shows a small part of what he's created. Ross has planted many shrubs and flowers and regularly mows the grass. The job is made even more difficult since it sits on a hill. Those who remember what it looked like before Ross adopted the area can really appreciate how much work he's done here.

A SWARM OF RIVER RATS SPOTTED AT THE RIPS
BY KAREN H. CLARK

The Sebec River Association " better known as the River Rats, held their annual summer picnic at "The Rips" Saturday, August 7th. Over 60 people were in attendance at various times during the day. The photo of the group shows about two thirds of the gathering. Unconfirmed oldest in attendance was a three way tie going to Phil and Ginny Barden and Willie Burke: Their birthdays are all in the same year so we won't divulge who is really the oldest! Youngest in attendance shown sitting in his great aunt (Janet Horne Richard's )lap was Jacob Keef, age 1 year, son of Peter and Michele Keef of Casco, Maine.

Editors Note: The Sebec River Rats are one of the most diverse, yet similar group of people you would ever meet.  Even though some of them live ”away”, their River Roots make them all true Mainers and you can bet each and every one of them can relate to the following.

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Jeff Foxworthy on Maine:
Submitted by: Margaret Zwicker

*If you consider it a sport to gather your food by drilling through 36 inches of ice and sitting there all day hoping that the food will swim by,…you might live in Maine.
*If you're proud that your region makes the national news 96 nights each year because Moosehead Lake is the coldest spot in the nation……you might live in Maine.
*If your local Dairy Queen is closed from September through May… you might live in Maine
*If you instinctively walk like a penguin for six months out of the year…….you might live in Maine.
If someone in a store offers you assistance, and they don't work there….you might live in Maine.
*If your dad's suntan stops at a line curving around the middle of his forehead, you might live in Maine. (Or at his neckline and biceps)
*If you have worn shorts and a parka at the same time,….you might live in Maine.
*If your town has an equal number of bars and churches,… you might live in Maine.
*If you have had a lengthy telephone conversation with someone who dialed a wrong number…. you might live in Maine.

YOU KNOW YOU ARE A TRUE MAINER WHEN:
1. "Vacation" means going South past Augusta for the weekend.
2. You measure distance in hours.
3. You know several people who have hit a deer more than once.
4. You often switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day and back again.(Ain't that the truth!!)
5. You can drive 65 mph through 2 feet of snow during a raging blizzard, without flinching.
6. You see people wearing camouflage at social events (including weddings).
7. You install security lights on your house and garage and leave both unlocked.
8. You carry jumper cables in your car and your girlfriend / wife knows how to use them.
9. You design your kid's Halloween costume to fit over a snowsuit.
10. Driving is better in the winter because the potholes are filled with snow.
11. You know all 4 seasons: almost winter, winter, still winter and road construction. (Oh, for sure.)
12. You can identify a southern or eastern accent.
13. Your idea of creative landscaping is a statue of a deer next to your blue spruce. (or in Joel’s case anywhere in his yard, the neighbor’s yard , or any vehicle)
14.. Down South to you means Augusta.
15.. Your neighbor throws a party to celebrate his new shed.
16.. You go out to fish fry every Friday.
17. Your 4th of July picnic was moved indoors due to frost.
18.. You have more miles on your snow blower than your car.
19.. You find 0 degrees "a little chilly."
20.. You actually understand these jokes, and you tell them to all your Maine friends.

Editor’s note: I realize a couple of these are repeats from past columns, but the new ones are worth printing. 

Dean Family Reunion
BY CAROLYN  SINCLAIR

On August 7th, 27 descendants of Guy and Mary Dean gathered at the home of Paula and James Copeland in Brownville for their 27th reunion. Guy and Mary Dean farmed in Medford for many years retiring to Massachusetts in the early fifties. Several of their
grandchildren still reside in this area along with many great-grand children.

 Included among those gathered was Herb Leach, widow of Violet Rollins, from Connecticut. Sorely missed were members of the Elton Dean family who were mourning the death of their mother, Dorothea Smith Dean. Plans were made to hold the 2005 reunion on Sunday, August 14th  at Range Pond State Park in Poland Springs, Maine.

A reminder about Vacation Bible School to be held at
Park Street UMC on Aug.16-20 from 9 to noon. All are welcome to come join the fun.

In Memoriam 

VAUGHN HENRY WEYMOUTH

BROWNVILLE JCT. - Vaughn Henry Weymouth, 90, husband of Joan (Bellingham) Weymouth, died July 18, 2004, at a Dexter nursing home. He was born June 25, 1914, in Brownville Jct., the son of Thadius J. and Clellie (Fisher) Weymouth. Vaughn graduated from Brownville Jct. High School, and went on to spend the rest of his life in his hometown. He was a retired Canadian Pacific Railroad conductor. He was a member of the Pleasant River Masonic Lodge No. 163 of Brownville, and a 73 year member of the Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church, where he contributed his many talents and skills from cabinet making and carpentry to choir member, and various other administrative committees. The church dedicated their 2003 100th Anniversary Annual Report to Vaughn, in recognition of his service over the years. We will all miss Vaughn's twinkling eyes, warm smile and soft giggle. He would stop and talk with everyone he knew, and often those he did not. He leaves behind his wife of 54 years, Joan of Brownville Jct.; two children, Janice Kilburn and her husband, Anthony, of Damariscotta, and Cheryl McLaughlin of Waldoboro; five grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren. Burial with Masonic services was in the family lot in Pinetree Cemetery.. Those who wish may make memorial contributions to either Three Rivers Ambulance Service, P.O. Box 432, Milo, ME 04463 or to the Brownville Jct. United Methodist Church, Box A, Brownville Jct., ME 04415. Arrangements are in the care of the Lary Funeral Home.

IN LOVING MEMORY

ALLEN PEARL

In Loving Memory Of ALLEN PEARL Jan. 27, 1955 - Aug. 5, 2002 It's been two years today since the lord took you away. He gave you some wings and let you fly, before we all had a chance to say good-bye, Now you're an angel in the Heaven's sky, with no worries as you fly. And someday we will be standing tall beside our Loved one that has it all. Sadly missed & Loved OXOX Dad, Mom, Norman, Wyona, Mauri, Patty, Julie, Kevin

SADIE

Editors Note: This past week I pulled into the parking lot at Foxcroft Vets to drop off some kitties to be neutered and I immediately noticed 3 familiar faces: Terri, David and Sadie Knowles.  I was saddened to learn that Sadie, their beloved Lab, was there to be put to sleep. 

Terri and David had provided Sadie with a life Julie, Katie and I wish every animal could have, having been treated with the utmost dignity, respect and love.  Terri’s and David’s decision to let Sadie go with that same dignity, respect and love was the ultimate act of kindness. 

We will miss seeing Sadie walking with her Mommy and will remember her always.  We have made a donation in her name to PAWS. 

Ronnie Knowles, David’s dad, wrote his thoughts about Sadie.

SADIE, OUR FRIEND

God blessed us with you, our friend, guardian and protector.  What a gifted and talented family member. So very intelligent, you brought joy to so many of us:  Young and old, the weak, feeble and strong.  You humbled us at the end.  We all know that you understood how much we loved you, as we knew too how much you loved us.

God blessed us when he sent you to our family.  We now say “Bless you Sadie”, our friend.  Sleep now and rest through eternity.

“Grampa”

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The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy
Continued Part XX
(SUBMITTED BY GWEN BRADEEN)

One important fact we do gain from this article:  when the new grammar school was built (1892-93), it became the one village school.

“So 1893,” the Breeze article went on, “brought the handsome new edifice, which is familiar to us all as our new high school building.”  (That was the building that we, in 1978, call the old grammar school).  “Joyfully,” says the article, “ the children trooped to the new house and settled into their places as Primary, Intermediate or High School Scholars (capitals mine).    Joyful at sight of the fine new building but reluctant to leave the pretty grounds around the old school ( the primary building).”

This last sentence carries us ahead for a moment, to the Fred K. Owen article in the 1908 Breeze.  The reason the old primary building had “pretty grounds” was that “The year of  1876 was known as the Centennial year… and there was a general tree planting all over the country, as one way of celebrating… and many of the beautiful shade trees growing in various parts of the village are a result.”

The Odd Fellows Hall and the primary building were next door to each other.  “The two yards were practically one,” wrote Mr. Owen, “ and it was resolved by the members of the lodge and the school committee (as a centennial celebration, remembrance) that a handsome grove of maples and elm trees should be set out there, one which future generations should be proud of.”

That is why the pupils were reluctant to leave the “pretty grounds” of the primary school when the new high school opened in 1893—and why they “looked with envy upon the pretty yard  around the primary building.”

One more parenthetical thought before going on with the development of the high school.  I mentioned a few paragraphs earlier the 1903 statement that the old IOOF Hall could be recognized “as the tenement near the present primary building.”  So we know that this building had been made into a tenement prior to 1903.  Most likely, alterations on that building had been made shortly after the new Odd Fellows Hall at the corner of Main and Elm Streets was erected in 1890.  The old tenement, let me add, during Civil War times was owned by the state and was known as “Armory Hall.”  The town once negotiated, unsuccessfully for its purpose as a town hall.  This old building can still be seen on the Historical Society’s map of Milo dated 1896.

Now to continue with the story of the high school:

During its first ten or twelve years of operation, attendance at the high school was evidently small, for in 1885, this item appeared in the town treasurer’s records: “Paid out for use of hall, wages and board of teachers, $192.50.”

In the late 1880’s attendance took a spurt and in 1890 registration was listed at 105 with an average attendance of 90.  In 1889, F.F. Hayes, the principal, received a salary of $125.35.  His assistant, Lillian Russell, received $80.  The year after the principal was F.O. Small and his wage was $74 a month.  There was no mention of an assistant.

This understaffing in the high school was to plague the process of higher education for a long time.  Despite an increasing registration the principal continued to operate with never more than one assistant.  The Breeze of 1905, in an editorial, deplored the continued understaffing.

“The greatest need of our school,” said the editorial, “ is a third teacher.  Two teachers are wholly insufficient to do the work that is being done at the present time… They cannot carry on successfully the work called for in our courses of study as it necessitates each teacher having an average of ten recitations per day throughout the year.”

Not only understaffing but also the lack of interest of parents and towns people in the schools drew complaints from the Breeze editors in issue after issue.  The complaints were coupled with a plea for visitors to come and see what was being done.

- - - - - - - - - - -

For nearly twenty years after its establishment in 1874, the curriculum of the free high school remains a closed book.  There is no light in its content until 1894 when Supervisor I.G. Mayo reported in a town authorized revision of the course of study throughout the school system.  This was the first such undertaking of the town’s records show.

In the course of his comprehensive report, Supervisor Mayo wrote:  “The (New) course of study was adopted at the fall term (1893).  It required considerable labor to arrange the classes and get each scholar in his proper grade and class; especially so in the high school, where they had been allowed to study anything and everything from the spelling book to Greek grammar.”

Before we take lightly this chaotic curriculum of the early years, we would do well to remember that the school was breaking a new road for itself.  All towns that entered into this new venture no doubt experienced some such problems of how to fit unprecedented details into one big, successful whole operation.  Most of us touched a hot stove once before we knew “what” hot meant.  The revision of 1893, despite the inevitable humiliation, was undoubtedly a great relief and a helpful boost to morale.  The revision must have been accomplished with help, at least, from the state department of education (to the extent that that department was then functioning), for the 1893 attention to details of teaching was painstaking as well as explicit.

Milo Free Public Library News
BY JUDITH MCDOUGALL

This week Pam has taken vacation time so Nancy Scroggins is once again helping us keep the library going. As she was a former library director in NH, she always has good suggestions and I am always receptive to new ideas.

Our community reader this week was David Walker, the superintendent for MSAD 41. His wife Deborah was planning to read at Story Time but had an unexpected appointment come up, and David filled in as a reader. As with all our readers, we certainly appreciate the time and effort David gave to the library Story Time for our youngest patrons. Please note that any child can come to Story Time. They DO NOT have to be a member of the summer reading program. If you have children visiting you on the next two Wednesdays, feel free to bring them in at 2:30 for Story Time. It lasts about 1⁄2 hour.

This week we received a box of TY “Beanie Babies”---cute plushy little animals. They were sent by our library benefactor in Salinas, CA, Esperanza Crackel. She will be sending another box soon. She is sending them for our summer reading program members. At our final party they will each be able to choose a “Beanie Baby” to keep for themselves. The “Beanie Babies” are all so cute, it will be very hard for them to choose one . Ms. Crackel is doing these special things, donating “Beanie Babies” and also books for our summer reading program, in memory of our former trustee, Helen Carey, who strongly supported this program too.

Here’s a little news I heard this week and thought it would be interesting for this column. A recent book The Shop on Blossom Street by Debbie Macomber is about a group of ladies who get together at the shop to knit, experts and beginners alike. The first pattern they plan to do together is a knitted baby quilt (would we call it an afghan?) Anyway one of our patrons told me she is making up the quilt from the book. I was really surprised and am certainly looking forward to seeing it when it is finished.

I’m reading an interesting book---Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss. It’s about punctuation and how it evolved, but it’s done in a very humorous way. In fact, the book is a best seller in Great Britain! As a former English teacher (very few will remember me as I taught a long time ago and for a very few months), I knew about the uses of punctuation but was curious about this book and wondered how such a book could be a best seller. I had never really thought about the history of punctuation and how it was developed bit by bit to give clarity and meaning to the written world, but that is the job of the comma, apostrophe, semi-colon and the period ( or as the British say-the full stop). They help to give a sentence its true meaning. Take the title of the book above as a good example. Without the comma after Eats the title is about the habits of panda bears, but with the comma, it puts a gun in the paw of the panda and changes everything. For those of you who are writers or for those of you who would like to browse an interesting subject as a change of pace, this book might be for you.

We have three new books this week. As this is an election year, the new Clinton book might be of interest, and of course Sue Grafton has been long awaited.

Clinton, Bill                       MY LIFE

Grafton, Sue                      R IS FOR RICOCHET

Greenlaw, Linda                  ALL FISHERMEN ARE LIARS

(this last a gift from Neil Hamlin)

Library Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---2:00-8:00
Telephone 943-2612

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CARD OF THANKS

The Family Of VAUGHN WEYMOUTH wishes to thank friends for their kindness during our time of loss. Joan Weymouth & Family

A Historical Review - Part 2

Residents of Sebec Lake Concerned over Dam Bangor Daily News, Diana Bowley, 6/6/1981 (Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2004)

Hartley said he told Kenneth Plumb, secretary of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in Washington, of eight provisions relating to the maintenance of the water level of Sebec Lake which should be included in any commission permit or license. They were:  Owner of the dam or power generating facilities should annually maintain a constant water level of 322.8 feet from Memorial Day to Sept. 15.... At no time during the year will the water be maintained or stored for power generation at a level higher than 322.8 feet.... During the 3 ½  month summer period, water will be released from the dam for power generation only if the lake level of 322.8 feet can be maintained.... In October of each year the lake level will be lowered to or close to the natural level (the level without the dam) as is customary to protect the spawning lake trout or togue.

... When ice is forming in the lake and when ice appears ready to go out in the spring, attention will be given to lowering the lake level a foot or more below 322.8 feet to protect waterfront facilities from potential damage resulting from high water, moving ice and high winds.... In the event ownership of the dam passes from Bangor Hydro-Electric Co. to the applicant or others, they shall cooperate fully with the Sebec Lake Association or its successor with respect not only to the foregoing provisions, but with respect to provisions that might arise in the future but cannot now be foreseen.

... Failure to comply with any of the provisions will initiate license or revocation proceedings, as established by the commissioner.

... Owners of the dam will accept financial liability for (1) property damage due to high water and flooding which could have reasonably been anticipated, and avoided, and (2) loss of the normal use of the lake and lakefront property because fo excessively low water during the summer when such excessively low water could have reasonably been anticipated and avoided.

(Continued next week) 

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham

Life is full of miracles...some big and some little; but no matter the size, none the less miraculous. Where to begin? It's been a long, arduous week. Dad needed surgery, and his surgeon wanted him in Bangor at the EMMC. We decided that we'd need to stay with him day and night to reduce his confusion. The operation was a success. His stay was even more successful. I took the first 36 hours and my brother was on board after that. Sometime during the wee hours of that first night/next morning someone told me about a program that they have for families who don't think it's safe to leave their elder parents alone with no support. That would have been me. It's not like I think I'm the only one who can take care of Dad....it's just that I know him better than anyone and I know that he would have been seriously confused without constant confirmation as to where he was and why he was there.

After that first 36 hours they moved Dad to a room where this one-on-one service could be better implemented. A one-on-one was shared with another man.....and that's when the miracle happened. The one-on-one was a little hyperactive Irish leprechaun.

I swear to God. He was a whirling dervish little man, tending to Dad and then tending to the other gentleman. Every comfort that he could afford both of these men...day in and day out...was provided. I was totally in awe of him and our good fortune. I cannot say enough good about this hospital and the quality of care that my father received. Both were tiptop. And....Dad came on board the same day that Debbie Carey Johnson (That's right, Milo's own Debbie Carey) was named President of the EMMC. She'd been acting the part for a while, and she did such a good job of acting the part that they officially gave her the part!! Good job Debbie! You and your hospital are a class act. Everyone was respectful, cheerful, and most importantly helpful. Even the few staff members who probably weren't working at 100% capacity were friendly. I'm convinced that the little leprechaun was sent to us from heaven above and that we truly were touched by an angel.

The next amazing thing that happened to me this week was something that I found. I can't believe this has been right under my nose...right here in my own house...for years and in my father's house for years before that...and I'd never looked at it before.

Dad needed to go to the Maine Veteran's Home in Bangor for a few days to receive some rehabilitation. It might be a short stay...and it might take a little longer than we anticipate, but in any case he's there and adjusting very well. He had been there before so they had him all in the computer and I didn't have to take much documentation with me. I did go in search of his discharge papers, though, just in case I needed to produce them. It wasn't hard. They were right in his room where he has always kept them. With the discharge papers was a little thin booklet...hard covered...pages worn from writing in it and then reading it over and over. It was a journal of his career in the military. Chronicled in time-line fashion were all of his interesting stops and events.

There was a page specifically for promotions, overseas destinations, how he got there and how he got back, buddies names and their addresses at home, etc. The page that I found most fascinating, however, was a page entitled "autographs." I almost skipped over the page, but one autograph caught my eye...Frank Sinatra. I screamed! Frank Sinatra!!! Then my eyes glanced up higher on the page and what I saw boggled my mind (and it is still boggled.) The first name on his list of autographs was Bob Hope. Bob Hope!!! Jack Benny was there, too, as well as Humphrey Bogart! There were a couple of names that I didn't recognize. I'm ashamed to say that I didn't recognize the name of Jimmy DooLittle nor Hap Arnold. I was quickly informed, by people in the know, that they were both famous Generals of the war and that it might be of some significance that Dad has their autographs together on the same page. Frances Langford and Frederic March also signed Dad's book. Quite a find, don'cha think??? I'm very excited about authenticating the signatures and finding out if it has any value besides sentimental. It's actually priceless to me.

I must apologize for the errors in last week's column. My critical editor (with whom I sleep) informed me that I spelled the word lightening wrong. Actually, there is such a word as "lightening"....and I didn't question the spelling...the sky was "lightened" wasn't it? He informs me it's "lightning." Different word altogether. Gotcha! Also, he says I spelled "noise" wrong. I spelled it "noice." I had to look that one up because "noice" looked right to me! What do I know? I can't believe my spell-check didn't correct that...well, I guess he did. Oh well, I'm sure you got the drift...and maybe a little chuckle besides. It's a darn good thing I wasn't in a spelling bee. I'd have been pretty embarrassed to go down on the word noise!

Here's something to do with those zucchini squash that will be coming in abundance in our gardens soon. Italian Zucchini Boats

6 medium zucchini
2 cups dry bread crumbs
2 eggs lightly beaten
1 large tomato, diced

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1/3 cup Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup minced fresh parsley (or 1 and 1/2 Tablespoons dry parsley)
2 garlic cloves
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
2 Tablespoons butter or stick margarine, melted

Cut the zucchini in half lengthwise. With a spoon, scoop out and reserve pulp, leaving a 3/8 inch shell. Cook the shells in salted water for 2 minutes; remove and drain. Chop zucchini pulp; place in a bowl. Add the bread crumbs, eggs, tomato, Parmesan cheese, parsley and garlic. Stir in broth, salt and pepper. Stuff into zucchini shells. Place in a greased 13" X 9" baking pan. Drizzle with butter. Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or until golden brown. This will serve 6.


HAPPY 59TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
MUM AND DAD!
Much love from Rita, Patricia, Nancy,
and families!


A FUTURE “TIGRESS WOODS”?

MISS EMMA O’CONNOR PRACTICING HER SKILLS AT THE JSI CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT AT THE KATAHDIN COUNTRY CLUB IN MILO ON   SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 2004.

Emma is the almost 4-year old daughter of Michael and Jody O’Connor of Glenburn.

 

Corrections for the Tae Kwon Do classes:

Mid-Maine Tae Kwon Do

Owned and operated by Bill and Karen Goodman.  Both are certified 2nd Degree Black Belts offering traditional lessons in street smart self-defense, sparring techniques, and much more.  Family discounts and private instructions are available for adolescents, teens, and adults.  There is a “Tiny Tiger” program for children ages’ kindergarten through 2nd grade.  They are continually accepting new students.  The classes are held at the Milo Town Hall on the second floor.

Tiny Tigers – Every Sunday from 2:30 to 3:30 and regular Tae Kwon Do classes from 4:30 to 6:30 every Thursday.

E-mail us at: Midmainetkd@yahoo.com or call 564-3073.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS
 
CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to enjoy fellowship, share ideas, conduct Club business, and host many interesting speakers.  All are welcome to visit with us.  If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application.  We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them with us.

AUGUST 4TH MEETING MINUTES

President Joe Zamboni welcomed sixteen members this morning and guest George Barton.  Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham asked for prayers for those in our country’s service.  Steve Hamlin read an inspirational passage about waiting to have children and all that is required of fathers is love and attention.

The Orono/Old Town newsletter was shared.

Steve and Cheryl Hamlin celebrate their anniversary on the 5th , Paul and Ruby Grindle’s is on the 7th, and Don Harris will observe his birthday on the 8th .

Happy and sad dollars were donated for the gazebo coming along, Dottie being back, having George here, twin great-granddaughters due later this year!, and spending an anniversary at Yankee Stadium.

Members are asked to let Joe or Nancy know what events they have participated in during the past year.  A list of activities will soon be sent to all Kiwanis members.

Joe reported that partial electricity is in at the gazebo site and the foundation is ready for the steel to be put in.

The next Senior barbeque is in LaGrange on August 11.

The Zoot Suit Review is the upcoming event at the Milo Town Hall Art Center.

The Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, August 5.

Steve Hamlin requested help for the JSI Charity Golf Tournament on Friday.  Spotters, greeters, and cooks are needed as well as help setting up canopies.  Val, Tabitha and D.J. Olmstead, Nancy, and Fred offered their help.

We will have an abbreviated business meeting on August 11 as Milo’s Town Manager Jane Jones, will speak to us about the Eastern Piscataquis Industrial Park, the Milo Special Town Meeting, the November County Bonding Issue, and the Palesky Initiative.

Our guest speaker on August 18 will be State Representative James D. Annis.

Don Harris told us that our speaker today, Jack Gifford, is the chairman of the “dreams for Maine Kids”.  This organization is not based in an office with administrators but consists of nine members who work full time at their own private jobs.  They are based in Bangor and receive funding from an endowment and donations.  Mr. Gifford emphasized that donations stay in Maine. 

He likened this group to the “Make-A-Wish” Foundation but much smaller with a quicker response time.  They have acted on requests within 48 hours!  They provide dream wishes for children with life altering illnesses.  Knowing the families are also in stressful times they are included in the activities provided for the child with an illness.  Even though  “dreams for Maine Kids” is a small organization, four or five dreams are realized each year.

 Dream wishes are as varied as the children.  They range from specially adapted computers to swimming with the dolphins in San Diego to appearing on the Rosie O’Donnell Show.

The five similar organizations in Maine coordinate efforts so as to not repeat wishes.

The brochures Mr. Gifford shared with us included beautiful artwork by a very special young lady.  When she received her specially adapted computer she asked how she could pay for it.  Mr. Gifford told her he needed artwork for a new brochure.  She made sure her drawings were accessible just a few days before she passed away.

To find out more about “Dreams for Maine Kids”, go to www.dreamsformainekids.org.

Thank you Mr. Gifford, for telling us more about the efforts of “Dreams for Maine Kids”.

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WHAT'S NEW ON TRC

The newest addition to our site is the Alumni Section (www.trcmaine.org/alumni/).  This section is devoted to the three local alumni associations from Milo High School, Brownville Jct. High School, and Penquis Valley High School.  We will post any and all information that the associations want.  Currently, only the MHS page has information on.  If you are involved in any of the organizations and would like to give us some info, please contact us at info@trcmaine.org, or Izzy Warren at 943-7367.

This summer we are also offering an Online Farmers Market (trcmaine.org/community/farmers). We are looking for prices, directions, and contact info for anyone who sells home-grown produce.  This service is free of charge, and we hope to better promote the local farmers!  Please contact us if you would like your prices and items listed.

WORD SEARCH

M L S R O G D D L N N J H F B
G Q F M K O N N L U H D D I S
M C J O I P J O A R B C B R Q
U T C J C C S I H M X L O E B
R O W P X E T T N H C A S D H
R D I N G R X A W C C I L E C
E D N Y W O M T O Z G R J P J
L U G Q Z L L S T E C M Y A A
Q O L L F I S E O E K S T R N
A H E M T M L C L P U A V T E
X F R X S Y D I I R W S N M D
R W L I Z T V L M Z O H L E N
L S F R I T X O P F D B I N J
W C H U K E Q P Q G L U I T G
M E E U G B O H M H R B E N C

FIREDEPARTMENT    POLICESTATION     MILOTOWNHALL      WINGLER     MILOREC     MURREL      CLAIR ROBIN BETTY TODD   JANE


WE NEED YOUR HELP!

If you know any information about the Boston Post Gold-Headed Canes, or who the current holders are for the towns in our area, please contact us!  We are looking to create a new Landmark Feature!

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