Three Rivers News, 2004-08-30
MONDAY, AUGUST 30, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 42
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

SOFTBALL CHAMPS
THE *HIT-WEASELS

Front from left to right, Erica “The Force” Lyford, Michelle “The Hit-Dog” Mulheran, Valerie “ The Elder” Robertson, Heather “ The Arm” Anthony, Julie “ The Hot Corner” Herbest, Katherine “The Trouper” Zwicker, Pat “ The Phenome” Zwicker and Marilyn “Coach” Zwicker Lyford.   Coincidently we lined up with the "meat" of the order in the front , the back row is the "meatless" order, and in the middle is our “athletic supporter”.

A LEAGUE OF OUR OWN
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON AND COACH LYFORD

Sunday, August 22, 2004, was the perfect day to play softball.  The Brownville Rec. Dept hosted 4 teams made up of past and current players from Milo and Brownville. Because of rain, the games had been rescheduled 2 times; so it was questionable as to whether there would still be enough players for 4 teams. With a little help from some spectators - turned players and  some fine pitching/umping by Torrey Ellis; there were enough players to  get all the games in.

The teams were as follows: (captains in bold, team members underneath)

Jean Larson    Dawn Russell   Erin Weston    Marilyn Lyford,

Peggy Ellis         Kelsey Ottmann    Barb Allen,            Erica Lyford

Megan Russell     Pattie Ottmann    April Allen          Val Robertson

Kerri Russell       Mindy Dolley        Mindy Dyer    Katharyn Zwicker

Haley Flanders     Danni Graves     Katie Roberston   Julie Herbest

Kasey Sherburne  Sherri Coburn    Donna Dyer    Michelle Mulherin

Deanna Sherburne Erika Coburn    Liz Gerrish      Heather Anthony

Angie Smart       Lori McGlaughlin  Debbie Durant    Pat Zwicker 

The resulting games were a sight to behold.  The veteran players were schooled by the rookies in order to bring some much-needed fundamentals back into the picture.  Heeding advice such as “hit it”, “somebody catch it”, “instead of oh-oh, someone yell “I’ve got it!”,  and “follow me-we’re going home”, paid off for the above group, and they somehow ended up winning the title of “Champs”.

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With 4 teams, each team playing each other once....... the 2 teams with the best records played 1 final game for the championship; and it turned into a marathon game! 9 innings to be exact.

The games were all quite close because of a good mix of young and old playing together.......but it came down to Dawn Russell's team vs. Marilyn Lyford's team (the S---Weasels). Dawn won the coin toss, so they elected to be home team. I think everyone was starting to feel the effects of playing all day, but there was still enough enthusiasm to get in one more game. Lyford's team got up.....and never scored a run their first time at bat......Dawn's team on the other hand, scored 3 runs right off the bat to "get ur done". I'm not exactly sure who had the hits that inning or who scored.....but I do remember that Mindy Dolley hit the ball exceptionally well and exceptionally FAR (and she seemed to bat a lot more often than the S@#$weasels wanted her to!).

There would be no more runs until the 3rd inning; which was a good one for the Weasel's, with Erica and Julie scoring on hits from Heather and Michelle making it a 3-2 game. If it ended like that, the Weasel's would be happy with their performance and stamina......but it didn't end. The Weasels somehow got another run in the 5th inning from Erica Lyford to tie the game at 3 all. Miraculously, they held Dawn’s team for the next two times at bat, sending it into extra innings.

It turned into a marathon game, with truly exceptional defense on both teams and great catches and (traps) from the outfielders. For the next 3 1/2 innings.....the score remained 3-3 until Michelle Mulherin hit a double, putting her in scoring position (with her great speed).  Marilyn Lyford was next and hit a line drive between 1st and 2nd.....giving Michelle the opportunity to score......and she did. The Weasels took the field with a 1 run advantage and somehow held Dawn's team for 1 last inning;
giving the Weasel's the championship. Who would have thunk it!

WIN OR LOSE........everyone who played had a great time and I know would love to play again next year. Hopefully the weather will cooperate a little better and we might possibly get more teams to participate.

A special thanks for the umpires who helped and "pitched" and to captains for all their help.

Editor’s Note:
In all fairness to the 2nd place team, we may have been given a few breaks on our way to victory lane.  Torrey Ellis served as our “pinch-pitcher”, and snagged a few line drives that may have gotten by our fatigued hurler, Marilyn Zwicker Lyford..  And the fact that it was a double elimination tournament and we only beat the second place team once may have helped us a bit on the way to our title.  Dawn Russell’s team gave us an incredible fight that went into extra innings.  And although perhaps the winning team may not have been the most skilled team, we were definitely the most enthusiastic, optimistic, and confident.

I cannot begin to tell you what fun the day was. Some of us hadn’t played ball in years and a few of us less athletic girls hadn’t played for decades. The fact that our muscles held up to play 4 games (one with extra innings!) is  itself a major accomplishment.  There were no season ending injuries, although many of us would have rather not had any stairs to walk up the next day.

Note of thanks:
The Penquis Valley High School Softball Team would like to thank all of the players, umpires and fans that contributed to the ladies softball tournament last Sunday. The tournament was a great success. As always the community support for our softball team has been tremendous.

Thanks again.
Coach Dick Martin , Coach Torrey Ellis and the girls

Editors Note:  Thanks for having us!

STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., AUG. 31 CHUCK WAGON BEANS, CALICO SLAW, BISCUIT, PEARS
WED., SEPT. 1 BAKED HADDOCK, PEPPER RELISH, MASHED POTATO, PEAS, CREAM PUFF SQUARE
THUR., SEPT. 2 STUFFED VEAL W/ ROSEMARY SAUCE, RED POTATO, CARROTS, CHERRY CRISP
FRI., SEPT. 3 ROAST BEEF, BAKED POTATO, BEETS, TAPIOCA
MON. SEPT. 4 ALL SITES CLOSED FOR LABOR DAY

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS.  WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM.
PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. 


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15 PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


THE MILO WATER DISTRICT IS LOOKING TO FILL THE POSITION OF WATER-WASTEWATER LABORER.  THIS IS A PHYSICALLY DEMANDING POSITION REQUIRING EXTENDED MANUAL LABOR.  SHOULD BE ABLE TO FOLLOW WORK ASSIGNMENTS, COMMUNICATE WELL WITH SUPERVISORS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC.  MUST HAVE HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR EQUIVALENT AND VALID MAINE DRIVER’S LICENSE.  STARTING PAY WILL BE $7.50 PER HOUR.    PLEASE APPLY AT MILO WATER DISTRICT,  943-2501, LOCATED AT:

62 MAIN STREET, MILO, MAINE 04463.  APPLICATIONS WILL CLOSE SEPTEMBER 7, 2004

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Milo Recreation Dept.

YOGA AND YOUR FITNESS
PRESENTED BY CINDY HERBEST-943-2630

Ok, it's time to stop talking about it  and time to actually try it!  With strength, flexibility and relaxation  being a few of the benefits, you will love this 8 week class.

Just wear comfortable clothing and stop by the
Milo Town Hall.

Starting Wednesday September 8,
6:00 - 7:00    $30.00

CARDIO CRAZE
Our bodies crave aerobic exercise,  so lets shake things up  and strengthen our heart and lungs. This easy to follow class  will get the heart rate up and the job done in a short time. Also, a great warm up for the Yoga class if you wish to stay.
Please wear comfortable clothing and sneakers.

Wednesday, September 8, 5:30 - 6:00
$18.00 or a $3.00 walk-in fee.

Jump into your fall fitness and take both classes for only $42.00, that's only $5.25 for each full class! 

Editors Note: Here we go girls. Let’s all take this class and get ready for our next Alumni Challenge!


To the Editors:

Last week Lynn Weston presented the readership of TRN with a very excellent and thought provoking cover photo. Like Lynn, many in the area probably have had grandfathers and even great grandfathers who worked in the Derby shops-myself included. Like Lynn's grandfather Jim Zwicker, my grandfather Will Roberts was better known for other jobs. Jim was a carpenter and saw filer. Will Roberts was a slate splitter, who worked briefly at Derby until the shops strike in 1922. The strikers went out on strike and never got their jobs back.

My grandfather went on to become superintendent of the Matthews Slate Quarry in Monson, taking his wife Grace and three children there with him. When Brownville celebrated its centennial in 1924, they came down from Monson to see it.

There are a few men in the photo that look like my grandfather, but I am not sure. It could be from another epoch.

Thanks Lynn for gracing TRN with your photos

Bill Sawtell

Brownville Trivia
Choose the best answer.

1. Brownville became a town in (a) 1814 (b) 1820 (c) 1823 (d) 1824.

2. The Pleasant River has (a) one (b) two (c) three (d) five branches.

3. Park Holland was a (a) surveyor (b) preacher (c) doctor (d) recreation area

4. Fleetwood Pride was a (a) singer (b) mill owner (c) town manager (d) blacksmith.

5. Carroll Conley coached the Railroaders to (a) one (b) two (c) three (d) five Eastern Maine championship(s).

6. (a) Brewer’s (b) Richardson’s (c) Stymiest’s (d) Frenches’ made the first pizzas in Brownville.

7.The first slate quarry was the (a) Crocker (b) Merrill (c) Highland (d) Abee Quarry.

8. Brownville's altitude is about (a) 100 (b) 200 (c) 300 (d) 400 feet above sea level.

9. Brownville's population is close to (a) 1000 (b) 1100 (c) 1200 (d) 1500 (d) 2000.

10. The first town manager was (a) Dave Cota (b) Lyle Towne (c) Ernest Seavey (d) Everett Gerrish.

Answers: 1-d 2-c 3-a 4-b 5-b 6-a 7-a 8-c 9-c 10-d

BOX TOPS FOR EDUCATION REMINDER

It's time to start turning in those Box Tops you clipped and saved all summer long. Stop by the Milo Farmer’s Union and drop them off.
 

The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy

Continued Part XXIII

Earlier in this story I mentioned that the district school teachers were desperately underpaid.  And they were!  The year 1890 is as good a time as any to bring evidence to bear in support of that assertion.  In that year the superintending school committee, apparently through some unfathomable foresight, recorded statistics about the district schools for us who might some day want to know.  And this report dealt, among other things with wages.

Signed by M.S. Bishop, H. F. Daggett and H. Hamlin, it listed district name and number; teacher at that particular time in each district school; weeks in term; wages per week; cost of board (for the town paid the board of teachers until about the close of the century); number of scholars registered in each school and the average attendance.

From that report we learn that Addie Church taught at Sargent Hill, wages $4 per week; board $1.50 per week, Gracie McIntosh, at the Goodrich School, wages $3, board $1.50; Edith Church, at the Hobbstown School, wages $2 (lowest wage in the system), board $1.50.

Sada Smart taught at the Stanchfield Ridge School, wages $3, board $1.25, (least expensive board in the system).

Three teachers were listed in District 5, the village:  primary, Mrs. Sawyer (not Agnes), wages $5, board $2; Grammar, W.S. Bishop, wages $8, board not listed, Intermediate, Mrs. Smith, wages $6, board $2.

The Murray School (back Brownville Road), paid Amy Murray $3 in wages and $3 for board.  Nellie Livermore, Drake School, wages $3, board $1.50; Alice Gifford, Tollbridge School, wages $3, board $3.  And at the Holbrook School, Edith Bumps was teacher at a weekly wage of $2.50 and board $2.50.

In his report for 1891, Superintendent I.G. Mayo explained the disparity between teachers in the wages paid.

“In four of the districts, “he wrote, “there has been an attendance of less than nine pupils.  In these schools the agents felt that they must hire teachers at a low price.  High wages would mean a very short term.  (This seems to imply that each district was allotted an amount of tax money in proportion to the number of its pupils registered.  Weeks per year varied from 24 to 26 in the districts.  The agents had one fixed factor-money-and two variables-weeks per year and wages.  The variables the agent had to bring into the equation as best he could).

For whatever interest it yields these were the figures on scholars in that 1890 gold mine of statistics. 

District Pupils Registered Average Attendance
1. Sargent Hill 26 24
2. Goodrich 9 9
3. Hobbstown 4 3.9
4. Stanchfield Ridge 17 14
5. Grammar 50 40
5. Intermediate 40 35
5. Primary 35 30
6. Murray 9 8.5
7. Tollbridge 14 13
8. Drake 7 6.85
9. Holbrook 10 7.5

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The four schools with the low registration were, as shown, Goodrich (Medford Road); Hobbstown;  Murray (back Brownville Road); and Drake (Brownville Road).

The superintendent was well aware of the complications inevitable in these low-paying districts.

“The consequence was, “the report went on, “we had several young, inexperienced teachers with only a fair, common school education.  Most of these teachers have done fairly well, considering their opportunities and will, with more experience or, what would be better, a few years’ drill (that word “drill” again) at one of our normal schools, make a good teacher.”      

The total wage picture, and its effect on schools, came up four years later in a vitriolic outburst by a superintendent whose name, for the first time, wasn’t signed to the report—at least in the town record.  It may well have been I.G. Mayo who had a controversial way about him, a strong sense of dedication to education and a rather short fuse.

“At the beginning of the year (1895)” ran the report, “it was my good fortune to secure teachers educated at one of the normal schools.  They gave excellent satisfaction.  But it was the vote of the committee to change these teachers on the grounds that we were paying too much wages—ten dollars a week.

“I think,” the report went on acidly, “that the schools of Milo need a little more supervision and a little less committee!”

The supervising school committee evidently didn’t like his report any better that they liked his teachers and clipped his wings forthwith, for he complained at the end of the same report: “The authority of the Supervisor was so reduced that all that was left to do was to visit schools and report their condition; and do any other duty that was not particularly pleasant for the members of the committee.”

A Historical Review
World War II Recipes
Bangor Daily News, March 13, 1942

(Submitted by C.K.Ellison, 2004)

Bean Loaf with Tomato Sauce:

1 and 1/2 cups dried beans, 1 small onion, chopped, 3 tablespoons fat, melted, 1 cup soft bread crumbs, 1 egg, 1 cup evaporated milk. Wash dried beans, cover with cold water, soak overnight. Cook the beans in this water for one hour or until tender. Drain, mash, add remaining ingredients and mix well. Shape into loaf and put into a well-greased baking dish or bread pan.

Bake in moderate oven about 30 minutes.
Serve with tomato sauce. Note: the bean mixture may be shaped into patties and browned in a greased frying pan on top of the stove.

Tomato Sauce:

Two tablespoons fat, 2 tablespoons flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 2 cups canned tomatoes. Melt fat, add flour and salt. Gradually add canned tomatoes. Cook on low flame, stirring constantly until thickened.

Tuna Bake with Cheese Swirls:

3 tablespoons chopped onion, 1/3 cup chopped green pepper, 4 tablespoons fat, 1 teaspoon salt, 6 tablespoons flour, 1 10-1/2 ounce can condensed chicken or celery soup, 1 1/2 cups milk, 1 can tuna fish, 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Brown onion and green pepper in fat; add salt and flour, blend; add soup and milk; cook until sauce is thick and smooth. Add flaked tuna fish and lemon juice. Pour into greased baking dish and cover with cheese swirls. Bake in hot oven, 450 degrees, 15 minutes. Reduce to 425° for 15 minutes.

Cheese Swirls:

Roll standard biscuit dough 1/2 inch thick; cover with finely cut spreading cheese or grated American cheese and finely chopped pimento. Roll and cut in 1/2-inch slices.
Place on creamed tuna, cut side down.

Porky Pie:

Cut 1 pound lean pork into 1-inch pieces, brown in 4 tablespoons fat heated in a frying pan; add 1/2 cup each diced onions, green peppers, and celery.
Cook 5 minutes, sprinkle with 4 tablespoons flour, 1-teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon paprika. Blend and add 2 1/2 cups water. Simmer 10 minutes. Add 1 cup cooked peas, 2/3 cup diced cooked carrots and 1 tablespoon minced parsley.
Pour into buttered, shallow baking pan and cover with biscuit dough (cut round or shaped). Spread tops lightly with equal portions of egg yolk and milk. Bake 30 minutes in moderate oven.

Note: Fat... I would choose butter, bacon fat, or olive oil; and use less salt if the fat contains salt.

Editor’s Note: I received this forward from Cheryl Hamlin.  When people lament about the good old days, and say that things aren’t what they used to be…..I say “Thank Goodness!”  Dwelling on the past and thinking that everything in today’s world is evil and counter-productive will only serve to make you bitter and unhappy.  Remember the wonderful positive things from years gone-by, but embrace change and go with it.  Medically we are living in an age where killer children’s diseases are becoming fewer and fewer, and people are being healed and living a much longer life. 

The Year is 1904

Maybe this will boggle your mind, I know it did mine! The year is 1904 ... one hundred years ago. What a difference a century makes! Here are some of the U.S. statistics for 1904:

*The average life expectancy in the U.S. was 47 years.
*Only 14 percent of the homes in the U.S. had a bathtub.
*Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone.
*A three-minute call from Denver to New York City cost eleven dollars.
*There were only 8,000 cars in the U.S., and only 144 miles of paved roads. The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.
*Alabama, Mississippi, Iowa, and Tennessee were each more heavily populated than California. With a mere 1.4 million residents, California was only the 21st most populous state in the Union.
*The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower.
*The average wage in the U.S. was 22 cents an hour.
*The average U.S. worker made between n $200 and $400 per year.
*A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year, a dentist $2,500 per year, a veterinarian between $1,500 and $4,000 per year, and a mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year.
*More than 95 percent of all births in the U.S. took place at home.
*Ninety percent of all U.S. physicians had no college education. Instead, they attended medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press and by the government as "substandard."
*Sugar cost four cents a pound. Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen.
*Coffee was fifteen cents a pound.

*Most women only washed their hair once a month, and used borax or egg yolks for shampoo.

*Canada passed a law prohibiting poor people from entering the country for any reason.

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*The five leading causes of death in the U.S. were:
1. Pneumonia and influenza
2. Tuberculosis
3. Diarrhea
4. Heart disease
5. Stroke

*The American flag had 45 stars. Arizona, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Hawaii, and Alaska hadn't been admitted to the Union yet.

*The population of Las Vegas, Nevada, was 30.

*Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn't been invented.

*There was no Mother's Day or Father's Day.

*Two of 10 U.S. adults couldn't read or write. Only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated high school.

*Marijuana, heroin, and morphine were all available over the counter at corner drugstores. According to one pharmacist, "Heroin clears the complexion, gives buoyancy to the mind, regulates the stomach and bowels, and is, in fact, a perfect guardian of health."

*Eighteen percent of households in the U.S. had at least one full-time servant or domestic.

*There were only about 230 reported murders in the entire U.S.

*And I forwarded this from someone else without typing it myself, and sent it to all of you in a matter of seconds! Try to imagine what it may be like in another 100 years ... it staggers the mind.

And speaking of the good in this world…..

Matthew Pokrywka will be leaving for the Peace Corps on September 20. He will be spending 2 years in Mali in north west Africa as an Urban Small Enterprise Development Adviser.

He graduated from Penquis Valley High School in 2000 and Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin this past May with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

There will be a reception for Matt at the Milo Town Hall on September 11 from 2PM to 4PM- all are welcome to come and wish him well in his new endeavor.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham

It's that time of year again. M.S.A.D. #41 schools are spit shined and polished. It never fails to amaze me that what we left in June could be transformed so beautifully in such a short time. There is nothing more satisfying than walking back into our schools in the fall....our new duds reflected in those incredibly shiny floors.

We registered several sweet little kindergartners last spring. In Brownville they'll be beginning their adventure into education next Monday (well, actually on Friday when they come to Open House). One of our little girls came for a little visit to my office yesterday. She hadn't come to orientation and so her Mom thought she'd bring her in for a "peek" ahead of Day One. My boss, Shirley Wright, took her for a little tour of the school and learned something very interesting about her......she sings. Shirley knew that I would be most interested in this news. She said, "Tell Mrs. Witham what you like to do." The little girl said, "Sing!" She immediately launched into two songs.....sung perfectly....never missing a word nor a note. Be still my beating heart! She even sang the country song with a bit of a twang! I think we've found one folks! Prepare yourselves for this child. With any luck I'll have her ready for a debut at the Variety Show next spring!

I've had many requests in the last couple of years to repeat the column that I wrote about the "things I learned from my mother." I will gladly do that for you. You must remember that I didn't dream these up on my own. I did add the things that made them unique to MY mother. Here is the column:

Maybe it was a 50's thing, but when I read this list I was struck by the fact that I'd heard these strategies before. Many of them were used on me. As a matter of fact, I used these strategies on my own children. I could hear the words coming right out of my mouth. Not only that, I've heard the same words out of my friend's mouths. I think it's called "motherspeak." These words were written by somebody that you or I don't even know...but, whoever wrote it must have been brought up by my mother. I called my brother and asked him if he'd written a list of things that mother had taught him and put it out on the internet. He said he hadn't, but when I read him the list he knew each line. I asked around to my friends and by golly they knew the list, too. Do any of you folks see any similarities in how you were raised by your mothers?

1. My mother taught me TO APPRECIATE A JOB WELL DONE - "If you're going to kill each other, do it outside - I just finished cleaning!"
2. My mother taught me RELIGION - "You better pray that mess will come out of that carpet."
3. My mother taught me about TIME TRAVEL - "If you don't straighten out, I'm going to knock you into the middle of next week." (This gross exaggeration was particularly intriguing. Just exactly what would that be like....to be 3 or 4 days ahead of everyone else.)
4. My mother taught me LOGIC - "Because I said so, that's why." (This never works even said through clenched teeth.)
5. My Mother taught me LOGIC...#2 - "If you fall out of that swing and break your neck, you're not going to the store with me."
6. My mother taught me FORESIGHT - "Make sure you wear clean underwear, in case you're in an accident."
7. My mother taught me IRONY - "You stop crying or I'll give you something to cry about." (of course in this politically correct passive world of the 21st century, nobody would dare to say this so that anyone else could hear them, but I've used it many times in private on my own kids.)
8. My mother taught me about the science of OSMOSIS - "Shut your mouth and eat your supper!"
9. My mother taught me about CONTORTIONS - "Will you "look" at the dirt on the back of your neck!"

10. My mother taught me about STAMINA - "You'll sit there 'till all that prune juice is finished."
11. My mother taught me about WEATHER - "It looks as if a tornado went through this room."
12. My mother taught me how to solve PHYSICS PROBLEMS - "If I yelled, because I saw a meteor coming toward you; would you listen THEN?"
13.My mother taught me about HYPOCRISY - "If I've told you once, I've told you a million times-Don't Exaggerate!"
14. My mother taught me THE CIRCLE OF LIFE - "I brought you into this world, and I can take you out."
15. My mother taught me about BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION - "Stop acting like a monkey."
16. My mother taught me about ENVY - "There are millions of less fortunate children in this world who don't have wonderful parents like you do!" (Those were not necessarily the same million children who were starving to death while I was leaving vegetables on my plate.)
17. My Mother taught me about ANTICIPATION - "Just wait until we get home."
18. My Mother taught me about RECEIVING - "You are going to get it when we get home!"
19. My Mother taught me MEDICAL SCIENCE - "If you don't stop crossing your eyes,they are going to freeze that way." (My mother also told me that her father said this to her...so we know this one was not necessarily a gender phrase...and it went way back before the '50's.)
20. My Mother taught me to THINK AHEAD - "If you don't learn those multiplication facts, you'll never get a good job."
21. My Mother taught me ESP - "Put your sweater on; don't you think I know when you're cold?"
22. My Mother taught me HUMOR - "When that lawn mower cuts off your toes, don't come running to me."
23. My Mother taught me how to BECOME AN ADULT - "If you
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don't eat your vegetables, you'll never grow up."
24. My Mother taught me about GENETICS - "You're just like your father."
25. My Mother taught me about my ROOTS - "Do you think you were born in a barn?"
26. My Mother taught me about WISDOM OF AGE - "When you get to be my age, you will understand."
27. And my all time favorite... JUSTICE - "One day you'll have kids ...and I hope they turn out just like you!" (Ain't that the truth!!")

There it is! It is pretty funny and mothers and their children, no matter the age, can appreciate and remember the truth in these words.

I've been a slug for weeks about cooking. Ever since Dad went into the hospital and then to the Veteran's Home I've taken a long vacation from cooking. It's so bad that last night I had a bowl of popcorn and a Diet Coke for supper.....I'm not kidding! And, worse than that....my husband was the one to fix it for me!

Speaking of mothers and speaking of cooking supper....here's a great casserole recipe from one of my favorite mothers. My dear friend Louise Rhoda's mother, Marion Cunningham gave me this recipe in 1983. I love reading recipes that are hand written. This one, written in that dear woman's own handwriting, is lovingly tucked into both my recipe box and my heart.

Potato Puff Casserole

1 lb. hamburger
1/4 cup chopped onions
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
1 Tablespoon chili sauce or catsup
1 can Cream of Mushroom soup
1/4 cup water
1 package (10 oz) frozen potato puffs

Cook hamburger, onions, peppers and the chili sauce until the onions and peppers are tender. turn into a 1 1/2 quart casserole dish and add soup and water - cover with the potato puffs and bake at 375 ° for 35 minutes.

METHODIST CHURCH SAYS “THANKS”!
By Carolyn Sinclair

Vacation Bible School was a great success. We had
forty children enrolled and all appeared to be enjoying the week. A big thanks to all who supported our efforts to provide a meaningful experience for the children.

IN MEMORIAM

JAMES B. FARRER

HUDSON, N.H. - James B. Farrer, 60, died Sunday Aug. 22, 2004. Mr. Farrer was born July 31, 1944, in Milo, son of the late John and Marion (Lewis) Farrer. He grew up in LaGrange, and graduated from Old Town High School in 1962. He was the husband of Dianna (Lufkin) Farrer, to whom he was married to for 39 years. Mr. Farrer was thoroughly devoted to his family and community as a resident of both Brewer and Hudson, N.H. In Brewer, he served as the Grand Knight in the Knights of Columbus and was elected and served on the Brewer School Board. After a successful career in sales and as a security guard at Southern N.H. Medical Center, he felt compelled to give back to the community by volunteering at Fairgrounds Junior High School. He also coached his children's basketball, football, softball and baseball teams, and chaperoned many class trips. Mr. Farrer enjoyed working with children and found it especially rewarding that he could make a positive impact in their lives. Mr. Farrer was very proud when he received the Larry Elliott Award at Bishop Guertin High School for his dedication to athletics. He was also an avid fisherman.In addition to his wife, survivors include three children, a son and daughter-in-law, John and Paula Farrer, of Nashua; a son and daughter-in-law, Jayson and Danielle Farrer, of Stratford, Conn.; a daughter and son-in-law, Jennifer and Steve Lavoie, of Tavernier, Fla.; three grandchildren, Nathan, Zachary and Jacob Farrer all of Nashua; his cousin, Roger Lewis, of Bangor, whom he thought of as a brother, and several aunts and cousins. In lieu of flowers, the family request donations to American Diabetes Association, 249 Canal St., Manchester, NH 03101.. To send an online message of condolence or for directions, please go to www.dumonsullivan.com.

MAUDIE F. SLEEPER

BANGOR - Maudie Frances Sleeper, 65, beloved wife of Norman M. Sleeper died Aug. 25, 2004 at a Bangor healthcare center. She was born July 25, 1939, in Memphis, Tenn., the daughter of Thomas P. and Mary Margaret (Hamilton) Bouzines. Maudie managed both McDonald's and Burger King in Ellsworth. She was assistant manager at the Red Carpet Inn on Main Street, Bangor. She became a CNA and was employed at Collier's in Ellsworth and at Stillwater Healthcare. In addition to her husband, Norman; she is survived by one daughter and son-in-law, Ramona L. and Asa R. Pickard III of Hampden; two brothers, Thomas Bouzines Jr. and wife Jewell, Bill Bouzines and wife, Virginia; three sisters, Jane Belski, Maryanna Crouch and husband, Andre, all of Memphis, Tenn., Vivian Helton of Kennett, Mo.; three grandchildren, Amanda Williams, Asa R. Pickard IV, and William J. Pickard; several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Graveside services were held Sunday, at Evergreen Cemetery, Milo, with Pastor Donald Booker of the Bradford Baptist Church officiating.

BRUCE DONALD WILSON

SANTA CLARA, Calif. - Bruce Donald Wilson, 76, died June 8, 2004, at a Santa Clara hos-pital. Bruce had been battling cancer. He was born July 2, 1927, in Derby, the son of Edward James and Iona (Dyer) Wilson. Bruce enlisted in the Navy in August 1944, serving during World War II as a lieutenant junior, and returning home in May of 1946. After his Milo High School graduation in 1948, he again served in the military, this time for three years with the Army in the Korean War. Bruce was awarded medals for his military career. After his service in the military, Bruce traveled, eventually settling in California. For 25 years he was a U.S. Postal Service carrier in Santa Clara. On the job he met Maria, his wife of 24 years. Bruce, Maria and Jenny, their daughter, resided in Santa Clara. One of Bruce's daily rituals was reading the newspaper and solving crossword puzzles. When growing up, he enjoyed playing winter hockey on one of Derby's ponds, and as an adult became a big fan of the San Jose Sharks (hockey team). He dreamed of being a professional baseball player, and greatly enjoyed playing for the Vintage Softball Club. He also enjoyed playing basketball, skiing and boating. Bruce is survived by his wife, Maria Wilson; daughter, Jenny; sister, Marjorie (Wilson) Mosher of Bangor, and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his brother, Edward Wilson of Oregon; and his sister, Lois (Wilson) O'Neal of Portland. Memorial services were held at the Lima Family Funeral Home in Santa Clara. Donations may be made in Bruce's memory to the Milo Town Hall Renovation fund. Please make checks payable to the Town of Milo, write "In memory of Bruce Wilson for Milo Town Hall Renovation Fund" on the check's memo line, and mail to Town of Milo, P.O. Box 218, Milo ME 04463.

KATHRYN G. SAXON

HOLDEN - Kathryn G. Saxon, 62, died unexpectedly, Aug. 14, 2004, at Holden. She was born Oct. 23, 1941, in Akron, Ohio, the daughter of Wilbert C. and Betty J. (Lias) Maschmeier. Kathryn had been a resident of Holden for two years and attended the South Levant Baptist Church, Levant. She is survived by her mother of Akron, Ohio; five children, Leonard Guysick and his wife, Cindy of LaGrange, George Guysick, Kristina Wassam and her husband, Gary all of Akron, Ohio, Laura Sbory of Barberton, Ohio, and Joseph Guysick of Akron, Ohio; seven grandchildren; three great- grandchildren; and three brothers. She will be remembered by her special friend, and loving companion, Donald Lambert, of Holden and a special friend, Dawn Marie Jenkins of Levant.

ARTHUR A. DOYLE

BRADFORD - Arthur A. Doyle, 62, the husband of Sheila (Severance) Doyle, died Aug. 18, 2004, at Bradford. He was born Jan. 29, 1942, in Bangor, the only son of Eric and Julia (Keezer) Doyle. Surviving in addition to his wife are two sons, Forest Carl and Christopher Allen and his wife, April; three grandchildren, Tiffany, Christian and Arial; a foster son, Dennis Ryder and his family; three sisters-in-law; three brothers-in-law; his mother-in-law, Ruth Severance; several nieces and nephews.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER –1990

30-L frost sunny breezy-44° at 9:10 pm.
31-Sunny breezy-66° at 12.
1-Sunny then mostly cloudy-52° at 5 am.
2-Sunny and cloudy-52° at 9 pm.
3-Sunny & windy-72° at 12.
4-Sunny windy-38° at 5 am.
5-L rain cloudy-44° at 9:30 pm.

TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY OF JACK, SR. AND MARY HOXIE: Please come and celebrate their GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY with them at the American Legion Hall in Milo on September 11 at 1 pm. (RSVP or questions: Please call Alton and Debbie Hoxie at 327-1514 or Sonny and Diana Burton at 943-5568.  Remember, this is supposed to be a surprise!)

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ZOOT SUIT REVUE DANCE SHOWS TO BENEFIT HOSPICE

The premiere dance team of the Back Door Dance Studio of Eddington will present “The Zoot Suit Revue’ during two upcoming performances as benefit fundraisers for Pine Tree Hospice. The high-energy Swing-dancing extravaganza will start 7 p.m. September 18th at the Milo Town Hall auditorium, and a second performance is scheduled for 7 p.m.  October 2nd at the Greenville High School auditorium.

Admission will be $7 for adults and $3 for students, tickets available at the door. At the Milo performance refreshments will be on sale offered by the 3 Rivers Kiwanis Milo-Brownville organizations before, during a 10-minutes intermission, and during the show.  Door prizes will be drawn as well.  All proceeds will benefit Pine Tee Hospice, which provides volunteer services for individuals and families in the Penquis region during the process of dying and bereavement.

The Zoot Suit Revue takes audiences back to the 1940’s, when Swing dancing was performed by men in their bright flashy zoot suits and women in their traditional-style swing dresses. The show also includes a tribute to the 1950’s jitterbug, a synchronized, ballroom waltz, lots of Lindy-hop, and jazzy 1920s Charleston with women in their flapper dresses. The dance team will perform a 1940s Shim-Sham, and the show ends with a high stepping “swing jam.”

The dance team of the Back Door Dance Studio performs regularly throughout Maine, frequently offering their services for free to assist non-profit organizations. More information on the dancers is available on the internet at: www.backdoordance.com. For additional details on shows contact Sherry French at 876-9008 or the Hospice office 564-4346.

BRAND NEW
From the Mayo Regional Hospital

A son, Alex Ernest Drake Wetmore, to Rosena and Clifford Wetmore of Dover-Foxcroft, on August 20, 2004.  Weight 7 pounds, 7 ounces.


M.S.A.D. #41 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2004

30-Chicken nuggets, mashed potato, peas, dinner roll, fruit, and milk every day.

31-Italian sand., oven fries, carrot sticks, and Jell-O/topping.

1-Spaghetti/meat sauce, garden salad, d. roll, and brownie.

2-Pizza, broc. /cheese, and apple.

3-hot dog/bun, scallop potato, Cole slaw, and fruit.

6-NO SCHOOL – LABOR DAY

7-Bacon cheeseburger, smiles, Cal. blend veg., and fruit.

8-Quesadilla pizza, vitamin sticks, fruit, and birthday cake.

9-Turkey/gravy, potato, creamed corn, d. roll, and fruit.

10-Ravioli, green beans, garlic bread, and watermelon.

13-Chicken burger, potato oval, cukes, and fruit.

14-Yogurt, salad, cinn. bun, and fruit.

15-B.L.T.C., oven fries, celery, butterscotch pudding/topping.

16-Macaroni/cheese, baked ham, carrots, bread slice, and fruit.

17-Fishburger, potato wedges, 3-bean salad, and whoopie pie.

20-Taco, lettuce/tomato, rice, and applesauce.

21-Turkey/lettuce on 12-grain bread, mashed potato, corn, and oatmeal-chocolate chip cookie.

22-Juice, pancakes, sausage links, and pineapple.

23-Chop suey, garden salad, d. roll, and apple crisp.

24-Breadsticks, cheese/sauce, stir-fry veg., and fruit.

27-Chicken salad wrap, rice pilaf, peas, and fruit.

28-Juice, egg muffin, hash brown, and peaches.

29-Shepard’s pie, mixed veg., d. roll and orange ¼’s.

30-Grilled cheese sandwich, fries, salad, and blond brownie.

31-Beef burrito, white rice, lettuce/tomato, and fruit salad.

Menus are subject to change without notice.

K-5 lunch-$1.25, Breakfast-$.75, 6-12 lunch-$1.50, Breakfast-$.75.

Adult lunch-$2.75 Reduced lunch-$.40, Reduced breakfast-$.30

All returned checks will be charged a $10.00 fee.

BREAKFAST MENU
This menu will apply for all schools. These choices will be the same every week.

Monday-Bagel/cr. Cheese, juice, and milk.

Tuesday-Gogurt, graham crackers, juice, and milk.

Wednesday-Pizza stick, juice, and milk.

Thursday-Cheese stick, muffin, juice, and milk.

Friday-Super bun, juice, and milk.

In order to promote a healthier student body and in conjunction with the federal government, we will portion foods containing starch.  The food bar will still be available at the Penquis complex.  Salad, vegetable, and fruit will be on the bar every day.

It is our desire to make the breakfast and lunch as healthy and nutritious as possible with the foods available to us.  We appreciate your cooperation in this endeavor.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS
 
CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to enjoy fellowship, share ideas, conduct Club business, and host many interesting speakers.  All are welcome to visit with us.  If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application.  We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them with us.

AUGUST 25, 2004 MEETING MINUTES

Incoming President Murrel Harris greeted twenty-one members and guests Lt. Gov. Glen Rogers, John Cushing, Ron Miles, Hoyt Fairbrother, Bonnie Guyotte, and Doc Sherman.

Eben DeWitt led the Pledge of Allegiance and Ed Treworgy said a heartfelt prayer.

The Orono/Old Town newsletter was shared.

Happy birthday wishes went to Dillon Conley on the 26th, Merna Dunham on the 28th, and Sandra Gray on the 29th.

Sixteen happy dollars were donated for the Yankees pulling out a game, having Roy present, Eben DeWitt being installed as Lt. Gov., a new vehicle, Key Clubs of New England, new printer, a new school term, and Three Rivers Kiwanis recognized as distinguished for 2002-2003!

Chris Almy volunteered to chair the interclub committee for the coming year.  Thank you, Chris.

The Board of Directors monthly meeting will be September 2 at 6:30 am at The Restaurant.

A short Board meeting was held after the regular meeting to discuss purchasing a new printer for the Three Rivers News.  A motion was made, seconded, and accepted to authorize $1795 for the printer.

Gunnery Sgt. Ryan O’Connor will be our speaker on September 1.

Don Harris introduced his friend and wife, Dot Brown, our speaker today.

Dot, a retired nurse, spent a few weeks as a medical coordinator at Camp Aggassiz in West Poland, Maine.  The camp was utilized as a YMCA until it burned in 1935.  It was then purchased for kids to have a place to go in the summer and in 1950 contained 600 acres.  There are 60 buildings, which includes a dining room that seats 400 people.

The camp is for 7 to 13 year-olds who are from Easter Seals and boy and girl’s clubs in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.  They have special needs due to multiple health problems such as spina bifida and many are underprivileged.  The

150 kids stayed at the camp for either a few days or the entire summer.

Dot said she spent many nights in the infirmary, calming ill and homesick children.  The infirmary contained six beds and was air-conditioned; a plus for kids with asthma.  Dot spent most of her nights in a dorm with the rest of the staff but said she eventually had to put her mattress on the floor because the bed was rather narrow.  She also served as a surrogate mother to many of the staff of 50 to 60.  The workers came from around the world and a number of them were fairly young.  They put in a lot of hours with one day off per week and often needed a ‘mother’s touch’. Dot told us that these special young people worked hard and received only minimal pay.

The camp provides arts and crafts, a library, and a ropes course in the woods.  Even children confined to wheelchairs are able to enjoy climbing the ropes, swimming, and tubing.  One young girl was so thrilled that she jumped from her wheelchair on the dock onto the tube already in the water!  What an opportunity for these kids!  They are able to join in the same activities as those without disabilities.

Thank you Dot, for sharing your experiences with us.  And for being such a caring nurse and ‘mother’. 

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WHAT'S NEW ON TRC

As of this week, we have added Bowerbank to the list of communities and towns that we cover.  This brings our total # of towns to 8!  Our coverage area looks quite impressive when you look at it on a full map of the State. 

We are looking for any info anyone might have on Bowerbank, its Town Office, or anything in general you may know.  Please contact us!


WE NEED YOUR HELP!

If you know any information about the Boston Post Gold-Headed Canes, or who the current holders are for the towns in our area, please contact us!  We are looking to create a new Landmark Feature!

WORD SEARCH

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