Three Rivers News, 2004-09-06
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2004
 VOLUME 3 NUMBER 43
SPONSORED AND PUBLISHED BY THREE RIVERS KIWANIS
& THREE RIVERS COMMUNITY ALLIANCE

ZOOT SUIT REVUE IN MILO TO BENEFIT HOSPICE

The premiere dance team of the Back Door Dance Studio of Eddington will present “The Zoot Suit Revue’ during two upcoming performances as benefit fundraisers for Pine Tree Hospice. The high-energy Swing-dancing extravaganza will start 7 p.m. September 18th at the Milo Town Hall auditorium.

Admission will be $7 for adults and $3 for students, tickets available at the door. At the Milo performance refreshments will be on sale offered by the 3 Rivers Kiwanis Milo-Brownville organizations before, during a 10-minutes intermission, and during the show.  Door prizes will be drawn as well.  All proceeds will benefit Pine Tree Hospice, which provides volunteer services for individuals and families in the Penquis region during the process of dying and bereavement.

The Zoot Suit Revue takes audiences back to the 1940’s, when Swing dancing was performed by men in their bright flashy zoot suits and women in their traditional-style swing dresses. The show also includes a tribute to the 1950’s jitterbug, a synchronized, ballroom waltz, lots of Lindy-hop, and jazzy 1920s Charleston with women in their flapper dresses. The dance team will perform a 1940s Shim-Sham, and the show ends with a high stepping “swing jam.”

YOGA AND YOUR FITNESS
PRESENTED BY CINDY HERBEST-943-2630.

Ok, it's time to stop talking about it and time to actually try it!
With strength, flexibility and relaxation being a few of the benefits, you will love this 8 week class.
Just wear comfortable clothing and stop by the Town Hall.
Wednesday September 8, 6:00 - 7:00
$30.00

CARDIO CRAZE

Our bodies crave aerobic exercise, so lets shake things up and strengthen our heart and lungs. This easy to follow class will get the heart rate up and the job done in a short time.
Also, a great warm up for the Yoga class if you wish to stay.
Please wear comfortable clothing and sneakers.

Wednesday, September 8, 5:30 - 6:00
$18.00 or a $3.00 walk-in fee.
Jump into your fall fitness and take both classes

for only $42.00, that's only $5.25 for each full class!

MASTER BUILDER

The gazebo is becoming a reality thanks to the efforts of many, including Frank, who is shown here painting the posts..Thanks to Fred Trask for this photo.  We at Three Rivers News pray that Frank is a better painter than river navigator.

The Milo Garden Club will meet at l2:00 noon on September l4,  at the cottage of

Joanne DeWitt in LakeView.

Meet at the municipal parking lot at

11:30 for car-pooling. Lunch will be furnished.


BEST WISHES ELLIE!!!

                On August 31, Ellie Monaco , a resident of Bowerbank, was surprised and honored at a Birthday Brunch celebrating 80 years of LIFE!!! The event was hosted and held at the home of Jim and Dot Gustafson of Bowerbank and included "family" and friends from St. Augustine 's Episcopal Church and Elli's Bowerbank neighbors. Ellie is a BRIGHT BEACON to all who know her. This was a memorable day for all of us. May there be many more in the years ahead!

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STATEMENT OF POLICY
   Three River News is published weekly by Three Rivers Kiwanis. It is available Tuesdays at the Milo Farmer’s Union, BJ’s Market, Graves’ Service Station, Robinson’s Fuel Mart, J.D.'s Emporium, Reuben’s Farmer’s Market, The Restaurant, Milo Exxon, Rite Aid, and Milo True Value. The paper can also be viewed online at news.trcmaine.org. Donations can be mailed to Valerie Robertson, PO Box 81, Milo, Maine 04463
   Letters to the editor, social news, school news, items of interest, or coming social events may be submitted NO LATER THAN FRIDAY NOON to the following addresses:
Valerie Robertson
PO Box 81
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.2324
Nancy Grant
10 Belmont St.
Milo, Maine 04463
207.943.5809
   Please drop suggestions and comments into the donation box or contact one of us. We welcome your ideas. All opinions are those of the editors unless otherwise stated. We will publish no negative or controversial comments. The paper is written, printed, and distributed by unpaid volunteers. Donations are used to cover expenses of printing, paper and materials.

Valerie Robertson | Nancy Grant | Virgil Valente
Seth Barden | Kirby Robertson | Tom Witham

HOW TO RECEIVE THE THREE RIVERS NEWS BY MAIL
    We have received many inquiries from readers as to how they can get the Three Rivers News delivered to their mailbox each week.  The news is available by subscription in 30-week increments. For each 30-week subscription we ask for a donation of $25.00 to cover the cost of printing and mailing. If you would like to sign up to get the news delivered, send your name, address and a check for $25.00 to one of the addresses above.
   We will mail your issue each Tuesday morning so you can have a nice fresh paper delivered every week! This makes an especially nice gift for an elderly person or for someone who lives away, but still likes to keep in touch with area happenings

MEALS FOR ME. MENU

TUES., SEPT 7 FISH CHOWDER, GERMAN CUKES, PEACHES
WED., SEPT. 8 MAC AND CHEESE, BEANS, BASIL TOMATOES, GINGER COOKIES
THUR., SEPT 9 BAKED STUFFED CHICKEN BREAST, SWEET POTATO, VEGGIES, FROSTED CAKE
FRI., SEPT. 10 COUNTRY STYLE VEAL, NOODLES, CARROTS, BANANA BREAD, PUMPKIN BAR
MON. SEPT 13 FISH STICKS, MASHED POTATO, PEAS AND CARROTS, PEACHES

ANYONE 60 OR OVER IS INVITED TO ATTEND OUR MEALS.  WE MEET AT THE MILO TOWN HALL DINING ROOM ON MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS AT 11:45 AM AND AT THE QUARRY PINES COMMUNITY ROOM ON FRIDAYS AT 11:45 AM.
PLEASE MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND!
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 943-2488. 


BINGO…BINGO…BINGO!!!
THE MILO AMERICAN LEGION POST 41 HAS BINGO
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT
A MEAL IS SERVED FROM 5:00PM UNTIL 6:15 PM
BINGO STARTS AT 6:15 AND ENDS AT 9:30
SEE YOU THERE!


Brownville Trivia
BY BILL SAWTELL

Choose the best answer.

1. (a) Eleanor Rosebush (b) Greta Connors (c) Mac Buchanan (d) Carroll Conley married a former student.

2. The Merrill Quarry is in the (a) north (b) east (c) west (d) south.

3. The Grange Hall stood for (a) 100 (b) 105 (c) 107 (d) 109 years.

4. Wayne Kirby once scored (a) 26 (b) 36 (c) 46 (d) 56 points in a single game.

5. Brownville has the best (a) slate (b) wood (c) iron ore (d) basketball

6. Moses Greenleaf discovered (a) slate deposits (b) iron ore deposits (c) gold deposits (d) both (a) and (b).

7. The YMCA was built by (a) the Methodist Church (b) the Town of Brownville (c) the State Of Maine (d) the Canadian Pacific Railway.

8. It was the (a) first (b) second (c) third (d) fourth YMCA in our county.

9. The BHS teams were called the (a) Bears (b) Beavers (c) Railroaders (d) Tigers.

10. Max Cohen and Sargae Rugale came from (a) France (b) Germany (c) Spain (d) Russia .

Answers: 1-a 2-c 3-d 4-c 5-a 6-d 7-d 8-b 9-a 10-d


CONSIDER YOURSELF ASKED

Please come to the Milo area blood drive on
Monday, September 13, from 2 to 7 pm
At the Milo Town Hall . **A valid ID is required**
Random drawings of prizes for donors!
Sponsored by the Milo / Brownville Knights of Columbus & Piscataquis Lodge # 44 of the Free Masons


Byron Spear of Evington , VA. had a cataract operation on August 31, 2004 .  It would make him very happy to hear from his many friends in Milo .

Thanks, his Mom, Avis Spear

DOUBLE DUTY

Darrell Spear of Melbourne , FL loaded up his car and headed for Virginia to be with his brother and also to get ahead of the hurricane, which is headed his way.

We hope and pray it will turn and go somewhere else—It’s terrible wherever it goes.

His Mom, Avis Spear

THANKS TO KIWANIS

Twelve tenants from Pleasant Park and two from the Garden Apartments enjoyed a nice barbecued meal on August 25 at the Pleasant Park Community Center .

Thanks also for the beautiful pots of mums that we drew tickets on.  The winners were Reuben Lancaster, Althea Hamlin, and Bill Stineford.

It was all very much appreciated.

Loving thoughts,
Avis Spear
Reuben Lancaster

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RED HAT SOCIETY
By Betty Graunke

The “Ladies of the Lake ” met recently at the Hitching Post B&B where Freida and Everett Cook served a delicious lunch.

Shown on the front porch-from left to right; Emily Gould, Barbara Howland, Lyn Sherburne, Laura Schnell, Delores Mayo, Paula Speed, Ellen DeWitt, Dena Sherman, Ellen Stoll, Sally S. DePampeo Barbara Wheeler, Betty Graunke, and Bea Mailman.  Seated in front are Mary Bridges and Nancy Woodward.

We plan to meet again in June ’05.

LITTLE LEAGUE SEASON IS OVER
By Scott and Jean Larson

The little league season has come to an end with an ice cream social banquet at the Brownville Elementary School . All five teams gave out team member trophies that included MVP, Coaches awards, and Most Improved.

It was a fine year as the A’s won it all with the Red Sox coming in second.  A big thanks to Dean and Murrel for a job well done on the league and the fields.

Pictured for the Cub’s are: James Gledhill, Ryan Stroud, and Brandon Erickson; who combined for a total of five home runs for their team.

Kiel Larson was honored with the Justin Eli Gerrish Award.

The Milo Rec. Farm League for 6-8 year olds would like to thank the Milo Fire Department for supplying shirts and hats.  The Rec. Dept. would like to thank the parents for their support and to assistant coaches Drew Hamlin and Justin Morrill for a job well done this summer.

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The Milo Rec. T-Ball, 3-5 year olds, would like to thank Three Rivers Kiwanis for their shirts and hats.  The Rec. Dept. would like to thank the parents for their support and assistant coaches Drew Hamlin and Justin Morrill for a job well done this summer.  A special thanks to dugout assistants Linda Rolfe and Andrea Lumbra.

Submitted by Murrel Harris, Milo Recreation Director.

MILO NATIVE MAKES TOP 100
By Nancy Grant

A fairly small box was delivered to my home last week that contained a publication titled “Arvada Profiles”.  You can imagine my surprise when I thumbed through to page 56 and saw Jed Ladd smiling back at me.  This man, whose school essays needed serious editing, had been nominated by the public and chosen by a ten-member selection committee, as one of a hundred people who play or played a significant role in Arvada , Colorado .

The following is reprinted with permission from the Arvada Sentinel of the Sentinel & Transcript Newspapers, August 2004.

Stories of the People Who Most Influenced Our First 100 Years  Profiles 1904 – 2004

Jed Ladd-Creating a social, political landmark

Jed Ladd never really fit in, but that didn’t stop him from finding his place in the quiet, conservative city of Arvada .

In the winter of 1982, when Ladd decided to move from Boulder to Arvada , he heard the rumors.  He had long hair and an earring, and people muttered, “What’s this hippie going to do in Arvada ?”

Two months later, he opened Laddy’s Restaurant and Saloon, Arvada ’s first rock ‘n’ roll bar.

Then-Councilman Don Kinney made Ladd lay a sidewalk in front of the bar.  Ladd said he felt “picked on,” since there weren’t any other sidewalks for two miles on either side of Laddy’s.  But like a smart businessman, Ladd had the 90-foot sidewalk constructed.

He decided to commemorate the day with The Don Kinney Memorial Sidewalk Parade.  The idea took off.  Residents, business owners, council members, including Kinney, and police officers attended the annual event that featured miniature floats, food and drinks.  He donated the proceeds to the Margaret Walters School , a school for disabled children.

“It became an informal town meeting,” Ladd said.  Residents had a chance to mingle with city leaders, and soon, the bar itself became a melting pot.

“On any given night, you could walk into the bar and see all kinds of people sitting together and having a good time.  You might see three council members, the chief of police and a group of softball players all hanging out together,” Ladd said.

Since the parade had become so successful, Ladd realized he could do more with his bar.

He held auctions and benefits for Ginny’s Kids, a nonprofit organization that fulfills the wishes of terminally ill children.  Over the years, Laddy’s raised $35,000 for the Margaret Walters School and $500,000 for Ginny’s Kids.

Through volleyball tournaments, live comedy and crab races, Laddy’s became a social, charitable and political landmark in Arvada .

In March 1996, it was time to take a break.  After 13 years of doing things for others, Ladd wanted to spend time with his girls.

“I was getting too old for the bar business,” he said.

Ladd remains active in the community, but on a smaller scale.  He went into retail, a decision he said he’ll never regret.

“I’m home every night by 5p.m. , and I never miss a basketball game,” he said, referring to his youngest daughter’s sport of choice.

Even though he’s slowed down a bit, he still wears his earrings and his hair long.  At first glance, he might not look like he fits in, but there’s nowhere else he’d rather be.

Marion C. Cook School News

The Marion C. Cook School held its first Terrific Kid assembly on September 3. Miss K. welcomed our students, parents, friends and staff. Mrs. Beres was introduced as one of our two principals this year. Mrs. Wright has met the students in their classrooms. Our new students were introduced, welcomed and recognized by the rest of the student body. What a wonderful group we have this year. New staff members include Mrs. Marchant, Mrs. Lee, and Ms. Bickford. Welcome all to our Cook School family.

Mrs. Beres was our Kiwanian friend this morning. Ryan Eylar, Joshua  Gray and Lillis Noke were the first three Terrific Kids named this year. Ms. Ivy said that Ryan is a kind friend. He works hard every day. Mrs. Carter was very impressed with Josh's first week in second grade. He has excellent work habits. Miss K. thanked Lillis for being so helpful with our new students. She also has an super work ethic. Lillis' homework and all of her assignments have been outstanding.

Kathy Foss presented Good Kid on the Bus certificates to Ethan Neal, Lindsay Turner and Dana Herrick. .Congratulations to all of our Terrific Kids.

We celebrated Haley Morel's 5th birthday. Mrs. Harmon led us in the singing of "The Terrific Kid" song and our school song.

Our assembly is held on Fridays at 10:50 am . We hope to see you there.

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The Milo District Schools
By Lloyd J. Treworgy

Continued Part XXIV

                It should be noted here as indicated in the last sentence of the quotation that the superintendent, in those days, was a fellow member of the superintending school committee.  He was chosen by the other members to serve as their field executive.  He was their unpaid workhorse, more conversant than the others with the schools operation, but decidedly not “primus inter pares.” (first among equals)

                Mayo may or may not have been the author of the diatribe just quoted but it sounds very much like his style.  It he did write it, it was only through inadvertence that his signature didn’t go into the records.  Mayo was one of the very strong characters that showed up in the development of the district schools in the 1880’s and the 1890’s.  He was one of the early proponents of consolidation in order to bring more pupils and better teachers together into a larger school.  He was also the first paid superintendent noted in the records.  For his services during 1896, the year after the fiery disagreement on teachers, he received $50 for his services as Supervisor, according to the records of 1897.

                Mrs. Helen Salley, Mayo’s granddaughter, whose husband, Mahlon Salley died in January of 1977, as this account is being prepared, told me earlier that her grandfather described himself as “schoolteacher, farmer and lumberman.”  Whether his teaching service included a stint in the Milo schools, he didn’t tell her.

                Mayo was born in Milo , December 28, 1839 and died in Milo in 1933.  He spent some of his early years in New York and served during the Civil War as a field hospital nurse at City Point , Virginia .  Wounded by a Rebel sharpshooter during a period of service with Grant’s army at the front in 1864, he received, under a special act of Congress in 1890, a pension of $10 a month.  He died at the house on Highland Avenue where his granddaughter still lives. 

                These details about the life of I.G. Mayo I have written in recognition of a personality who exercised a strong influence for good on the schools of Milo .  How he would have succeeded today when schools are complicated, motivation is low and public criticism can often sting, is moot.  Touching people, as a superintendent does, at their tenderest spot—their children—he would probably, in these years, have become embroiled often in argument.  Facing the burden of modern criticism, the superintendent of today, holder of an unenviable office, has learned to become aloof, or thick-skinned.

                Isaiah G. Mayo served one more year as superintendent after the altercation in which he may or may not have been a participant.  His last term was in 1896.  Thereafter his name appears as a member of the superintending school committee and as a furnisher of wood for fuel for one or another of the schools.  Never again though did he serve in the top office he had held for so many years.

                In 1897, two years after the controversy over teachers, the voters at town meeting authorized the school committee to choose a supervisor “not of their own number.”  The records show that Martin L. Durgin, a Milo attorney for many years, was the next superintendent.

                And then a strange thing happened.  Three out of the next four superintendents were women.  They were the only women to serve in that capacity, so far as can be determined from the records, during the long history of the Milo schools.

                In 1899, L.H. Doble was chosen as superintendent.  Since no title of “Mrs.” Appeared before the name as recorded, it appeared at first glance that L.H. Doble was another man—until Edna Hanscom set me right.

                L.H. Doble was Lillian H. Doble, Mrs. Hanscom told me—wife of Ronella Doble.  Ronella was an uncle of Frank Doble, who was the father of Richard Doble, out present postmaster.  The Ronella Dobles lived where Mrs. Edna Hanscom lives today, two houses on the Brownville side of Albert Street .

                Mrs. Stella Doble, Frank Doble’s widow, later corroborated Mrs. Hanscom’s statement.  The High School Breeze of 1901 also contained substantiating details in an obituary of Mrs. Doble.  It was written by Leon G.C. Brown, a member of the Class of 1901 and later, for years an attorney in Milo .

                According to the account Mrs. Doble was born and educated in Maryland .  She seems to have moved to Milo early in life.  The obituary notes that she served as postmistress in Milo

during the Cleveland administration.  Mrs. Hanscom mentioned that she was a very intelligent woman and the Breeze article noted that she was extremely popular.

                Evidently Mrs. Doble died suddenly, only a little more than three weeks after she had been elected to her third year as superintendent.

BACK ALONG WEATHER
From Grammie McCleary’s weather diary.

SEPTEMBER 1989

6-Foggy windy cool clouding up later on-58° at 2 pm .
7-Cloudy sunny breeze-62° at 12.
8-Fog cloudy-65° at 1 pm .
9-M Cloudy am sunny-70° at 12.
10-Foggy sunny-74° at 1 pm .
11-Cloudy-65° at 12.
12-M sunny-62° at 12.

Traditions of a Milo-ite
By Kathy Witham

Merna Dunham called me the other day and asked if I'd like to come to church on Sunday and sing in a choir directed by our former choir director Kaye Trickey. It didn't take long for me to make my mind up about that! Of course, I'd love to! Merna said that we'd rehearse from 10:15 a.m. until the time of the service at 11:00 . YIKES!! This didn't leave us much time, but I knew that those ladies knew best....no sense in worrying about it. Of course we could do it.

David Broadbent was going to be the guest speaker that Sunday, which meant that Paulette was going to be there singing in the choir. It was shaping up to be just like old home week at the church. I couldn't wait!

I got to the church at the appointed time and the group was already gathering and beginning to rehearse. Former choir members, and current members who never sang under Kaye's direction, just kept coming. Kaye had directed so many of us in the years past, and it was such a thrill for us to participate with her once again. I think she was thrilled, as well. The group was large enough to fill the choir loft and the harmony that came from that loft brought tears to more than one eye that beautiful, sunny, Sunday morning.

David's mother, Marjorie Broadbent, had given him pictures of the choirs from back in the days when her husband was minister of the Park Street United Methodist Church . There we all were, in our different robes....mine happened to be the black and white robes...all starched and pressed to perfection. The number of stripes on the stoles

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indicated the number of years we had participated with perfect attendance. I had belonged to choir many more years than I had stripes. Because my family did so much visiting of out of town relatives, I had to miss more frequently than some.

I'm pretty sure that the picture above was taken the year I was in the 7th grade. I can tell because of my haircut. How's that for a memory? I actually remember the haircut that I had in 7th grade! Of course I'm flanked by the twins....what else is new?! I can't tell you how many pictures I have of myself sandwiched in between the two of them. From being little preschoolers in dancing classes....to birthday parties.... to high school yearbook pictures....to parties when we were in college....and even now....they have always been like bookends to me. Our friendship is truly lifelong. My dad and the twin's dad were good friends. As a matter of fact, Dad went to the hospital the night they were born to celebrate with his good friend Bob!

Poor Paulette! All those years of being loyal to the choir and the church...even marrying the minister's son...and she's not even in the picture! She strained to pick herself out from the group picture. Who could have predicted that her absence that day would come back to haunt her 40 some years later. I can see Elbie Young and Alice Wharton, Karen Emery and Kathy Daggett. Arletta Hill and Carol Lyford, Patty Smith and Nancy Sharrow were some other recognizable faces in the picture. I believe Cheryl Fisher and Linda Davis are there, too.

In any case, this was a real trip down memory lane for me and I hope you will enjoy the picture and the memories that those choirs might hold for you.

As we head into apple season I thought I'd give you this nice coffee cake recipe.

Apple and Nut Coffee Cake

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1 egg
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup sliced peeled tart apple ( usually about 1 nice apple)
1/2 cup coarsely chopped pecans

Topping:

1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/4 cup chopped pecans
1 Tablespoon butter or margarine, melted
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

Combine the sugar, butter and egg and mix well. Sift the flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt and add to the wet ingredients. Stir in the apple and pecans. Spread in a greased 8-in square baking dish. In a bowl combine the topping ingredients and sprinkle over the cake mixture. Bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean.. Cool on a wire rack. Cut in squares and serve.

To lighten this recipe up....substitute the butter in the batter for applesauce and use an egg substitute for the real egg. Also, spray the pan with nonstick cooking spray instead of greasing with shortening.

Ward, Brasslett wed

LAKEVIEW — Jodi Katherine Ward, daughter of Stephen and Kathi Ward of Lakeview Plantation, married Joseph Keith Brasslett of Stetson on June 19. The bridegroom is the son of Scott Brasslett of LaGrange and Mauri Pearl of Omeville.

The couple was wed at Millenium Bridal in Newport by notary public Blaine N. Rideout. Bridesmaids were Erin Peasley, Jordan Stanley, Felicia Ward, Summer Stuart, Kylie Snowman. Best man was Troy Pearl. Ushers were Adam Stanley, Lucas Ward, Jacob Ward and David Moore.

Flower girl was Justice Pearl. Ring bearer was Travis Pearl.

Kylie Snowman crafted a scrapbook guestbook.

Decorations at the wedding included flowers both potted and arranged. The bride carried white calla lilies mixed with hydrangea and ivy. The bride's dress was an ivory strapless gown with beadwork on the bust, flowing down the back and one side in a "V". Bridesmaids wore strapless periwinkle dresses with beaded tops, and carried burgundy calla lilies.

The reception was held at the same location. The couple danced to Garth Brook's "If Tomorrow Never Comes." Father and daughter danced to "Butterfly Kisses" by Bob Carlisle and Mother and son danced to "Simple Man" by Lynyrd Skynyrd.

The couple spent their honeymoon on a roadtrip through the White Mountains in New Hampshire , Vermont and onto New York . They are in the process of building their first home in Stetson.

The bridge graduated Penquis Valley High School in Milo in 2001. She will be completing a degree in elementary education at Husson College in December 2004.

The bridegroom graduated Penquis Valley High School in Milo in 1999. He is now owner of a construction company.

MILO FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY NEWS
BY JUDITH MACDOUGALL

Again we’ve been making changes at the library-in personnel and in furniture. Last spring Tracy Morse resigned as a substitute to be able to put more time into classes she has been taking. The Town of Milo advertised for applications for library substitutes to fill the position. The library received several applications and selected two applicants for the positions of library substitutes. Nancy Scroggins, our only library substitute through the summer, worked a lot but will be taking more time off for herself this fall. The library uses a rotation system form of working so each substitute will have some time to work on a regular basis. The new substitutes are Victoria Eastman and Belinda Raymond. Both substitutes have been in to learn about our library’s structure so they will be useful additions to the staff.

Last February Helen Carey, our head trustee, passed away, and the library was chosen as the beneficiary of her memory gifts. We received many financial gifts-large and small. Where the giver requested certain books, I purchased them, but many of the gifts were undesignated. After a discussion with the trustees, we decided to have a glass fronted bookcase made as a memorial in Helen’s name. The bookcase was to be made at JSI, our local store fixtures business. I had not known much about it except that the business made store fixtures ( in my mind I saw white tin shelves). Last June Walter and I went in to talk to Paul Bradeen about having this piece of furniture made to the library specifications. For Walter this was a chance to see many of his old students. After we had discussed our ideas with various craftsmen, we were given a tour of the factory by Stephen Hamlin. Walter and I were really amazed at the beautiful wooden store fixtures they were crafting and sending to places as far away as NC and VA. We had no idea of the capability of this company in our town. Through the summer I had many opportunities to run into JSI to see how things were progressing. On one of these visits I met Mark Awalt, the Maine Small Business Man of the Year. That is quite an honor for a special person in our town. We had some things in common as he knew

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our son, Malcolm, and both had shared a high school basketball career.

On Monday , August 16, the bookcase was delivered , and it is a lovely piece of furniture. JSI incorporated some extra finishing touches to make it really unique. We are so pleased to have it, and the library staff thanks everyone who contributed to Helen’s memorial. We would enjoy having you all come in to view it.

We have a few new backordered books.

Brett, Simon                           THE HANGING IN THE HOTEL

McBain,                                  Ed HARK: A novel of the 87th

Sanders, Lawrence                                 McNALLY’S BLUFF

Library Summer Hours
Mon.-Weds.-Fri.---
2:00-8:00
Starting September 11th
We will be open Saturdays
2:00-4:00
Telephone 943-2612

News Alert - The Palesky Proposal
Article copied as published - see following web site:
http://www.memun.org/resources/Public/news/pp/main.htm
(Submitted by C.K. Ellison, 2004)  August 16, 2004

Carol Palesky’s tax proposal will be on the November 2, 2004 ballot. The Palesky Proposal rolls back assessed property values by almost a decade, allows for very minor interim adjustments for construction and sales, and imposes a property tax cap of 1% - or 10 mills -- on the rolled back value. This website contains important information about the proposal, its impacts, its problems, and most importantly, how you can help stop this flawed plan from becoming law in Maine .

The Palesky Proposal is based upon California law -- it was known as "Proposition 13" -- and contains dozens of provisions that conflict with Maine law. Accordingly, the Justices of the Maine Supreme Court have advised that significant elements of it will be deemed unconstitutional.

The Maine Municipal Association has conducted an analysis of the Palesky Proposal that assumes the unconstitutional rollback in valuations will be severed and that only the 10 mill cap will remain. Under this "likely" scenario the municipal tax revenue loss in FY 06 would be nearly $600 million, representing a 30% reduction in property tax revenues. If the proposal were enacted "as written" revenues would be cut by over $900 million! Either way, a loss of revenue on this scale would have devastating impacts on municipal service delivery and our public schools.

The Palesky Proposal takes a meat ax approach to policy making. The tax cap is exactly the same for every town, regardless of their current mill rate. For towns with mill rates below 10, the Palesky Proposal provides no relief at all; for towns with property tax rates well above 10 mills, services will be devastated.

Worse, the voters in each Maine town and city will have no control over whether they must accept the Palesky tax cap. Even if every single voter in your community rejects the cap, it will be imposed upon you if it passes statewide.

This violates most Mainers’ strongly held belief in self-determination and self-governance.

A broad-based coalition of individuals and groups concerned about Maine ’s future has organized to inform Maine citizens about the Palesky Proposal’s deeply troubling impacts. The coalition has officially established a campaign committee as "Citizens United To Protect Our Public Safety, Schools and Communities". The Citizens United coalition will be leading the efforts to defeat the Palesky Proposal. Please visit the Coalition’s website by following the link on this page.

At this point, the most important thing to do is inform your communities about the impact the Palesky Proposal could have in your town. Spread the word by doing the following:

* Urge your town or city to adopt a resolution or position statement in opposition to the Palesky Proposal.

* Complete a Palesky "impact" study for your municipality. We have provided a template on this website to help you conduct this analysis.

·          Actively share this information with your elected officials, school board members and staff, and with your local citizens.

IN MEMORIAM

PAULINE HOXIE GRINDLE

MILO - Pauline Hoxie Grindle, 87, wife of the late Dana R. Grindle, died Sept. 2, 2004 , at Bangor , following a brief illness. She was born Aug. 9, 1917 , in Orneville, the daughter of the late Charles and Gladys (Bishop) Hoxie. Pauline attended Milo High School and was a member and past deaconess of the Milo United Baptist Church . She had served as town clerk and as tax collector for Orneville, had delivered the mail to Lakeview for 18 years, and had worked at the Milo Farmers Union for many years. She belonged to the Orion Rebekah Lodge No. 16, the Orion Club, the Ayuda Club, the D.A.R., and the Milo Garden Club. She was a 50-year member of the Grange. Pauline also served as a volunteer for Milo Community Hospital . In her later years, she worked at Smith's Grocery & Lunch. She is survived by her four children and their families, Laurel and her husband, Dale Libby, of Easley , S.C. , Lois and her husband, Fred Trask of Milo , Paul and his wife, Ruby Grindle, of Brownville, and Shirley and her husband, Roger George, of Bangor . She is also survived by seven grandchildren, Mark Libby, Melissa Libby Whitfield, Brian Trask, Matthew Grindle, Michael Grindle, Andrew George and Adam George. Pauline was blessed with seven great-grandchildren, Christopher, Julia, and Jonathan Libby, Tyler Trask, and Katie, Sarah and Sydney Whitfield. She is also survived by a sister, Phyllis Edgerly, and several nieces and nephews. She will be remembered by special friends, Ruth Yougblood and Juanita Smith. Pauline was predeceased by her husband of 50 years, Dana Grindle; her sisters and brothers, Doris Willinski, Beatrice Lyford, Leona Mitchell, Ted Hoxie, Keith Hoxie, Verna Mulherin, and Marguerite Hoxie. A celebration of Pauline's life will be held 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2004, at the United Baptist Church in Milo, with the Rev. Ernest Madden officiating. Friends are invited to join the family for sharing and refreshments following the service. Those who wish may make memorial contributions to Three Rivers Ambulance Service, PO Box 432 , Milo . ME 04463. Arrangements are in the care of the Lary Funeral Home.

LAURA M. SMITH PINEO

CUMBERLAND - Laura Pineo died Friday, Aug. 27, 2004 , at Ledgeview in Cumberland Foreside, her home for the past year. She was born in Canterbury , New Brunswick , on May 26, 1913 , the daughter of Hugh and Hilda Grant Smith. Laura graduated from the nursing program at Aroostook Hospital in 1934, and was employed there until volunteering to care for patients in Bangor during the polio epidemic of the mid-1930s. Because the cause of polio was unknown, "the nurses were quarantined, and we had to walk to the hospital through an underground tunnel," she often told her family. In 1937, she moved to Milo , where she met and married her husband, Paul Pineo. He always called her Smithy, as did all the

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children in town while he was always called Mr. Pineo. A brave, adventurous, stubborn and spirited woman, Smithy later became a fond nickname for grandchildren and great-grandchildren with these same qualities. While caring for her family of four children, she was an active volunteer in the Town of Passadumkeag , and began a lifelong commitment to fundraising for the March of Dimes. She was also the unofficial town nurse. After the death of her husband in 1958, she and her family moved to Ogunquit, and subsequently to Sanford , where she was a supervisor at the Goodall Hospital . In 1973, she opened the first assisted living facility in Sanford , and for the next 10 years cared for many interesting folks. She moved to Portland in 1989, where she lived for 14 years. She had a lifelong love of travel and the outdoors, said her son Steve Pineo. She had visited all 50 states, most of the national parks, and 22 foreign countries. She was a Trustee of Lee Academy in Lee, and of the Goodall Library in Sanford . She was an active and dedicated volunteer at the Portland Observatory and the Children's Museum, and for the Southern Maine Agency on Aging. Laura is survived by daughter, Barbara P. Hall and her husband, Wilbur, of Windham, Paul Pineo and his wife, Susan, of Rochester, N.Y., Stephen Pineo and his wife, Suzanne, of Chambersburg, Pa., David Margolis-Pineo and his wife, Elizabeth, of Portland, as well as her Korean daughter, Young Otenti and her husband, Ken, of Lebanon. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue , White Plains , NY 10605 , or to the Pineo Admissions Center at Lee Academy , 4 Winn Road , Lee , ME 04455 .

UP ON THE FARM
BY VALERIE ROBERTSON

                It doesn’t seem possible that its been two months since my last column.  The action, as usual, has been non-stop between the critters here at “the farm” and the residents at the shelter.  I think that when I last updated my animal activities, I had just acquired BJ the 2-week-old raccoon, and Ranger, the half-dead 8-week old kitten.  As you can see from the above photo, Ranger has thrived and has become part of our still growing pet family.

                When Ranger arrived at our home, he was starved, cold and sick.  He and B.J., who was 3 weeks old by this time, hit it off immediately.  Once Ranger was improving health-wise, we would let him and B.J snuggle and hang out with each other and they became very good friends.  They slept curled up with each other and played constantly.  They even ate out of the same bowl!

                When B.J was 6 weeks old, Steve Hamlin called me to say he had found a baby raccoon on the Lakeview road, clinging to the body of its dead littermate.  I had already arranged for a rehabilitator to take B.J. to a wildlife preserve, but he was staying with me until he was completely independent and able to eat a solid diet.  I immediately went down to Steve and Cheryl’s to check out the baby and was thrilled to see that their rescued

baby was darn near the same size as B.J.  I figured they would be ecstatic to be with each other.

                Well, the new guy, Taz, was a bit different than my beloved B.J.  Besides being thinner, he was a bit wilder.  B.J.’s eyes weren’t open when I got him, so the first thing he saw was me, and he didn’t have a clue he was a coon.  He considered me his Mom and was completely dependent on me and loved me.  He also thought Ranger was his brother, so I was never sure what he thought he was, a cat or a person.  One thing he did know…he wasn’t a raccoon.  Taz, on the other hand, took one look at B.J. and KNEW this was the sibling he had been clinging to on the side of the road and was immediately thrilled.  B.J. didn’t know WHAT Taz was, and shied away from him, running to “Mama” for comfort and to be held.  You could see from the expression on Taz’s face that he didn’t understand at all what B.J saw in me, but he tolerated me holding him in order to get near B.J.  Before long, B.J., Ranger and Taz were all interacting like they were littermates.  They rolled and wrestled and nipped and made noises you’d have to hear to believe.  They ate together and soon everyone was one big happy family. 

                Taz and B.J. are now almost 3 months old, and they are very raccoon-like.  I figure they are about ½ grown, and I’m gradually weaning them from being dependent on me.  They play together in their pen and I no longer let Ranger  in with them, as Ranger is easily ¼ their size and I’m afraid the play might get rough and he would get hurt.  Ranger doesn’t mind, he has a million other activities to fill his time.  He loves to go in the yard and chase anything that moves.  Kirby and I haven’t had a kitten around for many years, and we are still surprised at the antics of the young cat.  No tail is safe when he’s feeling playful.  He leaps at all of the dog’s tails, wrestles with Ziggy, the Shitz Zhu, attacks any of the other 5 cats, chases chickens, ducks and guineas and has even swatted at Jack and Ozzie, the goats. 

                Whoops- I mentioned our other 5 cats and I should have said other 6 cats.  Yesterday Kirby stopped into the shelter and as he was sitting on the loveseat talking with Julie and I, a cat jumped up to see him.  It was Cocoa , one of the original cats who had been housed at our place before we had the shelter facility.  She had been adopted, but the family that took her was having problems and per the agreement we have adopters sign, Cocoa came back to the shelter.  Kirby was immediately taken with Cocoa and she with him.  When Julie told Kirby that Cocoa needed a special home with a chance to go outdoors as she loved to hunt…Kirby said that sounded like our place and you can guess the rest.  That makes our cat population 8, and like Kirby said…what’s one more?

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you can see from the picture, Cocoa immediately made herself at home and she and Ranger have brought out the best in each other.  She sees him as a baby to be cleaned and  made of, and he welcomes the loving attention.

                The pictures that follow are two of the newest babies at the shelter. They are both healthy and loving so I’m sure they are missed by their owners.  If you recognize them or think you know where they belong, or if you are interested in adopting them, give Julie a call at 943-5083..  We have a roomful of adoptable, friendly kittens at the shelter, so now that the busy summer months are over, it is a great time to welcome a new kitten or cat into your home.  To quote Kirby..”What’s one more?’

This little guy was found on Pleasant Street .  If you know who he is call 943-5083.  He had a flea collar on so he belongs to someone.

This orange and white fellow was found at Ricker’s Trailer Park.

THREE RIVERS KIWANIS NEWS
 
CHILDREN: PRIORITY ONE

The Three Rivers Kiwanis Club meets at The Restaurant each Wednesday morning at 6:30 to enjoy fellowship, share ideas, conduct Club business, and host many interesting speakers.  All are welcome to visit with us.  If you would like to join our organization, please contact Nancy Grant or any other Kiwanian for an application.  We are involved in many worthwhile local projects and would be very pleased to have you participate in them with us.

SEPTEMBER 1, 2004 MEETING MINUTES

Roy Bither led the Pledge of Allegiance and Herb Dunham blessed the teachers and our President in his prayer.

Our inspirational message was concerned with working at your tasks until they are done.  When Booker T. Washington was a young man he had a cleaning task to take care of.  He passed when his teacher inspected the job and realized he had swept three times and dusted four times.  It gained him entrance into the Hampton Institute in Virginia .

The Orono/Old Town newsletter was shared.

Birthday wishes go out to Fay Stevens on the 3rd.

Fourteen happy dollars were donated for having the eldest child in college again, feeling sorry for Paul and Murrel, a nice day, Yankees, speaking at the Dover Kiwanis, good start at MSAD #41, farewell to Jeff?, waking the sleeping giant, and a sad dollar for Paul’s Mom.

Heidi Finson told us she would stay on, as the Reading is Fundamental coordinator until a replacement is found.

Val Robertson said that the new printer for the Three Rivers News is amazing!  It has cut the printing time by more than half.  This gives Val more time to scrub her floors!

An interclub of four visited with the Greenville club.  Interclubs are planned for the 3rd in Dexter, the 7th in Dover , the 9th in Guilford , and the 14th in Orono/Old Town.

The Board of Directors will meet on Thursday, September 2.

PLEASE FILL OUT YOUR PARTICIPATION LIST AND SEND IT TO NANCY ASAP IF YOU HAVEN’T ALREADY DONE SO.  Also send your installation dinner choice(s) to Joe.

Our speaker next week, after a short business meeting, will be Gunnery Sgt. Ryan O’Connor.  He was unable to talk to us this week due to military matters. 

Chris Almy very aptly filled the spot with a report on the criminal justice system. 

The State is concerned with taxes but doesn’t seem to have the same sense of priority with the criminal justice system, as it doesn’t compare to urban centers.

Jail sentences were increased during the 1980’s due to more crime and there was some success.  It became a huge drain on the budget ten years later and affected county and state facilities.  The fairly new Penobscot jail was overflowing and putting more police on the streets and providing free lawyers as well as additional court costs added to the drain.

Chris told us about a case in Portland where domestic violence led to a homicide.  A person was arrested, sent to jail, and then let out on bail; which led to finding and murdering the domestic violence victim.  The rate of recidivism is fairly high.

Many states have database systems, which enable law enforcement to obtain information from any part of their state in a matter of minutes.  There is no such system in Maine but the information is available.  Chris told us that when a person is stopped for a minor infraction their motor vehicle history could be found in 2 to 3 minutes.  Obtaining a person’s criminal history could take weeks.  At the present time there are problems with gaining information from county to county.

Chris feels that if the Governor insisted on implementing a central database system in Maine , it would get done.

Thank you Chris.

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WHAT'S NEW ON TRC

As of this week, we have added Bowerbank to the list of communities and towns that we cover.  This brings our total # of towns to 8!  Our coverage area looks quite impressive when you look at it on a full map of the State. 

We are looking for any info anyone might have on Bowerbank, its Town Office, or anything in general you may know.  Please contact us!


WE NEED YOUR HELP!

If you know any information about the Boston Post Gold-Headed Canes, or who the current holders are for the towns in our area, please contact us!  We are looking to create a new Landmark Feature!

WORD SEARCH

A Y H A R N D G C M G S
T L J Z O P N H J I O K
X I M J S L C G K A T M
I M A G E A W C T V G X
X A I Q S N L U Y P P P
L F N X A T G R D O S Y
S N S G I S E L G S A Y
G T T L H V C X I T N W
H S R M I J T M F X D J
O S E L F N Z A T O R Z
I N E K I T R A S H A A
Z D T R Y B D G F F Z G

MAINSTREET    DELIVERY  FAMILY 
SANDRA    PLANTS    ROSES     GIFTS     FTD

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